BHO

Cheshire Quarter Sessions: 1698

Petitions to the Cheshire Quarter Sessions.

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Anne Stube of Witton, widow. QJF 125/4/8 (1698)

[Com?] Cestria

To his majesties justices of the peace att this quarter sessions hold att Northwich in the said county

The humble peticion of Anne [Stube?] of Witton in the said county widdow.

Humbly [sheweth?] that about six weekes agoe your petitioners husband departed this life leavinge behind him foure very small children, both younge and sickly, that your petitioner without some assistance and releife is not able to support them and herselfe beinge left very poore by her deceased husband and herselfe very weake and infirme

May it therefore please your worshipp to allow your petitioner such releife and maintenance for herselfe and children as you in your discrecion shall thinke fitt and your petitioner shall ever pray etc.

paratext

1 shiling per weeke

Elin Ryse of Northwich, widow. QJF 125/4/9 (1698)

To the honourable justices of the peace for the county of Chester at their generall quarter sessions at Northwich the 11 of January 1697.

The humble petition of Elin Ryse of Northwich in the said county of Chester widow humbly sheweth unto your worshippes:

That your poore petitioner is a very weake, deafe, infirme person of the age of three score and fourteene yeares and upwards and have not as yet bin much burdensome to my neighbours and have wrought as long as possible for my livelyhood but am now alltogether unable to help my selfe or to contribute any thing to my present maintenance and am like to starve and perish unlesse your worships charity bee forthwith extended to your petitioner who is now by reason of her great age impotency and weaknesse not able to worke or to goe abroad to aske the charity and benevolence of the neighbourhood and your poore petitioners most deplorable [illegible] estate and condition is well knowne to the inhabitants of the said towne=ship of Northwich who by the knowne lawes of this land and the principles and dictates of right reason, and Christianity ought to provide for your poore petitioners reasonable support and maintenance:

May it therefore please your worships the premises being tenderly considered to take your poore petitioners most weake and deplorable estate and condition into your most pious and Christian consideracion and to afford and order your poore and necessitous petitioner such speedy releif (by an order of this present sessions) for the stay and support of life as to your worshipps shall seem most fit and meet and your poore petitioner will as in duty bound ever pray for your worshippes health and happinesse etc.

paratext

8 pence per weeke

Mary Brooks of Northwich, widow. QJF 125/4/10 (1698)

To the honourable justices of the peace for the county of Chester at their generall quarter sessions held at Northwich the 11th day of January 1697: the humble petition of Mary Brooks of Northwich in the said county widow humbly sheweth unto your worshippes.

That your poore petitioner is a very weake, infirme, lame, and decrepit person of the age of sixty eight yeares of age and upwards troubled allwayes with a distemper called the kings evill alltogether unable to help herselfe or to contribute any thing at all to her present maintenance and subsistance and is like to starve and perish unlesse your worshippes charity and candour bee forthwith extended to your poore petitioner who by reason of her great age, extreame paine lamenesse and impotency is not able to worke or goe abroad to aske the charity and benevolence of the neighbourhood as formerly she hath done and your poore petitioners deplorable estate and condition is well knowne to the inhabitants of the said towneshippe of Northwich who by the knowne lawes of this land and the principles and dictates of right reason and Christianity ought to provide for your poore petitioners reasonable support and maintenance.

May it therefore please your worshippes the premises being tenderly considered to take your poore petitioners estate and condition into your most pious and Christian consideracion and to afford and order your poore and necessitous petitioner such speedy releife for the stay and support of life (by an order of this present sessions) as to your worshippes shall seem most fit and and meet and your poore petitioner will as in duty bound every pray:

paratext

8 pence per weeke

James Feild of Northwich, labourer. QJF 125/4/11 (1698)

[Com?] Cestria sessions

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace at the quarter sessions held at Northwich the 11th day of January 1697 for the county of Chester.

The humble petition of James Feild of Northwich in the county of Chester labourer.

Humbly sheweth, That your poore petitioner haveing lived neare 40ty yeares in the towneship of Northwich and all the time of his being there hath with hard labour got a smaul livelyhood, but being now aged neare 70ty yeares old is not able to worke haveing alredey sould all his goods to mainteyne him, and haveing noe freinds to help him if not speedely releived is like to be lost for want of maynteynance.

May it therefore please your worshipps the premises considered to grant your order to the overseers of the poore for the towneship aforesaid to allow him some weekely maynteynance as in your wise judgements you think fitt, and your poore petitioner will ever pray for your worshipps healths and all happynes long to continue.

paratext

8 pence a weeke

Richard Wood senior, a prisoner for debt in the castle of Chester. QJF 126/1/2 (1698)

To Sir Thomas [Bellott?] knight and barronett George Booth esquier and Thomas Aldersey esquier and the rest of his majesties justis of the peace for this county the humble petition of Richard Wood senior a pore distressed prisoner in the castle of Chester for debt

Humbly sheweth that your worshipps petitioner is in avery poore indigent and low condition, and hath beene a prisoner twelve monthes and more and hath not wherewithall to subsist on without the charity of well disposd [assistians?]

Wherefore your poore petitioner humbly implores your worshipps to take his miserable condition into your charitable consideracions and to order him the Kings bread for his reliefe to prevent his starving and your petitioner as in duty bound will ever pray for your long lives health and prosperity

paratext

Allowed

Robert Lomas, a poor prisoner in Chester gaol. QJF 126/1/3 (1698)

To the right worshipfull Sir John Mainewaring and George Booth esquier and the rest of his majestyes most honorable justis of the peace for the county of Chester

The humble petition of Robert Lomas apoore miserable and destressed prisoner in Chester gaole

Most humbly sheweth that your worshipps petitioner hath beene a prisoner in Chester gaole for debt this nigh twelve monthes and had long since starvd had it not beene for the charity of well disposd Christians, and hath wanted bread for foure or fives dayes togeather, and hath not any or the least subsistance and that unlesse your worshipps will allow him the Kings bread for his support of maintenance your worshipps petitioner cannot live but must inevitably starve

Wherefore your worshipps petitioner most humbly implores your worshipps to take his sad and miserable condition into your tender considerations and to order him the Kings bread to prevent his starving

And your petitioner as in duty bound will ever pray for your worshipps long life health and prosperity etc

paratext

Allowed

Richard Massey, a poor prisoner in Chester castle. QJF 126/1/7 (1698)

To the right worshipfull Sir John Mainwaring Sir William Glegg and George Booth esquire and the rest of his majestyes justyes of the peace of this county

The humble petition of Richard Massey apoore prisoner in Chester castle

Humbly sheweth that your worshipps petitioner hath beene a prisoner twelve monthes and more and hath livd in a most sad and deplorable condition having not one farthing to buy bread, and that without your worshipps will allow him the Kings bread for his reliefe hee must unavoidably starve

Wherefore your poore petitioner humbly implores you to take his miserable condition into your [consideration?] and to order him the King bread for his reliefe and your petitioner as in duty bound will ever pray etc

paratext

Allowed