Petitions in the State Papers: 1680s

Petitions in the State Papers, 1600-1699.

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'Petitions in the State Papers: 1680s', in Petitions in the State Papers, 1600-1699, ed. Brodie Waddell, British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/petitions/state-papers/1680s [accessed 21 July 2024].

'Petitions in the State Papers: 1680s', in Petitions in the State Papers, 1600-1699. Edited by Brodie Waddell, British History Online, accessed July 21, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/petitions/state-papers/1680s.

"Petitions in the State Papers: 1680s". Petitions in the State Papers, 1600-1699. Ed. Brodie Waddell, British History Online. Web. 21 July 2024. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/petitions/state-papers/1680s.

In this section

Charles Ray, gentleman. SP 29/413 f. 162 (1680)

To the Kings most excellent majestie etc.

The humble petition of Charles Ray gentleman.

Sheweth.

That your petitioner about 8 months
since was committed to this your majesties prison
of Kings Bench, for being concerned in publishing
a pamflet called the Appeal etc. And your
majestie being pleased at the intercession of Master
Secretary Coventry about 14 daies since to
order your petitioners discharge from this his
imprisonment without paying fees etc.

Yet neverthelesse Master Evens one of your majesties
messengers, having received the said order did
not give notice of the same to your petitioner
until ten dayes afterwards, and since demands
fee's for the said ten dayes att 6 shillings 8 pence a
day. And your petitioner by his long
imprisonment being disabled to pay the same.

Therefore your petitioner humbly prays
your majestie will bee gratiously
pleased to order, that your petitioner
may bee forthwith discharged
without paying fee's as aforesaid.

And your petitioner shall ever
pray etc.

William Charlton, barrister at law. SP 29/413 f. 298b (1680)

To the Kings most excellent majestie

The humble peticion of William Charlton barrester at law

Sheweth

That with your gratious majesties approbation your petitioner
was towne clerk of the corporacion of Ludlow and diligently officiated
the same for some years past.

That the magestrates of the said corporacion receiving your
majesties order to put in execucion the act of Parliament for regulating of
corporacions, some of them the 11th day of this instant June (for that your petitioner
had not at the very time of his admittance into the said place taken the oathes
the said act strickly required) did elect into his place one Edward
Smalman an attorney and although severall common councell men (of which
number the said Smalman was one,) were in the same condicion and were
reelected into their places of common councill men yet they refused your
petitioner who had greater right, he haveing taken not only just before his said
admittance but shortly afterwards all the said oathes and had at his admittance
done the same if they had beene tendred to him.

Therefore your peticioner most humbly beseeches your
sacred majestie not to confirme or approve of the election of the
said Smalman but to recommend your petitioner to be re-elected
as others were as aforesaid.

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc

Master Charlton - peticion to be re=
elected town-clerk of Ludlow
June 30

William Challoner, freeman of the City of London and Bristol. SP 29/414 f. 75 (1680)

To the right honourable the Lord Mayor of
the Citty of London

The humble peticion of William Challoner
freeman of the Citty of London and Bristoll and
of the Drapers Company and kinsman to Sir
Thomas Challoner tutor to Prince Henry who
was a famous and pious prince

Humbly sheweth

That your peticioner having a peticion to bee delivered
to the Kings most excellent majestie humbly desires
that it may be presented by your honours hands when you
have veiwed it and corrected it that it may bee accepted
by his majestie wherein containes fower things, if either
of them bee hearkened unto may overthrow all anti=
Christian and Popish plotts, and restore truth and
peace unto the nation, by turning the heart of the
King to his subjects and the subjects to the King as Saint
John is said its prophecied he should doe 1 Luke. To
the end that these things may be effectuallyit must
bee done in a loving and tender way which Christs
kingdome is much advanced by, in the same way that
will convert and bring home the Jews to Christ.

Your petitioner therefore humbly prays the premisses only
considered, hee may have authority and command from your
honour to choose twelve godly men, ministers and others
to discourse before your honour in Drapers Hall with twelve
Jewes that you may heare what will bee propounded on our
saviours behalfe for the bringing in of them and all
others that doe not confesse Christ, and compose all
differences amongst dissenting Christians, and bring
them all to bee of one mind

Praying for your honours felicitie here
and happines hereafter

Elizabeth, relict and administratrix of John Simpson, late jeweller to the king. SP 29/417 f. 555 (1680)

To the Kings most excellent majesty

The humble peticion of Elizabeth relict and administratrix
of John Simpson late jeweller to your majesty

Sheweth

That your peticioners husband haveing (for his loyalty to
your majesties father of blessed memory) lost all his estate amounting to 300 pounds per annum,
was upon your majesties happy restauracion forced to take up severall great summes of
money at interest, to enable him to serve your majestie with jewells, according to the
duty of his place, to the value of near 20000 pounds, as appeares by severall letteres of privy.
And long since has been forced to sell part of the debt at 30 pounds and 40 pounds per cent loss, being
constraned thereto by necessity, and the greatest part remaineing yett unsatisfied
upon which noe creditt is to be had upon it, and the interest of the whole amounting
to 7300 pounds of which noething hath been paid, hath soe far undone your poor peticioner
that (upon the faith of a christian) she and her children want bread at home, and
your peticioner dares not stir abroad because of an execucion out against her for moneys
that were borrowed for the services of your majestie with jewells.

Your peticioner therefore (for Gods sake) humbly beseeches
your majestie out of your abundant goodness and charity to order her
something at the present to supply her great want, and keep her
from starveing, and to settle such a pencion on her as your majesty in
clemency shall thinke fitt for the support of her and her seaven
children for the future.

And your peticioner as in duty bound shall
ever pray etc.

The humble [peticion?] of
Elizabeth Sympson

John Jones, one of the king's apothecaries in ordinary. SP 29/415 f. 47 (1681)

Peticon of John Jones
his majesties apothecary

To the King's most excellent majestie

The humble peticion of John Jones one of your
majesties apothecaries in ordinary

Sheweth

That your petitioners son John Jones was your majesties scholar
in Westminster schoole, and soone after your majesties most happy
restauration was elected from thence to your majesties royall foundacion
of Christ Church in Oxford; where he is now one of the senior
masters of the colledge, batchelour of divinity, and was some
yeares since senior proctor of that university and hath been
recommended to your majesties gracious favour by the right
reverend fathers in God the Lord Bishop of London, and the
Lord Bishop of Bath and Wells

And whereas Doctor Allestree cannon of Christ Church
is now desperatly sick, and past hope of recovery

Your petitioner doth most humbly pray, that if the
said Doctor Allestree dyes, your majesty will be graciously
pleased to bestow his canonry upon your petitioners said
son John Jones

And as in duty bound your petitioner
shall ever pray etc

John Jones

Alexander, Earl of Eglintoun. SP 29/415 f. 58 (1681)

To the Kings most excellent majestie

The humble peticion of Alexander Earle of
Eglintoun in the kingdome of Scotland

Most humbly sheweth that your peticioner being unfortunately in company
about a fortnight since with Thomas Madox deputy post master att
Doncaster a quarelsome disorderly person (and not long before had)
received severall bruises in former quarells) did abuse your peticioner
with such provoaking language that he gave him a box on the eare
whereupon he made att your peticioner with such greate violence that
your peticoner was forced to withdraw to a corner of the roome and drew
his sword and desired him to keepe of, notwithstanding which he
rushed in upon your peticoner and colared him, and in the scuffell
received two small wounds, whereupon he being unadvisedly lett
blood dyed about two dayes after, and your peticioner is now in Yorke
Castle charged with his death not in the least attempting to flye
for the same, in that there was never any difference before nor
now intended him any hurt; but what might happen in your
peticoners defence

He therefore most humbly prayes and beseeches
your most gratious majestie to grant unto him your
majesties most gratious pardon for this crime soe
much against his will comitted and as in
duty bound he shall ever pray etc

Nathaniel Thompson. SP 29/415 f. 106 (1681)

The humble petition of
Nathaniel Thompson

To the Kings most excellent majesty

The humble petition of Nathaniel Thompson

Sheweth

That the petitioner having formerly published an intelligence
of domestick news, wherein he disabused your majesties loyal subjects, and
discovered the notorious falshoods published by persons disaffected to
the government, he lett fall the said intelligence in obedience to your
majesties proclamation. That since the last sessions of Parliament
the same disaffected persons have presumed to revive and publish
weekly their intelligences and other news-books to inflame the
people. That your petitioner out of a due sense of loyalty, has still
refrained to renew his said intelligence without your majesties leave.

May it therefore please your most excellent majestie
to grant the petitioner your majesties gracious license to publish
a weekly account of all such news and remarkable
accidents (not medling with matters of state) within
your majesties dominions, as from time to time shall come to the
knowledge of the petitioner, and likewise of such projecti=
=ons mathematicall and others, as shall be invented
and projected by any of your majesties subjects, thereby to
undeceive your majesties loyal people, and prevent the many
abuses of your royal person and government, which are
daily vented abroad, to the great scandal of church
and state.

And the petitioner shall ever pray etc

Delivered me 23 February 80
by Master Sheridan from
his majestie, but without any
order upon it

Ann Fitzharris, wife of Edward Fitzharris esquire, prisoner in the Gatehouse. SP 29/415 f. 119 (1681)

The peticion of Ann Fitzharris

To the Kings most excellent majesty

The humble peticion of Ann Fitzharris wife to
Edward Fitzharris esquire now prisoner in the gatehouse

Sheweth

That your peticioner is bigg with child and ready to lye in having not one moment
to recken.

Wherefore humbly beggs leave of your majestie that your peticoners husband
may be bayled during your peticioners lying in, otherwise your peticioners
life may be in great danger because of the many feares, and frights that
your peticioner may have during her labour, and after not knowing
what becomes of her dear husband who has four small children by
her, or at least if your majestie thinke not fitt that hee be bailed that hee may
be allowed to come to her with a keeper whilst her lying inn and in the meane
time that you peticioner may have free accesse to him; your peticioner not
in the least doubting but her husband will prove himself a good subject
notwithstanding the mallice of his enemies

And your peticioner shall ever pray etc

Fitzharris

Bernard Dennis. SP 29/418 f. 44 (1682)

To the Kings most excelent majestie and the right
honourable the lords of his majesties most honourable privie councell

The humble petition of Bernard Dennis etc

Humbly sheweth unto your majestie that your pettitioners last petition
from the councell chamber lyeth still in the treasury
office, and nothing done inbehalf of your pettitioner, that your pettitioner
is this present weecke come out of prison, that your
pettitioners allowance is denied him, that the Earle Shaftsbery
hath issued out a writt against your pettitioner

May it therefore please your majestye
gratiously to order your pettitioner a sure pro
=tection to sheelde him from the
proceedinges of the said Earle, and procure that
he may not famish either by restoreing
unto him his former allowance, or granting
that he may spedily be sent towards his
country

And your pettitioner will ever
pray etc.

The humble
pettion of
Bernard Dennis

Rowland St. John, gentleman. SP 29/418 f. 55b (1682)

To the Kings most excellent majestie

The humble petition of Rowland St. John gentleman

Sheweth

That your petitioner stands accused for
the killing one Michael Styles and is to be tryed
for the same at the next goale delivery for Middlesex.

Your petitioner therefore most humbly prayeth
that if your petitioner be convicted of the sayd
offence, that your majesty would bee pleased
to grant him a repreive to stopp execution
until your majesty shall be more particularly
informed of the circumstances in the fact
by which he humbly hopes he may become
an object of your majesty's mercy.

[And?] your petitioner shall ever etc:

Petition of Master Rowland St John

John Booth, gentleman. SP 29/418 f. 68 (1682)

To the lords of his majesties most honourable privie
councill the humble peticon of John Booth gentleman

Sheweth that your peticioner lately obtayned an order from this
honourable board for the allowance of forty shillings a week
for his maintenance, but so it is (may it please your lordships)
Master Squibb who is to pay the same sayes the payment comences
onely from the 22d day of December last, being the day the
said order granted; now in regard your peticioner exhibited
his informacion on the third day of October last, which was
eleven weeks before that time, and upon all occations has born
his owne charges, and expended upwards of 30 pounds in that concern

Your peticioner humbly prayes that the sayd
allowance may comence from the said third of
October last, and your peticioner shall ever pray etc.

Master Booths petition

John Booth, gentleman. SP 29/418 f. 69a (1682)

To the Kings most exelent majestie the humble petition
John Booth gentleman

Sheweth

That your peticioner is a prisoner in the bench hous, and
his freinds and relations (being mostly fannatticks) do deny
to assist him, by reason of his late evedenceing the truth
against the Earl of Shaftsbury, whereby more debts, and
malitious actions, are layd upon your peticioner then he is
able ath present to discharg.

Your peticioner therefore most humbly beggs your
majestie will gratiously pleas to bestow upon
Matthew Booth your peticioners sonn, a land-waiters
place in the custom-hous London, whereby your
peticioner may be the better inabled to maintaine
himself, and familie and, your peticoner shall
ever pray

17 January 81
Master Booth

Master Booths petition

John Guillim, late captain in the king's guards etc. SP 29/422 f. 51 (1683)

To the Kings most excelent majestie

The humble petition of John Guillim late
captain in your majesties guards etc.

Sheweth

That wheras your majestie of your princely care and
bounty, did order and allow to your petitioner, in
reguard of his constant faithfull services and
sufferings for his loyalty, thirty five pounds a
quarter, towards his maintenance of which he has
now due to him in arreare one whole yeare and
a haulfe, which amounts unto above two hundred
pounds, (your petitioner havinge laine sick five
months in noe way able to help himselfe) and
it being the sole support of him and his family,
without which they must inevitablely perrish, and
who are now in a most miserable condition

Wherfore your petitioner most humbly
and earnestly prayes your sacred majestie
of your most pious and abundant goodnesse
to comiserate his extreame nessessyty, and
voutsaffe to order that your petitioner
may receave your majesties bounty as formerly
and he shall as in duty bound

Alwayes pray etc.

Peter Stepkin of London, gentleman. SP 29/422 f. 74 (1683)

The humble peticion of Peter Stepkin of London gentleman

Sheweth

That whereas your majesties peticioner has with
some difficulty and expence happily bin instrumentall in bringing
to your majesties knowledg the present designe of the French against
Ireland, and whereas his father had the honour to serve your majesties
royall father in the capacity of a collonall, in which
service he lost both his life and estate, and your majesties peticioner
by this present service done your majestie haveing made France
unsafe for him any longer to abide in, if discovered, and beinge
security for the debts of some persons insolvent here, he
humbly beseeches your majestie to be graciously pleased to put
him from under theis two iminent dangers, either by
comanding him to doe your majestie some farther service in any
capacity whatsoever, or by any other method more agreable
to your majestie pleasure

And your majesties peticioner as in
duty bound shall ever pray
for your majesties long and happy
reigne.

Peter Stepkin of London, gentleman. SP 29/422 f. 79 (1683)

To the Kings most excellent majestie

The humble peticion of Peter Stepkin of London gentleman

Sheweth

That whereas your majesties peticioners chiefe errand into
England was onely intended to doe your majestie service, by
which he has exposed himselfe to some of his creditors,
who he is well assured is about to make greate interest
to your majestie to deliver him into their hands, who will
put him into perpetuall imprisonment, to the utter ruine
of his wife and children, who are now in France without any
support, for the small reliefe he left them, in this month
that he has had the honour to attend your majesties comands
is quite expended. Your majesties peticioner in all humble manner
beseeches your majestie to be graciously pleased to secure him
from this fearefull fate, which without your majesties
grace and favour will inevitably fall upon him

Your majesties peticioner has expended in this affaire (with the
value of the things taken from him in his journy) 80 pounds, which
done in your majesties service he humbly prays may move your
majesties compassion.

And your majesties peticioner as
in duty bound shall ever pray
for your majesties long life
and happy reigne etc

Thomas Goddard, esquire. SP 29/422 f. 102 (1683)

To the honourable Sir Leoline Jenkins knight
his majesties principal secretary of state

The petition of Thomas Goddard esquier

Humbly sheweth

That Master Soame being recalled from the court
of Savoye and actually departing about the month of November
1681. Your petitioner received orders by your honours direction of
October 20 in the same yeare. That in regard those parts of Europe
might probably become the scene of very great and considerable action
fitt for his majesty and his ministers to know, your petitioner would
give your honour an account of his best observations of that kind

That your petitioner did comply with your honours orders, and accordingly did
correspond with Master Cooke for the space of one yeare and upward

That your petitioner towards the latter end of the yeare 1682 received
20 pounds part of a greater summe which he is informed your honour had de=
signed him about the month of February 1681) and noe more

Now your petitioner humbly prayeth that in regard
of the time in which he was serving his majestie
the expences he was att during that time, and his
long stay in these parts upon that account your honour
would please to represent this his case favourably to
his majesty, and procure some compensation (att
least) towards your petitioners charges

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc.

The peticion of Thomas Goddard esquire

The Lady Petre. SP 29/436 f. 29 (1684)

To the Kings most excellent
majesty

The humble peticion of the Lady Petre

Sheweth

That the Lord Petre having been long since committed a
prisoner to the Tower, is lately dead; and forasmuch as your petitioner is
desirous to bury him among his ancestors and others his relacions
in the country

Your petitioner humbly prayes that your majesty will be
graciously pleased to give order for the delivery
of the Lord Petre's body to your petitioner or whom
she shall appoynt in order to its interment

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc

Bridget Petre

Lady Petres petition
begging her husbands
body to be interred

Richard, Lord Maitland. SP 29/436 f. 30 (1684)

To the King's most excellent majestie

The humble peticion of Richard Lord Maitland

Sheweth

That whereas your petitioner having been committed to custody
on Monday last by your majesties order, and warrant of Master Secretary
Jenkins, as a person disaffected to your government and service
your majesty having been gratiously pleased to allow your petitioner the
honour to speak with your majesty and his royall highnesse in
private, hee hopes hee gave you full satisfaction. Although your
petitioners life hitherto hath beene nothing but one continued tract of
misfortune, yet hee looks on this as the greatest and most unsupportable
to him of all the others, that hee should be thought by the world
capable of the least disloyalty or designe against your majestie or the
government; especially seeing hee is not conscious to himself of
having in all his life ever harboured in his breast so much as a
disaffected thought; and would rather dye instantly then outlive
his loyalty affection and duty to your majesty, your lawfull heires and
successors, and the present government; one minute. And whereas
your petitioners restreint is of great prejudice to his private fortune and
affaires, as also to his health;

May it therefore gratiously please your majestie to consider your
petitioner to be a young man; his present condition and circumstances,
which you know to be very hard; and to compassionate the
many disasters and misfortunes of his family; and also to
remember its former services to the crowne; and out of
your princely innate grace and goodnesse to give order,
that your petitioner may be discharged and sett at liberty; or
that hee may be allowed to give baile to answer when and
where your majesty pleaseth.

And your petitioner (as in duty bound) shall
ever pray etc

Maitland

Robert West, prisoner in the Marshalsea. SP 29/436 f. 46 (1684)

To the Kings most excellent majesty

The humble petition of Robert West prisoner
in the prison of the Marshalsea of your
majestys household

Humbly sheweth

That your petitioner has been a
prisoner above half a year; during which time
he has been at a very great charge, has
sustained severall losses in his little estate, not
been able to receive any money that is due to
him, and is reduced to great straights for the
support of himself and his family, and through
the length of his imprisonment, and the remorse
of his mind, has contracted such an indisposition
of body, as may endanger his life, unlesse re=
moved by proper remedys, which this place will
not allow the application of.

Wherefore your petitioner doth humbly be=
seech your majesty that he may be sufferd
to be at his own house under such
restrictions as to your majesty shall seem
meet till your majesty shall think fit to
declare your further pleasure towards him

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc:

Robert West

To be in messengers custody.

To give security for true [illegible]
and bayl for [forme?]:

9 January 83/4
Master West his petition
with my Lord Keepers directions
thereupon touching his staying
at his owne house.

The JPs and grand jury of Wiltshire at the quarter sessions. SP 29/436 f. 80 (1684)

To the Kings most excellent majestie

The humble petition of your majesties justices of the [peace?]
and grand inquest of your majesties county of Wiltshire [at?]
the generall quarter sessions of the peace held for [the?]
said county att New Sarum the 15th day of [January?]
in the 35th yeare of your majesties reign.

Most humbly sheweth.

That Henry Bloxum (now a prisoner in your majesties gaole for the
said county of Wiltshire) was att the last assizes held for the same [county?]
convicted of clypping and coining of money, and the said Bloxum [making?]
a discovery of his confederates your majestie was thereupon graciously
pleased to repreive him from the execution of the sentence of death
untill your majesties pleasure was further known;

Your petitioners therefore humbly implore
your most sacred majestie to graunt unto
the said Henry Bloxum your majesties warrant
for putting the said Bloxum into your majesties
most gracious generall pardon for the next
assizes to bee held for the westerne circuit

And etc.

  • Roger Thain
  • [illegible] Good
  • Thomas Cartwright
  • Walter Kingman
  • Robert Gouldisbrough
  • William Longe
  • Robert Pinckney
  • William Mundye
  • Francis Thistlethaiwt
  • John Fanstone
  • John Locke
  • Laurence Tucke
  • Thomas London
  • Charles Gilbert
  • William Waters
  • [Giles?] Yardleye
  • John Newman

  • [Trattill?]
  • Charles Raleigh
  • Alexander Thistlethwayte
  • [illegible] Clerk
  • Robert Hyde
  • John Young

John Briscoe. SP 31/1 f. 128 (1685)

To the King's most excellent majesty.

The humble peticion of John Briscoe

Sheweth

That your peticioner hath with some yeares pains,
and study, and great charge in many experiments,
at last invented, and found out, the true and proper
art and way of makeing English paper for
writeing, printing, and other uses; both as good
and serviceable in all respects, and especially as
white as any French or Dutch paper, (which
hath been the great defect of all other pretenders
and undertakers, who have hitherto had pattents
for makeing paper here) and that by such meanes
and methods, as have not hitherto been found
out, or practised by any in your majesties
dominions, whereby much advantage will redound
to the publick, by that manufactures being
made at home, and great numbers of poor
people employed thereupon.

Your petitioner therfore most humbly
praies, that your majesty for an
encouragement to your peticioner, would be
graciously pleased to graunt him your
royall letters pattents, for the sole
excercise, and benifitt of his art, soe
found out by him as aforesaid, and your
peticioner as in all duty bound shall
ever pray.

At the court at Whitehall June 8th 1685
His majesty is graciously pleased to referre this petition to Master
Atturney or Master Sollicitor Generall to consider thereof and
report what his majesty may fitly do therein for the petitioners
gratification whereupon his majesty will declare his further
pleasure.
Sunderland

Upon consideration of this petition I doe conceive
his majestye may make such grant as is desired
under such restrictions as are usuall in such cases


R Sawyer 11 June 1685

Petition, reference and report
upon Master Briscoes petition

The master, wardens and assistants of Trinity House. SP 31/1 f. 274 (1685)

To the King's most excellent majestie

9

The humble peticion of the master
wardens and assistants of Trinity House

Humbly sheweth

That whereas your peticioners by an instrument bearing
date the three and twentith day of March 84 have surrendered into your majesties hands
all and singular the powers, franchises, liberties, priviledges and authorities whatsoever
heretofore granted to them by your majesties royall predecessors, or possessed by them by
vertue of any charters, letters patent, custome or prescription whatsoever

Your peticioners most humbly pray that your majestie would be
graciously pleased to regrant unto them all theire said liberties
and franchises, or so many of them and in such manner and under such
reservacions, restrictions, and quallificacions as your majestie in your
great wisdome shall judge most conduceing to the good government
of the said fraternity and encouragement of navigacion

And your petitioners etc

At the court at Whitehall Aprill first 1685.
His majesty is graciously pleased to referre the consideration of this
petition to Master Atturney or Master Sollicitor Generall, to report what
his majesty may fitly do therein; and also to propose such heads
for a new charter as may be consistent with his majesties service;
and upon such report his majesty will declare his further
pleasure
Sunderland

I have considered of this petition and conceive that a
regrant of theire antient libertyes with the alterations
in the schedule annext will bee sufficient for the new
charter


R Sawyer 14 April 1685

Henry Serle, esquire. SP 31/1 f. 287 (1685)

To the Kings most excellent majestie

The humble petition of Henry Serle esquier

Sheweth

That your majesties petitioner haveing for valuable considerations
purchased of the executors of Sir John Berkenhead knight to himselfe
Little Lincolns Inne Feilds in the county of Middlesex and entred into articles
with the benchers of Lincolns Inne to build a considerable part of the same
ground into chambers for the benefitt and great advantage of that society
and been at great charge in laying foundations for building pursuant
to the said articles, severall of the neigbouring inhabitants sett on by
persons formerly indeavouringe to deprive your petitioner of his right
have upon pretence of your petitioners altering some pathwayes [illegible]
exhibited informacions in your majesties courts at Westminster for the same,
on purpose to damnifie your petitioner not haveing any colour of just
right for their soe doeing: as is well known to all indifferent person
the said wayes being contrived much more easey and nearer then
heretofore were.

Therefore your petitioner for his speedy improvement
of his said estate and advantage of the said
society of Lincolns Inne: most humbly be
beseecheth your sacred majestie to order your majesties
Attorney Generall to enter a nolle prosequi to
such vexatious suites that the same may not
be further prosecuted

And your petitioner shall
as in duty bound ever pray etc

Nolle prosequi about
Little Lincolns Infields
Anno 1685

At the court at Whitehall June 6th 1685
His majesty is graciously pleased to referre the consideration of this petition to the
Lord Chief Justice Jones, Master Justice Charlton, Master Baron Atkins, and Master Baron Wright,
or any two of them, to examine the allegations thereof and report what his
majesty may fitly do therein, whereupon his majesty will declare his further
pleasure.


Sunderland

Samuel Heron, Peter Martell and William Miles of London, merchants. SP 31/5 f. 8 (1685)

To the King's most excellent majesty and the
right honourable the lords of his majesty's most honourable
privy councill

The humble petition of Samuel Heron,
Peter Martell and William Miles of
London merchants

Sheweth

That your petitioners having purchased five of
the doggers belonging to the companye of the royall fishery
which they design to employ in the fishing trade
and considering that the same cannot well be done
either to the advantage of themselves or the publick
without employing some Dutch men on board every
vessell, who may teach the English their way
of fishing, and ordering their fish, especially fresh
codd and herrings. And whereas by the Act of Navigation
the vessells and fish would become lyable to
confiscation, if they should take such a number of
forreigners as will be absolutely necessary at the
first for manning the said doggers and instructing
the English fishers as abovesaid

Your petitioners most humbly pray that for the
better carrying on and improving of their said
intended fishery, your majesty would be graciously
pleased to give them leave to invite and bring
over about 40 families of Dutch fishery to settle
here, and that for their encouragement and
security against the said act, they may by your
majesties royall grace and favor be made free
denizons of this kingdom gratis, in like
manner as the distressed French protestants
have been made

And your petitioners shall ever as
in all humble duty bound pray etc:

Received 8 May 85
Read in councill 8 May 85

To the King's etc.

The humble petition of S. Heron
Peter Martell and William Miles of London
merchants

Sheweth

That whereas your petitioners late humble petition
to your majesty in councill setting forth their having
purchased 5 doggers of the companye of the royall fishery,
and their design to employ the same in the fishing
trade, and therefore praying your majesty's leave to
invite and bring over about 40 families of Dutch
fishers to teach the English their art in catching and
ordering of fish; and that for their encouragement
to come over, they may be made denizons gratis
as the French protestants have been, stands referred to
the lords of the committee of trade and plantations
who (as your petitioners are informed) will not sit yet
[illegible] great while by reason of the weighty affaires in
Parliament, and in regard the season for herring
fishing does now advance apace, and that if your
petitioners be not quickly dispatcht with your majesties
gracious grant of their request, they must lose
the benefit of this years fishing, and keep their
vessells unemployed to their great damage
and your petitioners now attending to answer all
objections and questions in this matter

They most humbly pray your sacred
majesty will be graciously pleased to
grant them the effect of their said
petition, or to give them a hearing therein
without further references that they
may not lose time in their said intended
fishing, which will be so much to their
prejudice, if they be obleged to a longer
attendance

And they shall ever pray etc

Received 22 May 85

Martha Gamlyn, widow. SP 31/3 f. 301 (1686)

To the Kings most excellent majesty

The humble peticion of Martha Gamlyn widdow

Sheweth

That on Sunday last was seavennight one Francis Vaughan who had five days before
then married your petitioners onely daughter was commited to your majesties prison of Newgate for treason
alleadged to be committed by him in the late rebellion in the west to the great surprize of your
petitioner and her relations.

That the said Francis Vaughan (with his wife) hath ever since been kept a close prisoner
soe that your petitioner or any other of his relations are not admitted to see him though in the
presence of a keeper.

That your petitioner hath good ground to hope that the said Francis Vaughan is innocent of the
said crime haveing been borne of loyall parents alwaies bredd up in loyall principalls
and upon all occacions testified his loyalty as by certificate annexed may appeare.

Your petitioner therefore most humbly prayes that your majestie out of your
accustomed goodnes will be pleased to permitt the said Francis
Vaughan to be bayled and his case to be examined and if his
crimes (of which your petitioner is wholie ignorant) make him not unworthy
of your majesties mercy that your majestie will vouchsafe him your
royall pardon

And your petitioner as in duty bound shall ever pray for your majesties long and
happy raigne.

The bailiffs, wardens and assistants of the Company of Weavers London. SP 31/5 f. 40 (1686)

To the Kings most excellent majesty

The humble peticion of the bayliffs wardons and
assistants of the Company of Weavers London

Most humbly sheweth

That your petitioners being instrusted (by your majestys royall charter)
with the government of the trade of weaveing within London
and parts adjacent do find that the traders in the art of
weaving are become very numerous by the late prohibition
of French silks and the admitting of great numbers of French
men and other aliens to worke pursuant to the order and
direction of his late majesty in councell.

That by the frequent importation of vast quantities
of foreign wrought silks and stuffs and the present deadness
of trade occasioned by the late mourning and cursed rebellion
the traders in the art of weaveing are greatly discouraged
and rendered very poore and necessitous

That the manufacturing of all wrought silks consumed
in England would be of great benefitt and advantage
to your majesty and kingdome by the great increase of your majesties
subjects and in order hereunto his late majesty enjoyned the
admitting of strangers and foreigners to worke but so it
is may it please your majesty that when the petitioners have with
much ingenuity charge and expence of a whole winters
worke fully compleated and worked up great quantetyes of
wrought silks as well plaine as fashionable in expectation
of a good trade all theire hopes are frustrated by the
importation of foreigne wrought silks and preference given
thereunto although of farr less curiousity and intrinsick
value then the home made goods to the utter ruine of many
ingenious artists of good foundations

That when trade was under the like discouragements
the petitioners do thankfully remember that his late gratious
majesty caused a generall life and vigour into trade by his
own royall example

That inasmuch as foreigne wrought silks and stuffs are not
prohibited

The petitioners do most humbly pray that your
majesty will be gratiously pleased to incourage
the importation of raw and unwrought silk and
that your majesty and royall consort will be gratious
=ly pleased to give incouragement to the wear
and consumption of English made goods by
giveing preference thereunto in your
royall wardrobe or by such other wayes and meanes
to incourage the petitioners, as in your majestys [grea...?] [illegible]
shall seem most meet

And your petitioners shall ever pray for your
majestys long and prosperous reigne

  • Joshua Sabin
  • George Reevs bayliffs

  • Samuel Sanders
  • James Cole

  • John Drigue
  • Georg Hoard wardens
  • Richard Awbrey

The woollen manufacturers of Gloucestershire. SP 31/5 f. 44 (1686)

To the Kings most excellent majesty

The humble peticion of your majestyes most
dutifull and loyall subjects the woollen
manufacturers of the county of Glocester.

Humbly sheweth.

That the decay of trade is considerable in
our county of late, that multitudes of your majesties poore
subjects are not able to subsist, there being neare a fift
part of the value of some parishes, expended in relieving
their poore. And to the great grief of your majesties loyall
subjects, no prospect of amendment, but rather the
contrary, unless timely helped by your majestyes fatherly care
of us, and being not the least accommodated of any
people in your majesties dominions to promote the woollen
manufacture, wee are willing to encourage it, and
the rather for that our Stroude water cloth and collours,
hath alwayes been had, in great estimation, and our
constant course of trade, have been to make ready 800
long clothes weekely, but now reduced to less then five
for the cheif dependance in our sales, for many [yeares?]
last past, being upon the Turkey merchants, who
constantly bought of us above 20,000 clothes yearly, the
last yeare bought not seaven; and wee have not any
foundation whereon to build so much as probable
conjectures, that wee shall this yeare sell them five, which
is the great stop, and ruine of our trade, (Turkey being
the only proper place that wee send cloth to) which is
not at all occasioned (as wee are credibly informed) from the
want of vend for our cloth there, but the disposall of the
usuall effects of it here, which always hath been a very
usefull, and service able sort of silke, the only proper, and
naturall commodity of those parts, and mutuall cement of our
trade, the price where of being now so considerably
fallen for want of vend, that our trade thereby is
quite stopped, and the antient course thereof wholely
diverted by the aboundance of raw, and wrought silke
imported of late yeares, by the East Indya Company which
are no way the effects of our manufacture, but our
bullion; to whom indeed wee sell about fifteen hundred, or
two thousand clothes a yeare, but those scarcely sent to the
place where they usually deale, the climate being too hott
for that commodity; and they usually bought as many when
they imported no silke, which, with the private exportation of
our English, and Irish woole (to the encouragement of
foreigners) are the cheif pressures that our trade, and us
your majesties loyall sufferrers groane under, which are a
thousand, for one of those that reapes benefit by this our
calamity, but wee have no reason to feare, but that each
individuall loyall subject will be more tender to your
majestyes most princely compassion, than the greatest oppressor
of the common good, and cannot doubt releife from that
majesty to whom providence hath given such unparaleld
insight in trade, and wisdome in the conduct of affaires
and with hearts truely sensible of the many and great blessings
wee enjoy under your majesty whom (as is our duty) wee
will alwayes most readily serve to the utmost of our lives, and
fortunes, and dayly pray to almighty God for your majestyes
long and happy reigne over us.

Signed

  • Nathaniell Ridler
  • Nathaniell Ridler junior
  • Timothy Webb
  • Thomas Blanch
  • Daniell Packer
  • George Elton
  • Anthony Hopkins
  • John Arrundell
  • Daniell Watts
  • James Eckley
  • Charles King
  • Thomas Clutterbooke
  • Richard Nash
  • John Sorrell
  • Charles Fenell
  • Richard Clutterbooke
  • Daniell Woodhall
  • William Haynes
  • Richard King
  • James Lysons
  • William Lysons
  • Joseph Knight
  • John Bond
  • Holliday Knight
  • John Carver
  • Samuell Pegler

  • William Osborne
  • Joseph Worles
  • James Webley
  • Richard Hopton
  • Giles Nash junior
  • Thomas Smith
  • John Cornwall
  • Samuell Cornwell
  • Giles Hancocke
  • Giles Nash
  • John Blanch
  • Richard Cornwell
  • John Sandford
  • William Hayward
  • William Andrewes junior
  • William Andrewes senior
  • William Webb
  • Thomas Timbrell
  • Richard Freane
  • Thomas Fowler
  • Thomas Pinfold junior
  • Richard Webb
  • Samuell Webb
  • Richard Clissold
  • William Dunston
  • Joseph Mayor

  • Samuell Hall
  • Jasper Clutterbucke
  • Giles Pinfold
  • William Snow
  • Thomas Pinfold senior
  • Edward Pinfold
  • John Barnfield
  • Thomas Seele
  • Thomas Thayere
  • Joseph Pinfold
  • Richard [Hale?]
  • Richard Webb
  • Jonathan Shipton
  • Joseph Bennett
  • Samuell Kinn
  • Thomas Webb
  • William Hayward
  • Samuell Adridge

The clothiers of Suffolk and Essex. SP 31/5 f. 52 (1686)

To the King's most exelent majesty

The humble peticion of the clothiers of the
county of Suffolk and Essex

Humbly sheweth.

That your petitioners of late years are almost undone
and made unable to imploy the numbers of poore
familys that have their dependance on them by reason
of the decay of our wollen manufacture, being broad clothes
which hath usually been sent beyond sea in great numbers,
and chiefly to Turky, and now there is not above one
third part, yearely sent which use to goe.

Wherefore your petitioners do implore your most sacred majesty
to take into your princely consideracion how to relieve us,
and that the Turky Company might send out our clothes
as formerly, that so wee may be able to support our
selves, and those hundreds of familys that depend on
us: and your petitioners as in all duty bound will serve and
pray for you.

  • William Browne
  • Francis Folkard
  • Thomas Partridge
  • Edward Clarke
  • Edward Cage
  • Henry Sliverion
  • John [Renells?]
  • Edward Cheef
  • William Greene
  • Thomas Green
  • John Pewes
  • Francis Boolt
  • John Pidmonton
  • Edward [Fileto?]
  • Richard Michell
  • Nathaniel Boures
  • Edward Lewes
  • Stephen Skiper
  • William Michell
  • Benjamin Skiner
  • Raff Layfoord
  • John Blowfield senior
  • William Lewes
  • John Weede
  • Samuel Adkinson

  • John Cockerell
  • George [Larrit?]
  • John Wall
  • John Blomfield junior
  • Nathaniel Angier
  • Thomas Sayer
  • Lyonell Adkinson
  • John Gilson
  • William Baines
  • John Baines
  • John Parker senior
  • John Parker junior
  • Thomas Baines
  • Joseph Baines
  • John Crosse
  • John Newman
  • Thomas Houldin
  • Thomas Firman
  • Nathaniel Fisher
  • John Croft
  • Thomas Croft
  • Robert Cockerell
  • Samuel Smith
  • Nicholas Freeman

  • William Atkinson
  • Thomas Matsome
  • Samuel Baker
  • John Diamond
  • John Seaborne
  • John Jennings
  • Robert Mason
  • John Smith
  • William Smith
  • Robert Smith
  • Richard Houldin senior
  • Richard Houldin junior
  • John Houldin
  • Steven [Ham?]
  • Edmund Weed
  • Robert Alderton
  • Elias Wrinch
  • John Salmon junior
  • Elias Wrench senior
  • Thomas Colle
  • Samuel Webb

Examined.

Francis Price, vicar of Blackburn, Lancashire. SP 31/3 f. 42 (1687)

To the right reverend father in God,
Thomas, Lord Bishop of Chester,
my honoured diocesan.

May it please your lordship,
the regard your lordship has for your clergies concernes, and the justice
you administer upon all occasions with so much integrity, have brought me
to prostrate my self at your feet, to represent to your clemency in few
words an affair which ought to be treated as large; upon the eighth day of this
instant August 1687 one Master William Crosse of Upper Darwen in the parish
of Blackburne in the county of Lancaster demanded of me (the present
vicar of Blackburne) the keys of the chappel of Darwen, to which as vicar
of Blackburne I have an indubitable right and title, pretending that our
soveraigne lord the King had assigned that ancient and sacred fabrick
for the use of such of the inhabitants as did not conforme to the Church
of England; but because in the licence which he shewed me, I did not finde
the word chappel once mentioned, nor any thing sounding like it, ex=
cepting one expression contained in this sentence, we have allowed
and do hereby allow of a meeting-place erected in Darwen in the parish of
Blackburn I could not consent to the delivery of the said keys till I
was fully satisfyed that by those words his majesty did mean the chap
pel of Darwen; yet did I freely offer to deliver up the said keys, in
case that three of the justices of peace did apprehend, that those words
in the licence were to be so interpreted, videlicet: of the chappel of Darwen
and not of an-other edifice in Darwen, which some of the discenters [had?]
before signifyed and made knowne to the justices of the peace, [th...?]
set apart to assemble in; this reasonable motion was rejected, and
since then the doores of the said chappel have been broken open, and the
curate of that chappel not permitted to performe his ministeriall
offices, which with great agitations of griefe and sorrow I most humbly
desire your lordship to make known unto the Kings most excellent
majesty, and to beseech his majesty to certify your lordship whether
or no his majesty did mean the chappel of Darwen in those words
we have allowed and do hereby allow of a meeting place erected in Darwen

If your lordship do finde that by those words his majesty did not
mean the chappel of Darwen, I humbly beg that your lordship would issue
out an order to be affixed to the doore of Darwen-chappel, that no minister
whatsoever presume to preach in that chappel but such as are duly li
cenced by your lordship: but if on the other side your lordship do
finde that by the foresaid words is ment the chappel of Darwen; and that his
majesty thinkes fit for causes best known unto him self to wave my title
and to determine against my curates readmission, we shall not [impatient?]
ly repine, nor uncharitably censure, much lesse undutifully disobey, but in
all becoming silence sit downe in submission to his majestys good
will and pleasure; in which desire I will here rest, humbly beseeching
the almighty God to multiply his blessings upon the Kings most ex=
cellent majesty; and your lordship to pardon my great boldness, who am,

Your lordships in all duty,

Francis Price, vicar of Blackburne in [Lancashire?]

Inhabitants of Calne, Wiltshire. SP 31/3 f. 122 (1687)

To the Kings most excellent majestie

The most humble peticion of your majesties loyall subjects inhabiting in and near your majesties
antient borrough and towne of Calne in the county of Wiltshire

Most humbly shew, that John Bentley esquier about 27 yeares since devised by his last will several lands
and chattles to 7 trustees for establishing a maintenance of a free English schoole which was settled in this
towne and borrough of Calne and one Francis Flay appoynted schoolemaster there who executed the said office
for diverse yeares whilst the rents of the said lands amounted unto but twelve pounds per annum.

That about twelve yeares since the rents being improved to fiftie two pounds per annum one James Webb was placed
in schoolmaster there, who hath allwayes received the rents of the said lands to our Lady Day last and is still
in the possession of the schoolmasters house and schoole house there.

That the said James Webb being to our knowledge a man of a debauched and vitious life and conversation and
remise and negligent of his duty, the said schoole which wee well hoped would have beene advantagious to this
towne proved a damage, the children sent thether to be taught loosing their time and their parents
disapoynted

That complaints of Webbs miscarriage being made to the commissioners for charritable uses who upon examination
found that all the trustees were dead except Francis Rogers of Brainford in Middlesex and Master Thomas Webb
minister of Hannington in Hamptsheire father of the schoolmaster and conceiveing that the neglect of the
schoole might be in some measure occasioned by their liveing soe farr remote from this towne.

The commissioners about four yeares since proposed new trustees of the saide schoole to be added to which the said old
surviving trustees consented and persuante to the said commissioners decree they conveyed the lands to Sir John Erule
junior since deceased Walter Grubb esquier Master Jonathan Rogers Master Robert Maundrell Master Henry Rogers and
Master John Wilson all liveing neare this towne who upon their visitting of the said schoole and duly inquiring into
the manners of the said James Webb and finding him to be very remisse and negligent of his duty admonished and
desired him to reforme his life and conversation and to be carefull and diligent in teaching and instructing
the youth that the said schoole might be rendred of effect according to the intent of the founder.

That notwithstanding the said James Webbs frequent promises of amendment he persueing his ill course of life
the said trustees lately elected one Master Avery Thompson to be schoolmaster of the said free schoole whome
we know to be a sober and diligent person and in all respects able and fitt to teach and instruct our
children and to performe the duty of schoolmaster of the said free schoole.

May it therefore please your most gratious majestie to confirme the election
of the said trustees.

And your petitioners shall ever pray etc.

  • Robert Sheppard
  • Richard Stokes
  • William Haward
  • Henry Brookes
  • John Norman
  • [Arthur Esmead?]
  • John Cale

  • Thomas Fowler
  • Anne Nutt
  • Robert Norman
  • John Norman
  • John Goddard
  • James Cook
  • Walter Forman
  • Joseph Simpkins
  • Elizabeth Jhonson

  • Samuel Bourn
  • Gabriell Langrish
  • Robert Norman
  • William Baily
  • Walter [Nichole?]
  • Richard Forman
  • Samuell Stephens
  • Christopher Pearce
  • William Langton
  • Isrell Noyes

  • Edward Slade
  • Ann [Ska...?]
  • Arthur Robins
  • Edward Hawkins
  • Humfrey [Tonnson?]
  • Robert Buchatt
  • [Honry?] Boare
  • John Bishap

Trustees of the free school in Calne, Wiltshire. SP 31/3 f. 124 (1687)

To the Kings most excellent majesty

The most humble petition of your majesties most loyal
and obedient subjects, the major part of the trustees of the
free school setled in your majesties antient town and
burrough of Calne in the county of Wiltshire whose names
are hereunto subscribed

Most humbly sheweth that John Bentley esquier about 27 years
since devised by his last will several lands and chatles to seven
trustees for establishing a maintenance of a free English
school which was setled in this towne and burrough of Calne, and one
Francis Flay appointed schoolmaster there who executed the
said office for divers years whilst the rents of the said lands
amounted unto but 12 pounds per annum.

That about 12 years since the rents being improved to 52 pounds per annum
one James Webb was placed in schoolmaster there, who hath
always received the rents of the said lands till our Lady Day last, and
is still in the possession of the schoolmasters house and schoolhouse there.

That complaint being made to the commissioners for charitable uses that the said
Webb was remiss and negligent of his duty of schoolmaster and they upon
examination finding that all the trustees were dead except Master
Francis Rogers of Brainford in Middlesex and Master Thomas Webb minister
of Hannington in Hampshire father of the schoolmaster. And
conceiving that the neglect of the school might be occasioned by their
living so remote from the town of Calne and consequently not
visiting the same as was requisite.

The commissioners 4 years since proposed new trustees of the said school to be
added, to which the said old surviving trustees consented, and pursuant
to the said commissioners decree they conveyed the lands to Sir John Erule
junior since deceased and your majesties petitioners all living near the
said towne of Calne.

That your petitioners thereupon frequently visited the said school and duly
inquired into the manners of the said James Webb, and found the said
James Webb to be very remiss and negligent of his duty and therefore
admonished and desired him to reform his life and conversation, and to
be careful and diligent in teaching and instructing the youth that the
said school might be rendred of effect according to the intent of
the founder and to the incouragement of charitable dispositions
of this nature.

That notwithstanding the said James Webbs frequent promises of
amendment he persueing his ill course of life and neglecting the said
school your majesties petitioners lately elected on Master Avery
Thompson to be schoolmaster of the said free school whom your
majesties petitioneres know to be a sober and diligent person and in
all respects able and fitt to teach and instruct children and to perform
the duty of schoolmaster of the said freeschool

May it therefore please your most gratious majesty
to approve of and confirm our said election of the
said Master Avery Thompson to the said freeschool

And your petitioners shall ever pray etc

  • Walter Grubbe
  • Jonathan Rogers
  • Henry Rogers
  • Robert [Maundrell?]

Jean Douglas. SP 31/3 f. 153 (1687)

To the King's most excellent majesty

The humble peticion of Jean Douglas

Sheweth

[That?] two of your petitioners sones James and John Sinclairs, the first a gun-smith aged
[illegible] yeares and the other an engraver aged ninetein, were unfortunatly brought over
[to engrave?] three heads upon steell for which they were accused and processed before
Judge Halloway in the towne of Monmouth the beginning of August last past who [passed?]
sentence of death but delayed the execution thereof in expectation that your majesty
would be pleased to bestow upon them your gracious pardon, by reason of their yeares.

That ever since the sentence of death past upon them, they have been kept in
chaines in Monmouth prison in a most miserable and starving condition, which
is in some manner as bad as death it selfe.

May it therefore please your most gracious majesty to
extend your compassion, clemency and mercy by granting unto
your petitioner the lives of her sones, and to order for them
your royall [pardon?], and their release from prison

And your poor petitioner (as in duty bound)
shall ever pray.

At the court at Whitehall October 18th 1687
His majesty is graciously pleased [to?] referre this petition to Master Justice
Holloway, to consider thereof [and?] report how farre he conceives the
persons mentioned herein may be fit objects of his majesties mercy,
whereupon his majesty will [declare his?] further pleasure
Sunderland P

In obedience to his majesties comands signified
me by [your?] lordship I humbly certify that the
persons above mencioned are fit objects of his
majesties mercy
October 22d [16..?]
Richard Holloway

The mayor, bailiffs and commonalty of the city of Exeter. SP 31/3 f. 157 (1688)

To the Kings most excellent majesty

The humble petition of the mayour, baylifs
and commonallty of your antient citty
of Exeter.

Sheweth

That your petitioners haveing unanimously and cheerefully
(as hopeing the same may greatly tend to your majesties
service) by an instrument under their common seale
surrendered up to your majestie the charter or letters pattents
granted to them by his late majestie King Charles the second
of blessed memory, beareing date the 26th day of October
in the 36th yeare of his reigne, of which surrender your
petitioners humbly pray your majesties gracious acceptance.

Therefore they most humbly pray your majestie by your
royall charter to grant unto them all privilidges
immunities and franchises granted to them or their
predecessors by the said charter, and to confirme to
them all former priviledges by them or their predecessors
enjoyed before the date of their last charter and inasmuch as his grace the Duke of [Albemarl?]
(who is their present high steward and recorder) is now
in your majesties service beyond the seas, that your
petitioners cannott have recourse to him in their exigencies
your petitioners further humbly pray that in your said charter
such other noble person as your majestie shall think fitt
may be appoynted high steward and recorder of the
said citty, and that in such new charter your petitioners and
their successors may be dispensed with and pardoned by your
majestie from takeing all oathes and tests, save such as
are usuall for the due execution of their offices.

And forasmuch as your petitioners are att a great distance from
London, and many equitable causes arrise in the said citty
which are not of vallue enough to bring the same into your
majesties High Court of Chancery, your petitioners most humbly
your majesty to grant liberty to the mayor of Exeter for
the time being to hold a court of equity, for heareing and
determineing all causes under the vallue of five pounds
with such powers, fees, and perquesites as are or have bin
bin enjoyed in the mayors court of the citty of London.

And your petitioners shall ever pray etc

At the court at Whitehall February 22th 1687/8
His majesty is graciously pleased to referre this petition to Master Atturney or
Master Sollicitor Generall, to consider thereof and report what his majesty may
fitly do therein, together with such heads for a new charter, as may
be most proper, whereupon his majesty will declare his further pleasure


Sunderland P

The president and college of physicians in London. SP 31/4 f. 4 (1688)

To the King's most excellent majestie

The humble petition of the president and college
of physitians in London.

Sheweth.

That whereas your majestie hath been graciously pleased by your late royall charter
to grant to the president and censors of your majesties college of physitians in London, after the expiration
of an act of Parliament relating to printing, the power of licensing all books and other papers
whatsoever to be publisht by any person concerning physick, chirurgery, or the practice thereof,
for the prevention of the frauds and abuses occasioned by the bills of empiricks and other unlearned
practicers in the art of physick, for which royall grace we returne your majestie our most humble
thanks and acknowledgements. And being informed that your majestie hath at present under your
consideration the necessary regulating of the presse, we crave leave humbly to lay before your
majestie our particular care, beseeching your majestie that the aforesaid power concerning printing physicall
books (which we at present, till the expiration of the act aforesaid, exercise by vertue of a deputation
from his grace the Archbishop of Canterbury) may be inserted and confirmed in the said regulation.

And whereas your majestie hath been graciously pleased to direct under your royall signett some letters
to the president and college of physitians, and also to the Lord Mayor of the Citty of London, and likewise to
order a letter from your majesties privy councill directed to the justices of the peace for the county of Middlesex,
in forcing the due observance of the powers given to the said college by your sacred majestie for the
regulating the practice of physick within the Citty of London and seaven miles compasse.

Your petitioners humbly begg your majestie's leave to print and publish the said letters, and
also such other statutes and orders as have been made by the said college in pursuance
of your majesties royall charter concerning the practice of physick, to the end that more
publick notice may be given thereof to your majesties subjects.

And your petitioners shall ever pray etc.

Petition of the
colledge of
physitians
read att the
committee January 22th
1687/8 and granted

Captain Thomas Symondes. SP 31/4 f. 36 (1688)

The humble peticion
of
Captain Thomas Symondes

Peticion of Captain Thomas Symondes.

Sheweth
that he hath performed many eminent and
acceptable services for the crowne.

That he hath made it his business for severall
yeares to prove his majesties title to concealed
landes in Ireland, detayned from the 49 officers.

Prayes his majesty to referr him to the cheife
governour there, with his majesties letter in his
behalfe, or otherwise to grant him a pention

Received 15th May 1688.

18 May 88 referred to Lord Deputy

Sir Robert Dillington, Major John Leigh and others, on behalf of the inhabitants of the Isle of Wight. SP 31/4 f. 265 (1688)

To his highness the Prince of Orange etc

The petition of Sir Robert Dillington baronet, Major
John Leigh, Edward Dillington esquier Harrington
Dingley esquier and Richard Knight gentleman, in the behalfe
of the inhabitants of the Isle of Wight, who have made
complaints to your petitioners

Humbly sheweth

That your petitioners are informed that those Irish
newly come into the island are quartered on private houses, notwithstanding
your highnesses most gratious declaration to the contrary, which is a great
oppression to the poore inhabitants there, and might easily be prevented by
quartering them on the severall garrisons as well as in publick houses,
Carisbrook Castle being spacious enough to containe the major part of them

Your petitioners therefore most humbly prayes your
highnes to be gratiously pleased to grant an order
for the placeing of them accordingly, for the ease
of the said inhabitants.

And your petitioners shall ever pray etc.

John Warren of Grays Inn, esquire. SP 32/1 f. 42 (1689)

To the Kings most excellent majestie

The humble peticion of John Warren of Grayes Inn esquier.

Sheweth

That your petitioner hath for divers yeares in the time of
King Charles the second and in the late King James his time, been in the place
of the second justice of Chester and for Flint Denbigh and Montgomery and hopes
it will be made appeare to your majestie that he hath given good satisfaction and
content to the country in the circuit where he hath gone in discharging the duty
of the said place.

Your petitioner therefore humbly prayes your majestie will be pleased to grant
him an order of referrance unto the Lord President of Wales and to the
[illegible] to certifie unto your
majestie what they or some of them conceive concerning your petitioners fitnesse for
the execution of the said place, in order that if your majestie thinks good
your petitioner may be continued in the same; wherein your petitioner will apply
himselfe with all due care and fidelity for your majesties service.

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc

Att the court att Whitehall the 26th of March 1689
His majesty is pleased to refer this peticion to the right
honourable the Earle of Maclesfield President of Wales to
consider thereof and report to his majesty his opinion as
to the peticioners pretentions to bee continued in the
office herein mentiond, wherupon his majesty will declare
his further pleasure.
Shrewsbury

John Clapp, Joseph Pitts and John Gould of Colyton, and Daniell Cleaveland and Nathaniell Smith of Honiton. SP 32/1 f. 97 (1689)

To the Kings most excellent majesty

The humble petition of John Clapp, Joseph Pitts and John Gould of the parish
of Colyton in the county of Devon and of Daniell Cleaveland and Nathaniell Smith
of the parish of Honiton in the said county

Sheweth
that the persons herein after named were inhabitants of our respective parishes and neighbourhood
and men of sober and industrious lives and very usefull in theire severall callings.

That the late Duke of Monmouth landing in theire neighbourhood and declareing for the
protestant religion against the manifest designes of the then government and prevailing interest for its
subversion, some of them joyned in armes with him, some supplyed provisions, and others of them were noe
way assisting.

That after the defeate of the said Duke of Monmouth, they were all taken into custody
and at the tyme when they should have been tryed the Lord Cheife Justice Jefferyes required them all to
plead guilty or else they should be immediately executed, which threat having been made good upon
one that put himselfe on tryall, terryfyed the rest into a complyance, tho severall of them were innocent, who
being thus attainted by a forced confession, were banished for ten yeares and sold as slaves into America.

That by reason of the greate number soe banisht the country wants inhabitants artificers and labourers
to it's greate impoverishment and particularly the parishes where your petitioners inhabitt.

Your petitioners therefore humbly pray that your majestie will for the good of the country extend
your mercy to the persons herein after named and of your abundant clemency release them of theire
banishment and grant them [licences?] to retourne home to theire wives and children where we
doubt not but that they will deport themselves as becomes good and faythfull subjects to your
majesty.

And your petitioners shall ever pray etc

John Smith
Thomas Franklyn
Abraham Thomas
John Baker
James Fowler
Christopher Jewell
Richard Pyne
John White
Samuel Pinson
Richard Parker
Francis Smith

Emanuell Marchant
Thomas Meade
Nicholas Salter
Thomas Quick
Thomas Pester
John Conant
William Clarke
Edmond Bovett
Thomas Bovett
Peter Kent
John Clode

Argenton Roost
Gideon Dare
Humphrey Slade
John Skiffe
John Bagwell
Henry Tizard
Benjamin Whicker
John Alston
John Heathfeild
George Macey
Nicholas Braddon
Richard Greene

Francis Purkett
John Edwardes
John Gey
Robert Spurway
William Harvey
Edward [Vildue?]
William Browne

I knowing the petitioners, [many?] of the persons petitioned for and the contents
of the petition to be true [...eive?] them fitt objects of his majesties mercy
which I therefore humbly implore on theire behalfe.


Walter Yonge

Sir Walter Young in behalf
of the west country men

Att the court at Whitehall the 3d of May 1689
His majesty is pleased to referr this peticion to the right
honourable the lords of his majestys most honourable privy
councill appointed a committee for trade and forreigne
plantations to consider of the matter therein contained
and to report to his majesty their opinion of what is
fitt to bee done for procuring the liberty of the
persons mentioned herein and his majesty will then
declare his further pleasure
Shrewsbury

Sir Walter Young

Petition of the west
country men

Patrick Macdonnell, gentleman, and Owen Bannahan, late quartermaster in a troop of Irish dragoons. SP 32/1 f. 278 (1689)

To the right honnourable the Earle of Shrewsbery principall
secretary of state to theire majestyes

The humble petition of Patrick Macdonnell [gentleman?] and
Owen Bannahan late quartermaster in a troope of Irish
dragoons

Humbly sheweth

That your petetioners by vertue of your lordshipps letter pursuant
to an order of councell were taken up as Irish endeavour
ing to make escape to Ireland and have thereupon beene
detained ever since the 25th of March last without any
subsistance as allowed to other prisnors on that accountt;
dureing which confinement your pettitioners have beene putt to
very greate streights and beene inforced to part with what
moveables they had and even some of theire cloaths

Wherefore your pettitioners beeseches your lordshipp
to take theire condicion into consideration and
either to procure them their liberty to seeke
releife and assistance from their frinds
or to order them subsistance as to
other prisoners upon like commitment

And your pettitioners will pray etc

Patrick Macdonell Owen Bannahan

I under written doe certefye that the above petetioners have beene
taken up and detayned without subsistance ever since the
time above mentioned. [William?] Jackson [mayor?]

George Howse, gentleman. SP 32/2 f. 4 (1689)

To the Kings most excellent majestie

The humble petion of George Howse gentleman

Most humbly sheweth

That your petioner being ambitious to searve your majestie in your majesties kingdom
of Ierland was cheifly [cons...?] with two others in raiseing of a thousand men
privitly for your majesties service in the citty of Dublin in November and December last
expecting your majesties forces would have bein landed by that time for which your
petitioner made all the preperation that possable could be dun secretly in hopes
to joyne your majesties armie but your petitioner being discovered was forced to
make his escape in a [disguise?] for [severall?] leages at sea in a small boat and meeting
a vessell by chance bound for England your petitioner was by Gods great mercy deliver
=ed as well from the rageing seas as from the barbarous cruelty of the Irish losseing
an estate to the value of 400 pounds per annum besides money stock and goods to the value
of two thousand pounds starling and your petitioner being left in a deplorable con=
=dition made him uncapable of goeing vollentere with your majesties forces for Ierland
for being drove to so much poverty was not able to procure as much money as would carry
him thear with the armie

Therefor your petitioner humbley prayeth that your majestie would be gratiously
pleased to put your petitioner in to some imployment wherby your petitioner might
be capable of searveing your majestie either in this kingdom or in any other
place whersoever your majestie will be pleased to command him

And your petitioner shall as in duty bound for ever pray