Hartley

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Westmorland. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1936.

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Citation:

'Hartley', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Westmorland, (London, 1936), pp. 101. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/westm/p101 [accessed 13 June 2024].

. "Hartley", in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Westmorland, (London, 1936) 101. British History Online, accessed June 13, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/westm/p101.

. "Hartley", An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Westmorland, (London, 1936). 101. British History Online. Web. 13 June 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/westm/p101.

In this section

34 Hartley (G.d.)

(O.S. 6 in. XXIII, N.E.)

Hartley is a parish and small village immediately E. of Kirkby Stephen.

Secular

(1). Hartley Castle, house at the S. end of the village, was re-built in the 18th century. Immediately to the N. of it is a mass of rubble masonry enclosing a cellar with a segmental barrel-vault. There is also a length of rubble walling N.E. of the house and occasional outcrops of rubble core N. and W. of the house. These fragments perhaps belong to a mediæval building with an enclosing wall. Built into a gardenwall is a mediæval mask-corbel and in the outbuilding, E. of the house, are three 17th-century door-heads, probably re-used.

Condition—Of early house, ruined.

(2). Cottage, two tenements, 220 yards N. of (1), is of two storeys; the walls are of rubble and the roofs are slate-covered. It was built in the 17th century and retains an original doorway with a triangular arch and the date [16]82. There are also some small original windows.

Condition—Good.

(3). Barn, adjoining house on the E. side of the village, 700 yards N. of (1), is of two storeys; the walls are of rubble and the roofs are slate-covered. It was built probably in the 17th century.

Condition—Good.

(4). Outbuilding at Whingill, 1 m. N.N.E. of (1), was re-built probably in the 18th century, but incorporates stone with the name and date Isabel Close 1693.

(5). Cote Garth, house, nearly ¾ m. E. of (4), is of two storeys; the walls are of rubble and the roofs are slate-covered. It was built in the 17th century and retains some original windows, now blocked, and some exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Bad.