Madingley: Local government

A History of the County of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely: Volume 9, Chesterton, Northstowe, and Papworth Hundreds. Originally published by Victoria County History, London, 1989.

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'Madingley: Local government', in A History of the County of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely: Volume 9, Chesterton, Northstowe, and Papworth Hundreds, (London, 1989) pp. 173. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/cambs/vol9/p173 [accessed 24 April 2024]

Local government

In 1279 the bishop of Ely was said to have by long custom view of frankpledge and the penalties for breaches of the assize of bread and of ale at Madingley; c. 1275 he had set up a tumbrel. (fn. 1) About 1299 a man who killed there was tried and hanged at an Ely gaol delivery. (fn. 2) From 1600 the Hindes obtained a lease of the bishop's jurisdiction at Madingley. (fn. 3) In the early 15th century Denny abbey as successor to the liberties held by the Templars still held courts for tenurial business for its Madingley tenants, (fn. 4) as did Chatteris abbey for its copyholders from 1490 to the 1530s. (fn. 5) Burdeleys manor had a court to which Barnwell priory owed suit every 3 weeks in 1253. (fn. 6) The Cottons still held courts to admit copyholders from the late 17th century to the mid 19th, though largely for lands held of their manor in Cambridge St. Giles parish. (fn. 7) The last admission for a Madingley holding was in 1734. (fn. 8)

In 1609 both village watchmen were gambling in an alehouse on Sunday. (fn. 9) Although churchwardens were chosen in 1825, (fn. 10) in 1897 it was said that by custom none was appointed. (fn. 11) The cost of poor relief increased substantially from £11 in 1776 to £109 by 1803, when 14 people were on permanent relief. (fn. 12) In the early 1810s 12-16 were still regularly assisted, and almost as many occasionally, at a cost that ranged from £190 to £250 until the early 1830s. (fn. 13) About 1830 the highway surveyors put up to four unemployed labourers to work on the roads. (fn. 14) From 1836 Madingley belonged to Chesterton poor-law union, (fn. 15) from 1894 to Chesterton rural district, and after 1974 to South Cambridgeshire district. (fn. 16) No parish council was set up until 1976. (fn. 17)

Footnotes

  • 1. Rot. Hund. (Rec. Com.), ii. 446.
  • 2. P.R.O., JUST 1/95, rot. 57.
  • 3. B.L. Add. MS. 5805, f. 2v.
  • 4. For ct. rolls 1418-37, C.R.O., L/113; cf. Plac. de Quo Warr. (Rec. Com.), 99, 107.
  • 5. Occasional ct. rolls 1492-1537, C.R.O., L 63/17-18.
  • 6. P.R.O., CP 25(1)/24/16, no. 18.
  • 7. Ct. rolls 1660-1700, C.R.O., 588/M 13.
  • 8. Ibid. 588/T 206.
  • 9. C.U.L., E.D.R., B 2/28, f. 112.
  • 10. Ibid. C 1/6.
  • 11. Ibid. C 3/38.
  • 12. Poor Law Abstract, 1804, 36-7.
  • 13. Ibid. 1818, 30-1; Poor Rate Returns, 1816-21, 11; 1822- 4, 38; 1825-9, 12; 1830-4, 16.
  • 14. Rep. H.L. Cttee. on Poor Laws, 322.
  • 15. Poor Law Com. 2nd Rep. 512.
  • 16. Census, 1911, 1971.
  • 17. Camb. Evening News, 1 Feb. 1974; 21 May 1976.