Ross

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 2, East. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1932.

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Citation:

'Ross', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 2, East, (London, 1932), pp. 158-165. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/heref/vol2/pp158-165 [accessed 19 June 2024].

. "Ross", in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 2, East, (London, 1932) 158-165. British History Online, accessed June 19, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/heref/vol2/pp158-165.

. "Ross", An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 2, East, (London, 1932). 158-165. British History Online. Web. 19 June 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/heref/vol2/pp158-165.

In this section

67 ROSS (C.f.)

(O.S. 6 in. LI, N.E.)

Ross is a small town on the left bank of the Wye, 11 m. S.S.E. of Hereford. The church, Market House and Nos. 34–36 High Street (Man of Ross's House) are the principal monuments.

Ecclesiastical

(1). Parish Church of St. Mary stands on the S. side of the town. The walls generally are of local sandstone rubble and ashlar with dressings of the same material; the roofs are covered with slates. The presence of calcareous tufa in the walls may indicate the re-use of 12th-century material. The whole church, consisting of Chancel, Nave, North and South Aisles, was re-built in the last quarter of the 13th century; it was dedicated in 1316. The South Porch and West Tower were added early in the 14th century and the North Porch rather later; in the second half of the century the chancel was extended some 12 or 15 ft. towards the E. The Markye Chapel was added c. 1510. In 1721 the greater part of the spire was re-built with the old materials and the pinnacles added to the tower; in 1743 the nave-arcades were heightened and re-built with the old material. The church was restored in 1878 and subsequently. The Organ Chamber is modern.

The church is of no great architectural interest, but among the fittings the 16th and 17th-century monuments and the 15th-century glass are noteworthy.

Ross on Wye, the Parish Church of St. Mary

Architectural Description—The Chancel (51½ ft. by 20 ft.) has an E. window all modern except the 15th-century splays and rear-arch. In the N. wall are three three-light windows, all modern, except for parts of the 14th-century jambs and splays; the late 13th-century doorway has moulded jambs, two-centred arch and defaced label; at the W. end of the wall is the square-headed upper doorway of the rood-loft staircase. In the S. wall are two windows, uniform with those in the N. wall; farther W. is a modern archway. The late 13th-century chancel arch is two-centred and of two orders moulded on the W. face and chamfered on the E. face; the semi-octagonal responds have moulded capitals and a base on the S. side only; the N. respond has been partly removed for the modern doorway to the rood-loft staircase, which projects as a turret in the angle of the chancel and N. aisle; above the chancel-arch are three modern windows.

The Organ Chamber is modern, but re-set in the S. wall is a window uniform with the side windows in the chancel.

The Nave (69¼ ft. by 23 ft.) has 13th-century N. and S. arcades (Plate 10) of five bays raised and re-constructed with the old material in 1743; the arches are two-centred and of two chamfered orders; the cylindrical columns have 18th-century drums up to the moulded band-course above which they are of the 13th-century re-set; the moulded capitals and bases are mostly original; the N.E. respond has a 13th-century triple shafted corbel; the N.W. respond has the outer order of the arch carried down the wall and a partly restored corbel with a scalloped capital under the inner order; the S.E. respond has a made-up 18th-century corbel; below it is a squint to the chancel, now blocked; the corbel of the S.W. respond is modern. Beyond the W. end of both arcades is a 14th-century window of one trefoiled ogee light; below the N. window is a blocked doorway, probably of the 18th century.

The North Aisle (20¾ ft. wide) has an E. window, all modern except the late 13th-century splays, moulded rear-arch and internal label with head-stops; under the arcade is one jamb of a blocked doorway. In the N. wall are four much restored late 13th-century windows, each of two trefoiled lights with a quatrefoil in a two-centred head; the late 14th-century N. doorway has moulded jambs, two-centred arch and label. In the W. wall is a much restored late 13th-century window of three lights with a moulded internal label and head-stops.

The South Aisle (20½ ft. wide) has an early 14th-century E. window, with moulded jambs, rear-arch and labels, but with the tracery cut away. In the S. wall is an early 16th-century arcade of two bays, with two-centred arches of two chamfered orders; the octagonal column has a moulded capital and base and the responds have attached half-columns; the re-set mid 13th-century S. doorway has a two-centred head of two moulded orders with a moulded label; the inner order is continued down the jambs and the outer order rests on detached shafts with moulded capitals; farther W. is a window, all modern except the early 14th-century splays and moulded rear-arch; above the W. end of the arcade are remains of a destroyed window. Along the outer face of the wall runs a cornice of c. 1300 with ball-flower ornament. In the W. wall is a window, all modern except the 14th-century moulded jambs, rear-arch and internal label.

The Markye Chapel (36½ ft. by 14¼ ft.) is of early 16th-century date and has an E. window all modern except for the moulded splays and rear-arch; below it is a blocked square-headed opening perhaps to a 'bone-hole.' In the S. wall are three windows, all modern except for the splays and moulded rear-arches. In the W. wall is a doorway with moulded jambs and flat four-centred head; above it is a window of two trefoiled lights with tracery in a square head.

The West Tower (19¼ ft. square) is of early 14th-century date and of three stages with a moulded plinth, parapet with pinnacles at the angles and a stone spire. The two-centred tower-arch is of three continuous moulded orders with a moulded label. The W. window is modern except for parts of the moulded jambs, splays and rear-arch. A blocked doorway in the turret-staircase indicates that there was formerly a wooden gallery dividing the stage. The second stage has, in the E. wall, a doorway with chamfered jambs and two-centred head. The N. and S. walls have each a window of two trefoiled or cinque-foiled lights with a quatre-foiled spandrel in a two-centred head. In the W. wall is a window of one trefoiled light. The bell-chamber has, in each wall, a window of one pointed light; the N. and S. windows are larger than the others and have moulded reveals and labels and defaced head-stops. The octagonal spire has rolls at the angles and rests on squinch-arches across the angles of the tower; at the base of each of the cardinal faces of the spire is a window of two trefoiled ogee lights with a quatrefoil in a two-centred head in a gable.

The North Porch is of c. 1330 and has a two-centred outer archway of two continuous moulded orders; above it is a window of one trefoiled ogee light. The side walls have each a two-light window with a modern head.

The South Porch is of two storeys and of c. 1300 and has a two-centred outer archway of two continuous orders with a moulded label; above it is a window, all modern except the W. jamb. At the S.W. angle is a modern stair-turret.

The Roof of the S. aisle is of the 15th century and of four-centred barrel-form, with moulded ribs forming small panels and carved foliage and other bosses, some modern, at the intersections; the boarding is modern.

Fittings—Book: In S. aisle—William Burkitt on the New Testament, early 18th-century. Brass: In chancel —on N. wall, to Thomas Baker, 1622, inscription only. Chairs (Plate 42): In chancel—two, with turned front legs, enriched front rails, curved arms, scrolled tops and carved back, one carved with an enriched arch and vine-scroll and the other carved with a large conventional vine-sprig, early 17th-century. Chests: In ground stage of tower—with cambered top, three strap-hinges and square lock-plate, 17th-century. In second stage of tower—plain, with three strap-hinges and other straps, 16th-century. Churchyard Cross: N.E. of church, square base with chamfered top angles, square stop-chamfered stem and moulded capping, three steps, 14th-century, head modern; inscribed on base "Plague Ano. Dom. 1637, Burials 315, Libera nos Domine." Coffin and Coffin-lids. Coffin: In churchyard—S. of S. aisle, of stone, shaped for head, 13th-century. Coffin-lids: In chancel—in recess in N. wall, (1) with part of incised cross, flanked by chalice and book, 14th-century. In churchyard—against W. wall of S. porch, (2) broken, with enriched cross in circle, late 13th-century; (3) broken, with enriched cross in circle, sprigged stem and edges, late 13th-century; (4) with cross-head in circle, sprigged stem flanked by rosettes, late 13th-century. Communion Rails: with moulded rails and turned balusters, 17th-century, posts modern. Doors: In second stage of tower—of battens with strap-hinges, 17th-century. In N. porch—double gates with panelled lower part, upper part filled with scrolled iron-work, late 17th or early 18th-century. Font: In S. aisle—round bowl with acanthus-ornament, cylindrical draped stem with moulded top, late 17th or early 18th-century. Glass: In chancel—in E. window (Plates 57, 174), four main lights each with an elaborate canopy of tabernacle work containing the following figures—(a) probably St. Ethelbert, king with model of church, sceptre and scroll with modern ascription to St. Edward Confessor; (b) St. Anne and the Virgin with the kneeling figure of a bishop with mitre and crozier and holding a heart, scroll inscribed "Hoc p'cor oblatum cor suscipe terge reatum"; (c) St. Joachim, bearded figure holding book, scroll inscribed "Sc~e Joachym Virgini dans esse et hoc p. mirac'l'm de radice Jesse"; (d) St. Thomas Cantilupe, bishop in mass-vestments, scroll inscribed "Sc~s Thomas Herforde~sis"; below these figures, a further range of triple canopies and under them, half figures of angels, 15th-century, all said to have come from Stretton Sugwas, glass made up with modern work in 1873, glass in tracery modern except two quarries with suns. In S. aisle—in S. window, a jumble of fragments, including woman's head, hands, the initials T.S. and a mitre, probably for Thomas Spofford, Bishop of Hereford, borders, etc., 15th-century and fragments with foliage, 13th or 14th-century. Monuments and Floor-slabs. Monuments: In chancel—on S. wall, (1) of Nathaniel Hill A.M., 1632, freestone wall-monument (Plate 62), with figure in black gown and ruff, kneeling at desk, architectural surround with cherub-heads pediment and cartouche. In nave—below N.E. respond, (2) to John Fame, 1658, stone tablet with moulded frame and pediment. In S. chapel—on E. wall, (3) to William Rudhall, 1609, and Margaret (Croft) his wife, black marble and alabaster wall-monument with recess, side pilasters, cornice and two shields-of-arms, two figures and one shield missing, below recess figures of two sons and seven daughters; (4) to Richard Rudhall and other children of above, who died in infancy, alabaster round-headed tablet with enrichments and shield-of-arms; adjoining, achievement-of-arms in wreath, probably part of monument (4) or (3); on floor at E. end, (5) of [William Rudhall, attorney-general to Arthur, Prince of Wales, 1530, and Anne (Milborne) his wife] alabaster altar-tomb (Plate 175) and effigies (Plate 175); altar-tomb with moulded base and cornice, sides of nine and W. end of three bays each with cinque-foiled head and generally divided by shafts, bays occupied by figures or figure-subjects as follows—N. side, (a) St. George, (b) St. Edward the Confessor, (c) St. Dorothy or St. Sitha, (d) St. Michael, (e) St. Catherine, (f) St. Anne and the Virgin and three angels holding shields; S. side, (a) St. Paul, (b) St. John the Baptist, (c) the Trinity, with kneeling figures of man, wife and nine children and achievement, (d) St. John the Evangelist, (e) St. Peter, and two angels holding shields; at W. end, the Annunciation, with kneeling figures of man, wife and seven children; on altar-tomb, effigy of man in costume of sergeant-at-law, head on helm; effigy of woman in pedimental head-dress, head on cushion supported by two angels, traces of colour on figures; (6) of Colonel William Rudhall, 1651, alabaster standing figure (Plate 144), in Roman armour with cloak and cartouche-of-arms as shield, pedestal in form of column-base on square base with trophies of arms; (7) of John Rudhall, 1636, and Mary (Pitt) his wife, altar-tomb (Plate 172) and effigies (Plate 173) of alabaster and touch, altar-tomb with panelled sides and angle-pilasters; on N. side achievement-of-arms and two kneeling figures of daughters; on S. side kneeling figure of daughter, swaddled infant and cartouche-of-arms; at W. end recumbent figure of daughter and shield-of-arms; on altar-tomb, effigy of man in armour and wife in rich costume of period, hands joined, feet of both against crests. In Markye Chapel—on S. wall, (8) to Elizabeth (Cecil), wife of William Markey, 1686, draped stone tablet, with cherub-heads and defaced cartouche-of-arms. In churchyard—N. of N. aisle, (9) to Samuel Harris, 1711, head-stone. Floor-slabs: In chancel— (1) to John Baker, 1682, with shield-of-arms; (2) to John Newton, S.T.P., 1678. Piscinæ: In chancel— (1) recess with moulded jambs and two-centred head, label cut back, two round drains, 15th-century; farther W., (2) recess with chamfered jambs and partly restored trefoiled head, late 13th-century, two round drains, one modern. In nave—in E. wall, S. side, at level of rood-loft, (3) recess with two-centred head, mediæval, drain modern. In N. aisle—in E. wall, (4) recess with moulded trefoiled head, spade-shaped drain, late 13th-century. In S. aisle—in S. wall, (5) recess with moulded jambs and trefoiled head with ball-flower ornament, c. 1300. In Markye chapel—in S. wall, (6) recess with moulded jambs and two-centred head, enriched with pateræ, spade-shaped drain, early 16th-century. Plate: includes, cup and cover-paten of 1661, the former with inscription and date 1662; stand-paten of 1706; flagon of 1673 and alms-dish of 1711. Pulpit: four-sided with moulded and enriched cornice and base-rail, panelled sides with bolection-mouldings and inlay, late 17th-century, base modern. Recess: In chancel—in N. wall, with chamfered jambs and two-centred head, late 13th-century, probably tomb-recess.

Condition—Good.

Secular

(2). The Market House (Plate 178) stands in the Market Place. It is of two storeys; the walls are of local sandstone ashlar and the roofs are tiled. It is said to have been built by Frances, wife of William, 2nd Duke of Somerset, probably during her widowhood, 1660–74. The ground storey is open and has an arcade of six bays on the N. and S. sides and of two bays at the ends; the arches are round and rest on Doric columns, with half-columns as responds. The upper storey has two gables at each end; in the E. end are two windows each of three round-headed lights and between them is a round recess with key-blocks and containing a decayed bust. In the W. end are two similar two-light windows and three rectangular panels formerly finished with pediments and scrolls, now weathered away; in the gables are two oval openings. The side walls have each a range of windows similar to those at the W. end; in the middle bay of the N. side is a round-headed doorway opening on to a balcony with panelled and carved posts and turned balusters to the rail. On the S. wall, near the E. angle is a carved monogram with the initials T.C. From the middle of the roof rises a square boarded clock-turret with a modillioned cornice and a concave lead-covered roof.

Inside the ground storey is a range of five stone columns, supporting the open timbered ceiling with moulded beams. In the S.W. bay is the staircase (Plate 74), with a panelled enclosure, straight strings, turned balusters and square newels, with ball terminals. The upper floor has a range of four oak posts, carved as diminishing Ionic pilasters and supporting the roof.

Condition—Good.

Ross, the Market House

(3). The Prospect, walled garden or promenade, S.W. of the churchyard, has two stone gateways, both erected by John Kyrle, c. 1700. The gateway in the E. wall is flanked by two square piers with moulded bases and cappings and each carrying a large vase; the piers are supported by carved brackets standing on the enclosure-wall. The gateway in the S. wall (Plate 37) has a plain square-headed doorway with the date 1700 on the lintel; it is flanked on the inside by Corinthian pilasters supporting an entablature and pediment with a cartouche of the arms of Kyrle. The entablature and pediment are repeated on the outer side, with a monogram of John Kyrle in the tympanum.

Condition—Good.

(4). Base of Cross, lying loose at the N. corner of Wye Street, is of stone and octagonal to square on plan. It is moulded at the top, has the socket of a square shaft and dates from the 14th or 15th century.

Condition—Good.

(5). Webbe's Almshouses, range of seven tenements, on the W. side of Copse Cross Street and 130 yards S.E. of the church, is of two storeys; the walls are of stone and timber-framing and the roofs are slate-covered. It was presumably built in 1613, the date on a modern stone in the E. wall. The doorways in the W. wall have chamfered jambs and triangular heads. The N. end and E. wall are ashlar-faced. The roof is of queen-post type.

Condition—Good.

(6). Pye's Almshouses, range of four tenements on the W. side of Trenchard Street, 430 yards N. of the church, is of two storeys; the walls are of rubble and the roofs are slate-covered. It was built early in the 17th century, but has been much restored in modern times. One of the doorways on the E. side is original and has an elliptical head. Inside the building, the timber-framing is exposed.

Condition—Good.

(7). Rudhall's Almshouses (Plate 34), range of five tenements on the E. side of Church Street, 60 yards N.E. of the church, is of two storeys; the walls are of sandstone rubble and ashlar and the roofs are covered with tiles and slates. It was built probably late in the 16th century. The windows on the W. front are of one or two lights with square heads, the upper ones being in gabled dormers; the doorways have four-centred heads. The roof-trusses have king and queen-posts.

Condition—Good.

(8). The Rectory, E. of the church, is of three storeys with slate roofs. It has been almost entirely re-built in 1790, but the S.W. room on the ground floor has an early 16th-century moulded ceiling-beam and is lined with early 18th-century bolection-moulded panelling.

Condition—Good.

Monuments (9–53)

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century and of two storeys or two storeys with attics, timber-framed. The roofs are covered with tiles or slates. Some of the buildings have original chimney-stacks and exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good or fairly good, unless noted.

High Street. N. side:

(9). House and shop, No. 3, 15 yards E. of Edde Cross Street, is of four storeys and is partly of stone. The upper storey formerly projected on the S. front, which is now modern. In the N. wall is an original two-light window, now blocked.

(10). House and shop, No. 4, E. of (9), is of three storeys. The walls are of rubble. The front is modern.

(11). King's Head Hotel, 40 yards E. of (10), is of three storeys. The walls are of brick and the front is modern. Inside the building are some late 17th-century panelled doors.

(12). House and shop, No. 11, 13 yards E. of (11), is of four storeys and has a modern brick front.

(13). Saracen's Head Inn (Plate 22) and shop, Nos. 12 and 13, E. of (12), is of three storeys with attics and cellars. The timber-framing is exposed on the whole of the S. front, except the modern ground storey. The third storey and attic project on moulded bressummers enriched with egg and tongue and running ornament; the brackets are carved with male heads. The gables have been removed from the attic storey.

E. side:

(14). Chepstow House, 25 yards S. of Gloucester Road, has walls of stone and brick. It was mainly re-built c. 1700 and retains some windows of that date. Inside the building, the staircase, of c. 1700, has a moulded rail and re-used newels with acorn-pendants. In the S.E. room is some re-set early 17th-century panelling with a carved frieze and overmantel; the latter is of three bays divided and flanked by terminal figures and with a fifth figure in the middle bay; the side bays have arched heads and foliage-pendants. On the first floor are some panelled doors of c. 1700.

(15). Nag's Head Inn, at the corner of High Street and Old Gloucester Road, 15 yards S. of (14), is of three storeys with cellars. The walls are of rubble and brick and the W. front is modern. Inside the building are some 17th-century doors.

W. and S. sides:

(16). Houses and shops, Nos. 23–26, N.W. of (15), have a modern E. front. On the N. side is a four-light window of c. 1700. Inside the building, the original staircase has turned balusters to the lower flight and flat shaped balusters to the top flight.

Ross on Wye, Plan Showing Position of Monuments

(17). House and shop, No. 27, N. of (16), is of three storeys with cellars. The walls are partly of stone. At the back is a late 17th-century addition. The front is modern, but the N. wall has some exposed timber-framing.

(18). House (Plate 178) and shops, Nos. 34–36, S. of the Market Hall, and formerly the house of John Kyrle, the Man of Ross, is of three storeys with cellars. It was built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century and has a long projecting wing at the back. The N. front has exposed and fairly close-set timber-framing except to the ground-floor, which has modern shop-fronts, and the upper part of No. 36, which is cement-rendered. The second storey projects on a moulded bressummer with carved brackets; there is an enriched moulded beam and similar carved brackets below the eaves, formerly supporting a series of gables or other superstructure, now removed. The back additions are partly of stone. Inside the building, the ground-floor of No. 35 has original moulded ceiling-beams and on the first floor is some exposed timber-framing. The back room on the first floor has three walls lined with original panelling. The back wing has a roof with double collar-beam trusses; on the first floor are two late 17th-century doors, with the date 1689 and the arms of Kyrle in punctured decoration. No. 36 has, on the first floor, some original panelling, and on this and the floor above are some late 17th-century fittings.

(19). House and shop, No. 39, 5 yards W. of (18), is of four storeys, partly of brick. It has been almost entirely re-built, but contains a staircase of c. 1670, with moulded strings, turned balusters and square newels with moulded cappings.

(20). House and shop, No. 42, 5 yards E. of Church Street, is of three storeys with attics. Inside the building is a moulded ceiling-beam and other original details.

(21). Houses and shops, Nos. 46–48, 15 yards W. of Church Street, are of three storeys and partly built of stone. In the passage between 46 and 47 is some exposed timber-framing and a moulded ceiling-beam.

(22). House and shops, Nos. 51 and 52, 20 yards N.W. of St. Mary's Street, is of four storeys with attics and is partly built of brick. The front is modern.

(23). Houses, Nos. 53 and 54, N.W. of (22), is of four storeys and is stone-built. It is L-shaped on plan with a 16th-century S. wing, a front or W. wing of c. 1600 and a 17th-century addition on the S.W. of the S. wing. The S. side of the front wing has a three-light window, now blocked.

(24). Palace Pound, house on the W. side of St. Mary's Street, 60 yards N. of the church, has been entirely re-faced with brick and stone. In the S. wall of the basement are two original two-light windows and a blocked doorway. Inside the building is a late 17th-century staircase (Plate 74) with heavy turned balusters, straight strings and panelled newels with ball-terminals. In the staircase-window are some fragments of 14th to 16th-century glass.

(25). Radcliffe House, on the N. side of Wye Street, 170 yards N.N.W. of the church, is of three storeys with cellars and attics and partly built of stone. The S. front has been re-faced.

(26). Man of Ross Inn, at the corner of Wye Street and Edde Cross Street, is of three storeys with attics. The walls are of brick and rubble. It has been largely re-built and re-faced. The chimney-stack is set diagonally.

Market Place:

(27). Crown and Sceptre Inn, on the N.W. side, 30 yards N. of the Market House.

(28). Houses and shops, Nos. 11 and 12, on the E. side, 20 yards E. of the Market House, are of three storeys with attics. The walls are of rubble and brick.

Broad Street. W. side:

(29). House and shop, No. 5, at the S. corner of New Street, is partly of stone. At the back is an original doorway and a window with a solid moulded frame.

(30). Houses, Nos. 24 and 25, at the N. corner of Kyrle Street, have been re-fronted with stone. At the back, the upper storey has a heavy projection on the N. side, with exposed timber-framing. One original window remains.

(31). House, No. 29, 10 yards N. of (30), is partly of rubble and brick. It consists of a 16th-century L-shaped block with a 17th-century extension of the S. wing and a re-built block at the end of the E. wing, facing the street. The storehouse at the back of the S. wing is perhaps of the 15th-century, but has been much altered. In the S. wall of the storehouse are traces of an original window; the roof of the same building has chamfered tie-beams with large curved braces.

(32). House, Nos. 30 and 31, N. of (31), is partly of rubble. It was built in the 16th century on a T-shaped plan with the cross-wing at the E. end; the W. wing was extended late in the 17th century. The E. front is modern. The sides of the W. wing have exposed timber-framing. The roofs are of queen-post type.

E. side:

(33). House, No. 36, 15 yards S. of Station Street, is modern but incorporates part of the stone S. wall of a late 14th-century building. It contains a window of two trefoiled ogee lights in a square head.

(34). Gwalia Hotel, 10 yards S. of (33), is of three storeys, partly of brick and rubble. The building was formerly two houses and has an 18th-century or modern front.

(35). Storehouse, at the back of (34), has rubble and brick walls. The W. part is of late 16th-century date and the E. part a 17th-century addition or re-building.

Condition—Poor.

Brookend Street:

(36). House, No. 6, on the W. side 85 yards N. of Kyrle Street, has been re-fronted in the 18th century.

(37). Houses and shops, Nos. 23–26, on the E. side, 80 yards N. of Station Street, form a range with three gabled dormers in front.

(38). Houses and shops, Nos. 29 and 30, 10 yards S. of (37), are of late 16th or early 17th-century date and of three storeys. The top storey projects on a moulded bressummer with carved brackets; the timber-framing of this storey is exposed in No. 29.

(39). Houses, Nos. 32 and 33, 15 yards S. of (38), have some exposed timber-framing at the back.

(40). Houses and shops, Nos. 34 and 35, S. of (39), were built probably early in the 18th century and are of brick and stone. The front has rusticated angles and an eaves-cornice and the windows have flat heads and key-blocks. Inside the building, the staircase has straight strings, square newels and turned balusters.

(41). Railway Inn, at the corner of Brookend Street and Greytree Road, is modern except for an addition, at the back, which has exposed timber-framing.

(42). Brook House and adjoining house on N., at the corner between Greytree Road and Brampton Street, are of stone or brick covered with rough cast. The N. part of the main building is perhaps of the 17th century, but the S. part was added or re-built early in the 18th century. The back wing is a later addition. The 18th-century building has rusticated angles, square-headed windows with key-blocks and a modillioned eaves-cornice. The door has a semi-circular hood on slender brackets. Inside the building, the staircase has straight strings, heavy turned balusters and a newel at the bottom with a ball-terminal and four grouped balusters. Some of the doors are original.

(43). Plough Inn, on the S.W. side of Over Ross Street, 700 yards N.N.W. of the church, has a gabled and projecting upper storey on part of the front.

(44). House, Nos. 18 and 20, on the W. side of Trenchard Street, 350 yards N. of the church, is built of rubble.

(45). House, No. 8, on the N. side of New Street, 35 yards E. of Edde Cross Street, has a modern brick front.

(46). Priory House, on the N. side of New Street, 70 yards E. of (45), is of three storeys with cellars; the walls are of rubble and brick. It was built c. 1700, probably on earlier foundations. Inside the building is some panelling and doors of c. 1700 and the staircase, of the same date, has straight strings and turned balusters.

(47). House, No. 6, on the N. side of Old Gloucester Road, 35 yards E. of High Street, is of rubble and of three storeys.

Copse Cross Street. W. side:

(48). Ivy House and outbuilding, 130 yards E. of the church. The House is of two storeys with cellars and attics; the walls are probably of stone and have a moulded plinth. The lower part of the house dates from c. 1600, but the upper part was re-built in the 18th century. Inside the building, the late 17th-century staircase (Plate 74) has moulded strings, turned balusters and panelled newels with ball-terminals. In the basement is an original two-light window with moulded jambs and head.

The Outbuilding, S. of the house, is of stone, with an original doorway having a moulded segmental head.

(49). House, No. 12, S. of (5), is of two storeys with cellars and attics. The walls are of stone. The W. part of the house is an early 18th-century addition. Inside the building, the small staircase is original and has moulded strings, square newels and turned balusters.

E. side:

(50). House, No. 11, S.E. of (49), is partly of brick.

Condition—Poor.

(51). Conservative Club, at the S. corner of Old Gloucester Road, is built of stone, and has been much altered.

(52). Cottage, on the S. side of Alton Street, 700 yards E.S.E. of the church, is partly of rubble.

(53). Merrivale House, 700 yards S.E. of the church, is modern except for some of the cellar walls of the S. wing which are of late 16th or early 17th-century date.