Nash

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Buckinghamshire, Volume 2, North. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1913.

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Citation:

, 'Nash', in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Buckinghamshire, Volume 2, North, (London, 1913) pp. 206-207. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/bucks/vol2/pp206-207 [accessed 21 May 2024].

. "Nash", in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Buckinghamshire, Volume 2, North, (London, 1913) 206-207. British History Online, accessed May 21, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/bucks/vol2/pp206-207.

. "Nash", An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Buckinghamshire, Volume 2, North, (London, 1913). 206-207. British History Online. Web. 21 May 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/bucks/vol2/pp206-207.

In this section

171. NASH.

(O.S. 6 in. xiv. S.W.)

Secular

(1). Church Farm, house, cottage and barns, 70 yards N. of the modern church. The House is of two storeys, built in the 17th century on a T-shaped p an the central wing projecting towards the W. The E. front is of late 17th-century brick, with a moulded string-course between the storeys. The N. end of the transverse wing has some original timber-framing with filling of thin bricks. The W. wall of the central wing is also timber-framed; the filling and the other walls are of modern brick. The roofs are tiled. Two of the chimney stacks are original. Interior:—One room has a large open fireplace with a cambered lintel, and in the ceiling there are exposed joists and a large beam. Other rooms have old beams in the ceilings.

The Cottage, adjoining the S. end of the transverse wing, is also of the 17th century, and is of timber and brick, plastered at the back; the roof is tiled. The Barns, adjoining the S. end of the cottage, are probably contemporary with it. The walls are timber-framed and weather-boarded. The roofs are covered with thatch and some corrugated iron.

Condition—Of house and barns, fairly good; of cottage, now used as a fowlhouse, dilapidated.

Monuments (2–16)

These buildings are all of the 17th century, except possibly (9), and almost all are of two storeys; the walls generally are timber-framed, with brick filling which has been considerably restored; the roofs are thatched. Nearly all are of rectangular plan, and have old chimney stacks, some partly restored.

(2). The Old English Gentleman Inn, 100 yards E. of (1), is now covered with plaster. The plan is L-shaped. Inside the house is a fireplace with an old chimney-corner seat, and one room has a ceiling with exposed joists.

Condition—Fairly good, much restored.

(3). Cottage, about 80 yards N.E. of the church, is of one storey and an attic. A small adjoining barn is also of the 17th century, built of timber, and weather-boarded; the roof is thatched; two of the trusses have large bent timbers carried to the ground.

Condition—Fairly good.

(4). Cottage, about 80 yards E. of (3). One wall retains original plaster filling. The W. wall is of modern brick.

Condition—Good.

(5). Cottage, opposite to (2), is of one storey and an attic.

Condition—Fairly good.

(6). Cottage, at the S.W. corner of a lane, about 100 yards N. of (4). The walls are on a stone base, except where they are of modern brick. There is no original chimney stack.

Condition—Fairly good.

(7). Cottage, 250 yards N.W. of (6), is of one storey and an attic. The chimneys are modern.

Condition—Fairly good.

(8). Cottage, 80 yards N. of (7), is of one storey and an attic. One wall is partly timber-framed with plaster filling; the rest of the walling is apparently of modern stone, whitewashed. The chimneys are also modern.

Condition—Fairly good.

(9). The Three Horse-shoes Inn, about 70 yards N.E. of (8), was built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century. The roofs are tiled. The plan is T-shaped, the central wing projecting towards the S.W. On the N.W. front are two small gabled dormer windows. The central chimney stack has square shafts built of thin bricks. Interior:—On the ground floor all the ceilings have exposed joists, those in one room being stop-chamfered; a wide open fireplace has a cambered lintel.

Condition—Fairly good.

Town's End, W. side:—

(10). Cottage, 110 yards N. of (9). The front is of modern brick; the back has old plaster filling in the upper storey, and is partly weather-boarded.

Condition—Fairly good, restored.

(11). Cottages, a range, N. of (10). The N. wall is of rough stone, and embedded in it is a large beam with traces of a painted pattern.

Condition—Fairly good; N. end, bad, now disused.

E. side

(12). Cottages, a range opposite to (11). The lower storey is entirely of modern brick; the upper storey has some old plaster filling.

Condition—Fairly good; much altered.

Wood End

(13). Cottage, on the W. side of the road, about 230 yards S.E. of the church. The wall at the back retains most of the old plaster filling. A small outbuilding is of the 17th century, built of brick and timber, with a thatched roof.

Condition—Good, restored.

(14). Cottage, on the S. side of a lane, about 120 yards S.E. of (13). The walls are on a stone base.

Condition—Fairly good.

(15). House, on the N. side of a lane, 50 yards N.E. of (14). The chimneys are modern.

Condition—Good, much restored.

(16). Cottages, two adjoining, 50 yards E. of (15). Condition—Fairly good.