The hundred of Chart and Longbridge: Introduction

The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 7. Originally published by W Bristow, Canterbury, 1798.

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Citation:

Edward Hasted, 'The hundred of Chart and Longbridge: Introduction', The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 7, (Canterbury, 1798), pp. 484-485. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-kent/vol7/pp484-485 [accessed 17 June 2024].

Edward Hasted. "The hundred of Chart and Longbridge: Introduction", in The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 7, (Canterbury, 1798) 484-485. British History Online, accessed June 17, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-kent/vol7/pp484-485.

Hasted, Edward. "The hundred of Chart and Longbridge: Introduction", The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 7, (Canterbury, 1798). 484-485. British History Online. Web. 17 June 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-kent/vol7/pp484-485.

THE HUNDRED OF CHART AND LONGBRIDGE

LIES the next hundred southward from that of Calehill. It was formerly two separate half hundreds, viz. of Great Chart and of Longbridge, called in Domesday, Cert and Langebrige; and they appear to have been distinct in the reign of king Edward III. that of Great Chart contained Ashford, Chart, Bethersden, and Hothfield; and that of Longbridge contained Wilsborough, Kennington, Sevington, Kingsnoth, Mersham, Hinxhill, and part of Ashford.

IT CONTAINS WITHIN ITS BOUNDS THE FOLLOWING PARISHES:
1.BETHERSDEN in part.
2.GREAT CHART in part.
3.HOTHFIELD in part.
4.KENNINGTON.
5.HINXHILL.
6.WILLSBOROUGH.
7.MERSHAMin part.
8.SEVINGTON, and
9.KINGSNOTH.

And the churches of those parishes, and likewise part of the parishes of Ashford and Shadoxhurst, the churches of which are in other hundreds. Two constables have jurisdiction over it. It likewise formerly had within it the town and liberty of Ashford, comprehending the church and the greatest part of that parish, which has long since been made a separate jurisdiction from it, having a constable of its own.