BHO

Newton Longville

Pages 212-219

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Buckinghamshire, Volume 2, North. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1913.

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Citation:

In this section

174. NEWTON LONGVILLE.

(O.S. 6 in. xx. N.W.)

Ecclesiastical

(1). Parish Church of St. Faith, in the village, is built of stone rubble, except the tower, which is of ashlar; the walls of the nave and tower have embattled parapets and the other walls have moulded parapets, those of the chancel being modern. The roofs are covered with lead. The church was built apparently late in the 12th century, when it consisted of a chancel, and a nave of the same proportions as the present nave, with N. and S. aisles. Early in the 14th century the Chancel was re-built and the North Chapel added to it; the Nave and Aisles were re-built late in the 14th century; during the 15th century the West Tower and the North and South Porches were added and the clearstorey was built. The church was restored in 1881, when a W. gallery was removed.

The church is interesting on account of the late 12th-century work in the chancel arch and nave arcades. The 14th-century image and the 17th-century font cover are noteworthy.

Architectural Description—The Chancel (26½ ft. by 14 ft.) has a late 15th-century E. window of four cinque-foiled lights and tracery under a four-centred head with a moulded external label which has carved head-stops; over the apex of the label is a small crudely carved figure, apparently representing a skeleton; at the springing of the four-centred rear arch are two moulded corbels of the 14th century. In the N. wall, opening into the N. chapel, is a 14th-century arch, two-centred and of two chamfered orders, with semi-octagonal jambs, which have moulded bases, much restored; the inner order of the E. jamb has an original moulded capital; the W. jamb has a late 15th-century angel corbel, probably formerly supporting the roof; near the W. end of the wall is a vertical line of masonry, which apparently marks the original thickness of the W. wall of the chancel. In the S. wall are two late 15th-century windows; the eastern is a square-headed window of three cinque-foiled lights, placed in an opening which has a four-centred head, now blocked; the moulded label has carved stops, one being modern, and all the stonework has been much restored; the western window is of three trefoiled lights under a square head with a plain label; the stops are covered with cement: between the windows is a doorway of c. 1540, with splayed and moulded jambs and a four-centred head with a moulded label; the carved spandrels are of Italian detail. The chancel arch was re-built early in the 14th century, and is of two orders; the outer order is richly moulded on the W. side, and slightly chamfered on the E. side; the inner order is hollow-chamfered and grooved, set with small carved leaf and dog-tooth ornament; the jambs, which do not fit the arch, have attached semi-circular shafts with moulded, much damaged bases; the capitals are of 12th-century material re-used; the N. capital is carved with grotesque animals and foliage, the S. capital with stiff-leafed foliage; adjoining each capital, on the E. side, is a carved corbel which originally supported part of the 12th-century arch. The North Chapel, now the Vestry (26 ft. by 11½ ft.) has, in the E. wall, a late 15th-century window of three cinque-foiled lights under a four-centred head with a moulded label; one of the stops is a 14th-century moulded and carved corbel. In the N. wall are two windows; the eastern is similar to that in the E. wall, and the label has carved headstops; the western window is also of the 15th century, much restored at the top, and of three cinque-foiled lights with tracery under a two-centred head and plain label; the rear arch and internal splays are moulded; level with the sills of the windows is part of a large moulded and carved string-course of the 15th century, formerly over a reredos. The Nave (34 ft. by 16½ ft.) has N. and S. arcades, each of two bays and of late 12th-century date, re-built in the 14th century; the N. arcade has a circular column with a moulded base, and a large square capital carved with animals, birds and foliage; the semi-circular responds have plain square bases and the capitals have been re-cut; the two-centred arches are of two chamfered orders, and have broach-stops at the springing, and, in the nave, a label with an indented edge and stops carved as faces; at each end of the arcade the lowest stones of the label have nail-head ornament. The S. arcade is similar to the N. arcade, but the column has a 14th-century moulded base, and the capital is carved with water-leaf ornament; the outer order of the arches is richly moulded, like that of the chancel arch, and the chamfered label has small head-stops. In the N.E. angle is the staircase leading to the former rood-loft. In the S. wall, E. of the arcade, is an opening, some feet from the ground, with a segmental pointed arch and chamfered jambs, probably of the 14th century, restored, and with a modern label on the N. side; it was probably intended for a monument or effigy (see Fittings). The clearstorey has, on each side, three windows, of late 15th-century date, restored; the two eastern are each of two cinque-foiled lights under a square head, and the third is a single trefoiled light. The North Aisle (10 ft. wide) has, in the N. wall, a 15th-century window similar to the N.W. window of the N. chapel, with moulded rear arch and internal splays; the stonework has been restored, and the label is modern; the N. doorway is of the 13th century, re-set in its present position when the aisle was altered; it has chamfered external jambs and pointed head, and a moulded label, of which the stops have been destroyed; the segmental pointed rear arch is moulded and has a chamfered label. In the S. wall, E. of the arcade, opening into the staircase of the rood-loft, is a doorway with rebated jambs and four-centred head. In the W. wall is a 14th-century window of three lights and uncusped tracery in a two-centred head, with a plain label. The South Aisle (10 ft. wide) has an E. window of four lights, a S. window and a W. window, each of three lights and tracery, all of the 15th century, much restored, and similar to the N. window of the N. aisle; the labels have plain stops; the 15th-century S. doorway has moulded jambs and two-centred head; the stonework has been re-tooled. The West Tower (10 ft. by 9½ ft.) is of two stages, the lower stage being of two storeys with diagonal W. buttresses; all the detail is of the 15th century, except the embattled parapet, which is modern. The two-centred tower arch is of two hollow-chamfered orders, and is without responds; the moulded label has shield-stops. The W. doorway has moulded jambs and four-centred head, with a moulded label; the W. window is of two cinque-foiled lights and tracery, with a moulded label, all much restored; in the S.W. corner, opening into the staircase, is a doorway with moulded jambs and four-centred head. The second storey of the first stage is lighted by small loops in the S. and W. walls. The bell-chamber has, in each wall, a window of two cinque-foiled lights and tracery in a two-centred head, all partly covered with cement. The North Porch has a late 15th-century outer entrance with square jambs and a two-centred arch of two chamfered orders. The South Porch has an outer entrance of the same date and design as that of the N. porch. The late 15th-century Roof of the chancel is flat-pitched, of three bays, with moulded tie-beams having carved bosses, one with the arms of the See of Winchester; the wall-brackets have tracery; the ridge, purlins and wall-plates are moulded; two stone corbels at the E. end, carved as crouching figures, are original; the other corbels are modern. The roof of the nave is also of the 15th century and flat-pitched, of four bays with large moulded tie-beams, traceried wall-brackets, moulded ridge, purlins and wall-plates, with traceried spandrels between the tie-beams and rafters; in the middle of the soffit of each tie-beam is a large carved boss; five of the stone corbels have grotesque heads, apparently from a roof of earlier date, the others are modern; the two E. trusses, and the ridge and purlins in the E. bay show considerable remains of painted decoration (see Fittings). The roof of the N. chapel and aisle is also of late 15th-century date; two trusses close together divide the chapel from the aisle; the tie-beams, wall-brackets and purlins are moulded, and the spandrels between the tie-beams and rafters are traceried; some of the rafters have hollow-chamfered edges; five of the stone corbels, carved as heads, are of the same date as the roof; the others are modern. The 16th-century roof of the S. aisle has cambered moulded tie-beams, carved wall-brackets, and original wood corbels, moulded wall-plate and ridge; the four E. rafters are moulded, and the spandrels between the tie-beams and rafters are traceried. Both the porches have plain old timbers in the roofs.

Fittings—Brackets: In N. chapel—built into the walls, six, five carved as heads or faces, one moulded, 14th and 15th-century. In N. aisle—on N. wall, plain. In S. aisle—on E. wall, chamfered, probably 15th-century. Chests: In N. chapel— two, (1) small, with three elaborately carved panels, and carved figures on the styles, early 17th-century; (2) large, with moulded panels, late 17th-century. Font: circular tapering bowl, with modern carved ornament, probably 12th-century, re-worked, shafts of stem modern, on old octagonal base. Font-cover: octagonal, pyramidal, of oak, having panels carved alternately with lion and unicorn, foliage, etc., in low relief, panels of base fluted, counterpoise carved as dove with outstretched wings, early 17th-century. Image: N. chapel—on E. wall, outside, carved figure of woman in wimple, etc., standing on moulded and carved corbel, all of stone, early 14th-century. Lockers: In chancel—in N. wall, lined with oak, and having original oak door, probably 15th-century. In N. aisle—in N. wall, with rebated jambs, head and sill, 15th-century. In S. aisle—in S. wall, small, rebated, with original wood door, hinges and bolt, 15th-century. Monument: In nave—in arched opening at E. end of S. arcade, carved head of knight, in banded mail coif, late 13th or early 14th-century, found in a cottage in the village. Painting: In nave—on roof, considerable remains of colour, red, black, and white, bosses gilt. Piscinae: In chancel—in S. wall, two, (1) small, with moulded jambs and tracery, probably 14th-century, much restored, basin hidden by woodwork; in modern recess, (2) circular shallow basin, projecting part broken, probably 14th-century, re-tooled. In N. aisle—in S. wall, small, with trefoiled head and square basin, 13th-century, re-set. In S. aisle—in S. wall, with moulded and trefoiled head, moulded label, fluted circular basin, 14th-century. Plate: includes large cup and stand paten of 1685, large flagon of 1638, all given by Margaret Alden in 1685, with silk wrap embroidered with the initials and date 'M.A. 1685'; small cover of Elizabethan cup, no dateletter. Screens: In chancel—in front of modern prayer desk, two pieces of oak tracery, late 14th-century, probably from rood-screen. In N. chapel —at W. end, of oak panelling, with small open balusters above it, door in the middle with two ornamental hinges, early 17th-century. At the rectory—two pieces of traceried oak, loose, probably 14th century and from rood-screen. Sedilia: In chancel—three crocketed pinnacles, one on E. side and two on W. side of piscina, 14th-century, possibly from sedilia. Tiles: In nave—in floor, S.E. corner, a few, various patterns, mediæval. Miscellanea: In N. chapel—form with turned legs, 17th-century; coffin stool, with carved rails at the top and turned legs, early 17th-century; outside, in N.E. buttress, two traceried panels, of stone, 15th-century, both from elsewhere.

Condition—External stonework weathering badly, especially in the tower, which has been repaired with cement, but the cement in falling off has brought the surface of the stone with it.

Secular

(2). The Manor House, with dove-cot, S. of the church. The House is of two storeys and an attic, built of red brick with stone dressings; the roofs are tiled. It is on the site of the alien Cluniac priory of Newton Longville, founded c. 1150. The present house was built probably in the middle of the 16th century, but incorporates some of the materials of the priory buildings, and has been considerably restored at various dates. The plan is H-shaped, with a modern addition on the E. side; the main block, facing N., contains, on the ground floor, the dining room and passages, formerly one chamber or hall; the drawing room and a lobby are in the W. wing, and the domestic offices in the E. wing. The N. Elevation has, at the E. end of the main block, a 15th-century doorway, with moulded stone jambs and four-centred arch in a square head with a moulded label; above it is a stone shield with the arms of New College, Oxford, set in a moulded frame, supported by a bracket with an ornamental finial; the frame and bracket are apparently of the same date as the doorway, the shield is probably of the 17th or 18th century, restored; over it is a stone window of the same date as the doorway, and of two four-centred lights under a square head with sunk spandrels; at the W. end of the wall is a modern doorway copied from the other. The end of the E. wing is covered with ivy; in the return wall is a small old window with a stone frame, which formerly lighted the 'Blind Room' in the attic, and is now hidden by the ivy. The end of the W. wing is modern; in the return wall, on the ground floor, is a square window of stone, now blocked. The E. Elevation is much covered with ivy; the wall of the E. wing is visible in a passage between the house and the modern addition, and is of brick, apparently of late 17th-century date. The S. Elevation has, in the middle of the main block, a 16th-century projecting chimney stack of red brick, with stone quoins and the remains of a diaper pattern in black bricks; E. of the stack, opposite to the 15th-century N. doorway, is a doorway with jambs and head of stone, now partly blocked and used as a window; on the first floor is a wood-mullioned window of the 17th century. The ends of the wings are gabled, and the E. wing has been refaced with modern brick; the W. wing, with a modern addition in the angle between it and the main block, is covered with cement. The W. Elevation has a chamfered stone plinth; near the N. end is a projecting chimney stack of red brick with a pattern in black bricks, and stone quoins; S. of the stack, on the first floor, is a 16th-century window, with moulded wood mullions.

Interior:—On the Ground Floor, the dining room and drawing room have 16th-century moulded beams in the ceilings. The kitchen, in the E. wing, has a large open fireplace, partly blocked; at the N. end the pantry, probably part of the original kitchen, has a large open fireplace, with an oak lintel; the ceiling is higher than that of the present kitchen. In the modern addition, S.W. of the hall, is a 17th-century staircase, of oak, with a moulded handrail, turned balusters and square newels, which have moulded caps. On the First Floor of the main block the ceilings are carried up into the roof, and the floor of the attic has been removed, apparently a modern alteration. In the Attic, at the N. end of the E. wing, is the 'Blind Room', now approached only through a trap door above the modern staircase, N.W. of the kitchen, but retaining the well-hole and one newel of a former staircase; the room was closed possibly on account of various alterations in the house, and now opens only into the roof space.

The Dove-cot, in a field E. of the house, is probably of late 15th or early 16th-century date; the walls have closely set vertical timber-framing with brick filling, which has taken the place of the original plaster filling. The pyramidal roof is tiled, and has a dilapidated skylight in the middle. Inside the building the walls are lined with old oak cots for the doves.

Condition—Of house, good; the walls of the dove-cot are out of the perpendicular and it is almost in ruins.

The Stewkley road, with Moor End, E. side:—

(3). The Rectory, 120 yards S. of the church, is almost entirely modern, but contains, in the N.E. wing, some traces of a late 16th or early 17th-century building. The walls of the wing are of late 17th or early 18th-century brick. In a room on the ground floor is some late 16th or early 17th-century panelling, and in the room above it is a chamfered tie-beam, apparently part of an arched truss of the same date as the panelling; it is cambered and shows the mortices of the former struts.

Condition—Good.

Newton Longville, Plan Shewing Positions of Monuments.

(4). Farmhouse, N.E. of the Rectory, is of two storeys, built probably late in the 16th or early in the 17th century, timber-framed and covered with modern rough-cast. The roof is thatched. The plan is rectangular, with a modern addition at the S. end. The chimney stack in the N.E. half of the house is of thin bricks. Interior:— On the ground floor one room has, in the ceiling, a moulded 15th-century beam, brought probably from the priory (see Manor House); on the bracket or corbel supporting the beam was found recently a small medallion of Limoges enamel, probably of the 13th century; it is enamelled on brass, with the half-figure of Christ or a saint; round the figure are small circles and lozenges of various colours. The ceiling-beams in the other rooms are chamfered, and there is one large open fireplace.

In the grounds are many pieces of tracery, of stone, brought from the church when it was restored. Built into the walls of the garden, etc., are other stones, some being apparently small 13th-century wall-shafts and moulded bases; they were all brought from neighbouring cottages, destroyed by fire at different times, and were probably originally from the priory.

Condition—Of house, good, much restored.

Monuments (5–38)

These buildings are nearly all of two storeys, and all are timber-framed; the filling is chiefly of brick, much of it being modern; the roofs generally are thatched. Most of the buildings are of the 17th century. Inside a considerable number of them the timber construction is visible, and there are large open fireplaces, some being partly blocked.

(5). Cottage, 110 yards S.W. of (3). The walls are entirely covered with modern rough-cast.

Condition—Good, completely renewed.

(6). Cottage, about 30 yards S.S.E. of (5), setting back from the road, was built probably late in the 16th or early in the 17th century, but the brick filling is almost entirely modern and covered with whitewash. The plan is L-shaped, the internal angle facing S. At the N.E. end is an original chimney stack with a base of stone rubble.

Condition—Good.

(7). Cottage, 30 yards S.W. of (6). The walls are entirely covered with modern rough-cast.

Condition—Good, completely renewed.

(8). Cottage, 20 yards S. of (7), was built probably late in the 16th or early in the 17th century, and retains some original wattle and daub filling, which has been colour-washed. The central chimney stack is of old thin bricks, re-pointed.

Condition—Poor.

W. side

(9). Cottage (see Plate, p. 112), at the bend of the road, 30 yards S.W. of (8). The front is whitewashed; at the back are modern additions. The central chimney stack is probably of mid 17th-century date, and has round-headed sunk panels in the sides. Interior:—There are two wide fireplaces; one retains a small original locker and an old tinder box. The staircase is of old oak.

Condition—Fairly good.

(10). Cottage, opposite to (7), was built probably late in the 16th or early in the 17th century; at the S.W. end is an 18th-century addition, built of brick, and at the back the wall is of modern brick. Half the central chimney stack is of the 17th century.

Condition—Bad.

(11). Cottage (see Plate, p. 224), about 120 yards N.E. of (9), with the upper storey partly in the roof, was built probably in the 16th century, on a rectangular plan; a small projecting bay was added on the N.E. in the 17th century, and another on the N.W. in the 19th century, making the plan T-shaped. On the E. front, which is whitewashed, the overhanging upper storey of the projecting bay is gabled. At the bottom of the N. wall are some large rubble stones. In the S. wall of the main block are two large timbers naturally curved and carried up through both storeys. The 17th-century addition has a tiled roof.

Condition—Fairly good.

(12). Cottage (see Plate, p. 224), now two tenements, N.E. of (11). Some of the 17th-century wattle and daub filling remains in the walls.

Condition—Fairly good.

(13). Cottage, N. of (12), was built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century, and retains much of the original wattle and daub filling. The chimney stack has grouped square shafts built of 17th-century brick. Interior:—On the ground floor are two original doors, of battens, one with strap-hinges; some old brick paving also remains.

Condition—Fairly good.

(14). The Smithy (see Plate, p. 112), in the square, at the cross-roads, 60 yards E. of the church, is of one storey; the walls have some weather-boarding; the roof is partly tiled. It was built probably in the 16th or 17th century and the E. part, about one-third of the length, is wider than the rest, and probably of earlier date. The roof has old timber trusses.

Condition—Fairly good.

The Bletchley Road, with London End, E. side

(15). Farmhouse (see Plate, p. 112), with barns and outbuildings, opposite to (14), 110 yards E. of the church. The House in front and at the back is covered with plaster, and the gables at the N. and S. ends have plaster filling. The early 17th-century plan was rectangular; a small low wing at the back, making it L-shaped, was added probably later in the 17th century. In the E. half of the main block is a chimney stack of thin bricks.

Round the house are some old Barns and other Outbuildings; the walls are of timber, brick and weather-boarding.

Condition—Good, structurally; of floors at the W. end of the house, bad.

(16). Farmhouse, with outbuildings and barn, 100 yards N. of (15). The House was apparently two buildings of rectangular plan, the southern constructed probably late in the 16th or early in the 17th century, the northern of earlier date, each with a projecting chimney stack at the end next to the other building. The N. half of the present house is higher than the S. half: in front the timber-framing is of two bays and has curved struts; the intermediate posts are carried from the ground to the roof, and the filling is partly of wattle and daub; the S. half has two bays of vertical timber-framing with plaster filling; between these bays and the N. half is a small bay of modern brick. At the back the N. half is of two bays similar to those in front, but the curved struts have been reversed and some of the timbers are missing; the roof of the S. half is brought down low. In the middle are two adjoining chimney stacks, both square and built of thin bricks. Interior:—On the ground floor are two wide fireplaces back to back. In each half of the house is an old oak staircase.

The Outbuildings and Barn are probably contemporary with the S. half of the house; the outbuildings adjoin it at the S. end, and are partly weather-boarded; the barn is on the S.E.

Condition—Fairly good.

(17). Cottage, 80 yards N. of (16), is of two storeys and an attic. The front is divided into five bays by the timber-framing, which is black; a block of modern brickwork in the middle bay possibly indicates the position of an original doorway; two of the windows have wood mullions, probably of the 17th century. Interior:—The wide fireplace at the S.W. end retains the original oven.

Condition—Fairly good.

Lane running N.E. from the Bletchley road, S.E. side

(18). Cottages, two adjoining, about 300 yards N.E. of the church. Some of the filling in the walls is of plaster. The central chimney stack is of thin bricks.

Condition—Poor.

(19). Cottage, opposite to (18). The filling in the walls is partly of wattle and daub.

Condition—Bad.

(20). Cottage, 20 yards W. of (19). At the N.E. end is a chimney stack built of thin bricks.

Condition—Poor.

(21). Cottage, on the E. side of a lane running S.W. from the Bletchley road, 170 yards N.E. of the church. The walls retain a little of the 17th-century brick filling. At each end is a low modern addition; that at the W. end partly covers a projecting chimney stack built of thin bricks and restored at the top. Interior:—The wide fireplace at the W. end has an original oven and small locker.

Condition—Fairly good.

(22). Cottages, two adjoining, on the N. side of a lane W. of the cross-roads and 180 yards N.N.W. of the church. The walls have some plaster filling. The western cottage has an original central chimney stack, and at the W. end is a small weather-boarded outhouse, probably also of the 17th century.

Condition—Poor.

(23). Cottage, now two tenements, S.E. of (22) on the opposite side of the lane. The lower part of the walls is entirely of modern brick, the upper part of timber and plaster, except the N.E. end and part of the back, which are weather-boarded.

Condition—Good.

(24). Lilac Cottage, on the N. side of the Buckingham road, 400 yards W.N.W. of the church. The building is almost entirely modern. A large projecting chimney stack has a square shaft of late 17th-century brick.

Condition—Good.

Westbrook End.

Lane, ¼ mile W. of the church, between the Buckingham and Stewkley roads, W. side

(25). The Crooked Billet Inn, 40 yards S. of the Buckingham road. In front the wall is entirely of modern brick; at the back the plaster filling remains in the wall. One chimney stack is of late 17th-century brick.

Condition—Good.

(26). Cottage and Barn, S.E. of (25), were built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century, and retain the wattle and daub filling, but the barn is partly weather-boarded. The cottage has a central chimney stack of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Of cottage, fairly good; of barn, poor.

(27). Cottage, S. of (26), was built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century. The walls have some wattle and daub filling; the S. end is weather-boarded.

Condition—Fairly good.

(28). Cottage, 50 yards S. of (27), was built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century, and the filling in the walls is partly of wattle and daub. The roof is covered with corrugated iron. The chimney stack is original.

Condition—Good.

(29). Cottage, now three tenements, 40 yards S. of (28), was built early in the 16th century, and retains wattle and daub filling in the walls. On the E. front is an original doorway with a four-centred head, of wood.

Condition—Poor.

(30). Cottage, now two tenements, S. of (29), was built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century; the filling in the walls is of 18th-century and modern brick.

Condition—Good.

(31). Cottage, now two tenements, 100 yards S. of (30), was built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century; the filling in the walls is of 18th-century brick. The thatched roof is covered with corrugated iron, and the chimney stack is of thin bricks.

Condition—Fairly good.

(32). Cottage, 40 yards S. of (31). The filling in the walls is partly of plaster. The N. end is gabled and has a projecting chimney stack of 17th-century brick, partly covered by outbuildings.

Condition—Poor.

(33). Cottage, now a dairy and stable, 50 yards S. of (32), was built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century; the walls retain some wattle and daub filling. Interior:—One door is of three battens; another door is made up of 17th-century panelling; both have original ironwork.

Condition—Very poor.

(34). Cottage, 240 yards S. of (33), was built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century; the walls retain a little of the wattle and daub filling. The central chimney stack is partly of 17th-century brick, and a stack at the S. end has been re-built with similar brick.

Condition—Poor.

E. side

(35). Cottage, now a shop, at the corner of a blind alley, opposite to (31). In front the wall is covered with plaster. At the N. end, is a chimney stack of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Fairly good.

The blind alley, on E. side of the lane, ¼ mile W. of the church; E. side

(36). Cottage, 100 yards S. of (35), at the S. end of the alley. The chimney stack is of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Poor.

W. side

(37). Cottage, opposite to (36). The central chimney stack is of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Poor.

(38). Cottage, 40 yards N. of (37). The filling in the walls is partly of plaster. At the N. end is a chimney stack built of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Poor.