The hundred of Kinghamford: Introduction

The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 9. Originally published by W Bristow, Canterbury, 1800.

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Citation:

Edward Hasted, 'The hundred of Kinghamford: Introduction', The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 9, (Canterbury, 1800), pp. 328. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-kent/vol9/p328 [accessed 17 June 2024].

Edward Hasted. "The hundred of Kinghamford: Introduction", in The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 9, (Canterbury, 1800) 328. British History Online, accessed June 17, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-kent/vol9/p328.

Hasted, Edward. "The hundred of Kinghamford: Introduction", The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 9, (Canterbury, 1800). 328. British History Online. Web. 17 June 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-kent/vol9/p328.

THE HUNDRED OF KINGHAMFORD

LIES the next eastward from that of Bridge, lastdescribed. The name is not to be found in Domesday, but it seems to be mentioned in it by the name of the hundred of Berham.

IT CONTAINS WITHIN ITS BOUNDS THE PARISHES OF
1. BISHOPSBORNE.
2. KINGSTON.
3. BARHAM.
4. DENTON in part; and
5. WOOTON.

And the churches of those parishes, excepting DENTON. Two constables have jurisdiction over it.