BHO

America and West Indies: August 1665

Pages 316-320

Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies: Volume 5, 1661-1668. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1880.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying and sponsored by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. All rights reserved.

Citation:

August 1665

Aug. 1.
Virginia.
1029. Gov. Sir Wm. Berkeley to the King. Hath listed every man that was fit to bear arms to be ready on the first "Al'Arme" with their small shot to assist and man the merchant ships in their harbours, but as yet have not heard of D'Ruyter or any other Dutch man-of-war on their coasts. Doubts not to be able to give his Majesty a good account of this place. In want of great guns for the forts they are erecting, but dares not at this time of exigency beg them of his Majesty, but will supply them the best they can out of the merchant ships. With seal. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 85.]
Aug. 1.
Virginia.
1030. Gov. Sir Wm. Berkeley to (Secretary Lord Arlington). Has commanded all colonels and captains to be ready with their men to secure the ships in harbour with their small shot. Has not yet heard of D'Ruyter or any Dutch man-of-war on their coasts, and believes he never shall, for they have listed 1,500 able horse for dragooners, and have ready besides 2,500 able men on the first Al'Arme. No enemy can manage their great guns half a mile within their thick woods. A defence not necessary till now, for they begin to make those rich commodities which may hereafter tempt the army of princes. Have made great and unexpected progress in silk, which they shall double every year till they make 100,000 lbs. weight yearly ; in want of good wheels (the French call them mills) from Marseilles or Messina. Shall shortly make as much as 40,000 people in the world can do, for they are provided with innumerable trees, which in four or five years will come to their "perfectest." Have unsuccessfully laboured in flax, in which the Governor has lost 1,000l. sterling for want of experienced men ; it would be worth the care of the Council table to send over 10 or 20 able flaxmen. Thanks for favours to his brother Lord Berkeley. 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 86.]
Aug. 1.
Boston.
1031. Sir Robert Carr to the King. Has been told by letter from Col. Nicolls that his Majesty was unsatisfied with his actings in those parts. It strikes him with great amazement that he who served his Majesty's father and his Majesty so long and so faithfully should be condemned unheard. What he acted as a commissioner Col. Cartwright knows, what as a commander Col. Nicolls. Some perchance who sought their own profit more than the King's service have slandered him, but he cannot doubt of his Majesty's justice to him. 1 p. [Col Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 87.]
Aug. 1. 1032. Order of the General Court held at Boston. That all fines imposed according to law for profanation of the Sabbath, contempt or neglect of God's public worship, reproaching of the laws and authority here established, according to his Majesty's charter, shall be to the use of the several counties as formerly, and that every person so refusing or neglecting to submit shall be corporally punished, and their fines remitted. The constable of Kittery is required in the King's name to publish this order at a public town meeting there. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 88.]
Aug. 2.
Boston.
1033. Sir Robt. Carr and Sam. Mavericke to the Justices of the Peace and Magistrates of Rhode Island "appointed by us his Majesty's Commissioners to govern and regulate the King's Province until his Majesty's pleasure be further known." Revoking their previous order that all the inhabitants within the King's Province of Narragansett should quit the place by the end of September next, considering the time limited to be too short and prejudicial to said inhabitants, and ordering that all now in possession may so remain until the King's pleasure be further known. Also similar letter from Col. Nicolls concurring in the above order, dated from Fort James, New York, 15 Sept. 1665. 1 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 89.]
[1665.] 1034. Mem. how the King's Province may be laid out without detriment to any colonies whatsoever. Bounded on the west by Pawcatock [Paucatuck] river, from thence on a north line to the Massachusetts line ; on the north by the line of the Massachusetts ; on the east by Pawtucket river and Narraganset bay ; on the south by the sea. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 90.]
Aug. 5.
Barbadoes.
1035. John Reid to [Sec. Lord Arlington]. Arrived in Barbadoes on 3rd current, after a tedious passage of 88 days from London and 63 from Plymouth without seeing any enemy. The island is no less pleasant than fruitful, but one great garden, and such plenty of all things that a man need not wish himself in London ; it is not so hot as Spain in the dog days. Two or three frigates are wanted to scour the Leeward Islands, where are some Dutch privateers. 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 91.]
Aug. 8.
Barbadoes.
1036. Gov. Lord Willoughby to the King. Is ashamed to think how unprofitable a servant he has been. By last fleet he sent home for trial one Farmer with articles against him ; a very dangerous fellow, a great Magna Charta man and petition of right maker, the first that started up that kind of language here, which took so with the people that Willoughby did not think it safe to let him remain any longer in the island, where he set all the people into a flame, and brought them to think that they were not governed by his Majesty's Commission, or anything but their own laws, or rather their own wills, for they were beginning to dance after the Long Parliament's pipe, styling it the best of Parliaments, which was the doctrine of this John Cade. Hopes his disciples which are behind will not have any encouragement by his Majesty's lenity to Farmer, for the people as they are nearer the sun so they grow more productive of their evil humours and dangerous practices, which drove them to seek a livelihood in those parts. His commission is defective in several points, and by exercising it any longer he will but lose ground ; his back is at the wall, and good words and meek carriage beget little but contempt. No money can be raised without the people's consents, therefore nothing done but what they please. As they grow more rebellious and are not to be governed with an easy hand, hopes that when the Dutch have been chastised, so as to be no longer dangerous in these parts, he may have liberty to attend his Majesty for some few months at home, to inform him of what may concern his interest and greatness in the West Indies ; for it were a pity not to improve to the height his considerable footing there by the right regulation of Barbadoes, which is a master wheel. Humbly proposes that if his Majesty is not satisfied with the Act for 4 per cent. of all goods the growth of the island exported, his Majesty defer giving his assent or any answer thereto until he may wait upon him. 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 92.]
Aug. 9.
Virginia.
1037. Thos. Ludwell to (Sec. Lord Arlington). Refers to his last letter, see ante, No. 975, but doubting in these times of hazard that it might miscarry, gives an account of what it contained. All are alarmed with De Ruyter's being at Barbadoes 20 April last, though they do not know what his success hath been. They are putting this country into a good posture of defence, but the works cannot be perfected without taxes, therefore if any complaints reach him for imposing them, he hopes they will be acquitted of blame. Sends duplicates of public papers before sent to Col. Moryson, their agent in England. 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 93.]
Aug. 15.
St. Jago-de-la-Vega.
1038. Minutes of a Council of War held at St. Jago de la Vega. The Carmahaly negroes having again begun to rob and kill, ordered that the island be put in a posture of war, and every regiment under military discipline be regulated by a court martial, to consist of one field and five commissioned officers, who are empowered to inflict punishment according to the Article of War annexed. 3 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XXXIV, pp. 135-138.]
Aug. 16. 1039. Commission of the Justices of the Peace, commissioned by the King's Commissioners for regulating the affairs of the Province of Maine. Appointing John Wincoll, Captain of Militia for the town of Kittery. Signed by Henry Jocelyn, Francis Champernown, Edward Rishworth, and Edward Johnson. Certified copy. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 94.]
[Aug.] 1040. Fran. Champernowne, Edw. Rishworth, and Edw. Johnson to the King's Commissioners at Boston or elsewhere. Understand from Capt. Rich. Thirston the indefatigable purposes of our imperious neighbours of the Massachusetts are still kindling the pursuance of their own resolved designs, and as we conceive as near as may be the dissolving of his Majesty's authority settled amongst us, a way we fear as remote from their own good as our present peace. Directions would be very acceptable to them, and to the people very useful. Are informed that a General Court order has reserved some of their liberties under restraint. If might overpower, they must be content to suffer till the King's pleasure and authority be further understood. Indorsed, "A letter out of the Eastern parts a little before Sir Robt. Carr went thither." 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 95.]
Aug. 22. 1041. Order from the Justices of the Peace of the Province of Maine to the military officers there. Requiring them in the King's name to take care that the trained bands under their command be ready in complete arms at the first call of the drum for military service, to preserve his Majesty's laws and peace here settled against any who act violently by taking or attempting to take away any of his Majesty's subjects or interests whether of Record or Court Rolls appertaining to this Province, and commanding them by force of arms to apprehend all such persons thus presuming to act. Certified copy. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 96.]
Aug. 23.
St. Eustatius.
1042. Col. Theodore Cary to the Duke of Albemarle. In April last Lieut.-Gen. Edward Morgan set sail from Jamaica, with 650 men, commissioned by Sir Thos. Modyford to reduce the Dutch colonies in America. After struggling with many difficulties they arrived at St. Eustatius, where Gen. Morgan died through the illness and heat of the place, whilst the enemy was being pursued to the fort. The Gov., Peter Adrianson, sent three men with a parley, and having received a summons surrendered the fort. For better security it was determined in a full council of officers to send off most of the Dutch. The booty was then divided according to the custom of war, reserving for his Majesty's use the propriety of all lands and houses, the possession of the fort with the guns and ammunition. The dividing of the slaves has been rather tedious, but meanwhile a party of 70 men was dispatched and took an adjoining island called Saba, which though but small is yet convenient for its good store of provision, and both it and St. Eustatius being but 4 leagues from St. Christophers, are advantageous to his Majesty. A small garrison has been settled in each until further orders be received from his Majesty or Sir Thos. Modyford. Is now preparing to attempt the fort of Tortola or the Virgins, after which if his men continue in health and numbers fail not, will attack Curaao, the strongest Dutch fort in the Indies, if not prevented for want of seamen, but the privateers are so untoward that without a frigate or two little can be expected except plunder and destruction. Requests that their want of arms and ammunition may be supplied, and that his Majesty may know that whilst they have fingers on their hands and hearts in their bodies they will continue ready to serve him. Begs his Grace to procure him some military command at Jamaica that may maintain him ; the Lieut.-Governor's place is void, also he fears the Major's. Incloses,
1042 I. Summons to the Dutch Governor for the surrender of St. Eustatius. Demands the speedy surrender of the fortress, arms, and ammunition, the submission of the island to such taxes and duties as shall be imposed, and the supply of all necessary provisions for the English. These are the only terms can be offered, and if not accepted the "courages" of the soldiers will be put to trial, when the inhabitants may not expect any quarter but such as angry soldiers give those they take by assault.
1042. II. List of things found upon St. Eustatius. Twenty cannon, 131 small arms, 6 barrels of powder, 300 head of cattle, 50 horses, 500 sheep and goats, 5 sloops, 840 negroes and Indians, 50,000 lbs. of cotton, 6 good plantations with sugar works and several of cotton, little or no liquor. Seventy-six men, 42 women, and 132 children, all Dutch, were sent to St. Martin's, 19 men besides women and children, together with 61 English, Irish, and Scotch having taken the oath of allegiance were left on the island. The island is 40 furlongs in length and 16 furlongs in breadth. Together 4 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX. Nos. 97, 97 I., II.]
Aug. 23.
St. Eustatius.
1043. Col. Theodore Cary to Sec. [Lord Arlington]. Account of the capture of St. Eustatius and Saba and of an intended attack upon Tortola and Curaao. In want of two of his Majesty's frigates to countenance their design. Incloses,
1043. I., II. Duplicates of the summons and list above calendared. Together 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Nos. 98, 98 I., II.,]
Aug. 23.
St. Eustatius.
1044. Col. Theodore Cary to Sec. Lord Arlington. Duplicate of the preceding on same sheet with a letter dated Nov. 1665 [see No. 1088]. Indorsed, Rec. 9 May 1666, "sends a narrative of the expedition against the Dutch plantations." 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 130.]
Aug.
Saba.
1045. Account of the booty, arms, and persons taken upon the Dutch island of Saba by the Jamaican forces. 85 negroes and Indians and a small quantity of cattle, stock, goods, and arms, whilst 64 English, Irish, Scots, and French took the oath of allegiance to his Majesty, and 87 Dutch and Indians were sent to St. Martin's. The Jamaican forces numbered 69 men. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 99.]
Aug. 28.
Barbadoes.
1046. Gov. Fras. Lord Willoughby to the King. Has before intimated that his services would be more advanced if he were allowed to wait on his Majesty. Is now constrained by complaints of his being not only a useless servant, but also an unworthy and unprofitable one, by the ill disposing of his Majesty's revenue, to become an humble suitor to his Majesty to dispense with those commands he has imposed upon him in Barbadoes for some time, and grant him license to wait upon his Majesty to vindicate himself. Requests that the government may be entrusted for the time to his nephew, Henry Willoughby, who so lately successfully repelled De Ruyter's attack upon the island. 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 100.]
1665? 1047. Commission appointing Henry Willoughby, William Willoughby, and Sir John Yeamans in the absence of Fras. Lord Willoughby, severally in the absence of either, Governors in chief of Barbadoes and the rest of the Caribbee Island. Rough draft by Williamson. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 101.]
1048. Draft of the above, corrected by Williamson. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 102.]