Uxbridge

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Middlesex. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1937.

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Citation:

'Uxbridge', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Middlesex, (London, 1937), pp. 127-131. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/middx/pp127-131 [accessed 25 June 2024].

. "Uxbridge", in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Middlesex, (London, 1937) 127-131. British History Online, accessed June 25, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/middx/pp127-131.

. "Uxbridge", An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Middlesex, (London, 1937). 127-131. British History Online. Web. 25 June 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/middx/pp127-131.

In this section

55 UXBRIDGE (A.c.)

(O.S. 6 in. XIV, N.E.)

Uxbridge is a parish and town on the W. border of the county. The church and the Old Treaty House are the principal monuments.

Ecclesiastical

(1) Parish Church of St. Margaret (Plate 4), formerly a chapel of Hillingdon, stands in the middle of the town. The walls are of flint rubble with freestone dressings; the roofs are covered with tiles and lead. The North Tower seems to have been built late in the 14th century. The Nave with its N. and S. arcades dates from the first half of the 15th century together with the narrow North Aisle. In the second half of the 15th century the South Aisle was re-built as a guild-chapel of St. Mary and St. Margaret and the Chancel was re-built and lengthened about the same time. Perhaps early in the 16th century the North Chapel was built or re-built. The tower was largely re-built c. 1820. The church was restored in 1872 and the North Vestry was added in 1882.

The Parish Church of St Margaret, Uxbridge

The roof of the S. aisle is remarkable and among the fittings the 17th-century monument in the chancel is noteworthy.

Architectural Description—The Chancel (25 ft. by 15½ ft.) has a modern E. window. The much restored early 16th-century N. arcade is of two bays with four-centred arches of two moulded orders; the octagonal columns and half-octagonal E. respond have moulded capitals and bases; both this and the S. arcade are continuous with those of the nave, but spring from a higher level. The 15th-century S. arcade is lower than that on the N. and has been much restored and re-cut; it has two-centred arches of two hollow-chamfered orders; the octagonal columns and half-octagonal E. respond have moulded capitals and plain bases. There is no chancel-arch.

The North Chapel (29½ ft. by 13½ ft.) has, in the E. wall, a much restored early 16th-century window of three four-centred lights in a four-centred head. In the N. wall are two similar windows and a modern doorway.

The Nave (40¼ ft. by 15½ ft.) has 15th-century N. and S. arcades of three bays with two-centred arches of two chamfered orders; the octagonal columns and half-octagonal W. responds have moulded capitals and bases; the E. bay on the N. would appear to have been widened when the arcade was continued to the E. early in the 16th century. The restored 15th-century W. doorway has moulded jambs, two-centred arch and label; the W. window is modern except for the splays and rear-arch.

The North Aisle (10½ ft. wide) has, in the N. wall, two windows all modern except the splays and rear-arches. In the W. wall is a modern window.

The South Chapel and Aisle (24¼ ft. wide) have a modern E. window. In the S. wall are five windows, the three easternmost are modern; the two western windows are probably of early 16th-century date and are each of three four-centred lights in a segmental head; the S. doorway is modern. In the W. wall is a modern window.

The North Tower (10 ft. square) is of late 14th-century date, much altered and restored. It is of three stages, with a modern embattled parapet and modern niches in the buttresses. The ground stage forms a porch and has a partly restored outer entrance with jambs and pointed arch of four moulded orders with a moulded label; the inner entrance has moulded jambs, two-centred arch and a moulded label with head-stops. The second stage has a modern window in the N. wall and a doorway in the S. wall with chamfered jambs and four-centred head; it is now blocked. The bell-chamber has, in each wall, a modern window.

The Roof of the chancel is of late 15th-century date and of three bays with moulded tie-beams, short king-posts and curved braces. The late 15th-century roof of the N. chapel is of flat pent-form with moulded main timbers and wall-plates. The 15th-century roof of the nave is of three bays and similar to that of the chancel, but with chamfered main timbers and without braces. The roof of the N. aisle is of flat pent-form with plain cambered tie-beams. The 15th-century roof of the S. chapel and aisle (Plate 3) is of nine bays with moulded main timbers; the trusses are of hammer-beam type with curved braces below the hammer-beams springing from brackets carved with human heads; from the hammer-beams spring curved braces below the collar-beams, forming four-centred arches; there are curved wind-braces.

Fittings—Candelabrum: In chancel—of brass with modern branches and inscription "Christopher Blunt and John Harmond Chappel Wardens 1695." Chairs: In chancel—two with turned front legs, shaped arms, panelled and carved backs and carved front rails, one with the date 1679 (Plate 25). Chest: In S. chapel— of oak with plain lid and front with enriched arcaded panels, 17th-century. Font (Plate 11): octagonal bowl with moulded upper and lower edges, sides with quatre-foiled panels enclosing a rose and a leopard's face alternately; carved pateræ on lower moulding, late 15th-century. Monuments and Floor-slabs. Monuments: In chancel—(1) to Leonora (Vierendeeils), wife successively of Abraham Trion, Gregory Downhall and Sir John Bennet, 1638, alabaster and marble monument (Plate 125) consisting of high panelled base with bones in barred recess, reclining figure of lady and back-piece with Doric side-columns, entablature, broken pediment, cartouche and three shields-of-arms. In burial-ground, 150 yards S.W. of the church—(2) to Thomas Batty, 1695, Elizabeth, his daughter, 1700, and Sarah, his wife, 1729, and Martha, his daughter, 1729–30, head-stone. Floor-slabs: In N. chapel—(1) to Richard Wyth[ie], 1668. In nave—(2) to George White B.A., 1673; (3) to John Stonard, 1709–10. In S. aisle—(4) to Susana, wife of James Hassell, 1705; (5) to Richard Spooner, 1701, and others later; (6) to Sarah and Michael, children of William Webb, 1680; (7) to Catherine (Brabbant), wife of Richard Dobyns, 1670. Plate: includes a cup of 1686 or 1696. Staircase: In ground stage of tower—incorporating symmetrically turned balusters and moulded rail, early 17th-century.

Condition—Good, much restored.

Secular

(2) Old Treaty House (Plates 31, 146), now the Crown Hotel, on the S.W. side of High Street 580 yards N.W. of the church, is of two storeys with attics; the walls are of brick and the roofs are tiled. It was built probably in the first half of the 16th century and was of half H-shaped plan. The greater part of the house was pulled down in the 18th century and only the N.W. wing and the adjoining end of the main block now remain. It is said to have been used in 1645 by the commissioners of the king and parliament for the abortive treaty of that year; it then belonged to the Bennet family. The N.E. end of the range has a shaped gable but the former corbelled bay-window has been removed. On the S.E. front are two original bay-windows with moulded brick mullions; they are of two storeys and three-sided; at the S.W. end of the front is the end of the destroyed main block of the house; at its W. angle is an original octagonal turret, reduced in height. At the back of the range are three original chimney-stacks, each with one hexagonal and two octagonal shafts with moulded bases. Inside the building, there are two original fireplaces with moulded jambs and four-centred arches in square heads; there are also some 17th-century doors.

Condition—Good.

Monuments (3–39)

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century and of two storeys or two storeys with attics; the walls are timber-framed and often refronted and the roofs are tiled. Some of the buildings have exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good or fairly good, unless noted.

High Street, S.W. side

(3) House, No. 84, 70 yards S.E. of (2), was built probably in the 15th century. The upper storey projects in front and has a moulded bressummer; the upper storey has a 16th-century window projecting on brackets; it is of five lights with moulded mullions and transom. Inside the building is an original king-post roof-truss.

Uxbridge and West Hillingdon, Plan Showing the Position of Monuments

(4) House, No. 83, immediately S.E. of (3), has an original chimney-stack with two diagonal shafts. Inside the building is some original panelling.

(5) House, No. 68, 150 yards S.E. of (4), has been refronted in brick in the 18th century.

(6) House, No. 67, immediately S.E. of (5), has been refronted in 18th-century brick.

(7) House with shop, No. 59, 100 yards S.E. of (6), was built probably c. 1540 and has a roof of that period with curved wind-braces. The front is of modern brick.

(8) House with shops, Nos. 57 and 58, immediately S.E. of (7), has been refronted.

(9) House with shops, Nos. 46 and 47, 140 yards N.W. of the church.

(10) Three Tuns Inn, 50 yards S.E. of the church, was built probably late in the 15th or early in the 16th century and has a 17th-century addition at the back. Inside the building some of the original timber-construction is exposed and there is a doorway with a four-centred head.

(11) King's Arms Hotel (Plate 31), 20 yards S.E. of (10), was built probably late in the 15th century. The upper storey projects in front on curved brackets but the exposed framing is mostly modern; the three gables are additions. The back wing is an early 16th-century addition and has a roof of this date with wind-braces. On the N.W. side of the yard is a 17th-century out-building.

(12) House with shops, Nos. 15–17, 15 yards S.E. of (11).

(13) House with shops, Nos. 12–14, immediately S.E. of (12), was built early in the 16th century and has moulded ceiling-beams of that date. The roof has curved wind-braces.

N.E. side

(14) Great Western Inn, at the S.E. corner of George Street, was built in the first half of the 16th century. It retains remains of its original roof-construction with curved braces and wind-braces.

(15) House (Plate 31) with shops, Nos. 163 and 164, opposite Windsor Street, was built early in the 18th century and has a brick front with a modillioned eaves-cornice.

(16) House with shop, No. 155, 50 yards N.W. of (15), has a brick front of 1737.

(17) George Hotel, 20 yards N.W. of (16), was built c. 1576, but has been refronted and otherwise much altered. Some of the framing is exposed and there is an original panelled and nail-studded door. The Guildhall or Court-room, a brick building on the N. side of the yard, has now been reconditioned.

(18) House with shops, Nos. 145 and 146, 25 yards N.W. of (17), has been refronted in the 18th century. At the back of No. 144 is a late 15th or early 16th century building (Plate 30) with exposed timber-framing; the upper storey projects on a moulded bressummer.

Condition—Of back building, poor.

(19) House with shops, Nos. 127 and 128, 120 yards N.W. of (18), was built early in the 18th century and has a brick front.

(20) House with shop, No. 125, 30 yards N.W. of (19), has a brick front and a wooden eaves-cornice.

(21) House with shop, Nos. 122 and 123, immediately N.W. of (20), has a brick front.

(22) House with shop, No. 119, 25 yards N.W. of (21), was built about the middle of the 16th century, but has an 18th-century or modern brick front. The original roof has wind-braces.

(23) Red House (Plate 31), No. 113, 65 yards N.W. of (22), was built probably in the 16th century but the brick-faced front block was re-built early in the 18th century. It has a moulded eaves-cornice.

(24) House with shop, No. 112, immediately N.W. of (23), was built in the 15th century and has a king-post roof of this period. The front is of 18th-century brick.

(25) House with shop, No. 111, immediately N.W. of (24), has an 18th-century brick front.

(26) House, 15 yards S. of the church, has been refronted and enlarged in modern times.

Windsor Street, N.W. side (Plate 31)

(27) House with shops, Nos. 56–58, 15 yards S.W. of High Street, has been extensively altered.

(28) Queen's Head Inn, 5 yards S.W. of (27), was built probably late in the 15th or early in the 16th century, but has been refaced in brick. The roof has a heavy tie-beam with curved braces.

(29) House with shop, No. 53, immediately S.W. of (28).

(30) House with shops, Nos. 51 and 52, immediately S.W. of (29), was built in the 16th century. The upper storey formerly projected in front. Inside No. 52 is an original moulded ceiling-beam.

(31) House with shops, Nos. 43–45, 50 yards S.W. of (30), has been much altered.

(32) House with shops, Nos. 41 and 42, immediately S.W. of (31), has been largely re-built but incorporates two early 16th-century moulded ceiling-beams.

(33) House with shops, Nos. 39 and 40, immediately S.W. of (32), has a brick front.

S.E. side (Plate 31)

(34) Range of three houses and shops, Nos. 9 to 14, 50 yards S.W. of the church, has been partly refaced in brick.

(35) House with shops, Nos. 16 and 17, 5 yards S.W. of (34).

(36) House with shops, Nos. 21 and 22, 15 yards S.W. of (35).

(37) Outbuilding, 10 yards S. of (36), has a 16th-century roof with wind-braced purlins.

(38) House with shops, Nos. 34 and 35 at the N.E. corner of Cross Street.

(39) House with shop and inn, Nos. 2 and 3 Cross Street, 5 yards S.E. of (38), was built late in the 16th century and has later and modern additions. The inn has an 18th-century iron sign of a Catharine Wheel.