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Close Rolls, Edward III: July 1364

Pages 68-76

Calendar of Close Rolls, Edward III: Volume 12, 1364-1369. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1910.

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July 1364

July 11.
Westminster.
Roger Belere knight and Ralph de Cromwell knight to John de Loudham knight. Recognisance for 2,000 marks, to be levied, in default of payment, of their lands and chattels in Notynghamshire.
Memorandum that John de Loudham has appointed Henry Asty and John de Wyke his attorneys to sue the execution of this recognisance, take the money and give acquittance for the same, and to cause the enrolment thereof to be cancelled.
Cancelled on payment, acknowledged by Henry Asty attorney of John de Loudham.
July 11.
Westminster.
Nicholas le Norreys of Burtonheved to John de Lancastre clerk and Thomas de Thelwall clerk. Recognisance for 40s., to be levied etc. in Lancashire.
Cancelled on payment, acknowledged by the said John.
Writing of Richard earl of Aroundell and Surrey, being the defeasance of a recognisance made in the Common Bench whereby John de Lenedale is bound to him in 220l., so long as the said earl, his heirs and assigns, shall peaceably hold the moiety of the manor of Gatton, which he has of the grant of the said John and Joan his wife, without being impreached or impleaded by virtue of any charge or bond thereupon made by the said John by statute merchant, recognisance, annuity or otherwise, but if they be so impleaded so as to lose the said moiety or any parcel thereof by execution of judgment against them rendered without fraud or collusion by reason of any charges thereupon made by the said John since he espoused the said Joan, execution shall be sued upon the said recognsiance. Dated Kenyngton near London, 12 July 38 Edward III. French.
Memorandum of acknowledgment, 12 July.
July 12.
Westminster.
Robert Vynter of Maydenstan to Thomas de Neuby and Michael de Ravendale clerks. Recognisance for 40 marks, to be levied, in default of payment, of his lands and chattels in Kent.
Cancelled on payment.
July 13.
Westminster.
Robert Vynter of Kent to Thomas Morice of London. Recognisance for 40l., to be levied etc. in Kent.
Membrane 15d.
June 28.
Westminster.
John May and Thomas de Hynynden of Berkshire to Queen Philippa. Recognisance for 40l., to be levied etc. in Berkshire.
Charter of John Knyght of Gaddon, son and heir of William Knyght sometime of Gaddon, giving with warranty to John Clompstok clerk and William de Mettone, and to the heirs and assigns of John Colmpstok, all his lands which descended to him by inheritance in the parishes of Ufcolmp and Helecombe Regis (sic). Witnesses: Henry Percehey, William Walrand, William Prestecote, Roger atte Broke, John Souewelle. Dated Midsummer eve 38 Edward III.
Memorandum of acknowledgment, 28 June.
July 1.
Westminster.
William de Swanlond to Thomas atte Legh. Recognisance for 213l. 5s. 4d., to be levied, in default of payment, of his lands and chattels in Hertfordshire.
Writing of John Wynchestre of Southflete co. Kent, being a quitclaim with warranty to the king, his heirs and assigns, of all lands and rents with wards, marriages, reliefs, escheats and wharfages (quaruagüs) sometime of Robert Mount of Derteford, which the king has of the gift and feoffment of Thomas Houchon, William de Fulleswich and Roger Balle of Derteford, and they had of the gift and feoffment of the said Robert. Witnesses: William Fynchynden, William Wychyngham, William Holden, Robert Beleknap, Michael Skyllyng. Dated London, 3 July 38 Edward III.
Memorandum of acknowledgment, 4 July.
Charter of John sometime son of Luke de Grendon of Abynton, giving with warranty to Amory parson of Bokeswortht, Hamon de Ware, William Wightman and John Ingel of Bassyngborne, their heirs and assigns, all his lands in the town and fields of Abynton, with meadows, feedings, pastures, rents, services, wards, reliefs, marriages etc. thereto belonging. Witnesses: John atte Barre, William de Childerlee, William atte Strete, William Baudre of Abynton, William Filz Rauf, Simon Hayt of Bassyngborne, William Pynk of the same. Dated Abynton, Saturday the Feast of St. Peter 38 Edward III.
Memorandum of acknowledgment, 5 July.
Writing of Richard earl of Arondell and Surrey, granting to John de Foxle and Agnes his wife a yearly rent of 10 marks and one gown for the said Agnes suitable to her estate of the price of 20s. during her life, the said rent to be taken at the terms of St. Andrew and St. John by even portions of all the said earl's lands in Kyngeston by Lewes, the gown or 20s. at All Saints' day, with power of distraint if the same be in arrear; also granting to the said Agnes the profit of the earl's dovecot in Kyngeston for her life, with free ingress and egress. Dated his castle of Lewes, Sunday after the Annunciation 38 Edward III. French.
Memorandum of acknowledgment, 6 July.
June 14.
Westminster.
Robert de Horneby clerk to John de Lancastre clerk. Recognisance for 40l., to be levied, in default of payment, of his lands and chattels in Yorkshire.
Memorandum of defeasance, upon condition that the said Robert pay to the said John or to the prior of Lancastre 20l. at Michaelmas next.
Cancelled on payment.
July 15.
Westminster.
Leonard Carru to David de Wollore clerk. Recognisance for 4l., to be levied etc. in Devon.
Memorandum of defeasance, upon condition that the said Leonard pay 40s. on the quinzaine of Michaelmas next.
Cancelled on payment.
Writing of Roger son of John de Schulvestrode knight (militis), being a quitclaim to Richard earl of Arundell of all the lands which descended to him by inheritance in Hamptonnet co. Sussex. Dated Houeden co. York, Monday Midsummer day 1364.
Memorandum of acknowledgment, 29 July at York before William de Skippewyth, by the king's writ of dedimus potestatem which is on the files of chancery for this year.
July 24.
Westminster.
Walter de Thornhull to the prior of Witham of the Carthusian order. Recognisance for 20l., to be levied, in default of payment, of his lands and chattels in Dorset.
Memorandum that John Moubray received this recognisance by a writ which is on the files of chancery among writs of dedimus potestatem for this year.
Membrane 14d.
Indenture between the king of the one part and Henry Godchep and John Double of London of the other part, being a lease of the subsidy in Essex and Hertfordshire upon cloths for sale granted to the king by the lords and commons of the realm for release of the forfeiture of alnage thereupon laid of old time, to wit 4d. the cloth of assize without grain, 6d. the cloth of assize of 'scarlett,' 5d. the cloth of assize of half grain, the moiety thereof for every half cloth, and proportionally for every cloth exceeding the half cloth by 3 ells or more which is not a whole cloth, or exceeding the whole cloth of assize by 3 ells or more, to hold from 5 May last for two years, rendering to the king 40 marks a year at Michaelmas and Easter by even portions; covenant by the king that in case the said subsidy or any parcel thereof cease during that term by order of the king or council, the said Henry and John, their deputies and heirs, shall be quit of their farm from the time the same shall first cease; that they shall be quit toward the king in time to come of any impeachment touching the collection and administration of the said subsidy, saving to every man his action for extortion or excess by them committed; that they shall not be compelled to render account to the king of the issues of the subsidy, but only to answer for the said yearly farm; that they may have licence without impeachment of the king or his ministers to lease the subsidy in gross or in parcel to any who will take it; that whereas in the statute it is contained that all manner of cloths exposed for sale before being sealed with the seal appointed for the purpose shall be forfeit to the king, the farmers and their deputies shall be bound to deliver by indenture to the sheriff all cloths found so forfeit, and he shall answer for them upon his account, so that the farmers and their deputies shall thereby be discharged of rendering account, and for their pains for the king's profit in that behalf and in aid of their great farm they shall have to their own use the moiety of such forfeitures; that in case they shall have occasion to sue any man for any matter concerning their farm, the king will make himself a party in their aid; that commissions shall be made to certain persons at their nomination to make inquisition in the said counties at what towns and places cloths are made, and every maker thereof shall be forbidden on pain of forfeiture to suffer any cloth to pass out of his keeping until sealed as aforesaid; that from Michaelmas forward the seals which serve this office shall be new made by advice of the council and the farmers, and the other seals shall be given up and put in the treasury to avoid hurt which might come to the farmers during their said term; that in case after that term the subsidy shall be further leased and the said Henry and John will take it, they shall have the preference over others for the sum that others would give without fraud or covin. Dated Westminster, 10 May 38 Edward III. French.
Memorandum that James de London 'fisshmongere' and John Squyer of London have mainperned for the said farmers to answer for the said farm in case of their default.
Indenture between the king of the one part and John Ray of Coventre of the other part, being a like lease, mutatis mutandis, of the same subsidy in Warwickshire, Leycestershire, Salop and Staffordshire from Michaelmas last for two years, rendering 50 marks a year; and the said John shall have the third part of forfeited cloths. Dated Westminster, 28 October. French.
Memorandum that William Palmere of Frankton, Richard de Derlaston and Richard de Hampton have mainperned (as above).
Like indentures of lease of the said subsidy are made as below, to wit:
To John Chirbury in Herefordshire for two years rendering 5 marks a year, by mainprise of Ralph Spigurnell and John de Waddesworth, taking the third part of forfeited cloths. Dated Westminster 5 October.
To Henry Colas of Gildeford taverner in Kent for three years rendering 40 marks a year, by mainprise of Bernard Coke of Gildeford and Peter Semere of Gildeford, taking the third part of forfeited cloths. Dated Westminster, 12 December. French.
July 18.
Westminster.
To the constable of the Tower of London or to his lieutenant. Order to set free by a mainprise John de Cicestre, taken and detained in the said Tower by the king's command; as he has found sure mainpernors to content the king of a debt from him due, for which he is so detained, the names of which mainpernors and the form of the mainprise remain with the treasurer. By K.
July 12.
Westminster.
To the coroners in Westmoreland. Order to stay altogether the execution of the king's writ to them addressed, ordering them to attach Hugh de Querton by his body for a contempt, so as to have him before the king in chancery at a set day in the writ contained; as John de Stayndrop and John de Whitfeld of that county have mainperned in chancery to have him there on the aforesaid day to answer for that contempt, and further to do and receive what the court shall determine. By C.
Membrane 13d.
Charter of Thomas son and heir of John Iwayn of Bretforton, giving with warranty to John de Morehall by Alyncestre and Agnes his wife, Thomas son of the said John de Morehall, and the heirs and assigns of the said John, four messuages, four virgates of land, and one wood in Upton Wode called Rolveswode, all in Upton by Haseloure, with meadows, feedings, pastures etc., rendering yearly to the grantor, his heirs or assigns, one rose at Midsummer during the life of John de Morehall and Thomas his son, and after their decease 20l. a year at Michaelmas, reserving power to enter and hold the premises in default of payment. Witnesses: John Rous, Ralph Pauncefot, William de Ippewell, John de Belne, Thomas Wodeward, John Calewe, Richard de Berton, William Somenour. Dated Upton, Sunday after St. James the Apostle 38 Edward III.
Memorandum of acknowledgment in the chancery at Hatfeld co. Hertford, 31 July.
Indenture made between Thomas Iwayn citizen of London of the one part and William Youman citizen and carpenter of the said city and Margery his wife of the other part, being a demise with warranty of two shops in Fletestrete in the suburb of London between the tenement which the said William holds of the churchwardens of St. Dunstan West on the east and the brewhouse of the said Thomas on the west, with a garden by them extending from Fletestrete to the stable of the said Thomas, to the said William and Margery and to James their son for their three lives, rendering yearly 30s. at the four usual terms by even portions, reserving power of distraint if the rent be in arrear, and of ejectment for lack of distraint. Witnesses: John Rote, Jordan de Barton, William Persshore, Roger le Parchemyner, William Freman. Dated Fletestrete, the eve of All Saints 37 Edward III.
Memorandum of acknowledgment by the said Thomas Iwayn and William Yoman at Hatfeld, 31 July this year.
Indenture between Thomas Iwayn of the one part and William Youman 'ferrour' of London and Margery his wife of the other part, being a demise with warranty of a brewhouse called 'le Ledeneporche' with two shops adjoining and the vessels and utensils therein, situate in Fletestrete in the suburb of London in the parish of St. Dunstan West between a tenement held for life by William Persshore on the west and a house pertaining to the church of St. Dunstan on the east, to the said William and Margery and to Cicely their daughter now born for their three lives, rendering yearly 4 marks at the four usual terms by even portions and a moiety of the quit rent thereof yearly issuing to St. Bartholomew in Westsmethefeld London, and maintaining the said house, shops, vessels and utensils so as to leave the same in as good state as they received them or better, reserving power of distraint if the rent be in arrear, and of ejectment for lack of distraint. Witnesses: William Persshore, Jordan de Barton, William de Bathe, John Rote, Adam de Grymesby. Dated London, 6 June 38 Edward III.
Memorandum of acknowledgment (as the last).
July 10.
Westminster.
To Henry Grene and his fellows, justices appointed to hold pleas before the king. Order not to proceed without advising the king to take any assize arraigned before them concerning the lands in Suffolk which were of Giles de Neketon deceased, tenant by knight service of the abbey of St. Edmund lately void and in the king's hand, and are in the king's hand by his death and by reason of the nonage of his heir, or concerning any parcel thereof; as the king by letters patent has committed the wardship of those lands to Helmyngus Leget his yeoman to hold until the lawful age of the said heir for a set farm yearly to be rendered; and now the king has learned that certain persons, scheming to defraud the king of that wardship and for disherison of the heir, have arraigned divers assizes before the said justices. By K.
July 15.
Westminster.
To John Moubray and Edmund de Chelreye justices of assize appointed in Devon. Order not to proceed without advising the king to take an assize of novel disseisin arraigned by George de Colaton and Desiderata his wife, Robert Westcote and Margery his wife, and Henry Holwell and Isabel his wife against John Cary, Margaret his wife and others in the original writ named, concerning a messuage, one carucate of land, 8 acres of wood, furze and heath and 22s. 3d. of rent in Loghingcote, which were of John de Loghingcote outlawed for the death of William Pynson feloniously slain, and are in the king's hand by reason of his outlawry, if the tenements put in view are the same which are in the king's hand by reason of that outlawry; as for a set farm yearly to be rendered to him the king by letters patent has committed the keeping of the premises to the said John Cary so long as they shall remain in his hand, and now the king has learned that the said George and others have arraigned the assize aforesaid. By K.
Aug. 6.
Westminster.
William Colman to William Abbot of Kelleseye. Recognisance for 40s., to be levied, in default of payment, of his lands and chattels in Hertfordshire.
Charter of Thomas parson of Dounham within the Isle of Ely, giving with warranty to John Swyft of Pakefeld co. Suffolk and Katherine his wife and to the heirs of Katherine a messuage lying in the town of Ely behind the butchers' selds on the north between a messuage of Katherine de Everesholt and a messuage of Richard de Leycestre, the south head abutting upon the public way below the said selds on the north and the north head upon a tenement of John de Weston and Walter Canne. Witnesses: John de Bedeford, Adam de Walsyngham, John Benet, John de Pulton, John de Wetyngge, John Driffeld, William de Cley. Dated Ely, Thursday after the Annunciation 37 Edward III.
Memorandum of acknowledgment in the chancery at Dounham co. Cantebrigge, 15 August this year.
Membrane 12d.
July 11.
Westminster.
To W. bishop of Worcester. Order to grant John de Ledecombe the king's clerk such a yearly pension as may befit the giver and should bind the receiver to him, causing the said clerk to have letters under his seal thereupon, and writing again by the bearer what he will do; as by reason of his new creation the bishop is bound in such a pension to one of the king's clerks at the king's nomination until provision be made him of a suitable benefice, and the king has nominated the said John, whose advancement he has at heart. By p.s. [26357.]
July 13.
Westminster.
To John Moubray and Edmund de Chelreye justices of assize in Devon and Somerset. Order not to proceed until further orders to take any inquisition of the manors of Sutton Lucy, Colewill, Plumtrowe, Wode Hiwyssh, Harleston, Donterton and Suthpole co. Devon, the manor of Wotton Criket and the hamlet of Northome co. Somerset, or of any of them; as the king has learned that by colour of a writ of nisi prius to them addressed the said justices purpose to take certain inquisitions of the said manors and hamlet, which were of Thomas de Courteneye tenant in chief and are in the king's hand by his death and by reason of the nonage of his heir, and to proceed therein without advising the king would tend to the prejudice of the king and of the said heir. By K.
July 12.
Westminster.
To the mayor and sheriffs of London. Whereas at the last parliament among other things it was ordered, for particular causes there shewn, that no English merchant should by himself nor by another by any covin ply any trade but one to be by him chosen before Candlemas last, and to maintain those ordinances the king, with assent of the nobles and others of his council, by his letters patent has ordered that no foreigner or native on pain of forfeiture shall meddle in the craft of fishmongers save only those of that craft, the merchant vintners of Gascony bringing wines to England excepted, to whom the king has given licence, in order to keep the money in England, to buy herring and take it to their country; that the fish in the hands of the fishmongers in London shall be sold in three places, to wit in Briggestret, Oldefisshstret and the place called Lestokkes, 'stokfissh' excepted which belongs to the craft of 'stokfisshmongeres,' and all fish coming to the said city shall be discharged only at Billyngesgate and London Bridge below bridge, and above bridge between Dibbleswharf and the Fresshfisshwharf, and shall be lodged openly by day and not by night nor secretly (par muscet); that no fish, unless it belong to those free of the said craft, shall be lodged until the wardens of the craft have knowledge and be certified of the quality and quantity thereof by those that bring it on pain of forfeiture of the fish, to the end that the king's caters and those of lords and others may be served of the first prise, that it may be known how much fish is in the city, and the prise be made accordingly; that no foreigner bringing fish thither shall take a host to sell the same save of those free of the said craft, so that the traffic of the fishmongers be not made dearer by those having no knowledge of the craft, and no foreigner or native shall on pain of imprisonment and of losing his fish sell fish to sell again but to fishmongers made free in their 'leyhalymode,' but any man may sell in gross to whom he will for his own stock and not to sell again; that the fish[mongers] of the city and their successors may every year elect four persons of their craft who shall be sworn twice a year in their 'leyhalymode' in presence of the mayor or sheriffs or of their deputies to supervise the buying and selling of fish, to rule the craft to the common weal, and to punish those in whom default shall be found at the discretion of the said four persons by aid of the mayor and sheriffs when need be; and it is the intent of the king and council that the 'stokfisshmongers' shall sell their 'stokfissh' in all places they please in the said city, but shall not meddle in the sale of other fish, if it be not fish that they bring from parts beyond to sell in gross to the king's caters and others for their store, or to fishmongers made free in the 'leyhalymode' to sell again and to no other on the pain aforesaid, and that 'birlesteres,' to wit poor men and women who go crying fish in the city, may go by the streets as heretofore crying and selling to all who will buy the fish they carry and have bought of free fishmongers, so that they stand in no set place to sell, also that men and women coming from 'upland' with their fish from the Thames and other rivers round about, caught by themselves or given them by their servants, going about the streets may sell their fish as heretofore in the city and suburbs to any who will buy in gross or by retail for their own meat, but not to sell again save to free fishmongers, and they shall stand in no street or set place on pain of imprisonment: order to cause the matters before rehearsed to be proclaimed and observed. French.
[Fœdera. City of London Letter Book G, Cal. p. 169.]
July 15.
Westminster.
To the same. Whereas etc. (as above); and whereas it is shewn the king and council that men of divers crafts in the city of London meddle in the craft of 'draperie,' making divers deceits and frauds in plying the same to the hurt of king and people contrary to the ordinance aforesaid, the king, with assent of the nobles and others of his council, has ordered by letters patent that no man shall exercise the craft in the said city nor in the suburbs if he have not been therein apprenticed or otherwise received by assent of the craft; that every man of the crafts of dyers, 'tisters' and 'fullers' keep to his own craft, and meddle not in making, buying or selling any manner of cloth or 'draperie' on pain of imprisonment and loss of such cloth or the value of it; that no man having cloth for sale in the said city and suburbs shall on the same pain sell but to drapers free of the craft, if it be not in gross to lords and others who would buy for their own use and not to retail; that the drapers free of their craft in the said city may every year elect four persons of their own craft, who shall be sworn twice a year in presence of the mayor to supervise the crafts aforesaid that no default or deceit be therein used, to rule the craft of 'draperie' to the common weal, and to punish those in whom default shall be found at the discretion of the said four persons by aid of the mayor and sheriffs when need be, which mayor and sheriffs shall be aiding them at their request, and those four persons shall have power to take an oath of all received into the craft to exercise that which thereto belongs without fraud, saving always to the prior of St. Bartholomew in Smythfeld and to other lords having fairs in the said suburbs by grant of the king and his forefathers their fairs, liberties and free customs therein used from the time of such grants, inasmuch as the king would not that damage be done them by colour of this ordinance, saving also to the merchant vintners of England and Gascony the liberties to them granted by the king: order to cause all these matters to be proclaimed and observed in form aforesaid. French.
[Ibid., p. 168.]
To the same. Whereas etc. (as above); and whereas for particular causes, by assent of the nobles and others of his council, the king has ordered that no merchant nor other of the realm shall go to Gascony or elsewhere in those parts to buy wines and bring them to England, nor ply trade therein, nor meddle with the same, to wit in London except only those free of the vintners' craft, and in other cities, boroughs and towns those who have knowledge of the craft, for whom it is lawful to fetch wine from foreign parts, bring it to England, and sell their wine for reasonable gain in gross or at retail to lords and others as they shall see best to their profit; that merchants of Gascony and other foreigners shall sell their wines which they bring to England in gross by the tun and the pipe, to lords and others for their store in their own lodgings, and to the merchant vintners who will buy, and not at retail nor by small quantities; that no man, native or foreign, after bringing wines into the realm, may without the king's special licence take them out of the realm upon any pretence; that the merchants of the craft of traffic in wines shall every year choose four persons of the most sufficient, lawful and knowledgeable of the craft not holding taverns in the city of London, and shall present them to the mayor of the said city, or of other cities, boroughs and towns where such craft is exercised or to the bailiff or president where no mayor is, and those four persons shall be sworn in presence of the mayor, bailiff or president to supervise the sale of all manner of wines whatsoever at retail in taverns at a reasonable price for such wine according to its name and condition, and the taverners shall be ruled by them, and they shall correct faults found in the exercise of that craft, and punish them at their discretion with the aid of the mayor, bailiff or president; that to the end the least money shall go out of the realm and it be best retained, licence is given to the merchant vintners of England to buy cloth, and to the merchants of Gascony bringing wine to England to buy dried fish of Cornewaille and Deveneshire, herring and cloth throughout the realm, and take it out of the realm to Gascony and elsewhere there to be sold to their profit, and of the money thereof arising to buy wines there and bring them into the realm to sell therein and make their profit without disturbance, so that they do not sell nor cause to be sold in the realm nor elsewhere cloth, fish nor herring except in Gascony and other parts on that side, nor that Gascons nor other foreigners sell wine in England at retail but in gross by tuns and pipes as aforesaid; that all manner of wines coming to London shall be discharged and landed above London Bridge towards the west and towards the Vintry, so that the king's butler, 'gaugeors' and 'sercheors' may have view and knowledge of the places where wines are lodged, and may take his customs and prises and do what pertains to their office; that no merchant nor other native or foreign of whatsoever condition shall sell or buy wines, cloth, fish or herring otherwise than is aforesaid on pain of imprisonment and of losing the goods so bought or sold; and that these ordinances shall be kept in all cities, boroughs and free towns within the realm by the vintners and their successors for ever: order, on sight of these presents, to cause all these matters to be proclaimed throughout their baliwick, and to be observed in form abovesaid. French.
[Ibid., p. 169.]