BHO

Quainton

Pages 240-248

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Buckinghamshire, Volume 2, North. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1913.

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Citation:

In this section

186. QUAINTON.

(O.S. 6 in. (a)xxii. S.E. (b)xxiii. S.W.)

Ecclesiastical

b(1). Parish Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Holy Cross, stands at the E. end of the village. The walls generally are of stone rubble, the tower is ashlar-faced; the roofs are covered with lead, except those of the nave and chancel, which are tiled. The present Nave, with North and South Aisles, was built c. 1340; the Chancel, except the chancel arch, was re-built c. 1380, when it was extended towards the N. and E., and a N. vestry was added. In the 15th century the West Tower was built and the W. window and doorway of the nave were re-set in the tower; at the same time the nave arcades were heightened, a clearstorey was built, windows were inserted in the aisles and the North Chapel and South Porch were added. In 1877 the church was completely restored, the chancel, N. aisle and S. porch were re-built on the old foundations, the old materials, windows, doorways, etc., being re-used as far as possible; the clearstorey and North Vestry were also re-built.

Architectural Description—The Chancel (43½ ft. by 19½ ft.) has a modern E. window. In the N. wall, opening into the vestry, is a 14th-century doorway with moulded jambs and two-centred head, re-tooled and restored; further W., opening into the N. chapel, is a depressed four-centred arch of two hollow-chamfered orders and of late 15th-century date; the semi-octagonal responds have moulded bases and capitals. In the S. wall are three modern windows. The chancel arch is of c. 1340, much restored; it is two-centred and of two chamfered orders, with semi-octagonal responds which have moulded capitals and bases; on the W. side is a label, apparently modern. The North Vestry is modern. The North or Winwood Chapel (26½ ft. by 12 ft.) has, in the E. wall, a modern doorway opening into the vestry. In the N. wall are two late 15th-century windows, restored, each of three cinque-foiled lights with tracery; the head of the eastern window is four-centred and that of the western window approximately semi-circular; both have moulded external labels. In the N.W. corner is a doorway, modern externally, but with old internal jambs and four-centred rear arch. In the W. wall, opening into the N. aisle, is a modern arch. The Nave (61 ft. by 21 ft.) has N. and S. arcades of five bays and of c. 1340, heightened in the 15th century; the two-centred arches are of two chamfered orders, with plain labels in the nave; the pillars are octagonal and have moulded capitals; the moulded bases are almost all modern. The clearstorey has, on each side, five 15th-century windows, partly restored, and each of two trefoiled lights under a square head with a moulded external label. The North Aisle (7 ft. wide) has, in the N. wall, three windows, each of three cinque-foiled lights with tracery under a square head, which has a moulded external label; the two eastern windows are of the 15th century, much restored, the third window is almost entirely modern: between the second and third windows is the 14th-century N. doorway, much restored; the jambs, two-centred head and external label are moulded. In the N.E. corner is a square-headed doorway, rebated, and having old hooks for a door; it opens into the rood-loft staircase, which retains five steps. The South Aisle (7 ft. wide) has, in the E. wall, a window of two lights and tracery, all modern, except part of the jambs and moulded external label and the internal splays and rear arch which are of the 14th century. In the S. wall are three windows, each of three cinque-foiled lights and tracery under a square head with a moulded external label, all of the 15th century, except the jambs of the easternmost window, which are of the 14th century; it has more elaborate tracery than the other two windows, which resemble the middle window in the N. wall of the N. aisle: between the second and third windows is the 14th-century S. doorway with continuously moulded jambs and two-centred head and a moulded external label. The West Tower (13½ ft. by 13 ft.) is of three stages, with an embattled parapet, below which is a string-course with grotesques at the angles; the S.W. stair-turret is continued above the parapet of the tower and is also embattled; the W. angle buttresses are carried about halfway up the second stage of the tower, and above them are shallow diagonal buttresses. The 15th-century tower arch is two-centred and of three chamfered orders springing from plain jambs. In the S.W. corner is the doorway of the stair-turret, with chamfered jambs and two-centred head. The W. doorway and window are of c. 1340, re-set from the W. wall of the nave; the doorway has richly moulded jambs and two-centred head and a moulded external label, and has been partly restored with cement; the window is of two trefoiled ogee lights and tracery in a two-centred head, with a moulded label. The N., S, and W. walls of the second stage have each a small loop light, that in the N. wall being blocked, and that in the S. wall damaged. The bell-chamber has, in each wall, a 15th-century window of two trefoiled lights and tracery in a two-centred head with a moulded label. The South Porch has a 15th-century entrance archway, considerably restored; it is two-centred and of two hollow-chamfered orders with a moulded external label. In each side wall is a 15th-century window of three trefoiled lights under a square head with sunk spandrels. The Roof of the N. aisle has a few old stop-chamfered rafters; a few of the rafters in the roof of the S. aisle and the beams in the ceiling of the tower are also old.

Fittings—Bells: five and sanctus, 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th by Henry Knight, 1621; sanctus inscribed 'X t e', probably by Thomas Eldridge (1565– 1592). Books: In old lectern—Bible, blackletter, covers of leather over wood, with brass corners, stamped with name and date, '1658 Quainton'. Brasses and Indents. Brasses: In chancel—on N. wall, (1) of John Spence, rector of the parish, 1485, figure of priest in processional vestments, with marginal inscription in blackletter; (2) of Margery, wife of Sir 'Rauff' Verney, knight, and daughter of John Iwardby, 'lord of this towne', 1509, figures of woman, in pedimental head-dress, one son and three daughters, inscription and two shields with arms, first shield party fesswise, in the chief a cross with five molets thereon for Verney, in the foot a fesse with a lion over all for Whitingham, second shield quarterly 1. Verney, 2. Iwardby, defaced, 3. Whitingham, 4. a cross engrailed with a martlet in quarter, for Missenden; on S. wall, re-set in sedilia, (3) of Joan 'Plessi', half-figure of girl with long hair, and black-letter inscription in French, c. 1350; (4) of Richard, son of Nicholas Iwardby, 1510, figure in fur-lined cloak, black-letter inscription in English and two shields with arms of Iwardby, a saltire engrailed and a chief with two molets therein with a crescent for difference; (5) of John Lewys, rector of the parish, 1422, kneeling figure of priest, in cassock and tippet, with inscription. Communion Table: In S. aisle—of oak, with turned legs, early 17th-century. Door: In tower—in doorway of stair-turret, of battens with strap-hinges, date uncertain. Font: of limestone, octagonal bowl, sides carved with foiled panels, one side plain, octagonal stem with moulded corbelling, 15th-century. Lectern: In S. aisle—on communion table, desk, of oak, with band of carved ornament at the bottom, end spandrels carved, inscribed with names of churchwardens and date 1682. Monuments and Floor-slabs. Monuments: In N. aisle—against N. wall, (1) to Sir Richard Pigott of Doddershall, 1685, and Ann his wife, daughter of Sir Edward Harrington, 1686, and to other members of the family, 18th-century; large monument, signed by I. Leoni, architect, of grey and white marble, with projecting base, bearing inscription and supporting sarcophagus with claw-feet, flanked by classic columns supporting an entablature and broken pediment with coat of arms, see floor-slab (1); on W. wall, (2) to Susan, daughter of Richard Brawne of Alscott, Gloucestershire, and wife of Sir John Dormer, knight and baronet, of Lee Grange, Quainton, 1672, also to her husband, Sir John Dormer, 1674, of black and white marble, with large rectangular tablet, two busts, inscriptions and shields with arms. In S. aisle—on S. wall, (3) of Richard Brett, D.Th., rector of the parish, one of the translators of the Authorised Version of the Bible, monument erected by Alicia his wife, 1637, kneeling figures of man and woman, sons and daughters, of alabaster and black marble, coloured, in recess with frieze, pediment and pilasters, inscription on frieze in Hebrew, Greek and Latin, tablet below recess with long inscription in Latin, shield with arms of Brett; at W. end of aisle, (4) altar tomb of Richard Winwood, Deputy Lieutenant of the county in the reign of Charles II., son of Sir Ralph Winwood, knight, principal Secretary of State to Charles I., 1688, and Anne his wife, daughter of Sir Thomas Read, 169¾, recumbent figures of man and woman, white marble, man in armour and large wig; tomb of black marble, in front carved outline of skeleton, inscription recording erection of tomb in 1689, second inscription to three nieces of Mrs. Winwood, Elizabeth, Susan and Martha Rachael, daughters of Sir Gilbert Cornewall, knight, and baron of Burford, Salop, and shield with arms of Winwood quartered with argent three fleurs de lis sable, impaling Read of Barton quartered with or a crosslet sable; above tomb, tablet of white marble with inscription and carved crest. In tower— against S. wall, (5) to Fleetwood Dormer, 1638, his son John, 1679, both of Lee Grange, and to Fleetwood Dormer, 1696, monument of grey and white marble, with moulded and panelled base, supporting two large urns with two weeping cherubs, one now detached, flanked by obelisks, two classic columns surmounted by broken curved pediment, shields of arms, etc. Floor-slabs: In N. aisle—in front of monument (1) and forming part of design, (1) to Lettice, daughter of the Honble. Thomas Cooke of Dodders Hall, 1693, marble slab with inscription and arms. In tower—(2) to John Dormer, 1666, with inscription and arms; (3) to (?) Jane Dormer, date illegible, probably 17th-century, inscription and arms; (4) to Fleetwood Dormer, 1695, inscription and arms; (5) to Susanna, Lady Dormer, 1672/3, and Sir John Dormer, 1675, third name illegible. Painting: (see Screen). Piscinae: In S. aisle—plain rectangular recess with chamfered jambs and head, sexfoil basin, 14th or 15th-century; in E. splay of S.E. window, with chamfered jambs and mullion, trefoiled ogee heads, sexfoil basin, 14th-century, one head broken. Plate: includes cup and cover paten of 1569, flagon with hinged lid, of 1669, and paten of 1672, both with inscription recording the donation by Lady Ann Pigott, and a shield of arms. Reredos: In nave—on N. respond of chancel arch, recess with cinque-foiled four-centred head and stop-chamfered jambs, 15th-century, recess recently opened through wall, and now partly filled up. Screen (see Plate, p. 48): In N. aisle—at E. end, remains of screen, with moulded top rail, four panels with trefoiled ogee heads and carved spandrels, each panel painted with figure of saint in turban head-dress, holding book, background alternately red and brown powdered with roses, mouldings painted red and white, late 15th or early 16th-century, two posts modern with old buttresses attached. Sedile: In S. aisle—ledge of S.E. window carried down to form seat. Stoup: In S. porch—across N.E. corner, circular stone basin in square recess, with trefoiled support, 15th-century, re-set. Miscellanea: In chancel—unattached, small figure of lion, carved wood, possibly arm of seat or part of bench end, probably 17th-century. In S. aisle—over the Winwood monument, funeral helm, with crest.

Condition—Stonework of tower weathering badly; large cracks over chancel arch, and in apex of arch, now with test bars of cement, also cracks over arch opening into vestry and organ chamber, below E. window of S. aisle, and in walls of N. aisle, apparently due to recent settlement of foundations.

Secular

Homestead Moats (2–6)

a(2). S. of Upper South Farm, 1½ miles S.W. of the church, a small circular moat.

a(3). About 500 yards N. of (2); the island enclosed is 7 ft. above the moat, of which one arm has been filled in with material from the island.

a(4). 300 yards S.W. of Doddershall House.

a(5). 500 yards W. of (4).

a(6). N.E. of Woodside Farm, about 2/3 mile N.W. of (5).

a(7). Doddershall House, with Moat, about 2 miles W. of the church. The House is of two storeys; the walls are of brick, but are almost entirely covered with rough-cast; some of the quoins are of stone, the rest are covered with cement; the roofs are tiled, except part of the roof of one wing, which is covered with slate. The plan is of half-H shape, with wings extending towards the N.W.; on the S.E. front the S.W. wing projects slightly, and there is a porch in the middle. The main block and the N.E. wing were built early in the 16th century; the S.W. wing was added c. 1689; a former N.W. wing was pulled down c. 1790, and there are many modern additions and alterations. The main block originally contained the hall of three bays, with a porch and small staircase facing the courtyard, and a room of two bays, formerly the kitchen, on the N.E. side; both the hall and kitchen are now sub-divided. The present kitchen and domestic offices are in the N.E. wing. The S.W. wing contains the principal staircase, the drawing-room and two other rooms.

The house is a good example of 16th-century work; the original chimney stack on the S.E., the hall, and the staircases are noteworthy.

N.W. Elevation:—The main block is entirely covered with cement or restored with modern brick; in the middle is a gabled porch of two storeys, between two small gables; the entrance doorway has a flat four-centred head with traceried spandrels, all original, but the posts are modern or encased; E. of the entrance is a staircase and a modern addition, and beyond the W. gable is another modern addition. On the first floor are two original windows, one of two lights with a moulded wood frame, mullion and transom; the other is of one light with a transom, and is unglazed. The end of the S.W. wing is of late 18th-century red and blue bricks; the return wall, facing the courtyard, is partly covered by a low modern addition, above which are two large projecting chimney stacks of c. 1689, with rectangular shafts having sunk panels with round heads. The walls of the N.E. wing have been re-faced with modern brick. S.E. Elevation:—The porch, in the middle of the elevation, and the end of the S.W. wing are gabled; the main block has a moulded wood cornice with dentil ornament, possibly of the 17th century; at the corners of the porch are two large brackets of wood, carved with a volute pattern; W. of the porch is a large projecting chimney stack of early 16th-century date, covered with rough-cast to the level of the eaves, and finished with a moulded brick cornice and a shaped panel of brick set to imitate rusticated masonry; the two octagonal shafts are on a rectangular base, and have moulded caps and bases; built into the chimney-breast are three stones, carved with the head of a man, a conventional lily, and the face of a woman; lower down is a fourth stone carved with a grotesque beast and foliage; in the upper storey, E. of the porch are three similar stones, two of them being each carved with a fleur de lis, and the third with the head of a man; lower down in the wall are two shields, of wood, one carved with the arms of Pigot, and the other with ermine, three lozenges fessewise; the top of the second shield is missing: only one original window remains, and is of two lights, with frame, mullions and transom of moulded oak. The chimney stack at the S.W. end of the main block has grouped square shafts built of thin bricks; the stack at the N.E. end is apparently of 17th-century bricks. S.W. Elevation:—The walls are covered with rough-cast; two lead rainwater pipes have ornamental heads bearing the initials 'T.L.' and the date '1689'.

Interior:—On the Ground Floor the hall in the main block (originally 40 ft. by 20 ft., now sub-divided) has heavily moulded ceiling-beams forming six panels; the four wall-posts supporting the cross-beams are original and are thicker at the top than at the bottom; two of the walls have moulded beams, forming cornices; the ceiling-beams are supported at the intersections by large twisted posts, inserted c. 1810: the fireplace is of stone and has moulded jambs and depressed head with moulded spandrels; above it is a frieze and moulded cornice supported by narrow projecting pilasters; on the cast-iron fire-back is an achievement of arms, a cheveron between three escutcheons, each with a sprig of conventional foliage over it and bearing the initial 'T'; round the fireplace is some 17th-century panelling of carved oak; the N.W. window contains a few fragments of old glass with the Pigot arms. The rooms E. of the hall have intersecting splayed beams in the ceilings; one of the beams is supported on large wall-posts; in the dining room is an elaborately panelled 17th-century door. The 17th-century winding staircase on the N.E. side of the hall has plain square newels, with moulded caps, turned balusters, and a hand-rail moulded on one side. In the S.W. wing the walls of the drawing room are lined with large bolection-moulded panels, and the doorways and fireplace have moulded architraves, all possibly of late 17th-century date. The hall containing the principal staircase has walls partly covered with 16th and 17th-century panelling; some of the panels are carved, and attached to other panels are fragments of 15th and 16th-century carving, small cinque-foiled heads, linen panels, etc.; the frieze is partly made up with 15th-century tracery, of wood, possibly from the former church at Hogshaw; the door opening into the hall also has some 15th-century tracery, brought from elsewhere; the fireplace has an early 17th-century overmantel with three panels, which have carved semi-circular heads and spandrels, fluted pilasters and lower rail; the date 1510 is cut on a pilaster, but is of no significance. The oak staircase is of late 17th-century date, and has massive square panelled newels with moulded caps; fixed to each newel is a finial made up of two 15th-century poppy-heads, cut in half and attached to a central stem; they are probably from Hogshaw Church; attached to the panels of the newels are 17th-century figures, also brought from elsewhere; the large handrail and the fascia are moulded; the balusters are twisted and partly turned; the dado of the staircase has some 17th-century panelling, three of the panels being carved with shields each bearing the arms of Pigot impaling Iwardby; outside the shields are the initials 'R.S.I.' and 'C.P.': the window contains some glass bearing an achievement of arms dated 1577; the shield is of eight pieces, (1) and (8) argent a bend engrailed sable with three fleurs de lis thereon. Under the staircase is a doorway opening into a small cellar, which contains a well; over the doorway is an 18th-century panel inscribed with a verse dated 1610. In the N.E. wing are some plain 16th-century ceiling-beams.

Quainton, Plan Shewing Positions of Monuments

On the First Floor, over the hall, the library, originally the same size as the hall, but now sub-divided, has two intersecting moulded beams and remains of wall-posts similar to those on the ground floor; at one end of the room are two panelled doors of early 17th-century date. The passage at the top of the winding staircase has a 17th-century panelled door, and part of the partition is timber-framed, with wattle and daub filling; the elm floor-boards of the passage and of several rooms are original. The room in the S. corner of the house has a moulded cornice and a fireplace with a large architrave and a panelled overmantel, all of c. 1689. In the room over the drawing room the ceiling-beams are exposed, the walls are lined with large bolection-moulded panels, and the fireplace and doorways have large architraves.

Of the Moat only fragments remain N.E. and S.W. of the house.

Condition—Of house, good.

b(8). Denham Lodge, now a farmhouse, with gatehouse, moat and fish-pond, about ⅓ mile N.E. of the church. The House is on the site of a former manor house and is of two storeys and an attic; the walls are partly of stone and partly of brick; the roofs are tiled. The plan is of half-H shape; the main block was built probably early in the 17th century; the two small wings projecting towards the S. are of later date. On the S. front the main block has been re-faced with stone, and the wings are built of thin bricks, possibly re-used. At the back is a modern addition, and the walls are almost entirely of stone, but a staircase and a projecting chimney stack are built of thin bricks; the stairs have been removed from the staircase. Interior:— On the ground floor are two 17th-century panelled doors, and on the first floor is a door of old moulded oak battens.

The Gatehouse, now used as tool-shed, etc., on the inner bank of the moat, 30 yards S. of the house, is probably also of early 17th-century date. The walls are partly of stone and partly timber-framed, and are on stone foundations; the roof is tiled.

The Moat surrounds the house and is fed by a spring in the hills on the N.; it is now crossed by a bridge, but the gatehouse possibly indicates the existence of a former drawbridge. The Fishpond, E. of the house, is now dry.

About 40 acres of land adjoining the house are enclosed by a wall, built chiefly of thin bricks.

Condition—Of buildings and moat, good.

b(9). The Rectory, about 80 yards N.W. of the church, is of two storeys and an attic; the walls are of brick, with remains of timber-framing; the roofs are tiled. It was built in the 16th century on an L-shaped plan, with wings extending towards the N. and W., and a staircase on the N. side of the W. wing; the walls have been almost entirely re-faced, and considerable additions made, including a wing which extends from the W. side of the N. wing; on the W. side of the courtyard thus formed is a wash-house, apparently of the 17th century; in the middle of the N. wing is the original hall, now the drawing room, with the study, formerly the kitchen, at the N. end and the dining room at the S. end; W. of the dining room is the present entrance hall, with the doorway on the S. side; W. of the drawing room and study are the staircase hall, some domestic offices, and the servants' hall.

The house is an interesting example of 16th-century domestic architecture, with 17th and 18th-century alterations. The hall screen, of c. 1500, possibly brought from elsewhere, is especially noteworthy.

E. Elevation:—The wall is of brick with a wood cornice and sash-windows which have wood frames, all of late 17th-century date; at each end of the elevation is a projecting two-storeyed bay; in the middle is a gabled pediment with a semi-circular window in it. The N. and S. Elevations are of similar character to that of the E. elevation. At the back of the house the walls enclosing the courtyard were apparently re-faced with brick in the 18th century, except those of the staircase, which are thicker than the others and are of timber and brick; the window of the staircase is of c. 1600, and of three lights with a transom. The wash-house and the scullery adjoining it have some 17th-century casement windows with old fastenings.

Interior:—The walls of the entrance hall are lined with painted panelling of c. 1700; E. of the doorway is a deep recess with doors of somewhat later date than the panelling; the small chimneypiece is of c. 1700, and a cupboard on one side of the fireplace has panelled doors of the same date. In the drawing room, formerly the hall, is a moulded oak screen of c. 1500, apparently in the usual position at the N. end of the hall, but it is said to have been brought from the old manor house of Quainton; it is divided into five bays, two of them pierced by openings with four-centred heads, fitted with doors of late 16th-century date; the remaining bays have a double range of linen panels, and there are three similar panels over the doorways; above the panels are carved fantastic letters, forming the inscription 'G. de Neil', with a bird carrying a shield between the 'G' and 'de', and seven shields bearing arms, 1, Brudenell of Stoke Mandeville impaling Croke of Chilton; 2, Brudenell impaling Englefield; 3, Brudenell impaling (?); 4, Iwardby of Quainton impaling Brudenell; 5, Pigot of Doddershall impaling Iwardby; 6, Verney of Claydon impaling Iwardby; 7, Clifford impaling Iwardby; the back of the screen is plastered and forms the wall of the study: in the ceiling of the drawing room are three heavily moulded 16th-century beams, forming six panels; the walls are partly lined with 16th-century panelling which has moulded styles and beaded and chamfered rails; the modern fireplace has a mantelpiece made up of 16th-century material, re-used and inscribed with a monogram and date 'B. B. 1750'; on each side of the fireplace is a late 17th-century recess with a round head, pilasters and over-doors; the panelled doors opening into the dining room are of the same date as the recesses. The walls of the dining room are entirely covered with bolection-moulded panelling of c. 1700, and the detail of the whole room, except the fireplace, is apparently of that date. The study has a wide fireplace, partly blocked, and S. of the fireplace a winding staircase of oak leads to the first floor. The principal staircase is of c. 1600, and has square chamfered newels with turned finials and pendants, a moulded hand-rail and flat sectional balusters adapted to the rake of the stairs; it is entirely of oak and well preserved. On the first floor, on the outer wall of two rooms over the drawing room, is some 16th-century panelling, and in a doorway opening into the staircase leading to the attics is a door of moulded battens.

Condition—Very good.

Upper Street, S. side

b(10). The Winwood Almshouses (see Plate opposite), eight cottages in one range, facing N., on the W. side of the churchyard. The upper storey is partly in the roof; the walls are of brick; the roofs are tiled. The almshouses were built in 1687, as recorded on two inscriptions in front, but there are some indications of the wall at the back being of two dates.

The building is a good example of late 17th-century work; the brick gables and the coat of arms over the archway of each porch are especially noteworthy.

The plan is rectangular, with two porches in front; the cottages contain one room on each floor, and on the ground floor a scullery, in which is a staircase; there is one large chimney stack between every pair of cottages. On the N. Elevation the two porches are each of two storeys with a curvilinear stepped gable of brick; between them are two small plain gables; beyond the porches are also six plain gables, three on each side, with dormer windows between them; the entrance archways of the porches are semi-circular, and of brick with springers and key-blocks of stone; the stone string-course between the storeys breaks upwards over each archway, and supports a stone panel with an inscription recording the erection and endowment of the almshouses in 1687, by Richard, son and heir of Sir Ralph Winwood, knight, principal Secretary of State to James I.; over each panel are the quartered arms of Winwood impaling Read, with the phœnix crest of Winwood above them; against the walls of each porch, inside, are stone benches. The windows on the ground floor and in the gables have wood casements and leaded lights. The four chimney stacks have each four square shafts set diagonally, and built of thin bricks, apparently of an earlier date than those used in the rest of the building; the two W. stacks have been re-built. The S. Elevation has a series of small plain gables, and a curvilinear gable of brick which corresponds to that of the E. porch on the N. elevation.

At each end of the almshouses is a small outbuilding of one storey; the walls are of brick, with semi-circular gables at the ends.

Condition—Very good.

Monuments (11–38, 40–44)

These buildings are almost all of the 17th century, and of two storeys; the walls generally are timber-framed, with brick or plaster filling and a little stone. The roofs are thatched or tiled. In some of the rooms are wide open fireplaces and chamfered ceiling-beams.

Upper Street, S. side (cont.)

b(11). Cottage, 100 yards W. of the church. The plan is L-shaped. The walls are partly covered with plaster, and have an imitation of the timber-framing painted on them. One chimney stack has grouped shafts built of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Fairly good.

b(12). Cottage, on the E. side of (11). The plan is L-shaped. The walls have plaster filling, partly covered with rough-cast. One chimney stack is of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Fairly good.

b(13). Cottage (see Plate, p. 257), 150 yards W. of the church. In front the brick filling in the walls is original, and some of it is set in herringbone pattern; on the ground floor is a small projecting window with a gable over it and now blocked; the moulded wood mullions, head and sill are of the 17th century and the sill is supported by a small moulded bracket; on the first floor is a similar window, partly blocked, and without a gable; a third original window is also partly blocked. The N. end retains original brick filling, but the S. end is faced with modern brick, except the gable, which is covered with rough-cast. Two chimney stacks are of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Poor, especially at the S. end.

b(14). House, now two tenements, 200 yards W. of the church. The filling in the N. and S. walls is of original red and blue bricks; in front is a date, probably 1622, set in blue bricks, but the first two figures are covered with ivy. At the E. end is a small modern addition. The central chimney stack is original.

Condition—Good.

b(15). Cottage, now a shop, about 270 yards W. of the church. The walls have been much restored with modern brick and plaster. One small chimney is apparently of the 17th century.

Condition—Good.

b(16). Cottage, about 300 yards W. of the church. The brick filling in the walls is modern. One small chimney stack is of the 17th century.

Condition—Good.

b(17). House, about 90 yards W. of (16), was built late in the 15th century, and is probably the remaining part of a much larger building. On the N. front the timber-framing is braced and the upper storey projects; the moulded bressumer is supported by a plain bracket on each of the four main posts; in the lower storey, at the E. end, is an original doorway, now blocked, with moulded oak jambs and four-centred head with carved foliage in the spandrels. At the back of the house the brick filling is modern. The plain square chimney stack is of thin bricks.

Condition—Fairly good.

b(18). Cottage and Barn, ¼ mile W. of the church. In the walls of the Cottage the brick filling has been much restored; the lower storey at the N. end is of stone, and the S. wall is on a stone base. The central chimney stack, of brick, is original, and the projecting chimney stack at the N. end has one square shaft also of 17th-century brick.

The Barn is a plain, weather-boarded structure. Condition—Good.

N. side

b(19). Cottage, about 230 yards W.N.W. of the church. The plan is of the central chimney type. The walls have been considerably restored with modern brick. The chimney stack is of 17th-century brick, and has grouped square shafts, and, on one side, a sunk panel with a round head.

Condition—Good.

b(20). Cottages (see Plate, p. 24), three, 330 yards W. of the church, form an L-shaped building. They were restored late in the 17th and again in the 19th or 20th century. At the back the lower storey is partly of stone; the E. wall is covered with cement. One chimney stack is of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Good.

a(21). Cottages, three in one range, 560 yards W. of the church. All the walls are covered with rough-cast, except those of a small projecting wing at the back, which retains the 17th-century timber and brick, and has a small plain wood-mullioned window of three lights. The central chimney stack has grouped square shafts built of 17th-century brick; two small chimneys are also original.

Condition—Good.

a(22). Cottages, three, in one range, 230 yards N.W. of (21). The wall at the W. end has a stone plinth. One large chimney stack has grouped square shafts built of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Fairly good.

a(23). House, 200 yards S.W. of (22). The front has been almost entirely re-faced with modern brick. The central chimney stack is of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Fairly good.

a(24). House, now cottages, on the S.W. side of (23). The brick filling in the walls is almost entirely modern. The central chimney stack is of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Fairly good.

Lower Street, S. side

a(25). Cottage, two tenements, about 760 yards W. of the church. Some of the brick filling in the walls is modern.

Condition—Fairly good.

a(26). Cottage, 150 yards S.E. of (25). The walls are covered with rough-cast. At one end is a chimney stack of thin bricks.

Condition—Good.

a(27). Cottage, two tenements, 40 yards E. of (26). The walls have been restored with modern brick. The central chimney stack is partly of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Fairly good.

a(28). Cottage, about 30 yards E. of (27). The walls have been much restored, and the front wall has been heightened. The central chimney stack is partly of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Good.

a(29). Cottage, now two tenements and a modern shop, 50 yards E. of (28). The walls have been considerably restored with modern brick. The large central chimney stack is of 17th-century brick, and has grouped square shafts, restored at the top.

Condition—Good.

b(30). Cottage, two tenements, W. of (31), has been restored and enlarged. One chimney stack is of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Fairly good.

b(31). The Sportsman Inn, about 430 yards S.W. of the church, has been restored and enlarged. The chimney stack is of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Fairly good.

b(32). Cottage, E. of (31), has been enlarged, and the walls have been restored with modern brick. One chimney stack is of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Fairly good.

b(33). Cottages, a range, about 90 yards E. of (32). The walls have been much restored, and a small modern addition has been made. One chimney stack is original.

Condition—Fairly good.

N. side

b(34). Cottage, two tenements, 270 yards S.W. of the church, has been much restored and enlarged. On the E. side the 17th-century brick filling remains, and one panel is set in herring-bone pattern; the S. end is covered with rough-cast.

Condition—Good.

a(35). Cottage, 220 yards W. of (34), is of one storey and an attic. The walls retain much of the 17th-century plaster filling, restored with modern brick. There is a modern addition at the back.

Condition—Fairly good.

a(36). Cottage, now tenements, 130 yards W. of (35), is of one storey and an attic. The walls are partly of 17th-century brick. The central chimney stack is original.

Condition—Fairly good.

The Green, W. side

b(37–38). Houses, two, about 300 yards W.S.W. of the church. The walls are modern, or covered with rough-cast and cement. Each building has a chimney stack of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Good.

N. side

b(39). The Village Cross, remains (see Plate, p. 24), 330 yards W. of the church, probably of the 15th century. The remains consist of a rough square plinth and two steps with a square block on the top, and about 4 ft. of an octagonal stone shaft, which has stops at the base.

Condition—Much worn.

E. side

b(40). Cottage, two tenements, about 300 yards W. of the church, is of one storey and an attic. The walls have been partly restored and partly covered with plaster. The central chimney stack is original.

Condition—Good.

a(41). Farmhouse, on the E. side of Station Road, ⅓ mile S.W. of the church, is of two storeys and an attic. The original plan is L-shaped, with the wings extending towards the S. and W. At the S. end is a late 17th-century extension, and on the W. side of the S. wing is a small modern addition of one storey. The original walls have brick filling with some blue bricks set in a pattern, and have been much restored with modern brick. The large central chimney stack in the S. wing is original, with oversailing courses at the top.

Condition—Structurally fairly sound; internal condition bad; unoccupied.

a(42). Upper South Farm, 1⅓ miles S.W. of the church. The plan of the house is rectangular, facing S., with a projecting wing at the W. end, and a small modern addition at the back. The walls have been almost entirely re-faced with 18th-century and modern brick. Part of the N. wall is original, and has a gable and old windows.

Interior:—At the E. end of the house, on the ground floor, one room has a wide fireplace and an open timber ceiling, and another room has a heavily moulded beam in the ceiling. On the first floor the timber construction is visible, and there is a little early 17th-century panelling. Some of the floors are of wide oak boards.

Condition—Good.

a(43). Grange Farm, house, barns and outbuilding, 1 mile N.W. of the church. The House is of two storeys and an attic. The walls are almost entirely of brick. The 17th-century plan is rectangular, considerably enlarged and altered in the 18th and 19th centuries; only the present W. wing is original, and has been partly restored. Interior:—On the ground floor are some chamfered ceiling-beams, an open fireplace, and some 17th-century panelling.

The Barns, N. of the house, are of 17th-century timber and brick; the small square Outbuilding, S.W. of the house, is probably of late 17th-century date.

Condition—Good.

b(44). Denham Farm, about 1,000 yards N.N.E. of the church. The 17th-century house is of rectangular plan, facing S., with small 18th-century additions in front, at the back and at the W. end; a brick in the S. extension bears the date 1739. In front the original brick filling is whitewashed, and some of the windows are old. One chimney stack is of thin bricks.

Condition—Fairly good.