The hundred of Bosham: Introduction

A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 4, the Rape of Chichester. Originally published by Victoria County History, London, 1953.

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Citation:

, 'The hundred of Bosham: Introduction', in A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 4, the Rape of Chichester, (London, 1953) pp. 181. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/sussex/vol4/p181 [accessed 29 May 2024].

. "The hundred of Bosham: Introduction", in A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 4, the Rape of Chichester, (London, 1953) 181. British History Online, accessed May 29, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/sussex/vol4/p181.

. "The hundred of Bosham: Introduction", A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 4, the Rape of Chichester, (London, 1953). 181. British History Online. Web. 29 May 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/sussex/vol4/p181.

THE HUNDRED OF BOSHAM

CONTAINING THE PARISHES OF

BOSHAM FUNTINGTON WEST THORNEY
CHIDHAM WEST STOKE

No Hundred of Bosham is mentioned in the Domesday Survey, the great manor of Bosham being at that time in the king's hands, and the whole being presumably extra-hundredal. After it had been alienated from the Crown it was organized as a hundred, and as such figures in 1248. (fn. 1) Its constituent vills were Bosham with Southwood and Walton in that parish; Chidham, the manorial centre of the Bishop of Exeter's Chapelry of Bosham; Funtington with East and West Ashling; West Stoke, and West Thorney. (fn. 2) In the Subsidy Roll for 1296 Broadbridge, Creed, and Old Fishbourne, all in the parish of Bosham, also figure. (fn. 3)

The lordship of the hundred descended with the manor of Bosham (q.v.) and is now held by the Earl of Iveagh. Until 1914 an annual court of the hundred continued to be held, at which the tithing-men presented their small dues and were rewarded for their attendance by a good dinner.

Footnotes

  • 1. Assize R. 909, m. 21.
  • 2. Suss. Rec. Soc. x, 90–2, 118–20, 229–31.
  • 3. Ibid. 90–2.