BHO

Charles I - volume 172: August, 1630

Pages 319-336

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles I, 1629-31. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1860.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:
Please subscribe to access the page scans

This volume has gold page scans.
Access these scans with a gold subscription.Key icon

August 1630

Aug. 1.
Nonsuch.
Proclamation prohibiting the keeping of Bartholomew Fair, Sturbridge Fair, and Our Lady Fair in Southwark, on account of the plague which threatens London and Southwark, and has much afflicted Cambridge. [Coll. Procs. Car. I., No. 131.]
Aug. 1.
Nonsuch.
1. Petition of the West India Company of the United Provinces to the Council. A Spanish galleon, captured by a ship of the petitioners, was about December 1628 cast away at Castlehaven in Ireland. By an Order of Council of 5 Sept. 1628, free passage was granted to all ships of the petitioners, with right to all wreck of their vessels cast away in his Majesty's dominions. They have ever since laboured for recovery of their wrecked goods at Castlehaven, but Jacob Johnson has lately come thither, and has taken away wrecked goods, made ready for removal by the petitioner's workmen. Pray that he may be restrained from interfering. Underwritten,
1. i. Fiat of the King granting the petitioners' request, and referring the same to the Lords of the Admiralty. Nonsuch, 1630, Aug. 1.
Aug. 1.
Wimbledon.
2. Edward Viscount Wimbledon to Sec. Dorchester. Thanks for granting his request, especially in a hunting time and a progress. That which stayed his going to Portsmouth was only his commission.
Aug. 1.
Belhouse.
3. Edward Lord Newburgh to the same. Sends inclosed Lord Deincourt's answer to Lord Dorchester. The writer applied all the power of his interest and persuasions to bend him to the Sec.'s desires. Inclosed,
3. i. Francis Lord Deincourt to Sec. Dorchester. Is infinitely sorry that it is not in his power to pleasure the Sec. by letting him have his house. The many occasions that draw him to London, with his wife's unwillingness to part with it, disable him from giving his consent. Sutton, 1630, July 21.
Aug. 1.
The Downs.
4. Capt. Lewis Powell to Nicholas. Hears that a charge is to be brought against him, said to be in reference to a dead pay. Desires to know what the matter may be, and to come up and meet it. The whole fleet is now in the Downs, except the Tenth Whelp. The Hollanders are in hand for blocking up Dunkirk.
Aug. 2.
Mitton.
5. Foulke Reed to Lord President Conway. Sale of horses shall take place as soon as any fairs or other means conveniently may admit. Remits 100l. Reports on the state of the park pales and the number of deer in Kingley.
Aug. 2.
London.
6. Sir William Becher to Sec. Dorchester. Sends letters received from Lord Newburgh at Belhouse, and from Sir William Anstruther, which last comes from his brother Sir Robert. Is come to town to attend this August, but finds none of the Lords in town but the Lord Marshal and Lord Falkland, and none near the town but the Lords Keeper and Treasurer, and no business to do. If the plague increase, solicits permission to retire a while into the country, leaving one there to receive directions. Sends three warrants to be signed by the Lords at the Court.
Aug. 2.
The Downs.
7. Sir Henry Mervyn to Nicholas. Has given leave to Captain Powell to come for London for two or three days, to have conference with his physician, and also to speak about victualling his ship. Unless course be taken for supply of the Seventh and Second Whelps, they must come in. Is going that instant to attend the Duke of Lennox, and purposes to be in the Downs again by Thursday. The Convertive and other ships will go to the West with the first wind. Thanks for his congratulation of Sir Henry's forsaken kindred. His purpose is not to fall from bad to worse. The sense of a resolved sin woke him from that lethargy wherein he saw at hand the shipwreck of reputation and salvation. Hopes the want of grace will never more expose him to such a slumber.
Aug. 2.
Aboard the Seventh Whelp in the Downs.
8. Capt. Dawtry Cooper to the same. The bearer comes to crave his assistance for a supply of victuals. Much of his beer so stinketh that they are not able to endure the hold.
Aug. 2. 9. Officers of the Navy to Sir George Fane [Vane]. John Wall, their purveyor for timber in those parts, is instructed to bring in 500 loads of timber during the present year, and 300 loads in the year ensuing. He has brought in 360 loads; as to the remaining 40 [?] for this year, and the quantity for next year, the country may be charged to bring it no farther than Yalding, if the river be navigable from thence. [Copy.] Inclosed,
9. i. John Wall to the Officers of the Navy. Mr. Coale having offered the carriage of the timber by water from Yalding to Chatham, he was willing thereto, but finds a want of water this dry summer. [Copy.]
Aug. 2.
Stanford.
10. [Sir Thomas Roe] to Charles Viscount Wilmot. Is newly arrived from a hard journey. Gives account of the truce he had effected between Poland and Sweden. By it the glorious king of Sweden was set at liberty, and had landed in Pomerania, and taken Rugen and a pass near Wolgast. If he be not supported he will make peace with advantage, and return full of glory. Gives a brief glance at the state of affairs throughout the continent of Europe. The English court is a labyrinth of which he has not the clue. The way to heaven is strait and narrow, and in this only the court is like it; there is but one entrance. He expects little there. If anything falls it must proceed from the goodness of the King, who professes to take care of the writer. No show of altering the government of Ireland. Lord Falkland stands stiff to return, or to have recompense, so that the king's service is become a burden which was a reward; so he wonders not that their master is poor. Late mortalities have opened the way to ambitious suitors; as, to Wales, Portsmouth, the Stannaries, the Rolls, Justice in Oyer, and the second key, which are all disposed in design. [Copy.]
Aug. 2. 11. Bond of Wm. Gomeldon and Richard Hamby, for payment to John Sharpe, at his dwelling-house in St. James's Street, Westminster, of 14l. on the 12th February next.
Aug. 3.
Ragley.
12. Anthony Connon [Cannon ?] to Lord President Conway. Sends a brace of bucks' shoulders and umbles, and reports respecting a black brach given to the Lord President by Sir Thomas Tyringham, and also respecting the general state of the dogs and deer on Lord Conway's estate.
Aug. 3. 13. Attorney General Heath to Sec. Dorchester. Has received a letter from the Earl of Bedford about the sessions of Sewers for the Great Fens, which much concerns the King's service. Begs him to procure the King's signature to a letter thereon.
Aug. 3. 14. Lord Treasurer Weston [to the same]. Is commanded by his Majesty to send for him with all speed, to confer about some business of importance, of which the writer is to give his Majesty an account upon Saturday at Farnham. Begs him to tell his Lady that it is not the writer's fault so soon to call him from his ease and pleasure.
Aug. 3.
York.
15. Sentence passed in the Court of High Commission at York upon Peter Smart, for publishing and preaching a factious, scandalous, and schismatical sermon in the Cathedral of Durham on 27th July 1628. He was to make public submission in the Cathedrals of York and Durham, and at the High Commission Court in Durham, to be suspended from his ministry, to pay a fine of 400l., to be condemned in expenses, and to stand committed until he give caution to perform that order. [Copy, indorsed by Bishop Laud.]
Aug. 4.
Bagshot.
16. The King to Sir Henry Mildmay, Sir Thomas Fanshaw, and others of co. Essex. Sends them commission for compounding with persons appointed to receive knighthood, with instructions how to execute the same. The King's right to these fines has been made clear by a public declaration of the Barons of the Exchequer, and by counsel learned in the laws, and this shall be the last commission he will issue. Those who now refuse shall have no other recourse for it, but to the Council. Sir Henry and Sir Thomas to be collectors. [Copy.]
[Aug. 4?] 17. Edward Earl of Dorset and James Earl of Carlisle to the King. Report on the petition of the inhabitants of High Holborn. and the parishes adjoining, concerning the building of Jeremy Turpin. Having viewed the place, they judge it necessary to be built, for the safety of passengers, the adorning of the street, and the amendment of the highway. Leave should be so given as that this building be not made a precedent.
Aug. 4.
Bagshot.
18. Order of his Majesty referring the petition alluded to in the preceding article to such Commissioners of Buildings as formerly made stay of the said building. When it shall be made appear by their advice, that this building may proceed without prejudice to his Majesty's proclamation or commission for buildings, he will declare his further pleasure. [Draft.]
Aug. 4.
Edinburgh.
19. Capt. John Mason to Sec. Coke. On 28th July the three estates convened, and before their rising that day was granted payable in four years 400,000l. Scottish money, which makes 33,333l. 6s. 8d. English coin. On the 30th, into the Lord Chancellor's chamber, he lying sick of the gout in his bed, were gathered the Council to hear read the King's letters and instructions touching the fishings. They were afterwards represented to the three estates, and a committee was agreed upon which should give a resolution to the propositions; but little can be done until they have returned home, and have treated with their people, and then commissioners will be sent to London to give resolution. John Hay violently opposes and accuses the Earl of Seaforth for bringing in the Hollanders. The Lord Chancellor and others labour with great ferventness to set forth the work. As touching their woods, is confirmed in his opinion that masts and ship timber may be served from thence, a sample whereof he hopes to present to the King in London if he be not disappointed in the St. Anne.
Aug. 4.
Scadbury.
20. Sir Thomas Walsingham to Nicholas. If there be still transportation of corn and victual will make it known to the whole Council. Lord Thanet, in the writer's absence in Norfolk, wrote to his father that Sir Dudley Digges gave out that he should have a new commission of Vice-Admiralty that would drown that of the writer. For the value of the place he does not care, but for Sir Dudley to come over his head he should be very loath, neither would he endure it. For all his great words will not forbear to execute his place within Sir Dudley's hundred of Faversham that he has newly purchased.
[Aug. 5.]
[Farnham.]
21. Officers of the Navy to the same. Now that they are met at Farnham, they find no warrant for their proceedings. It is showed to them that it was Sec. Coke's direction that Nicholas should get the Commission dispatched. If the stay arise from there not having been an order for payment of the fees, pray him to lay out what is needful, and send the commission to them at Portsmouth.
Aug. 5. 22. Estimate for repairing and fitting to sea the St. Claude, and for boatswain and carpenter's stores for six months: total, 507l. 16s. 4d.
Aug. 5.
London.
23. Alexander Feris to Sir John Heydon, Lieutenant General of the Ordnance. Reports interviews with Sir Kenelm Digby on the subject of the contract for supply of gunpowder. Sir Kenelm said that "my Lord's" [Lord Treasurer's?] mind was altered, because Mr. Evelyn had offered to serve in all the powder at 8½d. the pound. Sir Kenelm would not bring the writer to see "my Lord" unless he was prepared to make a lower offer than Mr. Evelyn; the writer desired to have speech with "my Lord" in order to advise a better course for the King.
[Aug. 5 ?] Sir John Heydon to the King. Letter or petition praying him to give directions for a speedy prosecution of the Commission for inquiry into the state of the Ordnance, that so those that are delinquents may receive their just censure, and such as have faithfully acquitted themselves may no longer have to endure indignities beyond patience, nor remain obnoxious to indirect aspersions and malicious scandals. [Draft, written in pencil, by Sir John Heydon, on part of the remainder of the sheet of paper which contains the preceding article.]
Aug. 6.
Chichester.
24. Mons. de Larosiere to Lord President Conway. Has presented his Lordship's letters of recommendation to the Mayor of Southampton, who has given him complete liberty. Returns humble thanks. Fr.
Aug. 6.
Wimbledon.
25. Edward Viscount Wimbledon to Sec. Dorchester. When the Lord Mayor waited on his Majesty at Whitehall for his confirmation, his Majesty commanded him that when he went his visitation of the river Thames he should send word to the Court, his Majesty on account of past neglects having resolved to send some of his Council to visit the river with the Lord Mayor. The King appointed the writer, Lord Falkland, Sir Thomas Edmondes, and his Majesty's surveyor, Inigo Jones, as Commissioners, but the visitation was left to under officers, and the Lord Mayor neither went himself, nor sent to the Commissioners.
Aug. 6.
Arundel House.
26. Thomas Earl of Arundel and Surrey to the same. Sir Robert Mansell conceiving that a Patent lately signed by the King might be prejudicial to him, the Earl is willing that the words "glass and "glassworks only excepted" may be inserted into the bill signed.
Aug. 6.
London.
27. Philip Burlamachi to the same. Sends foreign letters. Signor Daniel Nys has sent a man express hither to intreat the King that he may be satisfied for the statues, but without paying Burlamachi the money he has disbursed for Nys. Hopes his Majesty will not allow him to lose this considerable amount, expended in a business in which he had no interest, except to fulfil the King's command to procure the statues to be sent to England. On taking to the Chancellor the parchment for the exiled ministers of the Palatinate, it has been found that it wants the order to pass by immediate warrant. The ministers of the Flemish Church have requested Burlamachi to send it to the Sec. for rectification. Fr.
Aug. 6.
Bristol.
28. Robert Kitchen to Nicholas. About 20 July there came in there a small English bark which had been taken by a Biscayner that did much spoil in that channel, and was retaken by Captain Hooke, of the Fifth Lion's Whelp. She is not worth above a hundred marks; four poor seamen own her, and she is their whole living. Capt. Hooke has disbursed 8l. for her.
Aug. 6. 29. List of ships now at sea, where they are employed, and for what time ordered to be victualled and continued abroad.
Aug. 6. 30. Copy of the same list.
Aug. 6. 31. Another copy of the same.
Aug. 6. 32. Nicholas's rough draft of the same.
Aug. 6. 33. Exchequer Account of Receipts and Issues from the 30th July until this day. Among the payments are mentioned Sir Richard Wynn, 150l.; Countess of Denbigh, 500l.; Mons. de Sancé, 300l.; John Quarles, 550l. The receipts were 45,560l. 18s.; the payments, 44,858l. 6s. 3d. The remain was 4,738l. 3s. 4½d.
Aug. 7.
Farnham.
34. Sec. Dorchester to Lord President Conway. The affairs of the world, like fruits, are grown ripe with the season. The Duke of Mantua has capitulated for himself and a few more, the rest of his town being sacked after a long siege. Death of the Duke of Savoy after having seen Saluces lost before his eyes. The King of Sweden has entered Germany with a powerful army, which divertisement is like to make the peace of Italy. Now the great ones have eaten up the less (the Austrians the Mantuan, and the French the Savoyard), a pill composed of plague, famine, and war being ministered to them by Mazarin, a Spanish doctor, they are ready to vomit all again. At Farnham their tents are set up like Tartars, and they hunt before and after noon like Indians, as if they should dine and sup on nothing but what they kill.
Aug. 7. 35. Attorney General Heath to Sec. Dorchester. Sir Thomas Frere [Fryer] and Colonel Hakluyt have brought a reference to the Lord Treasurer concerning a parcel of coppice wood enclosed in the Forest of Dean. Sir Alexander Hume has petitioned for the same thing, and the Lord Chamberlain claims an interest. Besides which there is a decree in the Exchequer that the King should make no improvements in that forest without the commoners' consent. Sir Thomas and Colonel Hakluyt hope the Sec. will find some way to help them.
Aug. 8.
Farnham.
36. The King to Attorney General Heath. Warrant to prepare a commission to Philip Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, Lord Chamberlain, to be the King's Lieutenant within cos. Somerset, Wilts, and Cornwall.
Aug. 8. 37. Attorney General Heath to Sec. Dorchester. Begs him to move his Majesty for insertion of the words in the bill granting a privilege for the use of turf and peat for making iron, which are necessary for the satisfaction of Sir Robert Mansell, and are consented to by the Lord Marshal.
Aug. 8.
Putney.
38. Philip Burlamachi to Sec. Dorchester. Understands that the man sent by Signor Nys has gone direct to the Court. Explains therefore the actual state of the affair. The King has caused several letters to be written that he wished to have the whole collection, and the Lord Treasurer, in the King's name, is bound for the payment. Believes the King continues in the same mind, but if there be a change in that respect, and Nys and the writer are left to proceed against each other, the letters of the writer, Mr. Carey, and others who signified the acceptance of the bargain, and that of the Lord Treasurer, promising payment, will be produced. Wishes him to consider the consequence to the reputation of his Majesty. Is obliged to say this, although in favour of a wicked man, who deserves a stroke of a poignard from the writer rather than any favour. Begs a word of explanation as to what Nys's agent has negotiated. Both master and servant act towards Burlamachi with all kinds of falseness. Fr.
Aug. 8.
Aboard the Tenth Whelp, in Portsmouth Harbour.
39. Captain Sidrack Gibbon to Nicholas. Ranging the coast he found in Studland Bay a Frenchman, which had in her 36 firkins of butter, laden in the Isle of Wight. Intreats that she may be allowed to go free, because she is a poor man's, and has other goods aboard, for which they have cockets from the Custom House at Southampton.
Aug. 9.
Farnham.
Proclamation against the false dying of silk. No dyer was to use any "slipp, alder-bark, filings of iron, or other corrupt or deceit"ful matter," whereby the weight of the silk might be increased, under pain of punishment by the laws, the Star Chamber, or the King's prerogative royal. [Coll. Procs., Car. I., No. 132.]
Aug. 9.
The Court at Farnham.
40. Sec. Dorchester to Bishop Corbet of Oxford. When the progress proves a regress, it may very well fall out that the Sec's. wife will meet him at Brightwell, with some good company out of Suffolk, where she now is with her friends. In the interim desires a fit seat in the church may be made for her at his charge. There was one anciently for the Mistress of Brightwell in the chapel where his father's and grandfather's tombs are, but that is in decay, and too much out of hearing. The place where a woman's pew already stands were the fittest for a divided pew, one for herself and the other for her women, and it would be more convenient if the pulpit were removed to the other side of the church, with the pew made for Mrs. Howson, whereby all would be well accommodated both for the Sec. and the Bishop, against he returned to have women in it as the Sec. had done.
Aug. 10.
Aboard the Reformation in the Downs.
41. Sir Henry Mervyn to the Lords of the Admiralty. Yesterday received their commands for clearing the coasts to the westward. Had not neglected those parts, having instructed Capt. Plumleigh to ply between the Land's End and Portland Point. State of the victualling of the several vessels under his command. Begs they may be supplied at Portsmouth. What service can they expect, or how can they keep the sea, when at every turn one ship or other must run in to supply some wants. The King loses his charge, and the writer his esteem in their opinion. Fourteen sail of Spanish ships of war are coming out of Dunkirk. Has promised the Hollanders, who have but ten ships, his aid, and hopes that want of victuals will not make him worse than his word.
Aug. 10.
The Downs.
42. Sir Henry Mervyn to Nicholas. Plumleigh went to the westward on Saturday last. He was before at sea, and made stay of a French ship. Sir Henry found him in the Downs, magnifico like, when he returned from Dieppe, where he landed the Duke of Lennox on Friday last. Could find no colour for his bringing the ship out of her way, and therefore discharged her. The gentleman loves to make a noise of nothing. He has Captains that know neither how to command nor how to obey. Intreats him, if he loves the honour of the service, to solicit that their ships may be victualled at Portsmouth for so long time as it is intended they shall stay forth.
Aug. 10. 43. Inventory by William Drake of tenths taken out of the Fortune, of Hamburgh, and the Joseph, both brought into Bristol.
Aug. 11. 44. John Evelyn to Sec. Coke. Forbore to acquaint him with Mr. Savill's sickness, hoping some amendment, and is not yet out of hope. Probably it is nothing but a new grief with which most houses in their neighbourhood are visited. In his own house has had seven of his ablest men ill at one time.
Aug. 12.
Lynn.
45. Capt. Thomas March to the Council. On Monday last off Flamborough Head met with six Dunkirk men-of-war. They have with them a Holland wafter, which they took, and that morning they took and sunk many English ships in view of the people of Flamborough. Wishes intimation were given to the men-of-war before Dunkirk, and ships sent to the northward, the fishermen being now expected home, and most of the coal fleet of the Tyne in that river.
Aug. 12.
[South] Hampton.
46. Andrew Pitcairn, Master Falconer to the King, to Lord President Conway. When Captain Penn gets his despatch the King wishes Lord Conway to insert words for some Barbary falcons. Capt. Penn brought him a cast for trial, promising more if his Majesty liked them.
Aug. 12.
Beaulieu.
47. Henry Earl of Holland to Attorney General Heath. The King is pleased to pardon Wm. Morgan the younger, Thomas Hall, Thomas Rowe, James Wenling, and Joshua Satterly, convicted at Southampton for piracy, in breaking into a ship. Prays him to prepare a bill accordingly.
Aug. 12/22.
The Hague.
48. Elizabeth, Queen of Bohemia, to Sir Thomas Roe. Sees by his letters that he stands in one state. Wishes with all her heart it were otherwise. "Our Ambassador" is now there, and has brought a message she looked not for, and which not a little troubles both the King and herself. Roe knows that she was very confident in her brother's promises, and though he has altered his mind in that, she hopes his good nature will not suffer him quite to abandon them, though a peace with Spain be very dangerous to them and all the public. The King of Sweden still prospers, which she hopes God will continue.
Aug. 12.
Tiningham.
49. Thomas Earl of Haddington to James Earl of Carlisle. Thanks for a letter in which the Earl addressed had urged the writer to bend his full endeavour to further the King's designs for applying the benefit of his fisheries to the commodity of his subjects and strength of his monarchy. In the late convention the writer exhibited his zeal to advance that project in a way which should be an answer to malicious reports. Since the death of the late King never presumed to beg any recompense from the heir of his blood, crown, and virtues. Sends this letter by Lord Traquair.
Aug. 12.
Ragley.
50. Foulke Reed to William Weld. Explains the increase of expence in repairs of the lodge, and other items in recent accounts of Lord Conway's rents.
Aug. 13. 51. Petition of Captain David Scott, Henry Carleton, and Thos. Jeffreys, his lieutenant and ensign, to the Council of War. The Commissioners for payment of the Army allowed the petitioners for their imprisonment and losses in France, 394 days' entertainment, which came to 268l. 13s.; 78l. of this sum remains unpaid. Pray for a warrant to Capt. Mason to pay the same out of the first moneys he shall receive.
Aug. 13. 52. Edward Lord Conway to William Weld. Has let Mr. Spencer know he was too choleric, but would not write to his father save on very good ground. Begs Weld to put his father in mind concerning the legend desired by the Lord Primate. Thanks for verses sent him. Hopes the lines are strong enough to bind Robin Maule and Jack Crofts from ever more using the phrase. Sends a cast of merlins, and will not tie him to so strict conditions as Sir William Brownlow did the writer when he gave him a goshawk, and desired him to accept her as if she were better. Sends 40s. and prays him to present Mr. Weckherlin with a pair of silk stockings, and to send the writer a beaver hat and a band of gold and silver.
Aug. 13.
Basings in Peckham.
53. Sir Thos. Gardyner to Sec. Dorchester. Has received a letter written by his son to the Sec., in which are declared some passages of business in those parts of the world, but the writer will shew him of wonderful things which are like to come to pass before the year 1666, when the beast of prophetical Scriptures, whom he interprets to mean the Eagle with three heads, namely, France, Spain, and the Emperor, is to be no more. The particulars of these things which God had given him he was about to present to the King in a book which he had in hand, but could not finish by reason of his employment for his Majesty's and the Queen's fruits.
Aug. 13.
Isle of Wight.
54. Capt. Richard Plumleigh to Nicholas. Had orders from Sir Henry Mervyn to go for the westward, and take with him the ketch and the Tenth Whelp, but they are not ready, so that he must along alone. Has put in there to take in some water to drink, for all their beer stinks, and he hears nothing from Alcock. His men are all in an uproar, but he feeds them with fair words till he can get to Plymouth, where, if he finds no order for beer, he shall be sure of a plain mutiny.
Aug. 13.
Bristol.
55. William Willett to the same. Has given his letter to Sir Thomas Button, to the purser of the Fifth Whelp, which is still in that river staying for a wind. The part victualling of the King's ships there and in Ireland hinders the service. Mr. Drake, according to the Lords' order, had sold the writer the sugars. Most of them are very coarse, and must to his city. They will not vent at Bristol. A cask of two cwt. will be sent him from the Three Cups in Bread Street, which Mr. Drake and himself present to Mrs. Nicholas. No good news from sea; not a prize these three months. Shall be glad to receive an order for sale of the St. John. The ship spoileth and so doth the aquavitæ.
Aug. 13. 56. Note by Nicholas of the state of the provisions of victuals for all the ships in service at sea.
Aug. 14. 57. Petition of Barnard Babb and John Tutchin to the Lords of the Admiralty. Their bark, wherewith they used to carry coal from Wales into Devonshire, and which was the sole support of themselves and their families, had been captured by a Biscayner, and afterwards recaptured by a King's ship, and brought into Bristol. Pray for its restoration. Annexed,
57. i. Certificate of Justices of Peace and others to the Lords of the Admiralty. In verification of the statements in the foregoing petition and support of its prayer.
Aug. 14. 58. Several affidavits of John Tutchin and Barnard Babb made in the Court of Admiralty, in verification of the facts stated in the preceding petition, and as to the ownership of their bark, the Truelove, of Seaton.
Aug. 14. 59. Abstract of the evidence respecting the ownership of the St. Anthony, a Brazil ship laden with tobacco and sugars, a prize in contest in the Court of Admiralty.
Aug. 14.
Ragley.
60. Foulke Reed to Lord President Conway. Sends Edward Hughes to serve Lord Conway as a falconer, and with him a sparhawk that has killed three or four brace of partridges. Reports as to the best place for a pool for fowl. Intends to send for Sir Robert Harley's man to come over and construct it.
Aug. 14. 61. John Moorcock to Nicholas. Prays that the cook in the Triumph may not be allowed to sell his place, or appoint a deputy before the writer has the refusal of it.
Aug. 14. 62. Return to an inquisition in which are set out various lands at Brill, Borstall, and Oakley, co. Bucks, in the occupation of John Dynham. [Copy, imperfect.]
Aug. 15.
Beaulieu.
63. The King to the East India Company. William Earl of Denbigh has an earnest desire to travel into Asia, into the Great Mogul's country, and also into Persia. His intended journey would be too tedious and dangerous overland; they are therefore required to give orders that he and his followers be received for his passage into the said countries into such one of their ships as he shall make choice of, and that the great cabin be allowed for himself and his train, consisting, at the most, of six persons. [Draft.]
[Aug. 15.] 64. Draft suggestion for the preceding, or some other document, in connection with the same subject.
Aug. 15.
St. James's.
65. Capt. Wm. Skipwith to Sec. Dorchester. Gives him notice of his wife's employment "in this honourable service," and solicits his directions for his and his wife's carriage therein.
Aug. 15.
Holyrood.
66. George Viscount Duplin, Lord Chancellor of Scotland, to the same. Having the commodity of the Lord Traquair, he sends the Sec. his thanks for his continual demonstrations of love and respect, and assures him that if it were in his power to do otherwise, he would not die so deeply indebted to any as he is to Dorchester.
Aug. 15. 67. Dr. James Chambers to the same. Arrangements in the nursery of the young Prince, on one of his nurses being seized with ague and threatened jaundice. He thrives well. He has neither sucked nor wakened but once all that night, and is yet asleep. His favour and complexion amend daily. Agues are sharp and frequent. The Lady Governess has had two smarting fits. She has rested well the last night, and is now in good temper. He attends Dr. Mayerne's coming (who was married yesterday), to consult for her relief.
Aug. 15. 68. Notes by Bishop Laud, indorsed by him, "My intentions for "charity, so soon as God shall make me able." They comprise intended alterations in the chapel and other buildings of St. John's, Oxford, and the foundation of a hospital at Reading, "in the house "where I was born."
Aug. 15. 69. Patrick Maule to Sir Richard Graham. Thanks for an unexpected letter. The writer's stay at the place whence he writes is uncertain. Remembrances to Sir Richard's wife, Mrs. Ashburnham, and Mrs. Waldron.
Aug. 15. 70. Will of Mildred Reade, of Linkenholt, co. Hants, widow. She bequeaths money directed by her late husband to be paid to her out of the produce of the sale of the manor of Linkenholt. She gives legacies to her husband's son, Andrew Reade, and his daughter Mary Hanwell, widow, and her children; her own daughter, Alice, wife of Thomas Farwell; her daughter-in-law, Anne Reade; her sons, William, Thomas, Robert, George, and Francis Reade; her nephew, Thomas Mayhew, the younger; her brother, Francis Windebank; her brother-in-law, Henry Reade; her friend, Nicholas Blake; her daughter-in-law, Mary Hanwell, with Andrew and Gerard Hanwell, her sons, and Anne Reade, her sister. [Copy.]
Aug. 15. 71. Certificate of Peter Hannay, bailiff of Bedlington, that, finding eleven Hollanders in the street of that place, armed with muskets, and pursuing a Dunkirker, he procured assistance, and took them into custody.
Aug. 16.
Tottenham.
72. Sec. Coke to Sec. Dorchester. For the great business of the Irish plantation of the Londoners, Sir Thomas Phillips sent him such a load of writings, that the perusal has spent all his time till now. But if he and the rest will peruse his collections, they shall find them well worth the labour. The Londoners are powerful, and have many advantages; the business is also very intricate, but he hopes the King and they will see that he has not spared endeavour to make it plain, that if his Majesty may have right, which without strong resolution will hardly be obtained, he may break the confidence of the times that have encroached upon him, and increase his royalties and revenue. Is thoroughly tired with this work, and the sickness of his son is some distraction to him; is, therefore, glad to have his Majesty's leave to see his house in Derbyshire, and take some fresh air.
Aug. 16.
Hatfield.
73. William Earl of Salisbury to the same. Apologises for not before returning thanks for the speedy dispatch of his late favour received from the King. By Dorchester's letter to Lord Doncaster, perceives that in this time of progress he can write to his friends. Intreats that when ordinary occurrents come to his knowledge, which are fit for the Earl to know, he will make one of his secs. send the same to Salisbury House, indorsed to the Earl. Will not fail to make Lord Denny partaker. The Earl's daughter is a mother of "a female animal," and the Earl a grandfather.
Aug. 16.
Tottenham.
74. Sec. Coke to Nicholas. Sends a warrant signed. Takes his journey towards Derbyshire to-morrow morning. Wishes him to let the Lord Treasurer know that he has been delayed by the business of the Irish plantations, and that he shall return within a month, or sooner, if necessary.
Aug. 16.
The Court at Tichfield.
75. James Earl of Carlisle to Attorney General Heath. It is the King's pleasure that he should prepare a protection for the bearer, Richard Glover, of London, merchant.
Aug. 17.
Westminster.
76. F. [?] Nicolls to Sec. Dorchester. Lord Dorset having desired that the writer should once a day wait on his Lady for letters to the Court, touching the health of the Prince, he waited on her yesterday, but understood by Lady Killigrew that the Countess being indisposed, had prayed Dr. Chambers to write. To-day her indisposition continues, but she wrote the inclosed. The bearer is newly returned from Sir John Peyton, with purpose, before he embarks for Jersey, to wait on the Sec. The keeper of the privy lodgings at Whitehall wishes the King to know that his weasel has been sick this fortnight of a lameness in his hinder feet, of which he is afraid it will die.
Aug. 17. Nicholas to Capt. Thomas March. On the 14th inst. order was sent to Sir Henry Mervyn to ply with his fleet to the northward, on advertisement that there were fourteen Dunkirkers gone that way. Copy of March's letter of the 12th inst. has been sent to him, with orders to make great haste. [Copy. Nicholas's Letter Book, p. 86.]
Aug. 17.
Southampton.
77. John Ellzey to Nicholas. Expected Nicholas there, and to take a hard lodging with him, when the King was in the New Forest; but he had been there four nights. Sends account of tenths received out of the Phœnix, of Homflett [Honfleur ?], taken by Capt. Chantre. Wishes order for the sale of these tenths, and those of Capt. Scras's prizes.
Aug. 17.
Leith.
78. Colin Earl of Seaforth to James Earl of Carlisle. Commends his care for the welfare of Scotland, as exhibited in his recommendation to his noble friends to go forwards in the association with the English in the enterprise of fishing. The Lord Chancellor and the Earl of Morton left no argument unuttered, which might induce their countrymen, and especially the burghs, to concur therein. Disinclination of the burghs to admit any association either of countrymen or strangers. They like not that noblemen or gentry should understand matters of industry. They will do what they can to move the King to delay. If he will look to the good of his kingdoms, or his particular profit, he will presently establish a burgh as he intended in Lewis.
Aug. 18.
Ragley.
79. Foulke Reed to Lord President Conway. Philip Clough comes up about the park pales. Edward Hughes is gone towards Lord Conway with a spar-hawk. A brickmaker has found good clay at Luddington. A brick or two shall be sent to his Lordship. Desires to know what quantity of land is to be drowned for the fish pond.
Aug. 18. 80. Lord Treasurer Weston to Attorney General Heath. Warrant to prepare a grant to Mrs. Cicely Crofts, one of the Maids of Honour, of a pension of 300l. upon a surrender of the same by Frances Lady Burr, as also of a pension of 150l. upon surrender of the same by Sir Edward Salter.
Aug. 19. 81. Names of such as attend on the Prince of Wales at St. James's who are to have lodging and diet of the Earl of Dorset. No one is to presume to lodge or diet there but only such as belong to the Lady Dorset, and no other persons, as husbands, friends, or servants of those who are here specified, are to come on visits until the King's pleasure be known. The list includes "Sir John Tunstall and his "two men; Dr. Chambers and his man; eight rockers and their "eight maids."
[Aug. 20 ?]
Lymington. Friday, at noon.
82. John Lord Poulett to Sec. Dorchester. A thousand thanks for his noble usage, and the liberty of his lodging at the Court, whence he got thither without much pain, but has since suffered from various hurts, the anguish of which has pulled a fever upon him. If he can, will be carried to-morrow to Mons. de Soubise's. Pained that he could not receive the King's commands.
Aug. 20.
Aboard the Seventh Whelp at Dover.
83. Captain Dawtry Cooper to Nicholas. Incloses a journal of his movements. Being at Dover, in the absence of Sir Henry Mervyn he received an order for convoying Mons. de Guilly and Mons. Ramus, to Calais, which he had obeyed. Mr. Rookes, the searcher of Dover, gave information that certain plate had been put on board which was none of the Ambassador's, but it turned out to be pewter in plate fashion belonging to a French picture drawer whom the Ambassador acknowledged to be one of his retinue.
Aug. 21.
Lymington.
84. John Lord Poulett to Sec. Dorchester. Sends a dish of ralles [rails], hoping they will be worth the eating and presenting to his Majesty. The remedies received by his Majesty's favour and means have given him so much ease that he feels no pain, but only a weakness in his limbs, so that he hopes he shall be able to return home by easy journies.
Aug. 22.
Battersea.
85. Oliver Viscount Grandison to the same. Has returned to his house, but so spent and wearied that he must rest his body and consult his physician. Prays Dorchester to excuse him to his Majesty for not waiting upon him.
Aug. 22.
Duchy House.
86. Henry Viscount Falkland to the same. At the sending over of two of his servants into Ireland about his Star Chamber cause, his Majesty granted them his protection to prevent foul play. Being now to employ Bartholomew Piesly and Philip Fernely thither again with a commission for the examination of witnesses about that matter, desires him to move his Majesty to extend to them the same favour. Pledges himself that this is desired only to prevent any interruption that may be given them to prejudice his proceedings.
[Aug. 22 ?]
Dernetown. [Dirleton ?]
87. Sir William Alexander to the same. Received his packet at Newcastle, making mention of one directed to the writer which had not come to his hands. The news made him sorry, not only as conjecturing what effects such a loss may produce, but compassionating so great a prince's extreme and unexpected miseries. The estates of Scotland assembling in as great a number as usual yielded all that was demanded by his Majesty, either for his own supplies or for the public good. Never subjects parted better pleased with a prince. God grant the like in all his kingdoms. Advanced thus far on his return to Court.
Aug. 22.
Putney.
88. Philip Burlamachi to the same. The advance of the King of Sweden alarms the Imperialists. His narrow escape of capture on going with a small party to visit a ford where with difficulty he avoided an ambush. Reminds the Sec. of two privy seals sent him last week. Out of Holland he only hears of the dispute between the English merchants and the Dutch about the taring of cloth. Fr.
Aug. 23.
Beaulieu.
89. Sec. Dorchester to Attorney General Heath. On the decease of the late Earl of Pembroke, two places of command became vacant in that country; the Captainship of Portsmouth and the Constableship of Porchester, with the Lieutenancy of the forest of Southbere. The first having been given to Viscount Wimbledon, the King is pleased to bestow the latter on Sir William Uvedale, Treasurer of his Majesty's chamber, during pleasure. Lord Wimbledon uses authority in Porchester as if it were passed to him in his grant, but his Majesty having called for the docquet thereof finds no mention therein of Porchester. It was ever the King's purpose to sever these commands, the Attorney General is to prepare a grant to Sir William Uvedale accordingly. [Draft.]
Aug. 24.
Tichfield.
90. Sir Henry Mervyn to Sec. Dorchester. Her Majesty having commanded him to wait on her that morning on board, he cannot attend the Sec. Requests him to send a warrant to Biggs, the storekeeper at Portsmouth, for delivery to Sir Henry of two lasts of powder for supply of his fleet, with ordnance for the Niver sloop, and 100 saker shot.
Aug. 24.
Beaulieu.
91. The King to [Abraham?] Biggs. Warrant to deliver to Sir Henry Mervyn the powder and ordnance above mentioned. [Draft.]
Aug. 24.
Billesley.
92. Sir Robert Lee to Lord President Conway. Explains the particulars of some disrespect alleged to have been offered to Rice and Franklin, two of Lord Conway's servants, by the bailiff of Alcester. It arose out of an assault made upon Rice, when returning from Bromsgrove fair by Field, a farrier. The constable interfered, and in assisting him two persons were hurt by Rice and Franklin, who were thereupon bound over to appear at the Assizes. Death of Sir Richard Verney, chief person in the commission for compounding with those who did not appear at the coronation. It is advisable to send down a new commission with other persons added to the surviving commissioners.
Aug. 24.
Convertive, in Plymouth Sound.
93. Capt. Richard Plumleigh to Nicholas. Against wind and tide got to Plymouth on Friday last, and has landed his stinking provisions. Intends to bestow three weeks about the Land's End to secure the Newfoundland ships, which are daily expected. On coming back will touch at Plymouth for further orders. If eight more ships were sent out the plaister would not do more than cover the wound, for 25 Dunkirkers are daily looked for to come out.
Aug. 24. 94. Account of payments ordered to be made out of anticipated receipts of Revenue. Total 305,278l. 9s. 8½d.
Aug. 24.
Beaulieu.
95. [Sec. Dorchester] to Sir James Cambell, Lord Mayor of London. Reminds him of the arrangement made with the King, respecting his being accompanied on his visitation of the river Thames by certain Royal Commissioners (stated nearly in the terms of Lord Wimbledon's letter of the 6th inst., see No. 25.) His Majesty has been informed that the visitation was made as usual by under-officers, and that the only notice of the Commissioners was that Lord Falkland, one of them, was with the Lord Mayor at dinner, when he impanelled the jury. His Majesty has commanded the Sec. to let the Lord Mayor know, that the Commissioners were not appointed to be feasted, but to see that service effected the neglect whereof his Majesty takes very ill.
Aug. 25.
Tichfield.
96. James Earl of Carlisle to Sec. Dorchester. Regrets that they are forced to receive a letter from him instead of having the pleasure of his company; but they must prefer his more serious affairs to their desires. Knows not with what face they can be troublesome to his niece in the absence of her husband; but his commands must excuse them. Will not fail to present his love and respects to the Lord Northumberland.
Aug. 25. 97. Certificate of Capt. Francis Sydenham and others of sufficiency of Robert Tray as a gunner.
Aug. 26. 98. Bre. [?] Lady Underhill to Sec. Dorchester. Regrets the inability of her knight, her sister, and herself waiting upon him at Brightwell, on account of being disappointed of the coach she trusted to. Her sister will no more come so far out of the way that she cannot hear from all her friends, for nothing else will give her content. She wishes to see Dorchester and Brightwell, because both places receive their honour from him, which she may do at her return in her journey to London. The writer will accompany her in order to present her respects to the Sec. and his lady. Thanks for warrants for venison.
Aug. 26.
Blountesdon. [Blunsdon.]
99. Richard Lord Lovelace to Francis Windebank. Since the writer came from his house at Hurley, Sir Edward Clarke, of Ardington, sent him a commission addressed to Sir Edmund Sawyer, Sir Edward Clarke, Windebank, and himself, to compound for knighthood not taken up at the coronation. Requests him to attend on the business at the New Inn, Abingdon, on the 6th September.
Aug. 27.
London.
100. Sir John Watts to Sec. Dorchester. Delivered the letter from the King to the Governor at the East India House, who received it with all due respect. It will be answered at the next court day.
Aug. 27.
St. James's.
101. Dr. James Chambers to the same. Mr. Windham returning to Court the writer sends a report of the health of the Prince. His last nurse, Mrs. Skipwith, is now well. The Prince's favour, likelihood, strength, mirth, and night's rest increase daily. The Lady Governess is most careful and diligent; Madame Vantelet is well recovered. The writer's wife regrets that she had not the honour to welcome the Sec. to her country house.
Aug. 28. 102. [Lord President Conway] to Robert Greville. His tenant Clough has been with him about a wrong done by a keeper of the person addressed, and has requested Lord Conway's permission to seek a remedy by law. He refused until he had acquainted the person addressed therewith, and received from him or Lord Brooke such satisfaction as he is assured they will give. Wonders at his having advised Clough to seek satisfaction by calling out the keeper. Has intreated his cousin Reed to shew him the informations Lord Conway had from Clough. [Draft.]
Aug. 28. 103. Statement by Robert Brandling, imputing misconduct to Francis Reade, Under-sheriff of Northumberland, for, amongst other things, distraining Mr. Brandling's horses for a fine leviable upon the whole county.
Aug. 28. 104. Note of money paid by Samuel Houghton, in Lord Conway's service, "the woman that nurses a child of Sir John Trevor's, 2s. 6d.; "tobacco pipes, 1s.; an old woman a Sunday morning, 1s."
Aug. 29.
Convertive, in the Downs, ready to sail westward.
105. Capt. Richard Plumleigh to the Lords of the Admiralty. The winds being contrary for the westward he had wafted into the Downs the London, an Indiaman, of 1,000 tons, from Bantam. Fourteen sail of Dunkirkers "gotten out." Twelve Biscayners lie at the mouth of the Channel to intercept the poor people ready to come in from Newfoundland. The Lords should command some other ships down, or revictual the Convertive for six weeks longer, by which time the Newfoundland ships will all be at home.
Aug. 29.
Convertive, in the Downs.
106. The same to Nicholas. Recapitulates the information in the preceding letter. Hardship to himself of his ship's being called in, and the Garland sent out in her room.
Aug. 29.
Aboard the Tenth Whelp, in Portsmouth Harbour.
107. Capt. Sidrack Gibbon to the same. Has sold the butter out of the French prize to Mr. Holt, for 20s. a firkin, which came to 30l. Incloses an inventory of the provisions of the Biscayner, which will show with whom he left her. If he proceeds in the Spanish voyage, at his return shall be able to give Nicholas thanks. Is ordered by Sir Henry Mervyn to Plymouth to find out Capt. Plumleigh. Incloses,
107. i. Inventory of sails and other provisions delivered to Mr. Holt out of a Biscayner taken by Capt. Gibbon.
Aug. 30.
Bristol.
108. Sir John Jephson to Sec. Dorchester. Is by Sir Charles Coote intreated to be a suitor, that, as his mother and he are fully agreed concerning his wife's passing a fine, the Sec. will hinder any further bar that may be added by his Majesty. Sir Charles's mother has intreated his company over with them, and desires rather to reduce him by way of persuasion than by any further compulsory way.
Aug. 31.
Westminster.
109. Warrant to pay to Sir James Bagg 26,491l. 0s. 3¾d, balance due to him on his account for money expended for the King's service. The whole expenditure was 51,609l. 11s. 4¾d.; the receipt on account, 25,118l. 11s. 1d. [Copy.]
Aug. 31.
Southampton.
110. Arnold Ellzey to Nicholas. Since Nicholas gave the writer's father order for selling the Spanish wools, a claim has been preferred to the whole on account of Mr. Delabarre and Mr. Kypp, of London, in behalf of a Frenchman in Rouen. His father, who is lame in his arm and unable to write, demurs to sell any more, and requests further directions.
[Aug. ?] 111. Philip Burlamachi to Sec. Dorchester. Thanks for a letter of the 9th inst. respecting Nys. Protests that if it were not for the writer's respect for the honour of his Majesty, he would run the risk of ruining Nys, even although the writer lost all that he was out of pocket. Has solicited the Lord Treasurer for him, but ready money there is none. The Lord Treasurer wishes the Sec. to solicit the King as to what instructions he would give Burlamachi respecting his demanding the remainder of the dower, and that the Sec. would inform him what were the objections which the French made when the amount was formerly demanded. Fr.
[Aug. ?] 112. Notes of grants of the custody of Portsmouth and Porchester, extracted with a view of shewing from previous usage and the nature of the grant to Viscount Wimbledon, that the Captaincy of Portsmouth and the Constableship of Porchester had both been passed to him.
[Aug. ?] 113. Another series of notes on the same subject.
[Aug. ?] 114. Note of benefices which will fall into his Majesty's gift if either Dr. Balcanqual, Master of the Savoy, Dr. Donne, Dean of St. Paul's, or Dr. Piers, Dean of Peterborough, be promoted to a bishopric.
[Aug. ?] 115. Verdict of a coroner's inquest held on 15 May 1628, on the body of Thomas Alcock of the city of Canterbury, killed by John Boys, by a blow on the head with a fire-pan. [Copy.] Annexed,
115. i. Indictment found at the Sessions at Canterbury against John Boys for the manslaughter of the same Thomas Alcock. [Copy. It appears from a memorandum written under the former of these papers that they were forwarded from Canterbury at this time with a view to the pardon of John Boys, the fact being manslaughter committed before the birth of the Prince.]
[Aug. ?] 116. Brief in the cause of the King against the ship, the St. John of Viana, captured by George Pentecost in the Expectation, under letters of marque granted by the late Duke of Buckingham, for a period which had expired.
[Aug. ?] 117. Petition of Capt Robert Smith to the Council of War. Prays for assistance to furnish himself forth for employments now in agitation.