Petitions to the House of Lords: 1648

Petitions to the House of Lords, 1597-1696.

This free content was born digital. CC-NC-BY.

Citation:

'Petitions to the House of Lords: 1648', in Petitions to the House of Lords, 1597-1696, ed. Jason Peacey, British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/petitions/house-of-lords/1648 [accessed 23 July 2024].

'Petitions to the House of Lords: 1648', in Petitions to the House of Lords, 1597-1696. Edited by Jason Peacey, British History Online, accessed July 23, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/petitions/house-of-lords/1648.

"Petitions to the House of Lords: 1648". Petitions to the House of Lords, 1597-1696. Ed. Jason Peacey, British History Online. Web. 23 July 2024. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/petitions/house-of-lords/1648.

Long title
Petitions to the House of Lords: 1648

In this section

Humfrey Goulde, Henry Millest, John Wheately, Richard Roake and others. HL/PO/JO/10/1/249 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in the upper house of Parliament assembled

The humble peticion of Humfrey Goulde Henry Millest John Wheately Richard Roake
William Kirkham Robert Roake John Tucker William Wicks and Humfrey Fledger in
behalfe of themselves and many hundredes more in the county of Surry

Shewe
that whereas your peticioners sued oute a commission under the greate seale of England
bearing date the 14th of September 17o Caroli grounded upon an act of Parliament made in the
17th yeare of his majesties raigne that nowe is directed to Sir Arthur Mannering Sir Richard
Onslowe knight and others to enquire touching the meeres meetes and boundes of the Forrest
of Windsor in the county of Surry but by your lordshipps order of the 13th of December 1641 the said
commission was adjourned untill after the sixt day of January then next following and
afterwardes executed and thereupon an inquisicon was taken at Guilford 7o January
17o Caroli which comission and inquisicon being duly and lawfully executed and retorned
was in Christmas vacacion brought into the file of the pettibagg office in Chancery and there
inrolled by a copie thereof under the officers hand appeareth

That after the filing and inrolling thereof your lordshipps by your order of 11o Januarii 1641 did
prohibite the retorne of the said commission and inquisicion and all proceedings thereupon till
the pleasure of the house were further knowne.

That your peticioners have since the filing of that comission and inquisicion required the
clarkes of the pettibagg there, to exemplifie that record which they refuse to doe.

Nowe forasmuch as that record was inrolled before your peticioners ever heard
or had any notice of your lordshipps order of 11 of January 1641 and forasmuch as
it concerneth your peticioners and the whole countrey in those parts which being
denied unto them and cannot have the benifitt thereof as subjects in like case
use to have your peticoners humbly pray your honours to give order for
such exemplificacion to be made accordingly

And your peticioners shall pray etc.

Humfrey Goulde

Edward Davis, the defendant. HL/PO/JO/10/1/249 (1648)

Solomon Smith plainant
Edward Davis defendant
In brevi de errore

To the right honourable the lords in Parliament
assembled

The humble petition of the defendant

Sheweth
that by verdict and judgment upon a faire triall and full examinacion of
witnesses, on either side, the petitioner recovered 417 pounds in an accion of trover brought by
him in the Kings Bench against the said Smith; upon which judgment the
said Smith hath brought a writt of error, which is depending before your lordshipps
and hath assigned the generall errour onely, whereunto the petitioner hath pleaded and
issue is joyned.

That the petitioner endeavouring to have the cause sett downe for hearing before your lordshipps
the same is obstructed; but by what meanes your petitioner knoweth not

He therefore most humbly prayeth that your lordshipps would be pleased to
order a short and certayne day, for arguing the said errors before your
lordshipps.

And hee shall ever pray etc

Edward Davis

3 January 1647


Davis


[Smith?]

John Walbancke, Christopher Perkins, Henrie Cowley and John Grover. HL/PO/JO/10/1/249 (1648)

To the right honourable the lordes assembled
in Parliament.

The humble peticion of John Walbancke,
Christopher Perkins, Henrie Cowley, and
John Grover gentlemen.

Humbly sheweth
that your petitioners in obedience to the order of this honourable
house, did give their attendance at the sessions held
for the county of Buckinghamshire at Aylesbury, uppon the
29th of Aprill last, your lordshipps having declared
that to bee the place where the sessions ought
to bee kept, but some justices meeting att
Buckingham did there fine your petitioners in great
summes of money for not attending there.

Wherefore your petitioners humbly pray this honourable
house will bee pleased to take their condi=
=tion into consideracion, and to prohibite the
barons of the Exchequer, and all other
officers whom it may concerne to estreat or
receive estreates of the fines imposed upon
your petitioners as aforesaid, and to order your petitioners
may bee discharged of the said fines, havinge
as they hope not any way offended

And your petitioners shall ever pray
etc.

3 January 1647
John Walbancke et alia

Exped

Warwick, Lord Mohun. HL/PO/JO/10/1/249 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords assembled in Parliament

The humble peticion of Warwick Lord Mohun.

Sheweth
that by order of the 23o October last, your lordships were pleased to referr the examinacion of severall
contemptes committed by Sir Henry Carew and others, to Sir Edward Leach and Master Hackwell two assistants
of your howse.

That your petitioner got the said referrees to assigne two dayes of hearinge at neither of which the said
Sir Henry Carew was present, but your peticioner never was absent from any day of hearinge.

That the said referrees heard both parties only one day, in which they could not proceede to the
hearing of the third part of the contemptes: that the reason why the said referrence was not
more effectually prosecuted, was, because Master Hackwell one of the referrees was engaged to
goe out of towne within two dayes after the last hearinge and wilbe in towne again within lesse
then 10 dayes: that the said referrees as yett have never conferred together upon theire
opinion of the said contemptes. And the said Sir Edward Leach is utterly unable to make a
perfect report upon the merrittes of the said contemptes. And your petitioner beleiveth that Sir
Edward Leach will avow all this to be true.

Yet notwithstandinge the said Sir Henry Carew on Friday last did peticion your lordships and upon some pretence
that the said contemptes were fully heard and ready to be reported, did procure an order, that
Sir Edward Leach alone should make the said report.

And therefore your petitioner humbly prayes, your lordships wilbe pleased to allowe the said referrence
to goe on; for your petitioner thereby seekes for nothing, but to be restored to a possession forceably
taken from him by Sir Henry Carew in contempt of former orderes of this howse: and of
your petitioneres priviledge as a peere of this realme. And to have satisfaccion made him for the
costes and damadges that your petitioner hath sufferred by the said contemptes, which your petitioner humbly
submittes to your lordships wisdome and justice.

And your petitioner shall pray etc

Warwick Mohun

3o January 1647.

4 January 1647
Lord Mohun
versus
Sir Henry Carewe.

Sir Henry Carew, Dorathy his wife, Bridget Nicholls and others. HL/PO/JO/10/1/249 (1648)

To the honourable the lords in Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of Sir Henry Carew and Dame Dorathy his wife Bridget Nicholls relict of John Nicholls esquire
and Charles Rascarrock esquire and Margaret his wife.

Shewing:
that the right honourable the Lord Mohun upon his peticion to your lordshipps did obteyne your order for the
allowance of his privilidge as a peere and by pretence there of did debarr your peticioners from proceeding att
law for tryall of their tytle to certaine lands parte of their undoubted inheritance into which the Lord Mohun
dureing the warrs and whilst hee was commander in cheife of the forces in the county of Cornwell against the Parliament
had without tytle entered.

For releife wherein and in answer to his lordshipps sayd peticion your now peticioneres were inforced to sett forth
their tytle to the sayd lands by peticion to your lordshipps wherein they prayed that if your lordshipps did thinke fitt
to restrayne them from proceeding at law you would bee pleased to appoint them an heareing before your honours.

That your peticioners to their great charge have attended these six mounths for a hearing upon their tytle before your
lordshipps in which they were delayed by the Lord Mohun for three moneths pretending that his writings were
in the country: and now hee still endevours to hinder them there in upon pretence of certaine contempts supposed to bee committed
by your peticioners by entering on his possession and speaking words against your lordshipps orders, of which though your
peticioners are noe wayes guilty, as they hope will appeare before your lordshipps upon the report which for this moneth your
peticioners have attended with their wittnesses whom to their great excessive charge they were enforced to bring out of
Cornwall and Devonsheire and still mayntayne here in London, the said Lord Mohun still indevouring to delay the same
by procureing witnesses to bee examined in the country contrary to course when hee hath heard what your
peticioners could prove and yet they are thereby delayed from an hearing upon their tytle; and in the meane
tyme the Lord Mohun doeth by force and power without right take the profitts of the sayd lands.

Wherefore and for that the pretended contempts are only alleaged and not proved and if they were proved yett
your peticioners hope they will not appeare such as that they should for them loose their land or bee
denyed to bee heard whether they have right or noe. And for that notwithstanding the proceeding
upon the tytle the Lord Mohun may if hee please proceede to the examinacion of the pretended contempts (which
as your peticioners never did soe they never shall endeavour to avoyd or delay they beeing alwayse
ready to submitt to your lordshipps just censure aswell therein as in poynt of [illegible] right, but hope they
shall not bee concluded in either but by what shall appeare judicially before your lordshipps
or uppon just tryall at lawe to either of which they are ready to proceede, and have withall humble
earnestnesse pressed your lordshipps heretofore and yet doe that they may not bee longer kept from
their right and possession gotten from them by the Lord Mohun since the Parliament, and whilest hee was
in armes against them. May it please your lordshipps either to permitte your peticioners to proceede at lawe
or else to appoynt a speedy day for hearing the sayd cause wherein the sayd Lord Mohun and your peticioners
may attend your honours to manifest their tytle, and in the meane tyme that the Lord Mohun may
bee ordered to decist from cutting timber or taking the tynn and other profitts of the sayd lands

And your peticioners shall ever pray etc.

  • Henry Carew
  • Bridget Nicholls
  • Charles Roscarrock

4 January 1647
Sir Henry Carewe
versus
Lord Mohun

Captain John Lea. HL/PO/JO/10/1/249 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of Captain John Lea.

Humbly sheweth:
that your petitioner at the begininge of these troubles raised a foote company in the
towne of Bridport in the county of Dorsett, for the deffence thereof against the
enemy, and that he marched with his said company to the towne of Dorchester
whither he caused the majour part of his goods to be brought, beinge mercery
wares, and the choyce of his househould goods amounteinge to the
value of 600 pounds.

That your petitioner beinge from thence commaunded upon service before
his returne the towne was surrendred to the enemy; whereupon he marched
into the garrison of Lyme, where he and his eldest sonne served the
Parliament untell the reduceinge of the country in which service his sonne
beinge his liftenant received eleven severall woundes and lost one of his
handes; the trueth of which maney of the honourable House of Commons can
testeffie.

That the Lord Moone himselfe quartred in the house where your petitioners goods
where (his regiment being parte of the forces to whome the said towne was
surrendred) who after a short space by his meanes caused [illegible] your
petitioners goods to be plundred, of which he hath suffitient proofe (to the
utter ruine and undoeing of your petitioner himselfe and children) as by sufficient
testimony may evidently appeare.

Your petitioner therefore humbly prayeth that (in regard your petitioner hath
ever manifested his affeccion to the Parliament in person and estate
your lordshipps wilbe pleased to order that he may have reparacion
for his said goods of the said Lord Moone, or else to permit
him to take his due course at lawe, for the [recovery?]
of his just right.

And he shall ever pray etc.

4 January 1647
Captain John Lea.

Sir Anthony Morgan, knight. HL/PO/JO/10/1/249 (1648)

To the right honourable the house of peeres.

The humble peticion of Sir Anthony Morgan knight

Sheweth
that your petitioners brother Thomas Morgan of Heyford in comitatu Northampton esquire being for
many yeares before 1641 seized only for life of the said mannour of Heyford and diverse other landes
with the remainder to your petitioner after his death without issue male who was slaine in Newberry
in armes against the Parliament, haveing noe issue male wherupon by ordinance of Parliament 5o January
1645 all his landes in England and Wales wherin hee or any for him had any estate upon the 4o of
January 1641 were granted to Alexander Pym esquire and other trustees and theire heires for payment of the
debtes of John Pym esquire deceased and for the maintenance of the said Alexander Pym Charles Pym and
Katherine Pym his children besides 500 pounds per annum out of the Kinges Queens and princes revenues
provided that all estate right title or interest to any other person whomsoever in or to any of the
said landes other then the heires or executours of the said Thomas Morgan or his children claymeing from
by or under him shall bee saved and reserved as if the said ordinance had not been made and
itt is therin alsoe provided that if any part of the said landes shall bee evicted or avoyded by any other
person claymeing from by or under the said Thomas Morgan that then the said Master Pym and the said
trustees shall have the value of the said landes soe evicted out of the estate of John Presson esquire

Since which tyme the said Master Pym hath therby taken possession not onely of the mannours
of Weston Moball Calladowne Wappenbury and other landes in Warwickshire and Northampton
shire but alsoe hath taken the mannours of Heyfordes and Clustropp and other landes in Northamptonshire
which belong onely to your petitioner supposeing the same to bee the inheritance of your petitioners said
brother wheras in truth the said mannours of Heyfordes and Clustropp and other landes were
setled upon your petitioner by deedes legally executed long before this Parliament began.

Your petitioner hath shewed the said deed to the said trustees in the said ordinance mencioned
who ordered astay of cutting down woodes untill further order by them as
appeares by the direccions annexed.

Your petitioner humbly prayeth that accordinge to the clause in the aforesaid
ordinance hee may have libertie to proceed at lawe to try his
tytle; and that in the mean tyme noe persons may meddle with the
cutting down or carryeing away of the woodes upon the aforesaid
mannours nor with the receipt of the rentes remayneing in the
tenantes or occupantes handes.

And your petitioner shall pray etc.

Anthony Morgan

4 January 1647
Sir Anthony Morgan
read nothing done.

Giles Peny of East Quantoxhead, gentleman. HL/PO/JO/10/1/249 (1648)

To the honourable the House of Commons assembled
in Parliament.

The humble peticion of Giles Peny of East Quantoxhead
in the county of Somerset gentleman.

Sheweth
that your petitioner liveing neare Bridgwater was carried in prisoner
by the Kings partie twice, and there kept till he was almost starved, and
enforcet to take a commission of a major, upon which he never acted, but
laid downe his commission in April 1644, and came into the Parliament upon
the surrendar of Bridgwater, and ever since served the Parliament with himselfe
and 3 men in armes which is almost these 2 yeares, for which he is still in
arreares and unpaid; yet having bin sequestred above a yeare
hath submitted to a fine at Goldsmiths=Hall, his estate being onely for
the life of his wife, who is an aged gentlewoman, and hath these latter
yeares bin sick with a tedious sicknes which still continues on her without hope
of recovery; your petitioner having attended here above these 12 months at
great cost and charges that he hath exhausted all his moneys he is
able to procure by his credit or otherwise; and that he now wants liveing
necessary; which particulars Goldsmiths=Hall cannot take notice of.

Your petitioner therefore humbly prayeth this
honourable house to acquitt him of his fine
for his arreares, and he shall ever pray etc

Giles Piny

peticion of Master
Giles Peny read
4o January 1647

Stephen Scott, knight. HL/PO/JO/10/1/250 (1648)

Stephanus Scott miles [plan?] in cancellaria
contra Edmundus Scott et Georgius Morgan defendantes

To the right honourable the lords assembled in Parliament

The humble peticion of the plainant

Sheweth
that whereas George Morgan hath lately preferred a peticion to your lordshipps against a
decree in his majesties court of Chancery whereby the said Morgan is decreed to pay
to the plainant 2066 pounds and to deliver up divers counter bondes pretending that the said decree was
unduely obtayned, and that all the proceedinges thereupon were irregular, and that neither
the late right honourable the commissioners for the great seal of England, nor any Lord Keeper
ever heard anything of the merittes of the cause, nor know for what it is.

That the petitioner for the clearer satisfaccion of your lordshipps of the manifest untruth of the
severall suggestions of Morgans peticion humbly presente to your lordshipps consideracion the
severall orders and papers of Justice Crook, Justice Reeve, Justice Heath and
Justice Foster, Justice Bacon and Justice Berkley: the order of reference from
Oxford: the 2 orders of the committee for obstructions, and the 3 orders upon the severall
hearinges of the cause before the commissioners of the great seal of England hereunto annexed
whereby it will plainly appear that the proceedinges in the cause were regular, and that Morgan
himself did acknowledge that hee had no matter to help himself against Justice
Crooks report, unlesse hee might bee admitted to examine witnesses against part
of the principall matter confessed under his own hand and seal by the indenture
tripartite dated 16o August 1620 which the judges to whome the same was referred did
not think fitt nor just to allowe

The petitioners humble suite is that by your lordshipps honourable justice hee may at the length after 11
years suite have at present so much fruite of the decree that the counterbondes may
bee delivered up by Morgan according to the decree, the rather for that Morgan
having by the favour of the Court of Chauncery obteyned an habeas corpus de die in diem
to prosecute his bill of review, which continued two years in abuse of that favour
and in contempt of the court Morgan did lately arrest your petitioner upon an accion of 1000 pounds
and hath declared against him upon two of those counter bondes, which by the decree are
to bee deliverd up. By which vexatious proceedinges the petitioner doubteth not but
Morgans unreasonable turbulency will sufficiently appear to your lordshipps
whose justice the petitioner shall never decline

And hee shall pray etc

  • Stephen Scott

Sir Stephen Scott. HL/PO/JO/10/1/250 (1648)

Sir Stephen Scott [plt?] in cancellaria
George Morgan defendant.

To the right honourable the lords assembled
in Parliament:

The humble petition of the plainant Sir Stephen Scott.

Shewinge
that whereas George Morgan hath lately preferred a petition to your lordshipps against a decree
in his majesties Court of Chancery (where by hee was decreed to pay to the petitioner 2066 pounds and to deliver
upp divers counterbonds) pretending that the said decree was unduly obteyned and that all
proceedings there upon weare irregular and that neither the late right honourable the comissioners
for the greate seale of England nor any Lord Keeper ever heard any thing of the merritts of
the cause to which petition your lordshipps petitioner put in an answeare with severall certificates orderes and papers
annexed whereby the petitioner doubtes not but the manifest untruth of the severall suggestions
of Morgans petition doth sufficiently appear to your lordshipps yett nevertheless Morgan still persisting in his
turbulent courses without any intention to yeild obedience to the said decree doth endeavour to obteyne
from your lordshipps a habeas corpus whereby hee may bee at liberty to prosecute this vexatious petition
before your lordshipps

The petitioners humble suite is that noe habeas corpus or liberty may be graunted him for these reasons.
First for that the Court of Chauncery finding that there was noe ground to mayntayne his
bill of reviewe for prosecucion whereof the court had granted him a habeas corpus, did
revoke and supersede the same and would not though often moved there unto continue or
revive the same in regard they found that hee made use of his liberty onely for vexation
and to putt the petitioner to endles expences.

Secondly for that the said Morgan insteed of delivering upp the counter bondes according to
the decree hath in a high contempt of the court lately arrested the petitioner upon an accion of
1000 pounds and declared against him upon two of those counter bondes which by the decree are to
bee delivered upp: and therefore Morgan having already soe insolently abused the liberty in
favour graunted him the petitioner humbly prayes that not any liberty may bee graunted him
untill hee doeth first soe farre yeild obedience to the decree as to deliver upp the counter bond
which is in his ready power to performe or at the least that the same may bee deposited in
the handes of the clarke of this honourable house to bee disposed of as your lordshipps in your wisdomes shall
thinke fitt.

And your petitioner shall dayly pray etc.

Stephen Scott

Sir Stephen Scotts
peticion.

Colonel Thomas Morgan, governor of Gloucester. HL/PO/JO/10/1/250 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in the Highe Court of
Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of Collonel Thomas Morgan governour
of Gloucester

Sheweth
that your peticioner comaunding in cheife the forces imployed for reduceing
of Hartlebury Castle in the county of Worcester, did engage his word
and honour to Collonel Sammuell Sandys then in Hartlebury Castle, who was
the person that appeared cheifly in the treaty for rendicion of the said place
that he would use his best endeavor to the Parliament that the sequestracion
of his estate should be clearely discharged without paying any composicion
your peticioner quallified those his engagementes with a promise of endeavour onely
out of the respecte hee bore to the Parliament as desiring that all acts of grace
should ultimately determine in them, not doubting but that the Parliament would
approve and accept such his endeavour for an absolute undertakeing. The which created
such a confidence in Collonel Samuel Sandys that he not only endeavoured but effected
the rendicions of the said place to the Parliamentes service which being soe seasonably
and punctually performed by him.

Your peticioner most humbly and earnestly desires that your lordshipps will
be soe farr tender of your servantes honoures as to grant a performance
of that which was really intended by your petitioner and as undoubtedly
expected and relyed upon by Collonel Sandys.

And your peticioner shall ever pray etc

  • Thomas Morgan

The inhabitants of Chichester and suburbs thereof. HL/PO/JO/10/1/250 (1648)

To the honourable assemblie of the Howse of
Commons assembled in Parliament

The humble peticion of divers of the inhabitantes of the
cittie of Chichester and the suburbs thereof, who susteyned
losse in fyering of the suburbs, and by plundering of
them, by the cavaleers.

Humblie shew
that your petitioners haveing howses and goodes in the suburbs of the
said cittie wherin divers of them inhabited; the cavaleeres
not regarding what wrong or damage they did to any man, soe
that they went on with their designe in keeping of the cittie against
the Parliament forces; agreed that if the suburbs were not
distroied they could not maintaine the cittie in that way they
intended; upon which it was resolved that the suburbs should bee
fiered and pulled downe, which they did accordingly, not giveing
your petitioners any notice thereof whereby they might have saved
their goodes; by which meanes divers of your petitioners are utterly undone
and the rest soe greatly dampnified by fier and plundering that
they are not able to beare the losse without bringing their
wives and families to povertie; the perticuler of which losses
appeares by a schedule hereunto annexed.

The premisses considered your petitioners humblie pray this honourable
howse that they may have their damage repaired by those men
which were the occasion of soe cruell a fact; and that such of them
as are in hold may not be discharged untill they have made
satisfaction and the rest compelled to stand to the judgement
of this honourable assemblie herein; and if there be a doubt of
the overvaluing of the losses, that there may be gentlemen
appointed by this honourable howse to take a full examinacion
and make certificate thereof; all which they humblie leave
to this honourable howse

And as in dutie bound shall pray etc

Many distressed inhabitants of Chichester. HL/PO/JO/10/1/250 (1648)

To the right honourable committee of lords, and commons for sequetirations.
To vertuous equities noble champions, to publicke spirits, and to true justice loving friends.
And namely to the right honourable Algernon Piercy Earle of Northumberland, Lord of Petworth etc:
To Henry Grey Earle of Kent: and to Phillip Herbert Earle of Pembroke, and Montgomery: worthily honoured,
and renowned for charitable justice. Noble peers the certaine perswasion of your gracious dispositions,
and vertuous inclinations to equity; hath encouraged mee, (to presume) to present to your pius consideration,
and tender view the sad condition: and:

The humble petition of many distressed inhabitants of the cittie of Chichester, (in Sussex:) and the parts adjacent;
who are utterly ruined in our estates: and brought into a perishing condition, by spoyling, and burning our houses
and our goods; for the preservation, and security of the citty of Chichester; the county of Sussex; and the whole kingdom
of England: therefore, wee humbly intreat you to view our case with commiseration, and to esteeme it as it is: (not a
particular affliction, but) a publicke calamity; and an inevitable destruction, if not speedily prevented, by potent justice
for wee are many sufferers, men, women, and children; great families, aged, weake, lame, blinde, people, and
helplesse poore widows, and orphanes, sick with continuall cold, and a griping famine: for our sufferings have beene, and still
doe continew extreamely bitter, even to the losse of all our estates, (that wee had to live on.) and our trades, for
want of stock: and to the perill of our lives: some are already dead with want, and heart=breaking sorrow, to
see, and to heare their children complaine, and crave for bread; and they had no releefe for them: and these our
sufferings have beene of long continuance; ever since December, in the yeeres 1642: and December: 1643:
some are already pined away, and many more are in great danger to perish by want, if they bee not speedily
releeved by charitable justice: extreame miserie, is the right object, of tender compassion. And wee are truely miserable.

Therefore, wee humbly beseech your honours to commiserate our lamentable condition: and to present our deplorable
case; to your right honourable associates, the committee of lords for sequestrations: and in your wisedome
finde out a meanes, and in compassionate justice appoint some present releefe for the poorer sort; (whose urgent
necessities, cannot admit of any longer delay), they being daily in want of bread: that wee, and our children;
may not perish, starve, and die by famyne: but live to glorifie God: and to continue our daily prayers; for
your honours prosperities.

Your honours observant suppliant, Grace Staker widow,
at the request of my poore neighbours, in, and about Chichester, in Sussex:

Grace Staker. HL/PO/JO/10/1/250 (1648)

Noble peere

This petition, (for substance) was preferred to the honourable House of Commons; in the beginning of January 1647/8 then
a committee of our Sussex knights, and burgesses was assigned to consider our case: and they grant repairations, (in words [onely?])
for houses, and for goods: then Sir John Temple did write a letter, which was signed by himselfe, and by [6?] more of the said committee:
and sent to Master Maior, and to the aldermen of Chichester, to examine the case, and to send up, an authentique account, which
account was brought up in March last: since which time wee cannot by any intreaty get it reported in the lower house:
therefore being often, and a long time delaid, and denied both by the knights of our county; and by the burgesses of our cittie:
urgent necessity constraining us, (and considering that) by justice a nation is exalted: Proverbs 14.34

Wee appeale to your honours humbly beseeching you that justice may spring from the principall fountaine, the noble [seem?]:
the peerage of the land. I crave but inck, and paper (authorised by your honours) to require, and to receive but a [illegible]
of much treasure, (that was saved by our ruine; as more at large may appeare:) to preserve a famishing multitude:
the most vertuous, supreame peere of the realme, cannot transport his honours derived from his renowned ancestors, for many
generations: nor his inheritance of their lands. But by gracious execution of the lords justice, they may bee preserved
and secured to him, and to his noble posterity:

For mercy, and trueths sake doe not deny us, nor delay us any longer: but view, consider, and judge whether it bee
the want of wealth, or of justice, that hath thus consumed us, and our children by famyne these 4 yeeres and 5
months: which is a long time for people to bee dispossessed of all, personall estates, present possessions:
and yeerely revenues: and to bee exposed to winters pearcing cold, and to continuall gripine famine.

Oh save, save a perishing people: hearken unto us in justice; that God may haearken unto you in mercy,
and divert his judgements, that yee may not perish; and leave your wives widows, and your children fatherlesse,
and none to pitty them. In the beginning of this Parliament, the safety of the people was the supreame law.
Are our laws now made of spiders webs? To catch onely the small weake flies? And to let the great strong ones goe?

I prayer to God to grant you King Salomons principall petition, videlicet: wisedome to execute judgement:

Grace Staker;

Grace Staker

William Gyse of the city of Gloucester, esquire. HL/PO/JO/10/1/250 (1648)

To the right honourable the lordes and commones in Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of William Gyse in the county of the cittie of Gloucester esquire.

Wheras your petitioner is named to be high sherrife of the county of Gloucester for this
ensewinge yeare.

He humbly shewes that as he allwaies hath bine, soe he is and ever will be ready to give
cheerfull obedience to all your commandes.

But soe it is may it please your honoures your petitioner hath not, nor for this 7 yeares last
past hath had any freehold landes, howse, or other estate within the said county of
Gloucester, as by the affidavit annexed appeares.

And humbly submitting it to your honoures great judgmentes whether he be a fitt person (as
sherrife) to have the custody of a county, wherein he hath noe estate or habitacion.

He humbly praies your honoures would be pleased to appoynt some other person
to the said office, that hath an estate, or howse within the said county

And he shall pray etc

  • William Gyse

Arthur Eveling, Bartholomew Hall and William Eveling. HL/PO/JO/10/1/250 (1648)

To the right honourable the peeres assembled
in Parliament.

The humble peticion of Arthur Eveling esquire, Bartholomew
Hall esquire, and William Eveling clearke.

Sheweth
that whereas your lordshipps the 17th of November last ordered that Sir John Brooks
knight should returne his answer in writeing to a former peticion of your
peticioners within three dayes next after notice of the said order and peticion, which
were both shewed unto him on the 21th of December last as by affidavit annexed
appeareth yett Sir John Brooks hath made noe answer thereunto

They humbly pray. That the said Sir John Brooks may forthwith
pay unto your peticioners the just debtes hee oweth them or else, that
your lordshipps would bee pleased to graunt your peticioners leave to arrest
him, and to take further legall course for recovery of their debtes.

And they shall ever pray etc.

Arthur Eveling, Bartholomew Hall and William Eveling. HL/PO/JO/10/1/250 (1648)

To the right honourable the peers assembled in Parliament

The humble peticion of Arthur Evelinge esquire
Bartholomew Hall esquire and William
Evelinge clarke

Humbly shewe
that Sir John Brookes knight doth stand bound unto your peticioner Arthur Evelinge
in one obligacion of 800 pounds and unto your peticioner Bartholomew Hall in one other
obligacion of 800 pounds and unto your peticioner William Evelinge in another obligacion of
200 pounds which sayd severall debtes have beene due unto your peticioneres above six yeares
duringe which tyme your peticioners could not proceed att lawe for recovery of their sayd
just debtes by reason that for many yeares duringe the late warr the sayd Sir
John Brooks remayned within the enemies quarters and synce hee came into the
Parliamentes jurisdiccion it is reported that hee is Lord Cobham and one of the peers
of this realme wherefore your peticioners out of theyr due respectes unto the peerage
doe forbeare to arrest him untill they may first obteyne leave of this honourable
howse.

They humbly pray that the said Sir John Brooks may
forthwith pay unto your peticioneres their said just debtes or
else that your lordshipps would bee pleased to give your peticioneres
leave to arrest him and to take such legall course for
recovery of their said debtes as councell shall advise.

And they shall ever pray etc

Dr William Gouge, Samuell Browne, Charles Ofspring and others. HL/PO/JO/10/1/250 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords assembled in Parliament.

The humble peticion of Doctor William Gouge, Samuell Browne esquire, Charles
Ofspring, John Geering, Richard Davies, surviving trustees for the disbursing of such
moneyes as had been, or should be contributed for the increase, and mainteynance of
the six lectures, in the parish church of Saint Antholins London, and other pious
and charitable uses.

Humbly sheweth
that divers well=affected persons having given and contributed severall summes of money to the then
trustees Richard Sibbs, William Gouge doctors in divinity, Sir Thomas Crew knight serjeant at lawe, Christofer
Sherland esquire, Alderman Healing, and your peticioners, and others since deceased, to thend that lands tenementes
rectories, advowsons, porcions of tythes, might be purchased by the said trustees; [illegible]
[illegible] to be ymployed, for the increase of the mainteynance of preaching
ministers, and other pious, good, and charitable uses, directed by the donours, and for want of their direction, for
such good uses, as the greater part, of the feoffees, and donees should think meet: and in particuler the rentes
issues, and profitts of the rectorie of Presteyne in the county of Hereford, were to be ymployed for the increase
of mainteynance of the six morning lectures, in the said parish of Saint Antholins, to make up in certaine, for the
mainteynance of each lecturer 30 pounds per annum, and 10 pounds per annum to the parson of the said parish

That the trustees, according to the trust reposed in them, did purchase, with the moneyes to them given
divers rectories, advowsons and other hereditamentes and setled them upon able, painfull preachers, in divers
places of this kingdome, where little preaching had been formerly; and did dispose of the premisses, conferred
and given, as was intended by those who did conferr, or give the same, untill and after terme, in the eight
yeare of his now majesties raigne, when William Noy, his majesties then attorney generall did, by the procurement of the
Arch Bishopp of Canterbury, exhibitt an informacion in the Exchequer Chamber against your peticioners, and
others the trustees aforesaid, thereby pretending, that the said trustees, had of their own authority, made them=
selves, a society or body corporate, and did the actes of a body politique, and under coulor thereof, had gotten
into their handes, divers summes of money given for necessary relief, and sustenance of men of the clergie, and
other pious uses, and with part of it had purchased severall rectories, a prebend, divers landes, tenementes, and
hereditamentes, which they had misimployed, and converted to their owne uses, and that it perteined to his majesties
care, that landes and goods, given for pious, or charitable uses, should be rightly imployed, and distributed.

That your peticioners, and other the then trustees, put in their answer, and set forth the trust, denyed the misimployment,
and for their proceedinges referred themselves to certaine bookes kept for that purpose.

That in Hillary terme, in the said 8th yeare of his now majesties raigne, the cause was heard in the Exchequer
Chamber, upon the informacion, the defendantes answer, and the said books, which the peticioners were ordered to bring
in, and upon pretence that the said trustees proceedinges, were to draw a dependency, of the whole clergie of
this realme upon them, introducing novelties of dangerous consequence, both to the church and comon wealth
and were a usurpacion upon his majesties regality, and that the said trustees, had not performed the trust, albeit
the court did forbeare to punish them, it was decreed, that the said trustees, from thenceforth, should hold noe
further assemblies, nor make any orders or constitutions touching the premisses, nor make any alteracion, or
limitacion of any estate, or interest in any of the premisses, whereof they were seized, or interested; and directed a comission
to be awarded for enquiring, what revenewes were purchased by the trustees, and of all leases and summes of money
that were given for the purchasing of impropriacions: and declared upon the returne of such certificate, the same
should be conferred upon perpetuall incumbentes, as his majesty in his wisdome should think fitt; and as touching the
advowsons, and nominacion of schoolmasters, purchased by the said trustees, it was ordered, they should be presented
unto, and disposed of, by his majesty and that the trustees should accompt for their receiptes and disbursmentes, before such
auditour of that court, as the court should appoynt; and afterwardes some of the said trustees, were in pursuance of
the said decree, inforced to make some conveyance of the said rectoryes and premisses to the Kings majesty.

Forasmuch as the said decree (as the peticioners humbly conceive) as to the said misimployment, by the trustees,
was made contrary to their oathes upon their answers, without any proofe to ground the same, and thereby the
trust reposed in the said trustees changed; the disposicion of the said advowsons, and nominacions to churches, and
schooles ordered to the Kinges majesty, and the said trustees inforced to convey the said rectories and premises, contrary
to the intent of the donours; a godly and pious work for the setting up of the preaching of Godes word subverted: to the
great dishonour of God, and scandall of the justice of this nation, and contrary to the rules of law and equity.

The peticioners humbly pray your lordshipps, that the Kinges councell may be called before your lordships
and that the said decree, for divers errors therein contained, may be reversed; the said trustees
restored to the premisses and all the profittes of the same, and may be permitted, notwithstanding the
said decree and conveyance, to performe the trust in them reposed, in soe good and pious a work.

And your peticioners shall ever pray etc.

  • Samuel Browne

  • William Gouge
  • Charles Ofspring

The provincial assembly of London. HL/PO/JO/10/1/250 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords and commons assembled in Parliament
the humble petition of the provincial assembly of London.

Humbly sheweth
that they doe with all unfained thankfulnesse acknowleadge the indefatigable labour and paynes of the honourable houses,
as in the civill affaires of the kingdome, so also in matters ecclesiasticall, and that not only in putting downe the High Commission
court, the common prayre booke, and prelacy, but also in establishing the directory for worship, and setling in some measure, the
presbyteriall government, and in remooving some impediments, which were observed to hinder the putting of it in execution, in providing
a way of ordination, and declaring against those that preach unordained, and in constituting a provinciall assembly in this citty. And
though they are not ignorant of the great distractions which have befallen you, and the kingdome, and how far the peace thereof is yet
unsetled, so as it is the lesse to be admired that we have not yet attained that desired uniformity which is mentioned in your and our covenant; yet
they [humbly?] crave leave to represent the state and condition of their province in a few particulars.

May it therefore please your honours to take into your pious consideration.

1 That (the quorum of the province for so great a city being already litle enough, that is to say twelve ministers and foure and twenty
ruling elders) the number of delegates is so small, (there being yet but eight classes formed of the twelve, besides the casualties
of sicknesse, journyes, and employment otherwise) that it is hard to have the full meeting of thirty six at any time, and the number of ministers
is greater in some classes then in the provinciall meeting, which seemes to be besides the intention of the houses declared in their directions
of August 19o 1645

2 The reasons why the other foure classes, that is, the second, the ninth, eleaventh and twelfth, are not formed, and send no
delegates (as wee humbly conceive) are eyther want of setled ministers to joyne with the people in choosing elders, or want of triers
to approove those who are chosen, or because some elders and triers are remooved. And this in the particulars your petitioners
are ready to declare if to the wisdome of the houses it shall seeme meet.

3 Thirdly the number of setled ministers in the province is very small, and there wanteth in the whole, as wee are informed about
a third part: some of those who have bin setled are upon remoovall, or ready for it upon occasion. Those who abide by their
charges are discouraged; all which ariseth partly because disaffected ministers are entertained in some congregations, and suffered to
intrude without an orderly approbation in such manner as the Parliament hath ordained, but especially by reason that the people doe
withhold not only the voluntary contribution which they have somtime given, but also that necessary maintenance which is setled upon
them by law and custome.

4 There are some ministers who baptize children in private houses, the same or others marry without publishing the purpose of
marriage betweene the parties, and consent of parents, or those who are in their stead, which tends to the ruine of the parties
themselves, the greife of their freinds, scandall of the Godly, and may proove mischievous not only to noble families, but to the
commonwealth in generall; as in other respects, so in this, that fornications, adulteries, forced marriages, are somtimes smothered up,
and the ill effects of them made remediles; and others who admit all sorts to the sacrament without taking in the elders to
joyne with them, in the examination of such as for their ignorance or scandall ought to be suspended acording to the ordinance
of Parliament; all which is contrary and prejudiciall to the good order and government prescribed, and enjoyned by the houses.

5 There are likewise other obstructions which hinder the progresse of the government in this province; as that, many
conceive it only to bee setled for three yeares, and in most parts of the kingdome not setled at all, and so not
probable long to continue; that church censures are not established, that divers churchwardens
in sundry places set themselves to oppose both the government and the power of godlines.

May it therfore please your honourable houses by way of remedy as to their wisdomes seeme good,

1 To encrease the number of delegates out of the classes which are or shall be formed within the province

2 To quicken the setling of those classes which are not formed, by enjoyning people to provide themselves ministers,
within a time prefixed, and in case of their neglect, to require the classis or province wherein they are, to supply them; as
in the case of suspension of a minister for scandall, is already in part provided for in the ordinance of the 14th of
March 1645. And by appointing triers where they want, or inabling the classis where it is formed, and province
while it sits to supply their defect where there are neither triers nor classes.

3 To provide some seasonable and effectuall encouragement for a godly, learned, and well affected ministry, that the
defects of the law, which are pretended in the case of city ministers for their maintenance may bee supplied.

4 That those which practise contrary to the directions, and ordinances of Parliament may be brought to reforme
themselves, least by their evill example others be emboldned to the like neglect of order and to disobedience.
Particularly that some more effectuall meanes may bee provided to prevent clandestine marriages, and for the punishment
of fornication, and adultery, and such other uncleannesse as ought not to bee named among Christians.

5 That the businesse of churchwardens may bee taken into searious consideration; that there may bee a choyse of
deacons; that the church censures be so established that notorious, and scandalous, offenders continuing obstinate
may bee excluded from church communion; and that the government may be setled throughout the kingdome
according to the word of God and the example of the best reformed churches.

And they shall ever pray etc.

Signed in the name and by the appointment of the provinciall assembly.

  • Arthur Jackson, moderator pro tempore
  • Ralph Robinson, scriba
  • W: Wickins scribe

The officers and soldiers of the garrison of Portsmouth. HL/PO/JO/10/1/250 (1648)

To the right honourable House of Commons assembled in Parliament at Westminster

The humble petition of the officers and souldiers of the garyson of Portsmouth
humbly shewinge

That Collonel Norton nowe on of the knightes of the shire for Hamshire received from your
honours a commission for the government of this place of the 10th of May 1645 (since which time as him
selfe very well knowes) the slacknes of pay hath made the souldiers very troublsome and the quiet
government of this garyson very hard especially nowe since Collonel Norton hath left the government
and left the officers and souldiers much behind in pay and much discontented which we suppose he
cannot redres unles your honours wilbe pleased to take some speedy course for the sattisfaction
of the areare due in the tyme of his government

We further present unto your honours consideracion, that there greate areare both officers
and souldiers have due to them, in the time of former governmentes (as well as in Collonel Nortons)
hath made them run in debt to the towne, allmost to the undoinge of the greatest parte of it
soe that the toune is unable any longer to trust and soe consequently the poore souldiers any
longer to subsist, which will inevitably render this place uncapable of servinge your honours
as we desire.

Our humble desires therfore are that your honours would take a speedy care that this
areere may be sattisfied, and the souldiers mindes therby quieted

And your petitioners shall ever pray etc

We have presented to your honours the summe of our areares due,in the government
of Collonel Norton to the whole garyson, the which amountes to the summe of
11883 pounds 9 shillings and 10 pence accordinge to the muster roles, signed by the muster master

Pourtsmouth

Portsmouth peticion

The committee for the militia of Westminster. HL/PO/JO/10/1/250 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords assembled in Parliament.

The humble petition of the comittee for the militia of Westminster and
partes adjacent.

Sheweth.
That your petitioners in pursuance of the ordinance of both howses of Parliament for
the setling of the militia of these partes, did on the 22th of December last, issue
out a warrant under our handes, directed to Robert Flood high constable of the
citty and liberties of Westminster, requiring him to cause his petty constables in that part of his
division which was within the late lynes of comunicacion, to repaire from howse to howse
in their severall wardes, and to take the names of all persons which were of the trayned bandes
and auxiliaries, or should be fitt to be listed in either of those capacities, and to retorne the
said lists unto us on the 30th day of the same moneth; (which warrant was delivered to
the said Robert Flood on the 22th day as aforesaid) but the said Robert Flood
(notwithstanding he had soe much time given for dispatch of this service) did wholie
neglect the same, soe that the petty constables of Martine in the Feilds and Covent Garden
received not their warrantes from the said Flood till the very day appointed for the
making of the said retornes, and the petty constables of Westminster but the night before
by which meanes the service hath bene retarded and the militia of these partes is
unsetled, and your petitioners having noe power to punnish constables for any neglect
have thought meet in all humblenes to represent the same unto your lordshipps
that such course may be taken therein, as to your lordshipps wisdomes shall be
thought fitt.

And your petitioners shall ever pray etc.

  • John Browne
  • George Manley

  • [Francis Squibb?]
  • John Clendan

  • John Honnor
  • George Crompton

  • John Berners
  • Richard Graves

  • William Dippar
  • Raph Gray
  • John Frampton
  • Samuel Smyth

17 January 1647
Militia Westminster

William Simondes alias Harriott. HL/PO/JO/10/1/250 (1648)

To the right honourable the lordes in Parliament assembled

The humble peticion of William Simondes alias Harriott

Sheweth
that by order your lordshipps of the 12th of this instant, your petitioner is to shew
cause this day why the judgementes of Fitz Hugh and Welles should not
bee affirmed, your petitioner now humbly sheweth to your good lordshipps; that
hee was robbed of the money which the said Fitz Hugh and Welles hath
sued him for, and that att the triall att Bedford your petitioner had very
hard measure as will appeare by the affidavit annexed:

May it therefore please your lordshipps to read the affidavit and
to consider the sadd condicion of your petitioner and to graunt him
a new triall or longer time whereby hee may be able to
procure councell to prosecute his cause before your lordshipps

And your petitioner shall pray etc

  • the marke of William Symondes alias
    Harriott.

The inhabitants of Deene and Deenethorpe. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honorable the lords and
commons now assembled in Parliament
and all others whom it may concerne

The humble peticion of the inhabitantes of
Deene and Deenethorpe in the county
of Northampton

Humbly sheweth that wee the inhabitantes of Deene and Deenethorpe
aforesaid haveing had sufficient experience of Samuel Tayler master
in artes, and minister of Godes word, to bee a faithfull, godly, and
able minister; and a man of honest and godly life and conversa
tion. Wee the inhabitantes aforesaid doe therefore humbly request
that the said Samuel Tayler may bee assigned to the rectory
of Deene aforesaid, and become our minister there (if it may
stand with the approbation of this honorable house, and of all
others whom it may concerne). And wee as ever bound shall
acknowledge our thankfullnes to God and you.

  • Edward Jenkinson
  • Robert Fowller
  • Thomas T Tayllor

  • John Bellamye
  • Henry H Wade

  • Robert Cornewell
  • Roger Wade
  • John Tayler
  • Robert T Tayllor

  • John Dalby
  • William Wade
  • John Fowller
  • [Christopher Warden?]
  • Jenkin Harrison
  • Walter Setchill

  • Edward Freeman
  • Henry Dalby
  • Edward [.allige?]
  • Wallter H Hutton

  • Thomas Martin
  • William Satten
  • Thomas T Wilkisson

  • Thomas Walker
  • John Barker
  • Nicholas [Vickery?]
  • [Nicklis Wise?]
  • [Collam Wise?]
  • [Richard Watson?]

19 January 1647
Samuell Tayler
[instituted?]
Exped

Charles, earl of Nottingham. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in Parliament assembled

The peticion of Charles Earle of Nottingham.

Humbly sheweth.
That your petitioner had formerly graunted unto him by letteres patent under the
greate seale of England two pencions the one of five hundered
poundes per annum the other of one thousand markes per annum which beinge in
arreare by the space of six yeares and one quarter the petitioner did by a former
peticion humbly pray that your lordships would be pleased to be a meanes to the
honourable House of Commons that his said pencions and the arreares of his
said pencions (which were and are the only meanes of his subsistance) might
be paid unto him, which peticion the House of Commons takeing into their
consideracion were pleased to order that the comittee for the Kings
revenue should pay unto the petitioner the arrears of his said pencion of 500 pounds
per annum and continue to pay the said pencion of 500 pounds from time to time as
it should become due which the petitioner thankfully accknowledgeth is
accordingly done. And it was also further ordered that the petitioner should
receive from the comittee for the county of Surry the sume of 500 pounds per
annum in parte of his pencion of one thousand markes per annum but noe order
was made for the payment of the arreares of the said pencion of one
thousand markes per annum.

Nowe for as much as the petitioner is become much indebted to severall
persons (for his necessary support in the service of the state) which
debtes (though willing) he is not able to pay unless the Parliament
shall be pleased to order the payment of his said arreares.

Your petitioner therefore humbly prayeth that your good lordships
takeing the premisses into your honourable and serious consideracion
will be pleased to be a meanes to the honourable House of Commones
that the arreares of his said pencion of 1000 markes per annum
amounting to 4000 and odd poundes (as by the certificate hereunto
anexed doth appeare) may be forthwith paid unto the petitioner

And he shall ever pray etc.

  • Charles Nottingham

Thomas Budd, prisoner in Newgate. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honourable the House of Peeres in Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of Thomas Budd prisoner in Newgate

Sheweth
that in December last at the sessions held before the Lord Maiour and justices for the
Cittie of London and county of Middlesex, your petitioner upon an indictment for being a popish
preist, and testimony that was then given against him, receaved the sentence of death
upon due consideracion of the evidence given, being of things pretended noe lesse
then 22 and 28 yeares since, and upon your petitioners humble addresses to the Lord
Maiour and justices for some small portion of tyme for the examining of some
absent witnesses, it pleased his lordshipp to graunt your petitioner a reprieve, for which your
honours requiring an account, the same reasons and grounds was by Serjeant Greene
rendred at your lordships barre, to which he humbly refferreth, but soe it is that
the Lord Maiour and justices apprehending your lordshipps displeasure in your petitioners reprieve
have warned him to prepare to suffer death on Friday morning, refusing to
receive any evidence or proofes that he hath prepared to discover his innocency
which had bine 14 dayes since humbly tendred to your lordshipps consideracion, had the
urgencies of state permitted.

Wherefore your petitioner appealeth and now flyeth to your honours highest court
of justice, and doth beseech your honours that his bloud may be soe pretious
unto you, that before he suffereth, there may be a review of what
he is charged, and upon what proofes, and if he is not able cleerly and
fully by sufficient witnesses to demonstrate himselfe free of this
charge, he doth desire justice may have ites course

And he (as in duty bound) shall daily pray etc

19 January 1647
Thomas Budd
Prisoner and condemned
Exped

Katharine Prude, one of the daughters of William Prude, deceased. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honourable the House of Lords in the
High Court of Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of Katharine one of the daughters of William Prude
alias Prowde late of Canterbury esquire deceased

Sheweth
that your peticioner being borne beyond the seas of English parents and living
for divers yeares within this kingdome of England a professor of the true protestant religion
and behaveing herselfe from tyme to tyme dutifull and obediently as a leige subject ought:
did about the begining of this present Parliament exhibitt a bill amongst others (by the name of
Katherine Hobart wife of James Hobart of South Pickenham in the county of Norffolk esquire
for passing an act for the naturalizacion of your peticoner which bill is yet depending in the
hands of the speaker of the honourable House of Commons upon exhibiting of which bill your peticoner
payed all the fees and dutyes to the severall officers of the sayd House of Commons in such cases due and according
to forme did in the sayd house take the oathes of allegeance and supremacy.

But soe it is (may it please your lordshipps, that soone after the exhibiting of the sayd bill
his majestie departing from the Parliament, the same could not then bee formally enacted
whereby your peticioner is much prejudiced in the legall recovery of her just rights and
due estate.

Your peticioner therefore humbly prayeth that her naturalizacion
may now bee granted and passed by ordinance of both houses of Parliament
(that soe by authority of the same shee may bee capeable of the benifitt
of the lawes of this kingdome whereunto shee hath hitherto con=
tinually bin obedient

And your peticoner shall ever pray etc.

19 January 1647
Katherine Prude
Exped

The Lady Prude
her peticion.

John Greene, clerke, administrator of Edward Wymarke. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords assembled in Parliament

The humble peticion of John Greene clerke, administratour
of Edward Wymarke esquire

Sheweth
that the late Lord Viscount Savage being indebted unto the said Edward Wymarke
in the summe of 3120 pounds by severall bondes payable 1634 and 1635 did convey divers
landes unto trustees for payment of his debtes; upon which landes the Earle Rivers sonne
and heire of the said viscount entred and tooke upon him the performance of the
said trust and paid all his fathers debtes save only this, due to your petitioner as administrator
that your petitioner for the recoverie of his debtes comenced severall suites in the courtes
of Common Pleas and Requestes; in both which the said earle stopped all proceedinges
by claiming his priviledge. Whereupon your petitioner July 1641 exhibited a peticion
to your lordshipps for a hearing of the whole matter, whereunto the earle
answered in writing, and therein promised his readines to attend an
hearing in Michaelmas tearme following.

That the 26th October 1641 being appointed by your lordshipps for a day of hearing
whereof the earle had notice, and your petitioner attending the said day with
many witnesses out of Cheshire to his charge of neere 100 pounds the said earle
failed, deserted the Parliament was also in armes against the Parliament and
remained in the Kinges quarters soe as there could be noe further proceedinges

That upon a second peticion presented by the petitioner to your lordshipps in March 1645 and
the earles answer thereunto, the 7th of May 1646 was ordered by your lordshipps
for a day of hearing upon the whole matter; but by reason of the greate
distance of the earle from London, and uncertainty where to find him such
timely notice could not be given of the said day unto the earle as that he
might appeare.

Now forasmuch as the said earle hath taken all advantages to delay the
petitioner. And that the petitioner hath been at the charge of above 500 pounds in
suites and comissions to discover the value of the landes, which are
proved to be sufficient for payment of all debtes with a good overplus

The petitioner humblie praieth that your lordshipps would be pleased to
appoint a certen day for hearing of councell on both sides upon
the peticions and answeres depending before your lordshipps, and that
the petitioner may have libertie to make use of the examinacions
taken in this cause, in the Court of Requestes witnesses haveing
been on both sides examined, and most of them tenantes to the Earle
Rivers whereof some are dead and others soe aged and impotent
as that they are not able to travell

And your petitioner shall pray etc

John Greene

20 January 1647
[illegible]

Joseph Nicholson, late minister of Gods word at Plumland. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

January 18
1647

To the right honourable the lords in Parlyament
assembled

The humble petition of Joseph Nicholson
late minister of Gods word in Cumberland
at Plumland in Cumberland

Sheweth
that whereas your petitioner was by an order of your honours
bearing date the 7th of October last, instituted and inducted
into the rectorie or parsonage of Plumland aforesaid; and
the said order is since reversed upon information given that
Master Richard Skelton patron of the said living was in armes
against the Parlyament which, because your petitioner was then
resident at Oxford, and because the said patron hath since
beene conformable to all ordinances of Parlyament, was to your
petitioner alltogether unknowne. And whereas also it hath
pleased your honours to confirme and conferre the said rectorie
upon one Master Gawin Eglesfield, who was also in armes against
the Parlyament, as is made appeare upon oath; which oath
is hereunto annexed:

May it therfore please your honours to take the premisses into
your consideration, and not to deprive your petitioner of
of the said rectory, and therein also of his sole livelyhood
nor to confirme another therein, who together with the
said delinquency patron is guilty of the same delinquency

And your petitioner shall ever
humbly pray etc.

  • Joseph Nicholson

Dame Frances Weld, widow. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords assembled in Parliament

The humble peticion of Dame Frances Weld widowe

Sheweth
that in October 1646 the mannours of Stepney and Hackney were extended by your petitioner upon astatute of 10000 pounds acknowledged
to her by the right honourable Thomas Earle of Cleeveland in July 1631 and a writt of liberate was executed thereupon
in January followinge

That your petitioners debtes exceeding the said somme of 10000 pounds and she having no other meanes to rayse a porcion for her
daughter and being in danger of arreste 28 January 1646 setled the said mannours upon the Lord Wenman Master
Winwood and otheres to paie parte thereof.

That the said mannours in 1634 were mortgaged by the said Earle of Cleveland to Sir Thomas Glemham
and Doctor Glemham trustees for the Lord Banning and forfeited for non payment of about 16000 pounds and the better to prevent
your petitioners entrie into the same were afterwardes setled upon Master Glover and Master Wallopp amember of the Howse of
Commons and Master William Stevens an other member was bayliffe of the libertie of the said mannours and Master Ellis an other
member was steward, the said Master Stevens standing upon his priviledge and with menacing speeches declared
the extending the said mannours by your petitioner to be abreach of priviledge of both howses.

That in February following the order of this honourable howse annexed was procured whereby your petitioners proceedings
upon the said statute wer stayed untill the right honourable the Earle of Pembrooke should be heard, the said Earle with
other comissioners being with his majesty when the said order was procured and as your petitioner is informed not privy
thereunto.

That the said mannours are nowe setled upon one Collonell Smith who hath ben in armes against the
Parliament and pretendes himselfe to be a creditour to the said Earle of Cleveland and the said Master Stevens which as bayliffe
is since steward who by pretence of the order of this honourable howse and his owne priviledge keepeth the agentes of your
petitioners said trustees out of the possession of the said mannours receaving the proffittes thereof which should paie
your petitioners creditours their debtes and her daughters porcion

That your petitioners creditours being debarred by the said order and priviledge of the said Master Stevens from raysing their
debtes out of the said mannours do endeavour to arrest your petitioner and cast her into prison where she is like to end her
daies your petitioner having little other meanes to satisfie the same all the mannours and landes of the said Earle of
Cleveland in the county of Bedford likewise extended by your petitioner being claymed by one Master Woodward and a
suite for the same is nowe dependinge.

That forasmuch as your petitioners title to the said mannours is many yeares precedent to the said mortgage under
which the said Collonell Smith and Master Stevens doe clayme and her said debt in lawe ought to be first satisfied
and for that the said Earle of Pembrooke is noe waies concerned in the said mannours but as his sonn
is contracted to one of the daughteres of the said Lord Banninge

Her humble suite is, that your honours wilbe pleased to take her oppressed estate into
consideracion and give libertie for your petitioners trustees to take the benefit of the lawes of
this realme for the recovering of the possession rentes and profittes of the said mannours
belonging to them, and to discharge the said order made to the contrary

And your petitioner shall praie etc

21 January 1647
Lady Frances Weld

Thomas Goodale. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honourable the lordes assembled in Parliament.

The humble peticion of Thomas Goodale.

Sheweth unto your lordships
that your petitioner arrested one James Kift upon accion of the case in London for 120 pounds in money and goods and
Richard Kift and Thomas Hammond became his bayle, who removed the plainte into the office of plees
in the Exchequer.

That your petitioner had 2 verditts at the Exchequer barr and 2 judgments for him. The first judgment entred in
Michaelmas terme 1646 against James Kift as principall for 136 pounds upon which he brought a writt of error
that terme, but never assigned errors upon it.

That in Hillary terme following your petitioner had a second verditt at the barr and judgment was therupon entred
against both principall and bayle for 156 pounds and your petitioner sued out a fieri facias against the goods of the
principall and his bayle, after the returne of which fieri facias, your petitioner ought to have had execucion
granted him that terme.

That the same Hillary terme before the returne of the fieri facias was, Baron Atkins made an order
that the defendants in the accion should have 17 daies respit before your petitioner should take out his execucion.
Before which daies were expired, the defendants had brought a writt of error againe and the terme was
ended, yet during the terme and after your petitioner knew of such an order, your petitioners counsell moved to have
execucion according to lawe and justice of the court as soone as the returne of the fieri facias was past
but it could not be obtained.

That the plainants in the writt of error ought to have assigned their errors within 8 daies after the former and
latter writt of error brought, which they did not upon either.

That therupon your petitioner moved againe by his counsell that he might have execucion upon his judgment;
but the barons denied it, having allowed the plainants before to renue their writt of error againe. And soe
they have continued that course from terme to terme these 3 termes and purpose (as they saie) to hold on
that course; although your petitioner doe and hath moved to the contrary. And the barons answere to your petitioners
severall mocions doth confirme it, that your petitioner shall be frustrated of his judgment therby, saying
the plainants have a writt of error and they will doe nothing to vacat that. Albeit the plainants have kept your petitioner
7 yeares in suite for his owne goods, which was all the livlyhood he had to subsist on.

That by this meanes the plainants endeavour to discharge themselves of the judgment the first day of the next
terme as they are bayle to the accion and as they stand for bayle in the writt of error, and have
already conveyed the principall out of the way, that he cannot be found, but the defendants goods in question
are in their handes.

May it therefore please your lordships in commiseracion of your petitioners great wrongs and losses
long sustained that the writt of error may noe more be renued, it being now out
of date. And that your petitioner may have execucion upon his last judgment of 156 pounds (after
soe many illegall proceedings to defraud him thereof), the first day of the next terme
and that the plainants may stand still lyable (as they are bayle to the writt of error) to
answere such damages as may be required of them heer after for the same; your petitioner
making the truth of the foresaid particulars to appeare.

And your petitioner as in duty bound shall ever pray etc.

21 January 1647
Thomas Goodale

Thomas Goodale. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honourable the lordes assembled in Parliament

The humble peticion of Thomas Goodale.

Sheweth
that in a suite depending in the office of plees in the Exchequer betweene your
petitioner James Kift Richard Kift and Thomas Hammond, your petitioner obtained severall
judgments at the Exchequer barr for 156 pounds in Hillary terme was a twelve moneth
soone after which tyme a writt of error was brought by James Kift and that writt
is now abated; yet your petitioner cannot have execucion upon his said judgments by
reason of the obstruccion of justice in cases of judgments given in the office
of plees and writts of error brought into that court, for want of a Lord
Chancellour, Lord Keeper of the Seale and a Lord [Thereasurer?].

Heerupon it pleased your lordshipps upon your petitioners former peticion to referr the
removing of this obstruccion of justice in this kinde to all the judges to
consider of an ordinance to that effect. They mett 3 severall tymes, but
have returned noe certificate to satisfie your lordships in that particular, soe that
your petitioner is left hitherto utterly remediless of the wrong he sustaineth.

Your petitioner is advised by his counsell at lawe (Master Hale) that the barons of the
Exchequer (though they are very willing of themselves) yet they saie alsoe that
they cannot grant your petitioner execucion upon his judgment, but it only lies in your
lordships power to give them your lordships order to grant it and not in any other legall
course, can your petitioner have execucion upon his judgment.

May it therefore please your lordships in consideracion of your petitioners 7 years
imprisonment and as long suite in lawe for his owne goods, to
vouchsafe your lordships order to the barons of the Exchequer to grant
your petitioner imediate execucion upon his last judgment of 156 pounds
against James Kift Richard Kift and Thomas Hammond.

And your petitioner shall etc

Thomas Goodale

John Honor, treasurer for the magazine of arms and ammunition for Westminster. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords howse of Parliament
The humble peticion of John Honor treasurer for the magazeene
of armes and amonicion for the citty and liberties of Westminster

Sheweth
that your petitioner by ordinance of both howses of Parliament of the 4th of September
1643 was appointed treasurer to receive 6000 pounds appointed for the said division to raise the
said magazeene; and the same was to bee collected and paid to your petitioner within one moneth
next after the publicacion of the said ordinance.

That your petitioner hath used his best endeavor in the execucion of this service; and hath spent
agreate part of his time therein for these 4 yeares past, to perfect books, solicite collectors
and other things incident to that businesse; insomuch that hee hath paid in, by direccion
of the subcomittee for the militia of the said citty and liberties of Westminster 5000 pounds and
upwards; and hee hath now remaining in his hands 120 pounds 0 shillings 4 pence 1/2 obulus, agreate part whereof
is in farthing tokens which hee [received?] upon the said collection and were then currant, part
of which money the subcomittee for the militia established for this division (whereof your
petitioner is a member) have directed and appointed your petitioner to pay by theire order; which
your petitioner conceiveth is not to bee disposed by the said comittee till theire ordinance bee passed.

Forasmuch as your petitioner by the said ordinance was to have but a penny in the pound
upon the said collection, which would have bin good recompence if the same
had bin received within the time therein limited.

And for that your petitioner hath spent soe much time and labor with the expence of
money in this service, and in passing and perfecting of books and accompts, and
in other services for the Parliament, and in securing the said moneys, and much of the
money beeing farthings which is in his hands.

Hee humbly prayeth your lordshipps to vouchsafe to order that
upon passing this ordinance to the militia, hee may have
such allowance out of the said money for his greate and
extraordinary paines, service, and care, as in your grave
wisdomes shalbee thought meete.

And your petitioner shall pray etc

22 January 1647
Militia Westminster
John Honor
Exped
[illegible]

William Martin, Robert Johnson and Raph Douthwayte, prisoners. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in Parliament
assembled.

The humble petition of William Martin Robert Johnson and
Raph Douthwayte prisoners in the custody of the gentleman usher
of this honourable house:

Sheweth:
that your peticioners have for these fowerteen daies last past been in the custodie of the said
gentleman usher upon a contempt untruly suggested in the petition of Thomas Worsley, John
Worsley and Elizabeth Worsley for not delivering of certaine goodes taken in extent
upon a seizure for debt in the accomptes of Sir John Buck knight and Sir Thomas Gower
knight late sherriefes of the county of Yorke, whereas in truthe the goodes so demaunded
were sould to the said Worsleys knowledges, two moneths before the order of the seaventh
day of October last was procured.

That your petitioners have been allwaies willing and readie, according to the order of the Exchequer
to restore the money receaved for the said goodes, deducting such charges, as is usually in
such cases allowed, and have severall tymes offered the same; but they refused to give
an acquittance for the same as was required.

In consideration whereof; and forasmuch as there is noe affidavit, either made or filed
to prove the said suggested contemptes; and that the cause is yet depending before the
barons of the Exchequer as it was referred by that order of the 7th of October, and some
of your petitioners examined upon interrogatories, according to the course of that court
as also that the contents of the said petition were both untrue to theire owne
knowledges, and impossible to be performed, the goodes being sould before the order
of the Exchequer procured; and the money for which they were sould often tendred:

May it therefore please your lordshipps to discharge your petitioners of theire said
supposed contemptes, or graunt them libertie upon baile; and order
that the barons, before whome the cause is now depending may
certifie unto your lordshipps the true state of thereof: or be pleased
to sett downe, a certaine and speedy day of hearing of the premisses
before your lordshipps

And they shall ever pray etc:

  • William Martyn
  • Robert Johnson
  • Ralph Dowthwayt

Petition

The Mayor and commonalty and citizens of the city of London. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honorable lords in
Parliament assembled;

The humble peticion of the Maior and comminaltie and
citizens of the Cittie of London governors of Christs
Hospitall:

Shewing
that whereas uppon the peticion anexed preferred to your lordships to bee settled in the present
possession of the lands in question devised unto the peticioners by Thomas Hawes deceased it pleased your
lordships by an order of the 9th of December last to referre the consideracion of the whole matter to all the judges or any 3 of
them who uppon full hearing thereof in presence of councell on both sides have certefyed that they thinck fitt that there
should bee a tryall at lawe betweene the peticioners and Trinity House who are in possession of the lands in question and who
clayme the same under Nicholas Hawes deceased) according to the directions of your lordshipes order of the 12th of December 1645 and
likewise that security be given by the Trinity House for answering of the meane profittes in case the tryall goe against them
according as the said Nicholas Hawes under whome they clayme was by your lordshipes order of the 22th of September last
ordered to doe as by the judges certificate anexed appeareth in pursuance of which certificate the peticioners
in all humblenes pray;

That according to the said certificate of the judges security may be put in by Trinity House to answere the
meane profitts if the tryall goe against them and a short day prefixed them to put in the same which security
being put in the peticioners will be ready to proceed to a tryall with all speed but in case the Trinity House shall
refuse to put in security accordingly or shall delay the same then the peticioners humble suite it that uppon
security put in by the peticioners to answere the meane profitts if the tryall goe against them they may bee
settled in the present possession of the lands in question especially there haveing beene so many verdits
allready passed in affirmance of their title by the will of the said Thomas Hawes and further also that in the
meane tyme untill security be put in by Trinity House that the rentes may remayne in the tenantes handes
undisposed of and that untill a tryall be had at lawe the Trinity House and all others may be restrayned
from felling or cutting downe any woods or committing any waystes or spoyle upon the premises
in question.

And your peticioners shall pray etc.

22 January 1647
Christ's Christ's Hospitall

Warwick, Lord Mohun. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in Parliament assembled

The humble peticion of Warwick Lord Mohun

Sheweth
that Sir Edward Leach and Master Hackwell (the referrees appointed by your lordships to examine and report the
contemptes committed by Sir Henry Carew and others) are readie according to order of this howse 4to
Januarii instant, to make report of so much of the said contemptes as your peticioner is able to prove
by such witnesses as he hath in towne

That by order of 13o December last your lordships did order, that your petitioner should have power to examine
witnesses in the countrie to prove more of the said contemptes, if Sir Henry Carew did not shewe
cause to the contrarie within six dayes, which he hath not done, but if your lordships doe not
thinck fitt, that your peticioner should proceede to a further proofe of the said contemptes, your
peticioner shall submitt himselfe to your pleasure therein.

And your petitioner now humbly praies that your lordships would be pleased to order that the sheriffe
of Cornewall doe restore your petitioners possession forcibly taken and deteyned from him, in contempt of an
order of your lordships dated 14o January 1646 and in breach of your petitioners priviledge as a peere: and to
order the said Sir Henry Carew and Charles Roscarrocke to satisfie your peticioner for
such costes and damadges as your petitioner can prove by oath that he hath bin putt to by the said
contemptes: and that your petitioner may be restored to the profittes and rentes of the said landes
deteyned by order of the 4th of January instant: and your petitioner must referr the said Sir Henry
Carew and Charles Roscarrock to your lordships justice, for the violacion of the honour of this
howse.

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc

Warwick Mohun

20o January 1647

22 January 1647
Lord Mohun
versus
Sir Henry Carew.

Sir Henry Carew, Dorethy his wife, Bridgett Nicholls and others. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honourable the lordes in Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of Sir Henry Carew and Dame Dorethy his wife
Bridgett Nicholls relict of John Nicholls esquire deceased and Charles Roscarrock
and Margarette his wife

Shewinge
that the right honourable Warwicke Lord Mohun haveinge disturbed your petitioners
possession in certaine landes in the countye of Cornewall whilst himselfe was
commander in cheife of the forces there against the Parliament uppon pretence of
priviledge and your lordshipps orders hath debarred your peticioners of theire trialls
att law concerninge the said landes whereuppon your peticioneres appealeinge to your
lordshipps and prayinge to bee heard before your honours uppon theire title they
have beene delayed therein by his lordshipp for diveres monethes uppon pretence of certaine
contemptes supposed to bee committed by them against your lordshipps orders which your
honoures were pleased to referre to examinacion. For the cleereinge whereof
and for the maintenance of theire title [illegible] your petitioneres were enforced to bringe
severall wittnesses out of Devonshire and Cornewall to London; where yett
to theire greate expence they are putt still to maintaine them.

Wherefore for that the said pretended contemptes have beene examined
and the report thereuppon before your lordshippes. And for that the Lord
Mohun doth still [illegible] keepe your petitioneres out of possession of parte of theire
inheritances and endeavours to take away theire possession of the
residue. May it please your honours to appoint a speedy day whereon
your petitioneres may bee heard uppon the said report; and that your honours
would bee pleased then also to heare them on theire title; or give them
libertie to proceed att law and in the meane time to quiet your petitioneres possessi=
on soe that they may not bee putt from thence by the power of the said
Lord Mohun before his right appeares

And your petitioneres shall ever pray etc.

  • Henry Carew
  • Bridget Nichols
  • Charles Roscarrock

22 January 1647
[Sir Carew?]
Sir Henry Carew

William Clerke, Robert Coleman, Richard Pagett, Anne Warren and others. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords assembled in the High
Court of Parliament

The humble petition of William Clerke doctor of lawes Robert
Coleman gentleman, Richard Pagett gentleman, Thomas Mandeslie, John Collett,
Anne Warren widdowe, Margaret Shakelford widdowe, and
others the creditors of Robert Walthew late of East Greenewich
in the countie of Kent esquire deceased

Sheweth
that Robert Walthew late of Eastgreenewich aforesaid was in his life time indebted
severallie unto your peticioners by judgements, statutes, and otherwaies in greate
summes to the summe of 4000 pounds and upwards, and that the said Robert Walthew
did thereupon bona fide and upon good and valuable consideracions assure and
convey to divers of your petitioners severall parts and parcells of his lands
and thereby satisfyed part of your peticioners debts, but left divers of your
petitioners debts altogether unpaid and unsatisfied.

And further your petitioners shewe that Thomas Wayte late of Leythorpe in the
countie of Leicester esquire pretending himselfe to be indebted to the King about the 5th of
June in the 11th yeare of this King, and after divers of your peticioners debts were due and
payable to them from the said Robert Walthew, as aforesaid did procure the said Robert
Walthew and Henrie Walthew his eldest sonne to become bound to the King in a poenall bond
of 4000 pounds conditioned for the payement of 2080 pounds at a day then to come, and long since past to the
said Thomas Wayte, towards the discharge and satisfaction whereof and of the interest for
the same the said Thomas Wayte in his life time, and his executors, or administrators since
his death did, and have received the summe of 2200 pounds in the life of the said Robert Walthew
who dyed about the month of December 1645.

And now soe it is that the said Thomas Wayte being deceased Frauncis Wayte executor or
administrator of the said Thomas Wayte, as he pretendeth did in the life time of the said Robert
Walthew cause the said bond of 4000 pounds to be put in suite in his majesties name in the Exchequer
and alsoe since the death of the said Robert Walthew hath by scire facias issueing out of the
said Court of Exchequer revived the said suite against divers of your peticioners as terretenants
to divers parcells of the said Robert Walthews lands, thereby intendeing and alsoe
endeavouring by colour of the said bond, and under colour, and by the abuse of the Kings
prerogative pretended in the same to defraude and deprive all your peticioners of their lands and
debts soe justlie and reallie purchased by and oweing to them as aforesaid, which they humbly conceive
to be contrarie to the common lawes and statutes of this kingdome, contrarie to his majesties
proclamacion dated the 30th of March 1640. wherein he expressely prohibitts such abuse
of his praerogative, and declareth the same voide and against lawe, and contrarie to all
right, equitie, and good conscience, as appeareth by the proclamacion hereunto
annexed

Wherefore since such proceedeings are not onlie injurious to your peticioners, but
a generall greivance in consequence and example, your peticioners humbly beseech
your lordshipps in consideration of the premisses to take such order, as to your wisedomes
shall seeme fitt for the releife of your peticioners, and that noe further proceedings
may be to their prejudice, untill your lordshipps pleasure be further knowne.

And your peticioners shall ever pray etc

25 January 1647
Doctor William Clark
Exped

Sir Oliver Luke, John Trenchard and Henry Trenchard. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in Parliament assembled

The humble peticion of Sir Oliver Luke knight John Trenchard
and Henry Trenchard esquires:

Most humblie show:
that whereas your petitioneres beinge the undoubted patrons of the rectory of Exford comitatu Somerset
did present George Trenchard clerke to officiate that cure, and your lordshipps 31o December 1646
did order, that institucion and induccion should bee given unto him, which was done, accordinglie,
and that afterwardes your petitioners saide clerke beinge disturbed and displaced by the comittee of
that county, whoe by theire owne order had placed another to officiate that cure, and contynued
him there, by the strength of a troope of horse, your lordshipps 8o April 1647 were pleased to order
that your petecioners clerke should bee forthwith restored to the quiet possession of the said rectory
and to all the profites and benefites therunto belonginge, and your petitioneres said clerke, was theruppon
againe restored to the possession of the said rectory.

But soe it is, that your petitioners said clerke hath latelie, and since the said orders, bene severall times disturbed,
in the quiet possession of the said rectory: by the county troope, whoe have severall tymes come to have
apprehended and imprisoned your petitioners clerke, by meanes wherof hee cannot with safety descharge the
duty of his place, and that Master Collier the sequestrator hath since the said orders and contrary
therunto, forbidden the parishioners to pay any tith unto your petitioneres clerke, in obedience wherunto
one Robert Edbrooke William Tucker, Silvester Williams, and others of the said parish carried away
theire tith, and then did, and still doe contrary to your lordshipps said order and in contempt therof
absolutly refuse to yeild obedience therunto, or to give your petitioneres said clerke any satisfaccion for the same,
and that one Larkecombe by authority from the said comittee hath very lately required the said parishioners to pay unto
him all such moneyes as hath growne dew ever since your petitioneres said clerke, was instituted and inducted as
aforesaid, and hath required all such as shall refuse soe to doe to appeare before the said comittee, to
answeare such theire supposed contempt: (the truth of all which appears by the affidavit and note heerto annext)

Your petitioners doe therfore humbly beseech your lordshipps peremptorily to order, that your petitioneres said clerke
may contynew and abide in the quiet and peacable possession of the said rectory; and may enjoy the
profites therof without the disturbance or interupcion of the said comittee, or any other under them:
and that the said Edbrooke, Tucker, and Williams, and all the rest of the parishioners may bee orderd forthwith
to give your petitioneres said clerke satisfaccion for all such tith as is already dew unto him, or that shall
heerafter grow dew unto him, accordinge to your lordshipps former order, and in default therof to order
the refusers to appeare before your lordships to answeare theire contempt therin, and that the same may bee
comended to the care of 3 of the next justices of the peace to see the same dewly observed.

And your petitioneres shall ever pray for your lordshipps.

  • O Luke
  • John Trenchard
  • Henry Trenchard

Ygnacio de Landahola, Spanish merchant. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords assembled in Parlament

The humble peticion of Ygnacio de Landahola -
Spanish merchant

Sheweth that the peticioner was imprisoned in May last
in the Poultrye Compter at the suite of Matheo de La
Fita, who doth pretend parte of the plate, which the peticioner
brought in the shippe Clare the which was all made
use on for the Parlaments service, and though your
honors made an order the 28th of May last, for his
releasement out of prison, yett the said order is not
obeyed, and the peticioner haveing given a copye of the
said order to one Sturmey the attorney of the said
Fita (because the said Fita is gone into France) yett the
said attorney contrarye to the said order doth still
prosecute, and hath brought a new write against the
peticioner and pretends to keepe him still in prison, and
to extort from him the monnye which the Parlament
hath, which the peticioner hopes your honors will not permitt
him to bee kept in prison, for the monnye which the
Parlament hath, without restoreing him the monnye or
giveing him maintenance, and therefore,

Humblye prayes your honors to make such
effectual order, that hee may bee released of
his imprisonment and that the said Sturmey
may bee comitted prisoner, for other eight proceeded against as your lordshipps shall
monthes thinke fitt in regard of his keepeing the peticioner
prisoner soe long contrarye to your lordshipps
said order

And the petitioner exca.

25 January 1647


Ygnatio de Landahola

William Martin, Robert Johnson and Raph Dowthwaite, prisoners. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in Parliament
assembled:

The humble petition of William Martin Robert Johnson
and Raph Dowthwaite prisoners in the custody of the
gentleman usher of this honourable house.

Shew:
that your petitioners have for these fowerteen daies last past been in the custody of the
said gentleman usher upon a contempt untruly suggested in the peticion of Thomas
Worsley John Worsley and Elizabeth Worsley for not delivering of certaine goodes
taken in extent upon aseisure for debt in the accomptes of Sir John Buck knight and Sir
Thomas Gower knight late sherrieffes of the county of Yorke; whereas in truthe the goodes
so demaunded were sould to the said Worsleys knowledges two moneths before the
order of the seaventh day of October last was procured:

That your petitioners have been allwaies willing and ready according to the order of the Exchequer to
restore the money receaved for the said goodes deducting such charges, as is usually in
such cases allowed: and have severall tymes offred the same, but they refused to
give an acquittance for the same as was required:

In consideration whereof, and forasmuch as there is noe affidavit made or
filed to prove the said contemptes; and that the cause is yet depending before the
barons of the Exchequer as was referred by that order of the 7th of October, and some
of your petitioners examined upon interrogatories, according to the course of that court
as also that the contentes of the said peticion were both untrue to theire owne
knowledges, and impossible to be performed, the goodes being sould before the order of
the Exchequer procured and the money for which they were sould often tendred:

May it please your honours to discharge your petitioners of theire said supposed
contemptes or otherwise graunt them libertie upon baile; and order
that the barons before whome the cause is now depending may
certifie the state of the cause: or be pleased to sett downe
a certayne, and speedy day of hearing of the premisses before
your lordshipps.

And your petitioners shall ever pray etc

25 January 1647

Petition of William
Martyn et alia

Henry Stuart, esquire. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

Henry Stuart his peticion

To the right honourable the howse of peeres assembled
in Parliament.

The humble peticion of Henry Stuart esquire

Shewing
that your peticioner being soe interupted as that he cannot reape the
benifitt of your lordshipps favour towardes him, and haveing by his long
attendance exhausted himselfe, whereby he is disabled to make his creditours
to whome he hath been beholden, satisfaccion; and although he is verie
willing out of the first money he shall receave by vertue of the ordinance
of both howses to him graunted, to pay everie one proporcionably; yett
such is the crueltie of some of them, that nothing but your petitioners imprissonment
will serve, and to that purpose have taken out writtes against him; insoemuch
as your petitioner is forced to keepe himselfe out of the way, and soe exposed to
all manner of hardshipp without your lordshipps favour be extended.

Wherefore he humblie praieth, that your lordshipps will graunt him
your proteccion for such time as your honours shall thinke fitt, that
soe he may follow his busines, and be enabled by your lordshipps to receive
the money ordered him towardes the discharge of his engagementes
(his estate in Ireland being utterly consumed by the rebells)

And he shall pray etc

Henrie Stuart

28: January 1647

The parishioners of Thornecomb, Devon. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honourable the house of peeres
sitting in Parliament

The humble petition of the parishioners
of Thornecomb in the county of Devon.

Sheweth
that your petitioners besides the grievances of many robberyes,
exiles, imprisonments, and wastings of their estates for their fidelity
to the Parliament have alsoe suffered above these twelve monethes
last past the want of a preaching minister of the gospell, by reason
that John Bragge the last incumbent there for his delinquency against
state was sequestred unto the time of his death which happened above halfe
a yeare since.

Now for as much as Richard Bragge esquire the patron of the
sayd vicaridg of Thornecomb hath layen under sequestration
by the space of a yeare and more and doeth still lye under sequestration
for his delinquency in having been a captaine of a troope of
horse and actually in armes against the state, and therefore not in a
capacity (as wee conceave) to present

May it therefore please this honourable house to
take into consideracion your petitioners sadde
condition, and to conferre the sayd vicaridge
of Thornecomb upon William Bragge
master of artes a godly able and orthodox
divine whom wee doe unanimously desire
to bee our minister

And wee shall ever pray etc

  • [.?] Rosewell
  • Nicholas Wakely
  • William Bowdidg
  • Barnard Pynny
  • Edward Darby
  • Wido Pynson
  • James Pynson
  • Robert Wakely
  • [Archebaut?] Doble
  • Steven Doling
  • John Bagg
  • Nicholas Hitchcocke
  • George Bowdidg
  • John [James?]
  • Thomas Sprake
  • Nicholas Pinny

  • John Coggan
  • Nicholas Baker
  • John Pynny
  • William Owsty
  • John [Smith?]
  • William Downe
  • Thomas Heath
  • William Phelps
  • William Fowler
  • Clement Baker
  • Laurence Phelps
  • George Legg junior
  • John Bragg
  • Nicholas Baker senior
  • Robert [Witchell?]
  • Roger Witchell

  • John Bragg senior
  • Rober Bryant
  • Silvanus [Dolline?]
  • John Cooke junior
  • George Bowditch
  • Michael Bowdedge
  • John Bowdidge
  • Richard Baker
  • John Baker
  • Steven Lane
  • Nicholas Wakely senior
  • George Legg senior
  • [Thomas Rookes?]
  • Henry Hynde
  • Thomas [Wellern?]
  • Abraham Wakely

  • John Lymbry
  • [Samuel?] Bodidg
  • Joshua Hitchcock
  • John Cooke senior
  • Bernard [Webbes?]
  • Peter Anley
  • Robert Perrin
  • William French
  • Thomas Silvester
  • Robert French
  • Clement Miller
  • Josiah [Lembey?]
  • Widdow [illegible]
  • Widow Hitchcocke
  • William [Lapcombe?]
  • John [illegible]

Inhabitantes Thornecomb

Lett an ordinance
bee brought into the
house

Margerie Riggs, widow, Thomas Riggs and Edmond Riggs. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

Mistress Riggs peticion

To the right honourable the lords in Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of Margerie Riggs of Winton widdow, and Thomas and Edmond
Riggs, sonnes to Ralph Riggs late of Winton gentleman deceased in the behalfe of themselves and other orphantes.

Sheweth
that the said Ralph Riggs (being seized of an estate for two lives in the [scite?] of the mannour of Fareham in
the countie of Southampton which he held of the Bishopp of Winton did in March 1641 renew his lease of the then
bishopp changeing the two lives then in being for two other lives and added a third, and paid for the same a
valuable consideracion of 400 pounds or thereaboutes.

That about November 1645 the said Ralph borrowed of the petitioner Margery 1000 pounds and assigned over the said new lease
to her for securing the said monyes, which being yett wholly unpaid, the right to the said lease remaines in your petitioner
Margery, and the right of redempcion in the peticioners Thomas and Edmond.

But soe yt is, that by an ordinance of the 9th of October 1646 all estates taken of any bishopps since
December 1641 are declared invalid, soe that though the contract were made in October 1641 which was
before the time, to which the said ordinance referrs, yett the lease not being sealed till March 1641 in
strictnes it is made void, and the petitioner Margery, with her children to whome the said money did
belong are likely to be ruined, togeather with many orphants children of the said Ralphe.

The petitioners humbly pray a consideracion may be had of their speciall case, that in regard the
contract was before the time to which the ordinance looks backe, the purchase being reall, not
fraudulent, and forasmuch as the mony lent upon the new lease is the greatest parte
of the estate of the petitioner Margerie and her children, and the lease it selfe the greatest parte
of the estate of the petitioners Thomas and Edmond and other orphanes. That therefore the
said ordinance may not be extended beyond its equitable sence, (the intencion thereof
being (as they humble conceive) to avoid fraudulent actes, not to devest any, of their just
titles) but that their estates may be confirmed to them by order from this honourable house
that so they may not undergoe that miserie, to which the extremity of the said ordinance will
necessarily expose them.

And your petitioners shall ever pray etc.

  • Margery Riggs
  • Thomas Riggs
  • Edmond Riggs

29 January 1647
Mistress Margery Riggs

Thomas Kirk of Bourne, Lincolnshire. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of Thomas Kirk of Bourne
in the county of Lincolne.

Sheweth
that your petitioner, being an inhabitant of Bourne aforesaid, and having right of common of pasture
for cattle, in a certaine common ther, called Bourn North Fenne, out of which the right honourable Roberte
Earle of Lindsey, (with the rest of the undertakers) have inclosed to themselves [ii00?] acres
of the best of the said fenne, to the great prejudice of the said inhabitants and commoners
your petitioner had 7 beasts and 3 horses depastured in the said commons, in the said fenne, which
(being all his lively hood) was on Michaelmas day, 1640 (with divers other goodes and beasts
of many of the poore inhabitants) driven and impounded at Pinchbeck, divers miles
distant from the said towne, by one Richard Wright, and others appointed agents by
the undertakers for that purpose, that your petitioner did repaire together with divers of his
neighbours unto Sir Edward Heron, for his goodes, but could not have them ther without
he would subscribe, to the granting away of the said common, wherby your petitioner was
inforced to take a legall course for regaining his said goodes, so unlawfully detained,
and procured a roplevin from the sheriffe, and finding his goodes driven and conveyed
from Pinchbeck unto a ground of Sir William Killegrewes, which he tooke out of
Donington Fenne, he ther endeavoured (according to law) to serve his replevin, but was
not only ryoutously assaulted and beaten by servantes and agents of the said Sir William Killegrew,
and Robert Long, but likewise the officers were outfaced, and threatened, and the
replevin not only disobeyed but also mainteyned to be disobeyed by the said Sir
William Killegrew, Roberte Long, and Sir Edward Heron (as they had don many others)
and told your petitioner, that if he got a replevin, and came with the sheriffe, they would
shoote him, and that notwithstanding your petitioners great labour and excessive charges and
expence, by the space of 3 weekes endeavouring by all legall meanes, to obtaine
his said goodes, yet they were driven from Donington to Heckington Hall yard to
Sir John Brookes, and from thence to Lincolne market, and ther sold by James
Fawcet and John Winfray agents for the said undertakers, without any maner of
of accompt, or restitucion of any part therof, they being worth fifty five poundes
and better, to the utter undoing of your poore petitioner who was inforced to leave
his habitacion for feare of pursuivantes, which were sent downe for your petitioner,
and divers other poore inhabitants, by Master Long and others; but such as
would subscribe to their decree, for granting away the commons, were
set free, and others who refused were served with pursuivantes, and
enforce to appeare, to their excessive charge and trouble, it being
proffered your petitioner by Sir William Killegrew, and Sir Edward Heron, that if
he would subscribe, he should have his beasts againe.

Now forasmuch as your petitioner, hath since the beginning of the late troubles,
faithfully served the Parliament, and is at presente in actuall service,
under the command of his excellency Sir Thomas Fairfax;
and for that your petitioner is destitute of relief in the premisses,
having formerly peticioned this honourable house, and that 7 yeares
ago, hath had 3 severall daies of hearing in this said house,
but nothing determined.

He therefore most humbly praieth that this honourable house would be
pleased, to take his extreame losses and expences in prosecuting
of his peticion, into your serious consideracion, and to order that
Sir William Killegrew, Sir John Brookes and Sir Edward Heron knightes
Roberte Long James Fawcet John Winfray and others may be
summoned to appear before your lordships, wherby your petitioner may
receive such justice in the premisses, as to your lordships
wisdomes, shalbe thought meete.

And your petitioner shall daily pray etc.

Thomas Kirke

31 January 1647
Thomas Kyrke
versus
Lord Cobham
and others.

The reduced officers who have faithfully served the Parliament. HL/PO/JO/10/1/251 (1648)

The reduced officers
peticion

To the right honourable the house of peeres

The humble peticion of the reduced officers
whoe have faythfully served the Parliament

Sheweth that your peticioners beinge allowed one monthes
pay by the ordinance of the sixteenth of June past
have given their attendance the space of seaven monthes or
thereabouts and as yet not received the same notwithstandinge
your peticioners certificats of their service hath been approved
by the auditoures appoynted for that purpose wherby many
are imprisoned some famished and the rest dayly threatned
with the like callamities

Your peticioners therefore most humbly desire that
this your lordshipps would recomend their sadd estate
and condition to the honourable House of Commons that
accordeinge to the aforesaid ordinance they may have
speedy releefe to prevent their future myseries
and your peticioners shall as formerly ever pray etc.

The reduced officers peticion

Rejected.

William Stephens, William Smith and creditors of Thomas, earl of Cleveland. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords assembled in Parliament.

The humble peticion of [illegible] William Stephens esquire memberes of the honourable Howse of Comons and William Smith esquire
and diveres citizens and other creditors of the right honourable Thomas Earle of Cleveland.

Whereas your lordshipps die Veneris 28o Januarii 1647 were pleased to order that your petitioners should have a sight of the peticion preferred to this honourable howse
by Dame Frances Weld, and make answeare thereunto by Tewsday following. In obedience to the said order, and in answeare to the said
peticion. Maie it please your lordshipps to give your petitioners leave to informe this honourable howse, that most of the charges in the said peticion are utterly untrue.

That your petitioner William Stephens, did never shelter himselfe under the privilidge of Parliament or give out any menacing speeches as the said Lady Weld doth unjustly
chardg. True it is, that your petitioner is steward of the mannours of Stepny and Hackney, as he conceaveth hee hath good right to be, and was soe, long before the
said mannours were extended by the said Lady.

That the estate was not setled uppon your petitioner William Stephens Smith since your lordshipps order of February 1646 as the said Lady does untruely informe
your lordshipps but was long since conveyed to your said petitioner and otheres, the truth of which, maie it please your lordshipps to understand as likewise of the whole matter.

True it is, that the said Lady Weld, hath a security of some landes in Bedfordsheire for 5000 pounds lent to the Earle of Cleveland, and a statute of 10000 pounds
for the performance of covenantes, which your petitioners [beleeve?] was acknowledged about the same tyme mencioned in the said lady her peticion.

That the said debt uppon the said statute, and likewise the mortgage of the mannours of Stepney and Hackney to the late Lord Baning together with all other
the debtes of the said Earle of Cleveland, when due, and to whome, were presented to this honourable howse, and there, then inrolled, to that intent they might
be satisfied in order, which was pretended by an act of Parliament in anno 1640 prosecuted by the said earle.

That after the said act tooke noe effect (soe that creditours were left to the security they had) the right honourable Phillip Lord Herbert eldest sonne
of the right honourable Phillipp Earle of Pembroke, and the then Lady Penellope Viscountesse Baning his wife in whome the right of the mortgage then
was made their complaintes by severall peticions exhibited to this honourable howse against the said Earle of Cleveland. Uppon a full hearing and uppon the
whole matter, die Martis 27o die April 1641 your lordshipps were pleased to make an order to this effect following. That possession of the said mannours of Stepney
and Hackney be delivered upp to the trustees of the late Lord Baning for the use and advantage of the said Lord Herbert and Lady Penellope.

That after the first day of March 1642 the said Lord Herbert and trustees, shall have power to sell all or any part of the said mannours for satisfaction
of their debtes, and that all such sales, should be good, observing such rules as are expressed in the said order.

That about 5 yeares since your lordshipps petitioners some of them finding noe other way to secure their estates and debtes, and being encouraged by your lordshipps order
and likewise observing the rules in the said order, contracted with the said Phillipp Earle of Pembroke, Phillipp Lord Herbert his sonne and
the said Lady Penellope. That in consideracion of the summe of 18546 pounds they should convey or cause to be conveyed the said mannours of Stepney and
Hackney unto some of your petitioners or such others as they should appoint and their heires, that accordingly the said Lord Herbert and Lady Penellope 8o die
Marcii 1642 did convey part of the estate [illegible] videlicet the remainder of a lease for 99 yeares unto your petitioner William Smith and otheres in trust for and by your petitioners
that your petitioners paid the summe of 4525 pounds as part of the consideracion of 18546 pounds and were willing to have paid the residue soe as the estate of
inheritance might have byn conveyed unto them, which the Lord Newarke now Earle of Kingstone one of the trustees for the Lord Herbert refused to doe.

That the said Lady Weld her mortgage and statute, of 10000 pounds were the security for the payment of an annuity or rent charge issuing out of the said
landes in Bedfordsheire (as your petitioners are informed) which the said lady might have taken a course longe since to have satisfied but voluntarily
neglected the same, and lately hath taken advantage of the said mortgage, and hath likewise extended part of the landes in Bedfordsheire and hath
gained the possession of about 1000 pounds per annum but not being contented therewith, hath contrary to, and in contempt of your lordshipps order, extended the
said mannours of Stepney and Hackney, and hath endeavored to frustrate the said order by depriveing the said Lord Herbert and your petitioners
of the whole fruite thereof, by turning them out of the possession of the whole; although neither at the tyme of the makeing of the said
order, nor at any tyme before the contract made by your lordshipps petitioners with the said Lord Herbert, shee ever claymed any thing out of the said mannours
of Stepney and Hackney but contented herselfe with her security of the landes in Bedfordsheire which is sufficient for her satisfaction. All which shee hath done
by the contrivance of one Master Smale and other her agentes, and by compliance with the Earle of Cleveland whoe combine together to defraude the
said Earle of Pembroke and Lord Herbert of their just debtes, and your lordshipps petitioners of their estates although shee hath byn first offered satisfaction
in case her security in Bedfordsheire was not sufficient, but nothing will satisfie her unless she may ruine your petitioners by takeing away their
estates which will availe her little, there being severall other securities precedent to heres, and not much present rent to satisfie her statute
most of the said landes consisting of revercions. And whereas the said lady pretendes that the landes in Bedfordsheire are claymed by
one Master Woodward and soe not capeable to satisfie her. Because it may appeare to your lordshipps that your petitioners are very willing, that the said
ladies just debt may be fully satisfied, they or some of them doe hereby offer (in case) that shee will assigne over all her security to them) to convey to her
and her heires soe much howses and landes, parcell of the said mannours of Stepney and Hackney, which they have purchased as the debt uppon
the said statute uppon a just accompt shall amount unto, and to adventure to reimburse themselves out of the landes
in Bedfordsheire.

Your lordshipps petitioners therefore humbly praye. That your lordshipps will be pleased to order. That the said Lady Weld may content herselfe with her
security in Bedfordsheire, in regard, that neither, at the tyme of the makeing of your lordshipps order of the 27th of Aprill 1641 by which your petitioners
were encouraged to purchase the said landes, nor at any tyme before the said purchase shee ever claymed any thing in the said mannours
of Stepney and Hackney, or that shee maye assigne the said security to your lordshipps petitioners in case they convey houses and land unto her for her
satisfaction uppon the said statute which they or some of them are willing to doe. And that if this answere prove not satisfactorie to your lordships
the said Earle of Pembroke and the said Lord Herbert may not be concluded or prejudicet thereby but that (before any order be made against
them) they may have libertie to answere by themselves or theire councell
as the cause shall require or your lordships direct

And your lordshipps petitioners shall ever etc

  • W Smyth
  • William Stephens

  • Percivall Pott
  • [Ansell?] Carter
  • Elizabeth March
  • Thomas Dunstervill

Thomas Mauleverer of Alderton Mauleverer, baronet. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the lordes in Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of Thomas Mauleverer of Alderton
Mauleverer in the county of York baronett.

Sheweth
that the right honourable John Earle of Bridgwater in and by one obligacion dated 20 July
18o Caroli Regis standes bound to your petitioner in 1000 pounds condicioned for the payment of 520 pounds on the
22th of January then next ensuing, which debt remaines wholy unpaid and although your
petitioner hath often desired the said earle to satisfy the same, and hath used his best meanes to the
said earle in that behalfe, yet doth the said earle from time to time putt off your petitioner
with faire promises and delatory answeares, not intending to pay the said debt (as your petitioner
conceaves) unles he be compelled by course of lawe

For asmuch as the said debt hath bene long forborne, and the said earle takes noe course to satisfye
your petitioner and your petitioner hath many debtes and paymentes of his owne to discharge, and in danger of suites
and arrestes.

Your petitioner humbly prayeth that your lordshipps wilbee honourablie pleased, to order that
your petitioner may have libertie to proceede at lawe against the said earle for
recovery of his said debt and damages uppon the said bond.

And your petitioner shall pray etc

Thomas Mauleverer

3 February 1647
Thomas Maleverer barronett

Captain Anthony Morgan. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the lordes in
Parliament assembled.

The humble petition of Captaine Anthony Morgan.

Humbly sheweth.
That about a yeare since your petitioner sued Griffith Lloyde esquire in the
Court of Pleas of the Exchequer upon a bond of 4000 pounds by him entred into
for makeinge good a jointure to Elizabeth your petitioners wife formerly the
wife of David Lloyd eldest sonne of the sayd Griffith of a 100 pounds per annum.

That the sayd Griffith Lloyde brought a supersedeas out of the Chauncerie
to dismisse the suit there after a peremptory day given by the court to
answer or a nihil dicit to be awarded pretending that your petitioner was not
minister domini regis wheras he sued as debitor domino regi as in truth
under your [illegible] lordships favour he is, as appeares by this acquittance
hereunto annexed.

That upon hearinge of councell on both sides the barons in their grave
wisedome accordinge to the constant practise of that court disalowed the
supersedeas.

That the sayd barons further ordered your petitioner to perfect his declara=
ration within 4 dayes and the sayd Griffith to plead within 14 dayes
after, or a nihil dicit to be entred.

That your petitioner accordingly perfected his declaration but the sayd Griffith
instead of pleadinge thereunto hath upon untrue surmises in his petition
procured your lordships order of the 19th of December [illegible] 1646 to staye proceedings
at lawe, till your lordships pleasure be farther signified herein:

He most humbly beseecheth your lordships in your tender and conscientious
care to conserve the peoples liberties and birthright the common lawe
of England to declare your gratious pleasure that he may be admit=
ted to his proceedinges at lawe for recoverie of his most just right
against the great and insufferable oppressions of the sayd Griffith
Lloyde and he may be dismissed hence with his costes.

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc. Anthony Morgan

3 February 1647
Captain Anthony Morgan
Exped

Sir Henry Carew, Dorothy his wife, Bridgett Nicholls and others. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the lordes in Parliament assembled

The humble peticion of Sir Henry Carew and Dame Dorothy his wife, Bridgett Nicholls
relict of John Nicholls esquire deceased and Charles Rosecarrocke esquire and Margarett his wife

Shewinge
that the right honourable Warwicke Lord Mohun havinge by force taken awaye the possession
and profitts of parte of your peticioners land in the county of Cornewall, did for staye
of their proceedings at lawe for recovery of their rightes prosecute your peticioners before
your honours upon their title thereunto: and likewise upon certaine pretended contempts to
your lordshipps orders for entringe upon and takeing the profitts of the said lands of which
after deliberate examinacion and report thereof made to your lordships yow have beene
honorablie pleased to acquitte your peticioners; but notwithstandinge your peticioners presume
not to take the profitts of the said lands as formerly they have donne for that by
your lordships order of the 4th January (a coppie whereof is hereunto annexed)
both the said Lord Mohun and your peticioners are prohibited to dispose of the said
profitts till your lordshipps farther order.

May it therefore please your honours as yow have beene pleased allready to
acquitte your peticioners from all contempt in takeing the profittes of the said
landes formerly soe to order that notwithstandinge the said order of
the 4th of January they may bee admitted to receave the same for the
future and likewise if your lordshipps thinke fitt to heare your peticioners upon
their title (for which they have attended above these 6 monthes and
have beene still delayed by the Lord Mohun) to appointe a speedy daye
for hearinge them therein or els to referr them for triall and maintenance
thereof to the ordinary course of the common lawe

And your petitioners as in duty bound shall pray etc.

  • Henry Carew
  • Bridget Nichols
  • Charles Roscarrock

3 January 1647
Sir Henry Carewe

The inhabitants of the New Exchange. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the lordes assembled in Parliament.

The humble peticion of the inhabitants of the Newe Exchange.

Sheweth
that diverse and sundry debaucht gentry and others have of late severall
times riotously comitted many violences and batteries uppon your petitioners persons
and servantes in theire shopp to the danger of theire lives and estates (some
of whome haveing been sued to outlary and taken thereon have evoided the
due course of the lawe through there interest in, and connivance of sherriffs and
there officers and more particularly of the Earle of Anglesey
Crewe and Parramour and some others in company with them, beeing
unanswered, by a modest maide to there uncivill and lascivious questions
assaulted her in her shopp threatned her life forced her flight to preserve
it, and in prosecucion of that force strucke her next neighbour and thrusting with
theire weapons at him had kild him but that another neibour diverted them
whome they cutt dangerously in the head and thrust through the arme, and
into the body which is conceived to bee mortall, and at theire departure marcht
with there swordes drawne and pistoll ready swearing damme they would
kill all that should offer to resist them and threatned to come againe in the
same manner to the same end, all which diverse of your petitioners are ready to
averre.

May it therefore please your honours to take the premisses into
consideracion and to graunt your petitioners such speedy redresse heerein
as your wisdomes shall thinke meete considering the greate danger
they are in.

And your petitioners shall pray etc.

  • Thomas Johnson
  • Charles Rich
  • James Heames
  • James Chipchase
  • Tobias Long
  • Robert Sutton
  • John [Bird?]
  • Anthony [Knipe?]

  • Thomas Hamond
  • Joseph [Dun?]
  • Nathaniell Tomson
  • James Bradshawe
  • John [H...ote?]

  • Thomas Seaman

3 February 1647
Inhabitantes New
Exchange
Exped

Edward, Lord Vaux. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of Edward Lord Vaux.

Shewing.
That your petitioner (in the name of Thomas Bullock) hath obtained a judgement in an ejectione firme
against Robert Knighton gentleman and others; and a writt of error is brought before your lordshipps to
stopp execucion; the error assigned is that the said Robert Knighton is an infant (though hee bee
30ty yeares of age, as appereth by certifficate and affidavit annexed: which is a great contempt and
abuse of justice; The

The said defendantes have deceitefully made such false allegacion of matter in fact; to thintent that
the same being doubtfull, how to bee tryed and where, and (att least) with expence of much time
the petitioner may bee that while kept out of possession by such suggestions; though manifestlie
false. The writt of error is apparantly abateable and naught in lawe: beeing
manifestlie mistaken and varient from the record itselfe which is the ground of it.

The petitioner humblie praies your lordshipps either to heere the said matter
on the writt yourselves or appoint some judges to heere the same; and
certefie their opinion, whether the said writt of error ought not to bee
abated; and that such certifficate may bee with such speed; as that
(if it may bee) your petitioner may proceed the tearme.

And your petitioner shall pray etc

Sir Nathaniell Brent, Thomas Manley and Ann Vernon. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in the High Court of Parleament assembled

The humble peticion of Sir Nathaniell Brent knight Thomas
Manley esquire and Ann Vernon widdow
the relict of Captaine Vernon deceased.

Sheweth
that Sir Nathaniell Brent Captaine Vernon and Thomas Manley have
peticioned your lordships to be restored to their possessions in Gedney in the county of Lincolne
removed in these troublesome tymes without law and against your order of 13th July 1641.

That the 11th January 1646 the said peticion was read, and then ordered by your lordships that affidavites
be made of the petitioners possessions, which are done accordingly, and in the clarke of the
Parliamentes handes.

They therefore most humbly beseach your lordships to order that the sheriffe of
the said county may restore their said severall possessions as have been
divers tymes done by this Parliament in like cases.

And your petitioners shall daylie pray etc

  • Nathaniel Brent
  • Ann Vernon
  • Thomas Manley

4 February 1647
Sir Nathaniel Brent.

Sir David Watkins, knight. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords and commons in Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of Sir David Watkins knight.

Sheweinge
that your petitioner heeretofore hath severall tymes peticioned your lordshipps humbly craveinge your licence to proceed against the Earle of Bridgwater
for recovery of severall just debts of 2000 pounds oweinge unto your petitioner by him, (beinge orphans money which he is trusted withall) and
nowe after severall orders therein made by your lordshipps the said earle hath nowe lately put in an answer to your petitioners peticion wherein he
onely doth acknowledge two principall debts of 500 pounds and 500 pounds to be due unto your petitioner with some use, but the truth is, the said
earle stands bounden unto your petitioner in three severall obligacions of a 1000 pounds penaltie a peece, condicioned for the payement of three
severall sommes of 520 pounds a peece which hath bin longe due, the principall and interest thereof nowe amountinge unto 2000 pounds
or thereabouts, the payement whereof your petitioner hath in all freindly manner often sollicited from the said earle, and his lordshipe haveing
as often promised satisfaccion, and once offered and importuned your petitioner to procure him chapmen for land by the demise or sale
whereof he promised to satisfye your petitioner but when your petitioner had procured him such as were willinge to have dealt with him
and offered him ready money, the said earle declined to lease or sell any lands, and from that tyme your petitioner could never
prevaile with his lordshipe for any satisfaccion.

And as for those conveyances which he mencions to have made in his answer wherewith to pay his debts, if any such be, it is
of little benefit or availe, to your petitioner, haveinge noe power to compell any such trustees, for to give your petitioner any satisfaccion
and your petitioner enformeth that all the obligors of the said bonds which are his lordships suerties therein, are either outlawed and
obscuringe themselves, or in prison or restrainte, whereby your petitioner is remedilesse ever to gett payement of his just debts, if that
your lordshipps in comiseracion of the said orphans miserable condicion, shall not give him way to proceed at lawe for the recovery
thereof, which he humbly prayeth that your lordships would order accordinglye,

And he shall praye etc.

  • D Watkins

The shopkeepers in the New Exchange and inhabitants in the Strand. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords assembled in Parliament

The humble peticion of the shopkeeperes in the New Exchange
and the inhabitantes in the Strand neare thereunto.

Sheweth.
That your petitioneres and passengeres that passe that way are much prejudiced and annoyed
by a multitude of hackney coaches that are continually standing in, and pestring the
streetes thereaboutes whereby noblemen and gentlemen's coaches, and country carriages
with provision cannot freely passe, and your petitioneres their servantes and children cannot passe
or crosse the streetes without great danger of being bruzed and spoyled betweene the
coaches or runned over by them, and much mischeefe hath bin done, men wounded,
blood spilt, and in a ryott betweene watermen and the said coachmen one man
was killed, and all occasioned by the standing of the said coaches there to be hired
and whereas divers ryottes have been unhappily committed in the New Exchange and
partes adjacent, the said coachmen for a small hyre standing there are ready to carry the
ryotters away, by which easy escape: they are emboldned to committ the like attemptes to
your petitioneres great danger and damage; of which greivances your petitioneres complayned to the
justices of the peace of this liberty at the quarter sessions, who thereupon made an order
that there should not above six coaches stand there at one time, under which pretence
every coachman takes liberty, and accountes himselfe one, included in that number
soe that the annoyance is thereby augmented, and not diminished.

Your petitioneres humble suite therefore is that your lordshipps will be pleased to
take such course, as you in your wisedomes shall thinke fitt, that there
may be noe coaches at all permitted to stand there to be hired, that
soe the streetes may be cleared, passengeres noe wayes annoyed, nor
your petitioneres dampnified

And your petitioneres shall dayly pray etc

  • Francis Ayloffe
  • Thomas Seaman
  • John [Bird?]
  • Thomas Johnson
  • James Bradshawe
  • Joseph Dun Richard [Bale?]
  • John Johnson
  • [Isay Babtista Feray?]
  • Anthony [Knipe?]
  • Robert Sutton
  • Charles Nelson
  • Thomas Hammond
  • James [Heanies?]
  • Roger Sawrey
  • William Field
  • Nathaniell Gauntlett
  • Henry Field

  • Charles Rich
  • Thomas Gibbon
  • William Fylliffe
  • William Drayton
  • Alexander Falconer
  • John Maddox
  • Margrett [Barwls?]
  • Ann Trinker
  • Thomas Bagley
  • John [Tuer?]
  • Hugh Pope
  • Nathaniell Tomson
  • Mary Turpin

  • John [Flonnor?]
  • Samuel Smyth
  • Edward Francklin
  • Richard Dod
  • Thomas Pell
  • Josias Long
  • Richard Sills
  • Nicholas Hill
  • Thomas Johnson
  • Richard Frampton
  • William Watkines

  • Phillipp Hanbury
  • John Holden
  • Thomas Richards
  • Myles [Sarrvey?]

4 January 1647
Inhabitantes nere exchange
this buisnes lefte to the
judges Master J Rolle et alia
of them. Exped

Peter Smarte, a distressed minister of Gods word. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in Parliament assembled

The humble peticion of Peter Smarte a distressed
minister of Gods word.

Sheweth
that the 22th of May 1646 your lordships ordered Gilbert Marshall or the receavor for the
tyme being of the deane and chapters rents at Durham to pay your petitioner his stipend and
[divist?] as formerly: and 480 pounds which by his owne certificate appeared to be due to your
petitioner out of the said rentes since which time there is 266 pounds 06 shillings 08 pence arreare unto him, wherby
there remaines about 500 pounds due now to your petitioner out of the said receipt [illegible] from [Burwell?] and Heath for want whereof
he is droven to extreame misery, which principally is occasioned by reason he hath not the
receaving of the said rents as formerly. It being his in right of his prebent, to which
he was restored with all rightes and priviledges thereto belonging by your lordshipps order in
June 1641.

That your petitioner is readie to give sufficient security to be answerable for the said receipt
according to the order of Parliament himselfe and officers being paid as formerly, which is a lesse
allowance then the now receavours have.

That your petitioneres lands in the country is extended for 600 pounds which he was fyned by the High
Comission at Yorke, as by the annexed paper appeares, whereby your petitioners troubles and want
is such as he is very weary of his life.

That your petitioner upon the removall of Mastre Daniell Carwardin (whome he presented to the viccaridge
of Acklife) to a livinge in Essex, your petitioner hath according to his right and the custome of that
church proved and confirmed by your lordships in September 1641 presented Master Robert Wilkinson
a consciencious minister to the said viccaridge with the consent and approbacion of the said parish
but cannott give him the wonted institucion and induction under the said deane and chapteres seale,
in regard it is justly taken away by this honourable Parliament.

In consideracion whereof your petitioner humbly beseecheth your honoures to order him the said
receipt, and that the said Gilbert Marshall and Anthony Smith be accomptable to
him for the rents they have received and that hereafter he or his deputy may receive
the same as formerly he hath done forabove twenty yeares togeather and [if Burwell?] and Heath their officers and tenants [may?] the said [204 pounds?] and that
you will be pleased to order the barons of the Exchequer to discharg your petitioner of the
said extent for High Comission fines, and lastly, that Master Robert Wilkinson
may be settled in the said vicaridge either by your lordshipps order, or under the broad
seale of England

And hee shall pray etc

  • Peter Smart

John Heath of Old Grang, esquire. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the howse of peeres.

The humble petition of John Heath of Old
Grang in the bishopricke of Duresme esquire

Humbly sheweth
that your petitioner about 7 yeares sithence was retained councell for some tennants
whoe were sued by the executors of one Doctor Carre upon their bonds in the
Court of Chancery att Duresme for the corps of the prebend there. And upon
a heareing the chancellour of the said court decreed 60 pounds to the said executors of
Doctor Carre, which somme was paid in to one John Heath receivour of the said
court and by him instantly repaid to the said executors.

That upon informacion to this honourable howse by one Smart, your honnours
were pleased to order a distresse to bee made by the sheriffe and souldieres
of the said bishoprick for 60 pounds upon the estate of [illegible] John Heath (without
any other addicion) whereby your petitioner is said to bee the Heath mencioned in your
lordships said order, onely because hee is of the same name, and is threatened
severall times to have this distresse made upon his estate.

Your petitioner humbly praies. That your honnours would
therefore bee pleased to vacate or explaine the
said order, or else to leave the misinformer (Smart)
to the lawe, your petitioner not being under any sequestracion
att all.

And your petitioner shall pray

John Heath

Master Heaths petition
to the Howse of Peeres

1647

1648

Major Roger Burgis. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the peeres assembled in Parliament

The humble peticion of Major Roger Burgis

Sheweth.
That your petitioner being major to the last regiment of foote of Colonel Anselmes under
the King of Spaine for the service of Flaunders, was left here only to get and
transport recruites for that service.

But soe it is may it please your lordships your petitioner by order from the Committee
of the Militia of Westminster was the 28th of January last sent to the prison
of the Gatehowse, as being one of the Kings partie, whereas long since
and still is ymployed in the service of the King of Spaine as by the
testimony of the ambassadour appeares which hath bin produced to the
said comittee, who (notwithstanding refuseth to discharge your petitioner
whereby the service of the said King imposed upon your petitioner is totally
neglected; besides your petitioner hath bin dampnified above 100 pounds by rifling his
lodging since his imprisonment.

Hee humblie leaveth the premisses to your honours consideracion
praying such order for his releasement as to your grave
wisedomes shalbe thought meete.

And he will ever pray etc

  • Roger Burges

Arnold Brames, James Pickering, Thomas Tyddyman and others. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of Arnold Brames, James Pickering
Thomas Tyddyman and Phinees Andrewes and Edward Wilson.

Sheweth
that whereas the Court of Admiralty some yeares past was the generall knowne court for hearing
and determyning all causes and differences arising or happening for freight of ships and sea affaires
betweene merchantes without any checke or controwle from any superiour court or power, and therein was
approved by all the then judges under their hands as by the copie annexed appeares. In which
time your petitioners or some of them by the common course of proceedings in that court did about 7 or 8
yeares since obtaine a sentence in that court against Nicholas Gould, Danyell Fairefax and Isaacke
Leigay merchantes for 1000 pounds due by them to your petitioners for freight of the shipp Lioness of Dover, from
which sentence they did appeale to the delegates where your petitioners obtayned a second sentence; that
since your petitioners prosecucion it is pretended, that the said court ought not to hould plea of any such
differences unles the contracts on which the same did arise were made super altum mare, of
which the said Gould, Fairefax, and Legay taking advantage doe unjustly molest your petitioners with
severall actions at common lawe, endeavouring to recover double dammages only for suing in
that court for a just debt.

Now forasmuch as it is the generall case of all the free people of England who have
sued in the said court, and that if any fault were, it was in the judges in yeilding such a
power, to the admiraltie, beyond its proper bounds which was unknowne to the persons whoe sought
redresse but for their just debts, besides the legaltie of such proceedings declared by all the
judges, and for that the penaltie is soe greivous and noe redresse or mitigacion in any court of
equity can be had, and it is not, nor can be pretended your petitioners have recovered more then is due
to them. But the parties for the oppression and vexacion of your petitioners pretend they did not recover in
a proper place.

Now for that your lordshipps can properly and onely give redresse in matteres of oppression
of this nature.

Your petitioners in behalfe of themselves and all the free people of England humbly pray
the ayde and favour of this honourable house, and that you wilbe pleased to call the parties
before you and heare and determine the same; and for the generall good of the kingdome that
your honours wilbe pleased to mynd the honourable House of Commons to take into consideracion
an ordinance for the settling of the jurisdiction of the admiraltie, which hath there
bine once read and still depends in that house.

And your petitioners shall ever pray etc.

  • Arnold Breames
  • Phinees Andrews

9 February 1647
Phines Andrews et alia.
Exped

Arnold Brames, Phineas Andrews and Edward Nelson. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of Arnold Brames, Phineas Andrews,
and Edward Nelson merchants.

Sheweth
that about 7 or 8 yeares since your petitioneres commenced a suite in the Court of Admiralty against Nicholas Gould,
Danyell Farvacke and Isacke Legay merchants for 1000 pounds due by them to your petitioneres for fraight of the ship Lyonesse
of Dover, and obtayned a sentence in the admiralty for the same, from which the said Gould, Farvacke and Legay
appealed to the Court of Delegates, and there, upon full hearing of the cause, the judges delegates finding
the sentence in the admiralty to bee just and well grounded, affirmed the same by their sentence alsoe, and your
petitioners had then noe reason to doubt that the Admiralty Court was the proper court and had full and cleere
jurisdiction in such cases, because all the twelve judges of the kingdome had unanimously agreed and
under their hands affirmed and declared that court to have full jurisdiction in such cases as by the copie
of their declaracion hereto annexed may appeare. Yett notwithstanding the said sentences, they the said
Gould, Farvacke, and Legay have comenced severall actions at the common lawe against your petitioners upon
the statute for double dammages, upon noe other ground, nor for any other cause or reason whatsoever
then only because (as it is now suggested) the Court of Admiralty ought not to have held plea in matters
for fraight of shipps: whereby your petitioners (sueing only for their just debt, as is not, nor can be denyed
by their adversaryes in a court affirmed by all the then judges of the kingdome, to be proper for the
decision of such causes: are therefore and for noe other cause or reason whatsoever prosecuted and lyable
to forfeite 2000 pounds and upwards for recovering their owne from such as unconscionably denyed to pay the
same, from which oppression they cannott otherwise be releived, but by the justice of this honourable house.

Wherefore, and for that this is not onely the case of your petitioners but very many other
merchants and owners of shipping, and doth much disquiet and disturbe them in their
way of trade, and doth verie much disturbe and obstruct the trade and imployment of
shipping: your petitioners doe humbly beseech this honourable house to take the premises into
consideracion, and to affoard your petitioners such releife therein as in equitie you shall thinke
fitt, and that in the meane time the proceedinges at lawe against your peticioners for the
cause aforesaid may be stayed.

And they shall ever pray etc

  • Arnold Brames
  • Phineas Andrews

Captain Henry Bell. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the lordes assembled in Parliament

The humble peticion of Capten Henry Bell:

Most humblie sheweth:
that through his longe restraint in prison he hath
had 175 pounds in demaund from one of the tellours of the
receipt, which he pretendeth to have paid and produceth
a collaterall discharge by an acquittance that
concernes not that somme: for finding out the truth
his humble suite unto your lordshipps is.

That you wilbe pleased to direct your order to the officers of the
receipt of the Exchequer that your peticioner may search in
their severall offices for the manner of paiment and allowances
of those particular sommes that concerned himselfe (which hath
not formerlie bin denied to anie of coorse) and have such
coppies and certeficates as are needfull and then that
your lordships will please to commend the hearing of his cause
to the honourable Committee of the Reaveanue, ether of themselves
or by some due referrence from them, to have it heard,
without the longe circumstance of a suite in the Exchequer
which your peticioner is not able to undergoe. And your petitioner
will daily pray for your lordships.

9 February 1647
Capten Belles peticion
Exped

The master wardens and assistants of the Trinity House. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the lordes in Parliament
assembled.

The humble peticion of the master wardens,
and assistantes of the Trinity House.

Sheweing.
That one Nicholas Hawes lately deceased, did by his last
will and testament devise unto your petitioners for the releife of
theire poore and maymed seamen, certaine landes in Kent,
to which Christes Hospitall make some pretence of title:

And upon theire peticion your lordships were pleased to referre
the consideracion thereof to the judges who have made
theire report, that they thinke fitt your petitioners should
give securitie to aunswere the rentes in case the title be
against them, which your petitioners are willing to doe, from the
time of theire interest, and they humbly hope they
shall be ordered, to give securitie for noe more

And for soe much they humbly offer in obedience
to your lordships order and the report of the judges annexed
Captaine Bryan Harrison, and Captaine Elias Jourdan
for securitie,

And doe humbly pray your lordships to appoint,
who shall receive the said securitie,

And your petitioners shall ever pray etc.

  • Brian Harrison master
  • Elias Jordan warden

The master wardens and assistants of the Trinity House. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the lordes in Parliament assembled

The humble peticion of the master wardenns,
and assistants of the Trinity Howse.

Shewing
that your lordshippes have ordered your petitioners at the humble request
of Christes Hospitall to goe to a triall with them as Nicholas
Hawes should have done; at which triall which is appointed
Wensday the 19th present, your petitioners are advised by their counsell
they cannot make a full defence, unles they make use of
the deposicions, which were used by Nicholas Hawes at the
former tryalls

Your petitioners therefore humbly pray your lordshipps order, that
they may use the said deposiciones accordingly, or that
otherwise the said tryall may bee deferred to a
further time; when your lordshippes upon hearing both parteis may
grant the same, the witnesses being dead:

And your petitioners shall ever pray etc:

Trinity House.

Alice Jenings and Anne Jenings, daughters of Sir John Jenings deceased. HL/PO/JO/10/1/252 (1648)

To the right honourable the knightes cittizens and burgesses in the
Commons House of Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of Alice Jenings and Anne Jenings
twoe of the daughters of Sir John Jenings Knight of the Bath deceased

Sheweth
that about Trinity terme last past your petitioners preferred their bill of complaint into the
Court of Chancery against Richard Jenings esquire your petitioners brother to be releeved for their
porcions by their said deceased father to them given, in respect your petitioneres could not by any
faire meanes obteyne the same; unto which bill of complaint your petitioneres said brother did
demurre and answere, and the said demurrer being heard before the commissioners for
keeping of the great seale, the 21th of October last past the said demurrer was, over=
=ruled, and your said petitioneres brother ordered to answere your petitioneres bill in chiefe by the
15th of November last, which hee refuseth to doe (beinge a member of this honourable house)
although your petitioneres have acquainted him with the order, whereby the said demurrer is
over=ruled and intreated him in all faire and respective manner to putt in his
answere, which hee then and still refuseth to doe, to your petitioneres utter ruine and destruction,
they being thereby deprived of all manner of support and livelyhood, the said matter
of complaint resting much in proofe of Sir William Litton, and Captain Wyngate
witnesses on your petitioners parte, and if they should dye, your petitioneres are like to be utterly
undone for want of proofe.

Your petitioneres therefore humbly pray (the premisses considered) that in this
case of soe neare relacion, the priviledge of this house may not be
extended or allowed to your petitioners brother, to the ruine of his sisters, but
that they may have liberty to proceed at law for recovery of their porcions,
notwithstanding any claime or pretence hee may make to
priviledge of Parliament in this case.

And your petitioneres (as in duty bound) shall daily pray
etc.

  • Alice Jenings
  • Anne Jenings

Sir Edward Leche, knight, one of the masters of the Chancery. HL/PO/JO/10/1/253 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords assembled
in Parliament

The humble peticion of Sir Edward Leche knight one of
the maisters of the Chancery attending upon your lordshipps.

Humbly sheweth that whereas the peticioner together with others [doth?] stand bound to
divers persons in divers great summes of money for the proper debt of the right honourable
the Earle of Leicester as may appeare under his hand and seale ready to be shewed to
your lordshipps

And whereas your lordshipps did formerly give to your peticioner a protection against one
Edward Cropley to whom 1000 pounds principall money was owing, which together with a debt
of 500 pounds principall owing to Mistress Rose Smith both of them being part of the said earles
debt,) your peticioner hath paid out of his owne purse as may appeare by the bonds now
ready to be shewed to your lordshipps.

And whereas one William Baker doth now prosecute the peticioner in the petty bagge
upon another bond of 1000 pounds part of the sayd debt, which might have bene paid unto
him if he would have accepted moderate interest, as the others did, but the sayd
Baker standing upon extremities with your said peticioner.

The peticioner humbly prayeth that your lordshipps would be pleased to
grant him your protection from the said bond, and all other bonds
entred into by your said peticioner which shall appeare to be the said
earles proper debts till your lordshipps pleasure shall be further knowen,

And your petitioner shall
ever pray etc:

Edward Leche

10 February 1647
Sir Edward Leech knight.
Exped

Sir John Thorowgood of Billingbeare. HL/PO/JO/10/1/253 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords assembled in Parliament

The humble peticion of Sir John Thorowgood
of Billingbeare in the county of Berkshire knight.

Sheweth:
that your peticioner having about 6 yeares since lent 500 pounds (in the name of William
Baker) upon the bond of Sir Edward Leech, and others Parliament men, the said Sir Edward
refuseth to pay the same, pretending it to be the debt of the right honourable the Earle of Leicester,
whereas it is in truth the proper debt of the said Sir Edward Leech and those who are bound in
the said bond with him, to which bond the said earle is noe partie, nor his name
mencioned as security for the said money at the tyme when the same was lent. But since
the petitioner hath heard that the said Sir Edward Leech with others did upon their creditts
about that tyme take up severall great summes of money, which they did lend unto
the said earle, and had very good land to a great value for their security, which land as
the petitioner is credibly informed, they have at this tyme in their possession.
And the petitioner having filed a bill against the said Sir Edward Leech in the petty bagge hee
hath procured the order annexed from your lordshipps for stay of your petitioners
proceedings.

The petitioner therefore humbly prayeth, that by the favour of
this honourable house, hee may have leave to proceed in a legall
way for recovery of his said just debt, upon the estate of the
said Sir Edward Leech.

And your petitioner shall pray etc.

Sir John Thorowgoodes
peticion

Thomas Sturmy. HL/PO/JO/10/1/253 (1648)

To the right honourable the lordes assembled in Parliament

The humble peticion of Thomas Sturmy

Sheweth
that hee is a clerke of the Court of Kinges Bench, and very many writtes doe issue
out in his name, the cause of accion being altogeather unknowne to your petitioner.
That Ignatio de Landohola at the suite of Mathew de La Fitta was by writt
arrested, not by the procurement of the petitioner, onely his name was to the writt.

That after the arrest Master Kilvert made knowne to the petitioner, that the cause was depending
before your honoures, and required your petitioner to discharge the defendant of the arrest, to whom your
petitioner answered, that hee did not know the cause of accion, neither did the writt expresse
it, or was there any order shewed your petitioner to enjoyne him soe to doe, or had hee
any warrant for it, therefore hee could not doe it. And to the order of the 25th
of January, for that your lordships had uppon the sheriffes mocion ordered that an habeas
corpus should issue out of Chancery to bring the bodie of the defendant before your honoures
thereby legally to discharge him, your petitioner had not any thing to say to that order,
because that was the onely safe way both for the sheriffes and the petitioners discharge, and
the defendant was by your lordships discharged, when your petitioner was there present attending
yet afterwardes, that very day, uppon the affidavit annexed, your lordships ordered that an
attachment should be awarded to apprehend your petitioner, whereas your petitioner never
committed any contempt against any your lordships orders or commaundes.

Therefore humbly prayeth, that your petitioner may be discharged of
that order and contempt.

And hee shall ever pray etc.

  • Thomas Sturmy

Sir Edmund Duncombe, knight, and Dame Hester his wife. HL/PO/JO/10/1/253 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in the High Court
of Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of Sir Edmund Duncombe knight
and Dame Hester his wife administratrix of the goodes and chattells of
John Theaker esquire and Dyana his daughter both deceased

Sheweth
that the leases of the mannour and castle of Crake and of Stockton
and Norton by a decree made in his majesties Court of Wardes in Easter
tearme anno vito Caroli Regis upon the lordes judges opinion and
resolucion were setled upon the said Dyana and the pettitioner Hester
as administratrix of the said Dyana hath just right thereunto.

In Hillary tearme 14 Caroli Regis an other decree was also made in
that court in affirmacion of the pettitioners title.

The leases and writings touching the said castle mannour and landes
were brought into the said court by Anne Ladbrooke widow by
order of the said court and doe still there remaine

The said court being since taken away by Parliament the pettitioners
for want of the said writings are in dainger to loose their
livelyhood

They therefore humbly crave your lordshipps order to
enjoyne Master Awdley late clerke of the said court to
deliver the said writings unto Thomas Danson
to the pettitioners use to whome the same of right belong

And the pettitioners as in duty bound shall ever
pray for your lordshipps.

10 February 1647
Sir Edmund Duncombe.

John Cooper and Daniell Welgrisse. HL/PO/JO/10/1/253 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in the High Court of Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of John Cooper and Daniell Welgrisse.

Sheweth
that in a cause betweene your petitioneres and Thomas Turner, the cause comeing to a
hearing 12o Junii 1644 your honours ordered that your petitioners should for a default of
their councell in not attending a former hearing, deposite into the hands of Master
Browne clarke to this honourable house 20 pounds by the 20th of June following, and then
the cause to be heard, and the monies to remaine in Master Brownes hands, untill
the pleasure of the house be further signified, which money was paid in accordingly
pro ut by the order and receipt annexed appeareth.

That since your petitioneres and their councell have attended severall days according
to your honours orders for a hearing, which as yett hath not bine, nor for a long time
prosecuted by the plainant Turner to their great expence and charge.

Wherefore your petitioneres humblie pray, that they may have the 20 pounds
by them deposited out of the hands of Master Browne, and a daie
for hearinge the cause, upon good securitie to abide your honours order

And your petitioners will ever pray etc

  • John Cooper
  • Danyell Wellgrisse

Warwick, Lord Mohun. HL/PO/JO/10/1/253 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in Parlyament assembled

The humble peticion of Warwick Lord Mohun.

Sheweth
that by orders from this howse your petitioner obtained a writ of priviledge issued to him in May 1647

That in July last Sir Henry Carew and others did by peticion before your lordships sue the petitioner for certaine landes in
Cornwall, part of which are in the possession of your petitioner and part in possession of Sir Henry Carew and the others.

That by order of your lordships 4o Januarii last, the proffittes of all the said landes were to be forborne to bee
receaved by either party [illegible] untill further order.

That by order of 3o February instant the said Sir Henry Carew and thothers are to make proffitt of such
part of the said landes as are in theire possession; but your petitioner is to make no proffitt of those landes in
his possession, unles he will wave his priviledge and trie the title at lawe.

That the petitioner humbly conceaves, it is no cryme in him, that he will not wave his priviledge and consequently
ought to carry noe penaltie with it and he hopes he shall not find the less favour from your lordships for that he
offers still to be tryed by you (his propper judges) when he wilbe tryed by noe others.

And therefore humblie praies that the order of 4o January may equally ly upon both parties, or
both parties left at libertie to make benefitt of what landes they were possessed of at the makeinge
of the first order of priviledge: or that your lordships will assigne your petitioner and thother parties a
day by theire councell, to shew cause why both parties should not be equally kept from, or
[restored?] to the proffittes of theire possession: and in the meane tyme that the order of
the 3d of February be superseaded.

And your petitioner shall pray etc

Warwick Mohun

10o February 1647

Warwick Lord Mohun

1647

Richard Beringer, philozer of the Court of Common Pleas. HL/PO/JO/10/1/253 (1648)

To the honourable House of Lordes assembled in Parliament.

The humble peticion of Richard Beringer one of the
philozers of the Court of Common Pleas, and now elected high
sheriff of the county of Buckingham.

Humbly sheweth
that whereas your petitioner standeth nominated for high sheriff of the said countie, which
nominacion did passe both the howses before your petitioner could make knowne to the howses his
particuler case, which doth very much differ from other mens, and soe soone as your petitioner had
notice thereof, he did in all humility attend the House of Commons with his peticion, which is now
in reference from that house before your honourable lordshipps. And for that the said nominacion is (as your
petitioner humbly conceiveth) contrary to the comon and statute lawes of this land, and tendeth to
the utter destruccion and ruine of your petitioner his wife and children in disseising him of his freehold
and livelyhood.

Hee most humbly praieth that he may by his councell at a day appointed
be heard concerning the said peticion, and the reasons therein conteyned
and hereunto annexed.

And your petitioner as in all duty he is
bound, shall ever pray etc.

  • Richard Beringer

Thomas Trescot, minister of Shobrocke. HL/PO/JO/10/1/253 (1648)

To the right honourable the lordes and comons assembled in
Parliament

The humble peticion of Thomas Trescot minister of
Shobrocke in comitatu Devonne.

Sheweth
that your petitioner had given to him by order of Parliament the rectory of
Shoobrocke in the county of Devon which was sequestred for the delinquency of
Edward Cotton late rector thereof.

Now forasmuch as the said Edward Cotton is lately dead and the
bestowing of the said rectory was in the power of the Bishop of Exonia

Your petitioner prayes that by the ordinance
annexed he may be confirmed in the said
living

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc.

  • Thomas Trescott.

Alexander, Lord Forbes. HL/PO/JO/10/1/253 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords assembled in Parliament

The humble petition of Alexander Lord Forbes

Sheweth
that your peticioner by his long stay these 19 moneths hath been put
to great straits to provide for him selfe and his family, and can
finde noe dispatch or payment of these moneyes due to him by the Par
liament notwithstanding he hath used all the diligence possible to pro
cure the same, and his creditores doe presse him exceedingly, and
hath arrested him, thereby disableing him to follow his businesse,
or procure his owne and their satisfacion, to the absolute undoing of
him and his family unlesse your lordships provide remeid

Wherefore it is your petitioneres humble desire that you
will take your peticioner into your protecion and command
his releasment, and that he may remain free to follow his
businesse till such time as the Parliament shall pay him, or
take off his creditoures which he shall accept as good payment

And your peticioner shall pray etc

Alexander Forbes

15 February 1647
Lord Forbes.
Exped

Thomas Morgan, William Morgan and John Thorpe. HL/PO/JO/10/1/253 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords and comons assembled in Parliament.

The humble peticion of Thomas Morgan of Manghen in the county of Monmouth esquire
William Morgan of Lydney in the county of Gloucester esquire and John Thorpe of Martynes
in the Feilds gentleman

Sheweth
that your peticioners by a lease made unto them by Sir John Wyntour before theis warrs
(and allowed of by the Comittee of Lords and Comons for Sequestrations, as by the order annexed
appeareth) were interested possessed and trusted with an estate for some yeares yet to come
whereof certaine iron mills forges and furnaces in Deane Forrest (the inheritance of the
said Sir John Wyntour) called Lydney Workes, Guns Mills Furnace, and Slitting Mill Forge,
in the county of Gloucester are part, for payment of debtes porcions and maintenance of
Sir John Wyntours lady and children:

Now so it is, that it hath pleased the right honourable the said two howses of Parliament by
ordinance to grant unto Colonell Edward Massey, all the iron mills forges and furnaces
in Deane Forrest, either belonging to the King or the inheritance of the said Sir John
Wyntour, by vertue whereof he the said Colonell Edward Massey hath seized to his owne
use those iron mills forges and furnaces thus given and passed over to your peticioners
for the uses aforesaid to the disinabling of your peticoners to performe theire trust, the
utter ruine of Sir John Wyntours lady and children, and the undoing of the creditors:

Wherefore your peticioners humbly pray the consideracion of the
premises, and that the said mills forges and furnaces, called Lydney
Workes, Guns Mills Furnace and Slitting Mill Forge which are passed and
conveyed unto your peticioners for the uses above said, may be enjoyed by
your petitioners without the interruption of the said Colonell Massey by vertue
of the said ordinance.

And they shall pray etc.

John, earl of Shrewsbury and Francis his wife and other heirs of Lady Arundell. HL/PO/JO/10/1/253 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords assembled in Parliament:

The humble peticion of John Earle of Shrewsbury and Francis his wife
in the behalfe of themselves and others the coheires and persons by and
under the coheires of Anne Lady Arundell of Wardour deceased.

Sheweth
that Thomas the first Lord Arundell of Wardour by good assurance in law long before his
death did settle the honour and hundred of Christchurch and Westower in the county of Southampton to the
use of himselfe for life, with remainder to Anne Lady Arundell and her heires

That the said Anne Lady Arundell dyed in June 13o Caroli leaving issue 6 daughters videlicet Kathrine
Eure widow, the Lady Mary Somersett, the Lady Baltemore, your peticioner Frances, Margarett the wife
of Sir John Fortescue and Clare the wife of Humfrey Weld esquire.


That the said Lady Fortescue dyed in December 13o Caroli leaving issue Frances her daughter
and heire then an infant and still under age

That the said Thomas Lord Arundell dyed in November 15to Caroli.

That by severall offices in 17o et 18o Caroli the title and estate of the coheires were found, and ther upon
the King became intitled to the wardshipp of the said Francis Fortescue the infant, and to livery and
primer seisin of the residue

That the Lord Baltemore not contented to have his part in right of his wife as coheire, sett
on foote a deed made upon voluntary consideracion by the said Thomas Lord Arundell in his
sicknes a little before his death, when his memory failed him, and tendred to him to seale amongst
many other things, which deed was gott secretly and by surprise, and is void in law.

That thereupon an informacion was exhibited in the behalfe of the coheires in the Court of
Wardes against the said Lord Baltemore, and he exhibited a crosse bill against the coheires, to
which theire were respective answeres putt in, issues joyned, witnesses on both sides examined
publication past and the cawse ready for hearing, when by ordinance of Parliament the said
court was dissolved:

It is therefore humbly prayed that your honours will be pleased (seeing the
Court of Wardes is determined) to heare and adjudge the cawse upon the proofes
there taken, otherwise your peticioners will be putt to great expences and delay
of tyme (the Lord Baltemore in the meanetyme keeping the possession and
raysing great profittes to himselfe by wood sales fynes rentes and otherwise)
and also it will be very prejudiciall to examine witnesses de novo some
being dead, and after publication very dangerous. All which is submitted to
your honours wisedome and justice.

And your petitioners shall etc.

15 February 1647
Earl Shrewsbery.
versus
Lord Baltamore.

John Perry. HL/PO/JO/10/1/253 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords assembled in the
High Court of Parliament.

The humble peticion of John Perry:

Shewth:
that your petitioner hath a judgment in the Court of Kings Bench at Westminster in Michaelmas
terme last for cx pounds against Thomas Gill upon which the said Gill brought
his writt of error retornable in this honourable court uppon which errors are
assigned by the said Gill and your petitioner shall have joyned issue thereto:

Your petitioner humbly pray your honours to order the
premisses to be heard and argued the next day that
shalbe appointed for such busines.

16 February 1647
John Perry
versus
Thomas Gill
error.
Exped

Gill versus Perrey. Error. 18 February 1647.

Scottish officers with their fellow officers and country men. HL/PO/JO/10/1/253 (1648)

To the right honourable the lordes assembled in Parliament

The humble petition of sundry Scottes officers who weare
omitted in the first list with theire fellowe officers and country men

Humblie sheweth
that your petitioneres being at the erupcion of theise unhappy distempers sent for
forth of Scotland, have long and faithfully served the state in theire severall
charges, and in Aprill 1645 being reduced had order for stating theire accomptes
which accordingly have beene long since stated.

That yesterday by the favour of the honourable House of Commons a report of the
states of theire severall accomptes being made, it pleased that honourable house to give
order only for one third parte of theire arreres appearing due to be paid unto
them in full discharge of all the whoale to be paid forth of Gouldsmiths Hall
in course without interest.

Nowe for that your petitioneres by theire long attendance have necessarily
contracted very greate debtes never since theire reducement (being above
twoe yeares) received any penny of theire arreres, and have soe small a
proporcion of what they have justly served for, allowed unto them.

They humbly pray your lordshipps to be pleased to take theire sadd
condicions into your pious consideracions and to be a meanes they
may not only have some further proporcion allowed and paid unto
them, whereby to discharge theire engagementes, and transport
themselves, but also that interest after 8 pounds per centum may be allowed
untill the same shalbe to the advauncers repaid as formerly hath
beene graunted to others, and that the remayne of theire
accomptes maye be allowed unto them as hath beene to others
theire said fellowe officers

And your petitioneres shall ever pray etc.

[...dry?]

Alexander, Lord Forbes. HL/PO/JO/10/1/253 (1648)

To the right honourable the lordes assembled in Parliament

The humble peticion of Alexander Lord Forbes

Sheweth that your peticioner having in obedience to your commandes sealed and de
livered the assignement for the use of Collonel Kempson of all that he can claim of
your peticioner

It is your peticioneres humble desire that a legall discharge be sent to the
sheriffs of London for your peticioneres full enlargement, and quashing the
suit commenced against him, and that a certain short day be appointed
him for his appearing before your lordships delivery of such bondes as he
hath of your peticioner for the like summe now assigned, and for giving
such reparacion for the affront done your peticioner contrary to his duty
faith and promise as your lordships shall think fit. It is likewise your peticioneres humble desire that
you will take him into your protection till this other peticion can be
taken into consideracion

And your peticioner shall pray etc.

  • Alexander Forbes

John Hill. HL/PO/JO/10/1/253 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords assembled in Parliament.

The humble peticion of John Hill.

Sheweth
that your petitioner in Michaelmas terme in the 21th yeare of his now majesties
reigne had a judgement against John Nicholas for xxviii pounds dammages.

That the said Nicholas brought a writt of errour retornable in Parliament
and after the record certified, did assigne the generall errour, and your petitioner
did plead (in nullo est erratum) above a yeare since.

His humble suite is, that your honours would be pleased to appoint
some day for the hearing the said erroures.

And your petitioner shall pray etc.

John Hill

The peticion of
John Hill

Exped

17 February 1647. Nicholas versus Hill. Error.

William Martyn, Robert Johnson and Raiph Dowthwaite. HL/PO/JO/10/1/253 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in
Parliament assembled

The humble peticion of William Martyn Robert Johnson
and Raiph Dowthwaite

Humbly shew
that your peticioners were brought out of Yorkeshire 150 miles upon
the peticion of Thomas Worsley John Worsley and Elizabeth
Worsley upon a pretended contempt and have remayned in restrainte
and under baile by the space of five weekes att least and in
all that tyme nothinge laide to theire charge although the
said peticioneres have had sufficient tyme for the same

Your peticioneres humble suite is that your honoures
wilbe pleased to discharge your peticioneres of
the supposed contempt and they shall dayly
pray etc.

  • William Martyn
  • Robert Johnson
  • Ralph Dowthwaytes

18 February 1647

The humble peticion
of William Martyn and
otheres.

Exped

Released

Humfry Browne of Gainsbrough, yeoman. HL/PO/JO/10/1/253 (1648)

To the right honourable the lords in Parliament assembled.

The humble peticion of Humfry Browne of Gainsbrough in the
county of Lincolne yeoman.

Most humbly sheweth
that your peticioner in Easter terme last past in his majesties Court
of Kings Bench att Westminster did obteyne verdict and judgment
against Richard Webster and Katherine his wife in an accion of
ejectione firme for his tenure in one tofte with thappurtenances
three acres of arable land two acres of meadowe and two acres of
pasture with costs of suite whereupon the said Richard and Katherine
have brought a writt of error for delay and vexacion and have
assigned the generall errors to the which your peticioner hath
pleaded and soe the same now dependeth before your honours.

Your peticioner therefore humbly praieth
your honours to appoynt a short day
for hearing of councell and determining
of the said errors according to the rules
of lawe and justice usuall before your
honours.

And your peticioner shall ever pray etc

18 February 1647
Humfrey Browne
Exped

[Tusday?]