BHO

Close Rolls, Edward III: August 1352

Pages 438-443

Calendar of Close Rolls, Edward III: Volume 9, 1349-1354. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1906.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:
Please subscribe to access the page scans

This volume has gold page scans.
Access these scans with a gold subscription.Key icon

August 1352

Aug. 19.
Westminster.
To the sheriff of Lincoln. Order to cause a coroner for that county to be elected in place of Robert de Holm, who is insufficiently qualified.
Aug. 20.
Westminster.
To John de Wynton, escheator in the county of Southampton. Order to cause Henry son of Henry Sturmy and Margaret his wife to have seisin of the hundred of Lys and 10l. rent in Lys, as the king has learned by inquisition taken by the escheator that Robert de Hungerford, knight, held in chief the said hundred and rent for life, by the service of a fourth part of a knight's fee, of the grant of Master Adam de Stonore and Edmund le Clerk of Burghbach, by a fine levied in the late king's court, with remainder to the said Henry and Margaret and the heirs of their bodies, and the king has taken Henry's homage.
By K. on the information of Thomas Brembre.
Aug. 20.
Westminster.
To the sheriff of York. Order to release Nicholas de Werk from prison, without delay, as he has made fine with the king by 2 marks for a redisseisin made by him by force and arms of Thomas de Fencotes, knight, and John de Heselarton, parson of Patrikbrumpton church, for the third part of a messuage in York and its suburb, whereof he was convicted before the sheriff and the keepers of pleas of the crown in that county, and he has satisfied Thomas and John for their damages in the matter as the sheriff has certified in chancery.
The said 2 marks paid are in the hanaper.
Aug. 20.
Westminster.
To the warden of the Flete prison. Order to release Peter de Bynbrok from prison without delay, as the king ordered the warden to certify why Peter was detained in that prison and the warden returned that he is detained for 78l. 8s. 6½d. at the suit of Queen Isabel, for the time when he was receiver of her money of her lordship of Haverford, and the said queen has notified in chancery that Peter has fully satisfied her for that sum.
Aug. 20.
Westminster.
To Thomas de Brewes, keeper of the Forest this side Trent, or to him who supplies his place in the New Forest. Order to amove the king's hand from a close of the abbot and convent of King's Beaulieu and not to intermeddle further therewith, restoring the issues thereof to them, as they have shown the king that Thomas, by pretext of an inquisition of office, by which it was found that their close by their default had been lying unenclosed for a long time, whereby the king's beasts often entered therein and are taken by the monks and brethren, to the king's detriment, has taken that close into the king's hand; and Henry III granted by charter to the abbot and convent that all their lands in wood and in plain should be deafforested and outside the power of the foresters, verderers, regarders and all their bailiffs, and that no justice, sheriff, escheator, constable, forester, bailiff or other minister should have power of entry into their lands or fees or those of their men. By C.
Aug. 30.
Westminster.
To the treasurer and barons of the exchequer. Order to receive John de Stoke, clerk, as the attorney of Peter de Nutle, sheriff and escheator in the county of York, to make his proffer and view of accounts, as Peter is attendant upon the custody of the temporalities of the archbishopric of York, void and in the king's hand, so that he cannot make his proffer at the exchequer on the morrow of Michaelmas next, or his view of accounts.
By C.
Aug. 30.
Westminster.
To the collectors of the tenth and fifteenth in the East Riding, co. York. Order to pay to Edward de Balliolo, king of Scotland or to his attorney those 200l. which the king asigned to him in aid of his expenses of the money of the tenth and fifteenth in that Riding, and whereupon the king caused two tallies of the receipt of the exchequer to be levied.
[Fœdera.] By bill of the treasurer.
Aug. 28.
Westminster.
To John Buttetourte. Notification that the king, for certain causes shown before the council, has discharged him of the office of being keeper of the peace and of the statutes of Winchester and Northampton and to be justice to hear and determine divers felonies and trespasses and all things contrary to the statute of labourers in the county of Worcester, with certain other lieges, and he shall not intermeddle with that office until further order. By C.
William de Beauchamp is discharged by a like writ of the keeping of the peace in that county and of all the other premises.
Membrane 14.
July 26.
Westminster.
To William de Ryngebourn, escheator in the Isle of Wight. Order to amove the king's hand from a messuage and a carucate of land at La Hale and not to intermeddle further therewith, restoring the issues thereof to Adam Brabason and Margery, his wife, as on its being found by divers inquisitions taken after the death of Richard atte Hale that he held no lands at his death in his demesne as of fee or in service in chief, but that he held the said messuage and land of Robert de Godyton by knight's service, at the suit of Adam and Margery, Robert's sister and heir, asserting that the custody of the premises pertains to them by reason of the minority of Richard's heir, and beseeching the king to order his hand to be amoved from the same, he ordered the sheriff of Southampton to notify Richard le Kerver of Winchester, who has the custody of those tenements by the king's grant, to be in chancery on the quinzaine of Easter last with the letters patent made to him for that custody, to show cause why these letters should not be revoked and the king's hand amoved from the tenements; and Richard and Adam came in person on the said day and Margery came by John de Codyngton the younger, her attorney, and Richard said that the manor of Hale was lately half a knight's fee and that William de Godyton held that manor entire of the manor of Gatecombe, which is held in chief, by the service of a moiety of a knight's fee, which manor of Hale, after William's death, was divided between two heirs in equal portions, to be held of the manor of Gatecombe, and that Richard de Hale at his death, held the said messuage and land as a moiety of the manor of Hale of the heir of John de Gatecombe, a minor in the king's wardship, as of the manor of Gatecombe, by knight's service, and so the custody of Richard's heir and of the messuage and land ought to pertain to the king, and he offered to verify this; and Adam and Margery said that Richard atte Hale and his ancestors, tenants of the messuage and land, held them immediately of William and Margery's other ancestors, who held them in service of the manor of Gatecombe from time out of mind, by knight's service, without William holding the manor of Hale entire in demesne or any partition thereof being afterwards made among the heirs, and for this they placed themselves upon the country, and Richard also; and the king appointed the said escheator and Theobald de Gorges and John de Kyngesdon to take and inquisition upon the matter in the presence of the feudaries of the island and of the keeper of the king's lands there or of his attorney, and of the said parties if they choose to attend, and by the inquisition it is found that the manor of Hale was lately half a knights' fee, that William de Godyton now held it entire of the manor of Gatecombe in demesne, but that he held a moiety of the manor of Hale in demesne and another moiety in service of the manor of Gatcombe by the service of a moiety of a knight's fee, and that the manor of Hale was not divided after the death of William de Hale, and that Richard atte Hale did not hold the messuage and land at his death of the heir of John de Gatecombe, a minor in the king's wardship, but that he held the messuage and land of Robert de Godyton by the service of a fourth part of a knight's fee as of mean between him and the lord of Gatecombe.
Mandate to Richard le Kerver not to intermeddle further with the said messuage and land.
July 26.
Westminster.
To the collectors of customs in the port of Kyngeston upon Hull. Order to cause the 50 sacks of wool of the king's sheep of the parts of Holdernesse, which the king has charged Peter de Grymesby and Adam Pund of Kyngeston upon Hull to take to the ports of Flanders and sell there for him, to be weighed when it comes to that port, and to permit Peter and Adam to take that wool to the said ports without paying the custom and subsidy thereon. By K. on the information of the treasurer.
Aug. 1.
Westminster.
To the collectors of the customs and subsidy of wool, hides and woolfells in the port of Sandwich and to William de Grantham controller of the customs and subsidy there. Order to the controller to dearrest 60 sarplars and 3,300 wool-fells arrested by him in that port, and to deliver them to John de Wesenham, Henry Pycard and John de Stodey or to their attorney, without delay, and the collectors shall permit John, Henry and John to place the said wool and fells in ships in that port and take them to Flanders, if they wish, without paying any new custom or subsidy thereon, and cause letters of coket to be made for their security in the matter, as the king ordered the collectors and controller to certify him why the wool and fells had been taken into his hand, and the controller returned that on 13 April last he found at Reycolvre, co. Kent, in his bailiwick 60 sarplars of wool and 3,300 wool-fells which had been landed by reason of a storm and the breaking of a ship called 'la Laurence' in which the wool and fells were laded at London, and were coketted and customed as was said, and he arrested the wool and fells because they were being taken to parts beyond before answer had been made to the king for the custom and subsidy due thereon and he did not know to whom they belonged; and subsequently at the suit of John, Henry and John, for themselves and certain other men asserting that they had laded divers wool and fells in the said ship at London, to be sent to Flanders, and had coketted and customed them, and the ship was broken near Reycolvre when crossing to Flanders, and much of the wool and fells had been afterwards landed and were arrested by the controller and beseeching the king to order the same to be dearrested and delivered to them, the king ordered James Lapyn, sheriff of that county and William de Langele to take an inquisition upon the matter, by which it is found that of the wool and fells laded in the said ship, 60 sarplars of the said John, Henry, John and divers other men named in the inquisition, and 3,300 wool-fells, which belonged to Richard de Stoke of Oxenford and Robert de Lychefeld, were landed at Reycolvre and saved there, and the measures of the wool and wool-fells are not known, and that much other wool was not landed and the collectors of the custom of wool, hides and wool-fells in the port of London have certified in chancery that the said wool and fells were laded, coketted and customed in the port of London under the names of John, Henry and John and of Richard Bittere, James Andreu, John atte Holte, Nicholas Chaucer, William de Shepeye, Simon Chaumberleyn, Robert de Rugham, Roger de Burton, William de Orleton, Thomas de Oxenford, and Robert de Lychefeld on 5 May last, and John, Henry, John and the others have affirmed before the king in chancery that the wool and fells so landed and saved and arrested by the controller are of those laded, coketted and customed in the said ship. By C.
Sept. 1.
Westminster.
To the collectors of the tenth and fifteenth in the county of Oxford. Order to levy all the fines, redemptions, forfeited issues and amercements of the labourers, artizans and serjeants in that county adjudged and assessed before Guy de Bryan and his fellow justices by extracts delivered to them by those justices and to distribute them among the townships in that county in aid of the payment of the said tenth and fifteenth, in accordance with the agreements thereupon, superseding the levying of all fines, etc. previously assigned to them by the extracts of other justices, as on 3 May last the king appointed the said Guy and Gilbert de Chasteleyn in place of John de Grey of Rotherfeld and John Golafre, keepers of the peace and justices, together with William de Shareshull, John de Stouford, Richard de Birton, Thomas de Langele, John de Alveton, Edmund Malyns and John de Herdwyk, to hear and determine all things done contrary to the statute of labourers in that county.
Aug. 25.
Westminster.
To Richard de Salteby, William de Spayne and Frederick de Tilneye. Order to deliver to merchants of the Hanse of Almain all their goods, chattels and merchandise and debts, without delay, except the goods and chattels of Hildebrand Suderman, until the king is more fully informed of his attitude, as the king, on being informed that certain merchants of the said Hanse had procured the death of Richard Curteys, merchant of Bristol, at Lescluse in Flanders and had slandered him and the English nation, appointed Richard, William and Frederick to arrest the goods and debts of those merchants in the county of Lincoln and keep them safely until further order, but for certain causes shown before him and his council the king has granted that those merchants may come securely to the realm with their goods and merchandise, stay there and trade and depart to parts beyond the sea at will, and that their goods and debts arrested in England as aforesaid, which have not yet been delivered to them by a mainprise or otherwise, shall be delivered to them without delay, and that no arrest shall be made upon their goods and they shall enjoy the liberties and free customs which they used to have in the time of the king and his progenitors. By K. and C.
The like to the following, to wit:—
John de Weston, Richard de Causton, Richard de Preston and Richard de Wycombe, appointed to arrest such goods and chattels in the city of London.
William Graa, Roger Strigel, Walter de Kelstern and Adam Pound, appointed to arrest such goods and chattels in the county of York.
Membrane 13.
Aug. 20.
Westminster.
To Robert Sauvage, steward of the county of Ulster, in the king's hand by reason of the minority of the heirs of William de Burgo, earl of Ulster, and in the custody of Queen Philippa by the king's grant. Order to deliver to Elizabeth de Burgo the manors of Antrum, Coulrith, Portrosse, Portkaman, Drumtarsy, Dunsomery and Dundryff, all the issues and profits of the River Banne and del Lyn, 3 carucates of land in Suncterton, the mill of Lyn, 2 carucates of land in Kyrketon and Ardebegave, 40s. yearly rent issuing from land in Dondewan, 3 carucates of land in Balybogy and Sadeleyton, 40s. yearly rent issuing from lands in Staneton, 46 acres of land in Portkaman and a carucate of land in Loganton, together with the issues and profits thereof, without delay, as the king ordered Roger Darcy, then escheator in Ireland, to certify in the chancery of Ireland why he had taken the premises into the king's hand, and he returned that the reason was because Richard de Burgo, earl of Ulster, who held the same of the king in chief by knight's service, alienated them to John de Burgo his son and Elizabeth, John's wife, without obtaining the royal licence, and so John died seised, after whose death Elizabeth entered the said tenements and rents without licence, and by a fine which she made with the king on 16th June in the 19th year of the reign, by letters patent under the seal used in Ireland the king pardoned her the said trespasses and granted that she should hold the premises, and on 14 June in that year, at her suit beseeching the king to provide a remedy, as she was jointly enfeoffed with John son of Richard de Burgo, earl of Ulster, her husband, of certain manors and lands in Ulster and elsewhere in Ireland of that earl's grant, in the late king's time, and the escheator, pretending that the said manors and lands were held in chief and had been given to them without obtaining the king's licence, took them into the king's hand, the king pardoned her by letters patent under the great seal of England for that and any trespasses committed by her for other lands held in chief there, and granted that she should hold the said manors and lands; and now she has shown the king that certain ministers of the queen, striving to aggrieve her, and, pretending that she or John had not acquired the said manors and lands of Richard de Burgo, but that he had died seised thereof and so they ought to pertain to his heir, in the king's wardship, have taken them into the king's hand, and by fines levied in the court of Ulster and shown in chancery and by the certificate of the said escheator sent into chancery in Ireland and in the said letters of pardon, under the seal of Ireland, it is clear that the said Richard granted those manors, mill, lands and rents to John and Elizabeth in the form aforesaid, and John died seised thereof jointly with Elizabeth, and it is not right that she should be amoved from her free tenement without answer, contrary to the form of the said fines, letters of pardon and grants. By p.s. which is on the files of the 25th year.
Sept. 8.
Westminster.
To John de Weston, escheator in the county of Gloucester and the adjacent march of Wales. Order to amove the king's hand from the manor of Estorcheard, co. Kaerdyf, and not to intermeddle further therewith, restoring the issues thereof to Laurence de Berkeroles, as at his suit showing that Roger de Berkeroles his father, two years before his death, granted that manor by charter to Gilbert his son and to the heirs of his body, with remainder, in default of such heirs, to the said Laurence Gilbert's brother and the heirs of his body, and Gilbert was seised of the manor by virtue of that grant and died without an heir of his body, and Laurence entered the manor after his death by the form of the said gift and continued his seisin there until the manor was taken into the king's hand by virtue of an inquisition taken by the escheator by which it was found that Roger died seised of that manor as of fee without the possession of Laurence, and he beseeching the king to order his hand to be amoved, the king appointed the escheator and Guy de Bryane and Matthew le Sore to take an inquisition upon the matter, by which it is found that Roger two years before his death gave that manor by charter to Gilbert with remainder as aforesaid, and if Laurence should die without an heir of his body the manor should revert to Roger's right heirs, and Gilbert was seised of the manor for two years and eleven days by virtue of that grant, and he died seised thereof, and Laurence entered the manor because Gilbert died without an heir of his body and he continued his seisin for two weeks, and he has not changed or alienated his estate therein and Roger at his death had no estate therein. By C.
Aug. 20.
Westminster.
To Robert de Thorp and Hugh de Sadelyngstanes. Order to proceed with the duties for which the king appointed them, as he appointed them with Richard de Kelleshull to be justices to take all assizes, juries, and certificates arramed before certain of the king's justices by divers writs in the counties of Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridge, Huntingdon, Bedford and Buckingham, which appointment the king wishes to remain in force, and he has revoked other letters to them appointing them to take such assizes etc.: the king has ordered Richard not to meddle further therewith by virtue of that commission. By C.