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America and West Indies: September 1665

Pages 321-323

Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies: Volume 5, 1661-1668. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1880.

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Citation:

September 1665

Sept. 1. 1049. Orders of the Governor and Council of War in Jamaica. Whereas the Varmahaly negroes daily treacherously beguile and murder hunters and others ; and for an encouragement to surprise and kill those sneaking and treacherous rogues, whoever shall bring to the Governor that Varmahaly negro commonly called the Sergeant-Major, dead or alive, shall have 30l. reward, 20l. reward for any other negro officer, and 10l. for any of the common negroes of that gang. Any servant or slave killing or bringing in one of those negroes shall be free ; any Varmahaly negro bringing in one of his fellows shall be pardoned and set free ; and any persons finding out the pallenque of said negroes, shall have and enjoy to their uses all the women, children, and plunder for their reward. 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XXXIV., pp. 138-140.]
Sept. 2.
Excise Office, London.
1050. John Champante to Sec. Lord Arlington. Has received, as Lord Willoughby's agent, a packet of letters for his Majesty and his Lordship. If his Lordship have any commands, if he will direct them to be left at the Excise Office in London, they shall be carefully delivered into the first ship sailing thence for the Barbadoes. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 103.]
Sept. 6. 1051. Warrant for a pass for 100 gelding nags for Robert Vickres, merchant, of Bristol, to be transported to Nevis, or other his Majesty's plantations in the Caribbees. p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. XXII., p. 267.]
Sept. 9.
Boston.
1052. The Governor and Council of the Massachusetts to the Chief Saggamakers of the Mohawk Indians. Describe the depredations committed by five of their men armed, whom they have imprisoned and examined. Are willing to accept the answer they make, that they intended no hurt to the English, and that the Mohawks desired to live in amity with the English as formerly, but expect if they desire to continue friendship with the English that they will not permit their people to come armed or in great companies into any English towns or houses without leave from some of the magistrates ; also, that the Indians forbid their people to rob or spoil the English or their corn or cattle ; and that they distinguish between those Indians who live amongst the English and others, that none of their people kill, rob, or spoil any Indian that lives within a day's journey of Boston, who are generally clothed in English apparel and their hair cut after the manner of the English, these Indians being their friends and under their protection ; complaints against any such will be punished as the fault deserves. Have released their men and delivered them all their arms and victuals for their journey, and sent them home with this letter, to which the Governor and Council desire an answer to be sent to Capt. John Pinchon, that lives at Springfield, upon Connecticut river. 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 104.]
Sept. 10. 1053. Thos. Middleton to Samuel Pepys. The Royal Catherine has arrived at Cowes from Barbadoes laden with sugar sent as a present to the King from Lord Willoughby, being part of the 4 per cent. Customs in Barbadoes ; the captain is unable to venture further without a new cable ; has, therefore, lent him one from the stores [Dom., Chas. II., Vol. CXXXII., No. 62, Cal., p. 557.]
Sept. 12. 1054. Prince Rupert to Sec. Lord Arlington. Encloses a relation of the condition of the country and fort of Goree in Guinea ; the writer says it was victualled but for two months, and had no cargazoon to trade with ; he speaks of a design to drive the English out of the river Gambia, to which he says the Portuguese have offered their assistance ; he also complains that the French only now trade above that place ; in the postscript he gives notice of some English shipping come to the Gambia with ill news. Supposes it was of the last battle. [Dom. Chas. II., Vol. CXXXII., No. 86, Cal., p. 562.]
Sept. 14.
London.
1055. Wm. Rider, J. Bence, Geo. Cock, and Ellis Leighton to Joseph Williamson, Sec. to Lord Arlington, at Oxford. The factors of the Royal Company at Barbadoes advise that when Capt. Peperell arrived there with his prize the William and Susan, the owners arrested him "in an action of 500,000 lbs. sugar trover and conversion." Their factors were obliged to bail the captain in double the action, and petitioned Lord Willoughby to have the business heard in the Admiralty Court, but they would proceed nothing to the condemnation of the ship, or removing the case from the common law, "where they say we can expect no favour from a jury of their neighbours." Request him to move his Majesty for a command to Lord Willoughby to proceed no further against the bail of Capt. Peperell, to transmit the whole case to the King and Council, and that some of those merchants that have shown such contempt to the King's charter may be sent for home to answer it.
Jan. 2.The above letter is a copy of one sent by Mr. Ald. Bence, which they confirm, and doubt not he has taken effectual care about. If not, he is desired to apply his best endeavours speedily to effect it, considering how prejudicial the loss of time may prove to the Royal Company. Indorsed, "Rec. 3 Jan. 6 Ginney Comp." Annexed,
1055. I. Proclamation of Gov. Lord Willoughby that he will hold a Court of Admiralty in Barbadoes on 17th June inst., 1665. June 13.
1055. II. Proceedings in the Court of Admiralty of Barbadoes on 17th and 24th June 1665 on petition of Thomas Colleton, Tobias Payne, and Nicholas Pepperrell, captain of the Charles, to restrain Nathaniel Kingsland and others from pursuing an action at common law for 500,000 lbs. of sugar against Capt. Pepperrell for seizing the ship "William and Susan" found trading on the African coast in contravention of the charter granted to the Royal African Company, and to transfer the suit for the condemnation of the "William and Susan" to the Court of Admiralty 17th June 1665. A citation having been issued the court adjourned to the 24th, when it having been shown that the "William and Susan" had been sent out of the jurisdiction of the court to Jamaica, the court refused to take further cognizance of the matter, 24th June 1665. Together 10 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., Nos. 105, 106.]
Sept. 15. 1056. The King's Commissioners to the Justices of the Peace and magistrates of Rhode Island. Duplicate of No. 1033. "Signed and approved by mee, R. Nicolls. 7ber the 15th, 1665." 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 107.]
Sept. 22. 1057. Warrant from Sec. Lord Arlington to Robt. Gyde, serjeant-at-arms, to take into custody Samuel Farmer for treasonable practices, and to bring him before the King and Council next week. See his petition, No. 1068. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. XXII., p. 275, Cal., p. 570.]
Sept. 22.
Deal Castle.
1058. Capt. Titus to [Sec. Lord Arlington]. Has received his Lordship's letter and warrant, but believes the prisoner is with his Lordship now, or else Capt. Parey who transported him is very much mistaken. Capt. Parey was so credulous as to dismiss the prisoner at Portsmouth upon his giving a bond for 5,000l. to repair to the King. Scarce ever saw such a warrant as Lord Willoughby's committing a man to close custody without specifying any crime or reason. In his Lordship's warrant there is no such omission, but it mentions high treason and other misdemeanors. Intercedes that the prisoner may be punished for the treason only. Has interest enough at Court to get his other faults pardoned. Protests he knows not the man's face, and is not over kind to the King's enemies, but reads that there is in ulciscendo modus, which morality allows us not to transgress. Indorsed, Rec. 26th Sept. 1 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XIX., No. 108.]
Sept. 26. 1059. Alderman J. Bence to Williamson. Sends petition on the Royal African Company's business with copy of counsel's advice. The ship Barbadoes, Capt. Heath, is arrived with news that our people are safe at Cape Coast Castle, and at Ardra have a number of blacks on their hands, and want shipping to take them off. The blacks are wary of the Dutch, and had the English a fleet there, they might easily have all again ; prays that somebody may move the King to it. [Dom., Chas. II., Vol. CXXXIII., No. 43, Cal., p. 573.]
Sept. 1060. Petition of John Willoughby, Mayor and other merchants of Bristol, adventurers to Virginia, to the King. For a convoy to be sent to Virginia to escort back 24 ships which they have sent thither, a far greater number than they intended, but that the trade from London and other places is obstructed by the plague ; these ships produce a large revenue in customs, and supply many mariners for his Majesty's navy, but the Dutch are making great preparations to surprise them in their way homewards. [Dom., Chas. II., Vol. CXXXIII., No. 66, Cal., p. 577.]