Tarrington

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 2, East. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1932.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:

, 'Tarrington', in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 2, East, (London, 1932) pp. 182-185. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/heref/vol2/pp182-185 [accessed 18 May 2024].

. "Tarrington", in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 2, East, (London, 1932) 182-185. British History Online, accessed May 18, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/heref/vol2/pp182-185.

. "Tarrington", An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 2, East, (London, 1932). 182-185. British History Online. Web. 18 May 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/heref/vol2/pp182-185.

In this section

78 TARRINGTON (C.d.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)XXXIV, S.E., (b)XXXV, S.W.)

Tarrington is a parish 7 m. E. of Hereford. The 12th-century church, with remains of the plinth of a round apse, is the principal monument.

Ecclesiastical

a(1). Parish Church of St. Philip and St. James stands near the middle of the parish. The walls are of local sandstone rubble and ashlar with dressings of the same material and the roofs are tiled. The Chancel and Nave were built in the second half of the 12th century. Excavations in 1931 proved that the original chancel was square with an apse projecting to the E. of it. The West Tower was added soon after but was largely re-built, probably early in the 16th century. The apse was destroyed and the E. end of the chancel was re-built and extended, probably late in the 15th century. The N. arcade was built and the North Aisle added in 1836; the church has been restored subsequently and the South Porch is modern.

The church has interesting 12th-century detail and among the fittings the early 14th-century monument is noteworthy.

Architectural Description—The Apse (12 ft. by 15 ft.) has been entirely destroyed except for part of the base of the S. curve, with a chamfered plinth, excavated in 1931.

The Chancel (27 ft. by 19¾ ft.) has a late 15th-century E. window of three cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a two-centred head. In the N. wall are three windows, the easternmost of the 15th century and of two cinque-foiled lights in a four-centred head; the other two windows (Plate 179) are single 12th-century lights with diapered ornament cut on the stones in which are cut the round heads; the rear-arches have round or vesica-shaped sinkings on the voussoirs. In the S. wall are two windows, the eastern uniform with that in the N. wall and the western of the same date but of four cinque-foiled ogee lights with vertical tracery in a four-centred head; between the windows is a blocked doorway, with a segmental-pointed head, perhaps of the 16th century; above it is a jamb of a 12th-century window; below the eastern window are the lower quoins of the original angle of the chancel. The chancel-arch is modern but springs from 12th-century responds (Plates 180, 14), probably re-set farther apart; they are of two orders on the W. and one on the E. face, all with attached shafts, with scalloped or carved capitals and moulded bases; the chamfered imposts have diapered faces and are interrupted by carved label-stops, that on the S. being entirely defaced.

The Parish Church of SS. Phillip & James, Tarrington

The Nave (43¼ ft. by 23¾ ft.) has a modern N. arcade of two bays. In the largely modern S. wall are three modern windows; the S. doorway has a round head of two orders, the inner modern and the outer of the 12th century and resting on attached shafts with capitals carved on the W. with scallops, and on the E. with a crudely carved man and horse (Plate 15); the imposts are moulded.

The North Aisle is modern, but re-set in the N. wall is the 12th-century N. doorway, now blocked; it is set in a shallow projection and has a round arch and moulded label, enclosing a plain tympanum; the jambs have each an attached shaft with scalloped capital; the moulded base on the E. is old.

The West Tower (11 ft. square) is of three stages, undivided externally. The E. wall, up to the floor-level of the bell-chamber, appears to be of 12th-century date and is of the same thickness as the side walls of the nave; the rest of the tower was largely re-built, probably early in the 16th century. The 16th-century tower-arch is two-centred and of one chamfered order with moulded and embattled imposts. In the W. wall is a modern window. The stair-turret has a blocked doorway to a former gallery. The second stage has, in the S. and W. walls, a loop-light. The bell-chamber has, in each wall, a window of two cinque-foiled lights in a square head with a moulded label, all probably re-used material and with re-used jambs of earlier date. The upper part of the tower incorporates much re-used 12th-century ashlar, and re-set in the plain parapet are a number of stones with cusped heads of windows or panelling.

Fittings—Chairs: In nave—(1) with turned front legs and rail, curved top and raised panel in back, early 18th-century; (2) with turned front and moulded back legs, raised panel in back, early 18th-century. Churchyard Cross: S. of church—lower part of chamfered square shaft on square chamfered base and step, pointed niche in W. face of base, 14th-century, capping of shaft modern. Coffin-lid (Plate 48): In tower— tapering slab with plain cross and pendant ring under each arm, date uncertain. Font (Plate 55): octagonal bowl with moulded lower edge and modern flowing tracery cut on faces, moulded stem with four filleted shafts and octagonal to square base, 14th-century. Glass: In chancel—in S.E. window, collection of fragments arranged in panels and including, crowned head of the Virgin, part of angel playing cymbals and other figures, eagle device, tabernacle work, borders, heads, etc., 14th and 15th-century. Monuments: In chancel—in N. wall, (1) effigy in recess (Plates 181, 83), effigy of lady in sideless gown and cloak; recess with moulded ogee arch, enriched with a variety of dog-tooth ornament, side pinnacles with finials, gabled label with crockets, finials and ballflower ornament, carved foliage in spandrels of arch, early to mid 14th-century. In churchyard—S.E. of nave, (2) to John Hooper, 1712–13, and his son, 1712, flat slab; (3) slab with sunk border, probably early 18th-century, inscription defaced. Piscina: In chancel —recess with chamfered jambs and pointed head, 13th or 14th-century, no drain. Plate: includes late 17th-century cup and cover-paten, without date-letter, and a pewter flagon and two plates. Scratchings: On re-used stones in tower—various masons' marks.

Condition—Good.

Secular

a(2). Tarrington Court, house and moat, 300 yards S.W. of the church. The House is of two storeys with cellars and attics; the walls are timber-framed and the roofs are tiled. It was built late in the 16th century on an L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the W. and N. In the 17th century the W. cross-wing was added and there is a large modern addition at the S.E. angle. The timber-framing is exposed and the upper storey projects slightly at the end of the original N. wing; it has a moulded bressummer. Inside the building are some exposed ceiling-beams and chamfered wall-posts with shaped heads.

Tarrington, Plan Showing the Position of Monuments

The Moat is fragmentary but appears to have formerly enclosed an area of about an acre.

Condition—Good.

a(3). The Rectory, 50 yards S.S.W. of the church, is of two storeys with attics; the walls are now mostly of brick and stone and the roofs are tiled. The W. wing was built in the 17th century and the middle part of the house early in the 18th century. There are modern wings at the E. and W. ends. The old work has been re-faced. Inside the building are some exposed ceiling-beams and a staircase retains some late 17th-century balusters.

Condition—Good.

a(4). Soller's Court, house, 300 yards S.S.E. of the church, is of two storeys, timber-framed and with thatched roofs. It was built probably late in the 15th century but was much altered in the 17th century. The timber-framing is exposed. Inside the building the S. part retains an original king-post roof-truss with curved braces below the tie-beam and four-way struts springing from the king-post. The middle room on the first floor has a 17th-century plaster ceiling (Plate 44); one panel has an octagonal design with grape-bunches and shields with double-headed birds at the angles; a fragmentary second panel has a band of running vine-ornament and smaller square panels at the angles.

Condition—Bad.

Monuments (5–42)

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century and of two storeys; the walls are timber-framed and the roofs are tile or slate-covered. Many of the buildings have exposed external timber-framing and internal ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good or fairly good, unless noted.

a(5). Cottage, 60 yards W. of (4) and 275 yards S. of the church, is faced with rubble.

a(6). Cottage, on the W. side of the road, 230 yards S.S.W. of the church, has been partly re-faced in brick.

a(7). Swan House, at the S.E. angle of the cross-roads 40 yards N. of (6), has rubble walls and has been entirely remodelled late in the 18th or early in the 19th century.

a(8). Cottage, 14 yards N.E. of (7).

a(9). Cottage, on the S. side of the road, 120 yards S. of the church, has a thatched roof.

a(10). Barn, on the N. side of the road, 160 yards S.W. of the church, is partly roofed with corrugated iron.

a(11). Barn, on the W. side of the road, 90 yards S.W. of (2), is weather-boarded and has a corrugated iron roof.

a(12). The Vine, house, on the N. side of the road, 350 yards W.S.W. of the church, has brick walls. It has no old external features, but in the boundary-wall, S.E. of the house, is a doorway made up of 17th-century stone-work, including a panel carved with a fleur-de-lis.

a(13). Cottage, on the W. side of the road, 200 yards N.W. of the church, has a thatched roof.

a(14). Cottage, two tenements, on the N. side of the main road, 70 yards N. of (13), was built probably late in the 15th century on an H-shaped plan with the cross-wings at the E. and W. ends. It has been largely re-faced in brick but the close-set framing is exposed at the N. end of the W. wing.

a(15). Cottage, 70 yards E. of (14), was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century and has a thatched roof.

a(16). Cottage, 40 yards E. of (15).

a(17). Cottage, 60 yards E. of (16) and 220 yards N. of the church, has been largely re-faced.

b(18). Little Tarrington Farm, house and barns, ½ m. N.N.E. of the church. The House is of two storeys with cellars and attics and was built, probably, late in the 16th or early in the 17th century. It has been much altered and almost entirely re-faced. Inside the building are some dados and a door of early 17th-century panelling.

The Barn, N. of the house, is of five bays, weather-boarded. Farther E. is a second barn.

b(19). Cottage (Plate 30), on the W. side of the road, 170 yards E. of (18). To the E. of the house is an outbuilding of three bays.

b(20). Cottage, on the S. side of the road, 60 yards E.N.E. of (19). The roof has been raised.

b(21). Cottage, on the N. side of the road, 200 yards E. of (20), has a thatched roof. In the chimney-stack and in a modern outbuilding are some re-used 12th-century stones, perhaps from the church.

b(22). Cottage, on the N.E. border of the parish, about 1 m. E. of the church, has a thatched roof.

b(23). Eastwood Farm, house, about 1 m. E.S.E. of the church, has been lengthened at the N. end.

b(24). Cottage, two tenements, 100 yards E. of (23), has a thatched roof.

b(25). Cottage, at the N.E. end of Durlow Common, 1¼ m. S.E. of the church.

b(26). Cottage, 50 yards W.S.W. of (25), has a thatched roof.

b(27). Cottage, 50 yards S.W. of (26).

b(28). Cottage, 100 yards S. of (27).

b(29). Cottage (Plate 32), 1,650 yards S.S.E. of the church, has a thatched roof. It probably formed part of a larger building and has mediæval crutch-trusses in the E. and W. walls and curved braces in the N. and S. walls.

Condition—Poor.

b(30). Cottage, on the E. side of the road at Alder's End, 1,100 yards S.S.E. of the church, has a thatched roof.

b(31). Cottage, 70 yards N. of (30), has a thatched roof.

a(32). Alder's End Farm, house and fishponds, ½ m. S.S.E. of the church. The House is of three storeys and was built c. 1700 with brick walls; it was remodelled and re-roofed late in the 18th century. The walls have a band-course between the storeys and rusticated stone quoins. Inside the building is an original staircase (Plate 75) with turned balusters, square newels and moulded strings.

The Fishponds, N.E. of the house, consist of one large and three smaller ponds divided by narrow banks.

a(33). Cottage, at the E. end of Tarrington Common and 950 yards S. of the church, was built in the 16th century and has a thatched roof.

Condition—Bad.

a(34). Cottage, on the N. side of Tarrington Common, 240 yards N.W. of (33), was built early in the 18th century and has a thatched roof.

a(35). Cottage, 20 yards N.W. of (34), was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century and has a thatched roof.

a(36). Cottage, 180 yards W. of (33), was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century.

a(37). Cottage, immediately S. of (36), has been faced with stone and has a thatched roof.

a(38). Cottage, 150 yards S.S.W. of (37), was built early in the 18th century and has a thatched roof.

a(39). Cottage, on the W. side of Tarrington Common and 1,000 yards S.S.W. of the church, was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century and has a thatched roof.

a(40). Cottage, 140 yards S. of (39) and of the same date and type.

a(41). Cottage, 80 yards W. of (39), was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century. The roof has been raised.

a(42). Higbnam Farm, house, nearly 1 m. S.S.W. of the church, has been remodelled and largely re-faced.

Unclassified

a(43). Lynchets, in the E. angle of a field immediately S.E. of (42), consist of five terraces, about 74 yards long.

b(44). Lynchets, in the S. angle of a field 300 yards S. of (29), consist of three terraces, 140 yards long.