Roxwell

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 2, Central and South west. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1921.

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'Roxwell', in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 2, Central and South west, (London, 1921) pp. 204-207. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/essex/vol2/pp204-207 [accessed 21 April 2024]

In this section

79. ROXWELL. (E.c.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)xlii. (b)xliii. S.W. (c)li. N.E. (d)lii. N.W.)

Roxwell is a parish and small village 4½ m. N.W. of Chelmsford. The Church, Hoestreet Farm and Dukes are the principal monuments.

Ecclesiastical

b(1). Parish Church of St. Michael stands in the village. The walls are of flint-rubble with dressings of clunch; the roofs are tiled, the bell-turret weather-boarded and the spire shingled. The Chancel and Nave are probably of the 14th century, but the church has been so completely restored in the 19th century that little evidence of date is left. The North Aisle, Vestry and Porch and the bell-turret are modern.

The Church, Plan

Architectural Description—The Chancel (27ft. by 21 ft.) has a modern E. window. In the N. wall is a doorway, possibly of old material reworked. In the S. wall are two modern windows and a modern doorway. The 14th-century chancel-arch is two-centred and of two chamfered orders; the responds have each a semi-octagonal attached shaft with a moulded capital and modern base.

The Nave (59 ft. by 24½ ft.) has a modern N. arcade. In the S. wall are three windows, all modern except for the splays and rear-arches, which are possibly of the 14th century; further W. are the splays and segmental-pointed rear-arch of the former S. doorway, now blocked. In the W. wall is a modern window. The modern bell-turret at the W. end of the nave stands on four 15th or early 16th-century posts with curved braces.

The Roof of the chancel is of cross-braced collar-beam type and of doubtful date. The nave has a braced collar-beam roof with three rough chamfered tie-beams.

Fittings—Bells: three; said to be, 2nd by John Waylett, 1707; 3rd by John Clarke, 1621. Brass: In chancel—to Thomas Younge, 1593, and his son, Thomas, 1596, and his son's wife, Parnell(Hunwick), 1597, inscription and shield of arms. Glass: In nave—in W. window, two panels of German or Swiss glass, one dated 1600, and each with a central and smaller side panels; (a) The Nativity with small figure subjects of Humility, Chastity, the Annunciation, the Virgin and St. Elizabeth, Contemplation, Perseverance, and a German inscription; (b) The Resurrection with small figure subjects of incidents in the life of our Lord. Monument and Floor-slabs. Monument: In chancel—on S. wall, to Sir John Bramston, 1654, chief justice to the King's Bench, also to Sir John Bramston, K.B., his son, 1699, white marble draped tablet with martial emblems and cartouche of arms. Floor slabs: In chancel—(1) to Alice (Abdy) wife of John Bramstone, 1647, with shield of arms; (2) to Elizabeth (Brabason), wife of Sir John Bramston, 1647, with two shields of arms; also to Catherine (Nutt), wife of Anthony Bramston, 1708, with shield of arms. In nave—(3) to Thomas Crush, 1670. Plate: Includes cup of 1695 and cover-paten of 1698. Royal Arms: In N. aisle—over N. doorway, of James II., 1684, painted wooden panel. Screen: Between chancel and nave, modern but incorporating carved cornice, cresting and traceried heads of posts, mixed Renaissance and Gothic detail, late 17th-century, said to have formed part of former organ case of Durham Cathedral. Seating: In N. aisle—oak settle with panelled back, curved arms and turned legs, 17th-century. Miscellanea: Incorporated in church-yard wall, pieces of window tracery, etc., 15th-century.

Condition—Good, much restored.

Secular

Homestead Moats.

a(2). At site of Old Skreens, 1½ m. W. of the church.

a(3). At Bolding Hatch, 2 m. N.W. of the church.

b(4). At Chalk End, about ¼ m. E.S.E. of (3).

b(5). At Hill Farm, 1 m. N.N.W. of the church.

b(6). Newland Hall, house and moat, nearly ¾ m. N.W. of the church. The House is of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. It was built early in the 16th century with a cross-wing at the N. and S. ends. Late in the same century the N. cross-wing was extended towards the E. The main block has been heightened and its roof continued over the S. cross-wing. The timber-framing is exposed on one side of the E. extension and has brick nogging. Inside the building the rooms of the main block have original moulded ceiling-beams carved with running leaf-ornament. There are two doorways with four-centred heads and sunk spandrels. Parts of the original roof remain with a moulded wall-plate.

The Moat is incomplete.

Condition—Of house, good.

b(7). Mountneys, house and moat, ½ m. W. of (6). The House is of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. It was built probably late in the 16th century and has exposed ceiling-beams inside the building.

The Moat is fragmentary.

Condition—Of house, fairly good.

b(8). Lightfoots, house, barn and moat, ¼ m. W.N.W. of the church. The House, now two tenements, is of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. It was built probably late in the 16th century and has three gables on the N. front. Inside the building is some original panelling and exposed ceiling-beams.

The Barn, N. of the house, and probably contemporary with it, is timber-framed and thatched.

The Moat surrounds the house.

Condition—Of house, fairly good.

d(9). Hoestreet Farm, house and moat, about ¾ m. S.E. of the church. The House is of two storeys with attics, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. It was probably re-built c. 1600 with cross-wings at the N.E. and S.W. ends. On the S.E. front the upper storey projects at the end of the cross-wings. The original central chimney-stack has four diagonal shafts. Inside the building the N.E. wing has an original moulded ceiling-beam. One room has some early 17th-century panelling. On the first floor the wall of one room has early 17th-century strapwork painted on the plaster and the adjoining door; above the fireplace are the Stuart Royal Arms and supporters, dated 1606. The roof of the main block has king-post trusses.

The Moat is incomplete.

Condition—Of house, fairly good.

Monuments (10–24).

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered or weather-boarded; the roofs are tiled or thatched. Several of the buildings have original chimney-stacks and exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good or fairly good, unless noted.

d(10). House, now two tenements, 100 yards S. of (9), was built early in the 16th century and has a cross-wing at the N. end. The upper storey projects at the W. end of the cross-wing. The early 17th-century central chimney-stack has attached diagonal shafts. Inside the building are two original doorways with four-centred heads, and the cross-wing has an original tie-beam with curved braces, forming a four-centred arch.

d(11). Board's Farm, house nearly 1 m. S. of the church, was built probably late in the 16th century with cross-wings at the E. and W. ends. The original chimney-stack at the W. end has tabled offsets and two octagonal shafts with moulded bases.

d(12). Blow's Farm, house nearly 1½ m. S.S.W. of the church, was built early in the 17th century with cross-wings at the N. and S. ends. The chimney-stack at the S. end has two diagonal shafts.

c(13). Radley Green Farm, house about 2¼ m. S.W. of the church, was built about the middle of the 16th century and has a cross-wing at the S.W. end. Inside the building a wide open fireplace has two recessed seats with four-centred heads. The staircase has symmetrically turned balusters of c. 1600.

d(14). Stonehill Farm, house about ¾ m. S.S.W. of the church, was built probably early in the 17th century with cross-wings at the N. and S. ends. The upper storey projects at the E. end of the S. cross-wing and has a moulded bressumer. The original central chimney-stack is of cruciform plan with flat pilasters.

b(15). House, at Chalk End, 150 yards S. of (4), was built late in the 16th century. Inside the building is a fireplace with a three-centred head.

Condition—Ruinous.

b(16). Malthouse, house at Boyton Cross, ½ m. N.N.E. of the church, was built late in the 17th century.

b(17). Dukes, house and barn, 250 yards N.W. of the church. The House was built in the 16th century with cross-wings at the N. and S. ends, and a projecting wing with a 17th-century extension at the back. The E. front has been re-built, but above the door is a wooden panel inscribed "1666 T.A.C." The three original chimney-stacks (Plate p. 129), have each three octagonal shafts on a rectangular base with a deep band at the top diapered with quatrefoils; two of the stacks have been restored. Inside the building are some original panelled doors with cock's head hinges. The roof of the main block has king-post trusses.

The Barn, W. of the house, is of the 16th century, and has queen-post roof-trusses.

b(18). House, now three tenements, on N. side of the road, 120 yards W.N.W. of the church, has a 15th-century W. wing, but the rest of the house was re-built in the 17th century. The upper storey of the original wing projects in front on curved brackets and with moulded brackets to the gable. Inside the building the original wing has a king-post roof-truss and a cambered tie-beam.

b(19). Row, of four tenements, N. of the church-yard, was completely re-built in the 19th century, except for the 17th-century chimney-stack, cruciform on plan.

b(20). House, two tenements, N. of (19), was built early in the 17th-century, and has a cross-wing at the N. end, extended in the 18th century. This extension covers a projecting upper storey of the original building.

b(21). Chequers Inn, 50 yards E. of the church, was built early in the 17th century.

b(22). Cottage, 40 yards E. of (21), now incorporated in a row of tenements (Plate p. 45), was built probably in the 16th century. The upper storey projects and is gabled. Inside the building is an original window with a diamond-shaped mullion and now blocked.

b(23). Hare and Hound Inn, nearly 1 m. E.S.E. of the church, was built probably early in the 17th century but has been much altered.

d(24). Thatcher's Farm, house ¼ m. W. of (23), was built probably in the 17th century but has been much altered.

(25). Skreens, house about 1½ m. W.S.W. of the church, has now been demolished; it contained a considerable quantity of re-used 16th-century panelling with carved heads; a late 16th-century fireplace (Plate p. 247) with fluted pilasters and an overmantel with carved heads; the staircase had square carved newels.

Condition—Now demolished.

Unclassified

b(26). Mound, about 1½ m. N.E. of the church. A low, irregularly shaped mound situated on high ground. The mound was opened with negative results.

Condition—Poor.