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Charles I - volume 236: April 1-15, 1633

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Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles I, 1633-4. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1863.

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April 1-15, 1633

April 1.
Bury.
1. Sir Edmund Bacon and Sir Roger North, Justices of Peace for Suffolk, to the Council. The Lords had ordered, in a business between Capt. Dawson and Mr. Griggs, that Dawson, before the 25th March last, should repair to Bury and produce to the writers proof of his demand of 50l., or that otherwise Griggs should be discharged, and the bond of his son be delivered. Griggs entreats that the order may be complied with, Dawson not having appeared. [One page.]
April 1. 2. Officers of the Navy to John Wells, keeper of the stores at Deptford. Warrant to deliver to William Pett, master of the Fortune, pink, to be transported to Chatham, for new mooring the ships there in August next, certain described cables. [Copy. Three quarters of a page.]
April 1. 3. [Edward Viscount Conway] to his cousin Foulke Reed. Wishes Osbaston to have the benefit of certain lands let to him by the late Lord. Expects to hear from Reed about payments to be made. Will take order for them as long as he is in England. Sir Robert Lee's money is due yearly in November. [Draft. One page.]
April 2.
Whitehall.
4. Minute by Sec. Coke of order of reference by the King to Lord Keeper Coventry and Henry Earl of Manchester, Lord Privy Seal. Differences having fallen out between the Knight Marshal of the Household and the Bailiff of the Duchy Liberty concerning some arrests lately made in the Liberty, the Lord Keeper and the Lord Privy Seal are to settle a good regulation between them, or to report to the King thereon. Underwritten is an appointment by the referees to hear the cause on the Tuesday next after the 3rd of May at eight o'clock. [One page.]
April 2.
Whitehall.
5. Sec. Coke to Sir John Wolstenholme. The King is pleased that by connivance, though not by open warrant, way may be given for the passage of such recruits of the English companies in the Low Countries as are ready to be embarked. If needful he may send the searcher to the Secretary that he may satisfy him that it is his Majesty's pleasure at this time and in this manner to dispense with the general restraint. [Three quarters of a page. Copy.]
April 2.
His Majesty's pinnace, in Portsmouth Harbour.
6. Capt. George Carteret to the Lords of the Admiralty. The Eighth Lion's Whelp will be ready to sail on receipt of her ammunition which is to be brought about by sea from the Tower. [One page.]
April 2./12.
Heilbron.
7. John Durie to Sir Thomas Roe. Has sent Mr. Hartlib a copy of the propositions which the Lord Chancellor [of Sweden ?] made at the meeting of the States there. The treaty between Sir Robert Anstruther and the Lord Chancellor is like to take effect, and the writer has great likelihood of success, even by means of the Lord Chancellor himself; but nothing will be done till matters of state shall be settled. Begs him to help Mr. Hartlib with a petition of Divines of those quarters concerning an edition of a Body of Practical Divinity, gathered out of English authors, a work which will be exceeding profitable, but will require divers agents and an exact ordering of the work, for which no one is fitter than Roe. Since the death of the King [Gustavus Adolphus] their side has not lost anything, but has rather prospered and does still prosper. The King of France will not suffer the Spaniard to cross the Moselle. [One page.]
April 2. 8. Receipt of William Caldwall for 10l. from Nicholas; a quarter's rent for a house, garden, and stables in Axe Court and King Street in Westminster. [Half page.]
April 3. 9. Lord Chief Justice Heath to Sir William Becher. An order was made at the Council Board, on the petition of the town of Newcastle, that the ballast-shore at South Shields should be perfected and yet no ballast cast there in the meantime. Entreats Sir William to move the Lords to explain that such ballast may be laid there as is necessary for finishing the work, which is what Mr. Warmouth agreed was fit. [One page.]
April 3. 10. Mary Fulwood to her nephew Humphrey Fulwood. Salutes himself, his wife, and child, and wishes him to put her brother in mind to remember her son Vyner of their suit to him to procure her son Fulwood's eldest son, a scholar's place in the Charter House. In a P.S., which is imperfect, begs him to send her a little good tobacco, but not to let some one [torn away] know. [One page.]
April 3. 11. Deposition of Mary Smedley and Mary Michell, wife of Thomas Michell; made in order to procure a pass to enable them to return to Amsterdam to their husbands and children. They swear that they have been and are conformable to the government of the Church of England, and the same thing is testified, in reference to Mary Michell, by four other persons. [Three quarters of a page.]
April 4.
Westminster.
12. The King to Bishop Laud. Humphrey Peake, one of the King's chaplains is about to leave the place of Lecturer in St. Martin's-inthe-Fields. Considering the greatness of the parish and quality of the auditors, the King recommends for that charge Alexander Levingston, B.D. [Half a page.]
April 4. 13. Draft of the preceding. [Half a page.]
April 4. 14. Richard Kilvert to Sir John Lambe, at Rowell. Friday last, being the day assigned for the return of the answer of the Bishop [of Lincoln] and none come in, Mr. Attorney moved for a messenger, but the whole day was given, and on Friday night, Smalley, the examiner, brought a long plea of the Bishop, but no answer. Yesterday, Mr. Attorney moved, and that most earnestly, that he might presently answer, and showed how he had trifled with the Court, and the insufficiency of the plea, and that he had pleaded matter which he knew to be untrue. The bill, the plea, and the Lord Chief Justice's report on his former demurrer being read, after arguments of Mr. Attorney, and of Sergeant Bramston and Mr. Herbert for the Bishop, it was referred to the two Chief Justices to consider of the plea. They this morning reported it to be insufficient, and to-morrow the Lords will order the Bishop to answer before Wednesday se'nnight. Presumes he has heard of Lord Holland's confinement to his house at Kensington and Harry Jermyn to Sir Abraham Williams. The occasion being that Lord Weston, on his return home through France, intercepted a letter of the Earl of Holland and opened it. Finding therein a letter from the Queen he brought them back and delivered them to the King. The letters imported nothing but a mediation on behalf of Chevalier de Jarre. This was ill taken by the Earl and the Queen. Lord Holland sent Lord Weston a challenge. He did not entertain it, but acquainted his father, and he the King. Thereupon Lord Holland and Jermyn were confined and so things stand. [Two pages.]
April 4. 15. Account of payments ordered to be made out of anticipated receipts of revenue; total 238,490l. 1s. 6d. Among the payments thus provided for are,—Lady Anne Fielding, 2,000l. and 1,000l.; Viscount Wimbledon, 600l.; Viscount Bayning's executors, two payments of 2,671l. 17s. 4d. each; Sir Henry Vane, two payments of 1,800l. and 1,500l. [Three quarters of a page.]
April 4. 16. Notes for a search to be made this day among Clothworkers within three miles from London for the discovery of bad work. [One page.]
April 5. 17. Sir Henry Marten, Sir Henry Spiller, Richard Fen, and William Hakewill, a sub-committee of the Commissioners for Pious Uses for the business of St. Paul's, to the said Commissioners. Report on the composition to be paid to Mr. Pearson, Master of the Singing Boys of St. Paul's, whose houses are being demolished. The writers have arranged with Mr. Partridge for his interest in another house, part of the college, large enough for Mr. Pearson and his boys, for 240l., subject to a rent of 12l. Pray order for the Chamberlain of London to pay the 240l. [One page.]
April 5.
Harold, [co. Bedford].
18. Oliver Boteler to Thomas Earl of Cleveland. Recommends a petitioner who desires an enlargement of a patent to the city of London. Complains of Anthony Mabbott, of Pavenham, one of his trained soldiers, who has not only continually absented himself, but in words has so slighted the service as to encourage others to neglect their appearances. Wishes Mabbott to be punished. [One page.]
April 5. 19. Estimate of the Lords of the Admiralty and Officers of the Navy for setting forth the Antelope and the Ninth Whelp to serve on the coast of Ireland; total, 6,350l. 5s. 10d. [Two pages.]
April 5. 20. Copy of the preceding attested by Nicholas. [Two pages.]
[April 5.] 21. [Sec. Coke to John Dickenson, clerk of the Council.] By his Majesty's express command he is to go to Kensington to the Earl of Holland, and tell him that the King has received information that, contrary to the nature of his confinement, to the notice given him of his Majesty's pleasure, and to his own promise, he has "admitted many," so that the disorder increases to his Majesty's great offence, that the King has therefore sent Dickenson to command the Earl to continue close prisoner in his house under Dickenson's custody, and that neither the Earl nor Dickenson shall permit any but the Earl's family and necessary workmen to have access to him, except it be for necessary business which Dickenson is to take notice of and hear what it is. [Draft. Three quarters of a page.]
April 6. 22. Minutes by Nicholas of business to be submitted to the Lords of the Admiralty. Instructions to some one for guard of the Narrow Seas; letters from the Officers of the Navy and the Lord Chamberlain; Mr. Polhill's petition; estimate of ships for Ireland; Sir Sampson Darrell attends to acquaint them that the King's bakehouse is still detained from him; Sir Henry Marten desires to speak to the Lords. [Half a page.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to Bishop Laud. Charles Keane having served five years as chaplain in the Navy under Capt. Mennes and Capt. Plumleigh, and being recommended as careful, diligent, and conformable, the Lords pray the Bishop to be a mediator to his Majesty to bestow on him some preferment. [Copy. Vol. ccxxviii., fol. 35 a. Half a page.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
The same to Capt. Thomas James, captain of the Ninth Lion's Whelp, employed on the coast of Ireland. Warrant to take command of his ship. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 36. Third of a page.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
The same to Robert Earl of Warwick. Notwithstanding the proclamation prohibiting the use of trawls the fishermen still use them. He is to cause his deputies in his Vice-Admiralty to search for and seize all trawls, and to cause all fishermen to enter into bond to fish with trawls no more, and if any fishermen refuse to be bound he is to signify their names to the Lords. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 36. Three quarters of a page.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to Charles Earl of Nottingham. Letter similar to the preceding. [Minute. Vol. ccxxviii., fol. 36 a. Two lines.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Thomas Walsingham. Similar letter. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 36 a. Three quarters of a page.]
April 6.
Wallingford House.
The same to Sir Lionel Talmach [Tollemache]. Similar letter. [Minute. Ibid., fol. 37. Two lines.]
April 6.
Wallingford House.
The same to Sir Thomas Southwell. Similar letter. [Minute. Ibid., fol. 37. Two lines.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
The same to Gabriel Marsh, Marshal of the Admiralty. Similar letter. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 37. Half a page.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
The same to Capt. [George] Carteret. Warrant to repair with the Eighth Whelp into the Downs and there to attend further directions. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 37. Quarter of a page.]
April 6. Entry of committal by the Lords of the Admiralty of Thomas Osborne, biscuit baker, to the Marshalsea. [Minute. Ibid., fol. 37 a. Two lines.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to Capt. [Richard] Fogg. Warrant to repair with the Tenth Whelp into the Downs and there to attend further directions. [Minute. Ibid., fol. 37 a. Three lines.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
Order of the Lords of the Admiralty on the petition of Bryan Smyth, calendared Vol. ccxxxiv., No. 42. The Lords referred the same to the Officers of the Navy to certify. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 37 a. Half a page.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
Similar order on the petition of Alexander Cussens. In time of hostilities between England and France, petitioner's ship, the Pearl of Dartmouth, was taken up by Sir James Bagg, at 190l., for his Majesty's service, and Sir James gave petitioner a bill on Sir Sackville Crow for payment. Petitioner has been a suitor for five years and the bill has been mislaid. Sir James certified the facts. Petitioner was ordered to produce the bill or certificate from the Officers of the Navy or the Auditors of the Imprest that he is not paid. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 37 a. Half a page.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to the Officers of the Navy. To take order that the numbers of men mentioned in an inclosed list of his Majesty's ships forwarded to the Lords by the Council be duly observed. Prefixed,
i. List of his Majesty's ships, calendared Vol. ccxxxiv., No. 51. [Copies of Letter and List, Vol. ccxxviii., fol. 38. Two pages.]
April 6.
[Whitehall.]
Order of the Lords of the Admiralty on the petition of the Four Principal Masters of the Navy for increase of their wages. The Lords thought it unfit to increase their ordinary pay, but for their encouragement ordered that two of the masters shall attend at Chatham to be employed by turns as commander of the pinnace for guard of the Thames and Medway, one shall be employed at Portsmouth, and shall be commander of the pinnace for guard of the ships there, and the fourth shall go master under the Admiral of the Narrow Seas. [Copy. Vol. ccxxviii. fol. 40 a. Three quarters of a page.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to Capt. Richard Plumleigh. Warrant to take the command of the Antelope as Admiral of the ships employed to guard the coast of Ireland. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 41. Half a page.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
The same to Lieut. Jacob Lovell. Warrant to take charge of the Antelope as Lieutenant to Capt. Richard Plumleigh. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 41. Half a page.]
April 6. 23. Petition of Capt. Richard Bradshaw to the Lords of the Admiralty. Sir Henry Marten has lately reported in the cause between petitioner and Sir William Killigrew. Has attended almost twelve months about the said cause to his excessive charge and the utter ruin of his family. Prays an order for his speedy relief. [Half a page.]
April 6.
Chatham.
24. Sir Henry Palmer, Comptroller of the Navy, to Sec. Coke. Has inquired respecting the cables left at Dover, and incloses all the satisfaction he can receive. Sends receipt for an anchor delivered by Sir John Hippisley's order to a ship of the East India Company, and has ordered one left in lieu thereof with the cables to be brought into the stores at Chatham. [One page.] Incloses,
24. i. William Leonard to Sir Henry Palmer. According to his letter has delivered the great anchor which laid upon the Crane Quay at Dover, with two cables, to Thomas Coke. The cables were in the charge of Peter Dibbs until his death, and were part of the store of the three ships lost on the coast of France. Inclosed also is a copy of an acquittance respecting the anchor. Dover, 4th April, 1633. [One page.] Inclosed,
24. i. i. Receipt of Peter Young for an anchor borrowed by Sir John Hippisley's order for one of the East Indies ships in the Downs. It contains 26 cwt. 34 lbs. 1st November, 1626. [Copy. Quarter of a page.]
April 6. 25. Sir Edward Duncombe to Sec. Windebank. Understanding that a complaint has been exhibited against him for not repairing a highway between Hockley and Woburn, co. Bedford, acquaints the Secretary that he has been ever careful to keep that road in sufficient repair, and intends to lay yearly on the same 400 loads of gravel and stone. He is also at an extraordinary charge in the repair of two other great roads in the way for Ireland, in the parish of Battlesden. [One page.]
April 6.
Constantinople.
26. Jane Lady Wyche to the same. Congratulations on the due honour conferred upon him by his Majesty, from one who is his kinswoman as well as his servant. Recommends her husband [Sir Peter Wyche] to his protection. He has been ambassador for five years in this place. [One page.]
April 6.
London.
27. James Martin to Archbishop Neile of York. Appeals to him against the oppression of Bishop Bridgman of Chester. Gives a minute narrative of various suits respecting church preferments held by Martin, but called in question by the Bishop. These suits terminated in Martin being ousted from his King's preachership at Ormskirk, and also from the vicarage of Preston, in which latter town "after infinite obloquy and extremity," the writer's "poor wife and a son (having no where else to be) were starved to death in the streets." Since which the Bishop has for three years "perpetually pursiavanted" Martin upon pretext of certain passages in a licensed book, which the Bishop desires to have censured in the High Commission, so as to work his utter ruin and "exterminion." Begs the Archbishop to procure him some recompense. In a P. S. suggests that the 200l. per annum allowed by the King to four preachers is more needed in Warwickshire, where the most dangerous priests and Jesuits are resident, whereas in Lancashire popery is exceedingly decreased, and the dullest of all their priests are dispatched there. [Three pages.]
April 6./16.
St. Sebastian.
28. Prestwick Eaton to George Wellingham. Remits 1,000 ryals in plate, with other things, to be disposed of and placed to account. Three rings sent to be set. Wishes to have sent to him two dozen of fine diaper napkins and a couple of table-cloths; two cwt. of wrought pewter, of which 150 lbs. to be in trenchers and the rest in dishes of sundry sizes; eight yards of cloth for a suit, with a couple of new beavers, another gold cap with coloured flowers, and other articles. [Two pages.]
April 6./16. 29. Copy of the same. [One page and a quarter.]
April 8./18.
The Hague.
30. Stephen Goffe to Sec. Coke. Was commanded by Lord Vere, his noble patron, to read our English prayers in his regiment last summer. Has found an unquiet business of it, being wholly taken up in answering what has been laid against him publicly to the Council of State, and privately to Lord Vere. Amongst other things, it has been said that the writer had commission from England beforehand to bring in this practice, but there not being any probable argument to prove it, Lord Vere concludes for the writer's plain dealing according to the truth; only one clause in the Secretary's letter to Lieut.-Col. Hollis is brought to prove that what the writer had done was by command from his Majesty. Begs him to clear this point to Lord Vere. Lord Vere was always ready to command it, and the writer, finding it was the earnest desire of the late Earl of Oxford, who was then Lieut-Colonel, knew that it was his duty to lay hold on the opportunity. [Three quarters of a page.]
April 8. Notes by Sec. Windebank of proceedings in the Star Chamber, wherein Sir Cornelius Vermuyden, Sir Philiberto Vernatti, and Sir John Cutts were interested touching the draining of Hatfield Chase, co. York. [See Domestic, Car. I., Vol. ccxxxii., No. 122.]
April 8. 31. Foulke Reed to Edward Viscount Conwayand Killultagh. Sends 160l., all he could provide. It is the custom for the tenants to pay their rents a month after the day. Lord Brooke's rent, 105l. 6s. 8d. will be paid in London. Lady Pelham sent for her mother's picture last week. [Three quarters of a page.]
April 8. 32. Account by Sir Thomas Canon of the expenses of a journey, made in his Majesty's service, touching certain charges against Bishop Bridgman, of Chester, begun 12th January, and ended 3rd March, 1633; total expenses, 111l. 10s. 6d. The party consisted of six persons; five of them travelled in a coach, which was paid for at the rate of 21s. per day whilst travelling, and 10s. per day whilst the carriage was kept, but not used. A messenger of the chamber, who accompanied them, rode on horseback. They went to Chester, Warrington, and Wigan. [Two pages.]
April 8. 33. Form of acknowledgment to be made by Henry Sherfield of the justice of the sentence passed upon him in the Star Chamber, for destroying a painted glass window in the church of St. Edmund, in Salisbury. Draft settled by the Attorney General. [One page.]
April 9. 34. Petition of James Autherlonie [Auchterlony] to the King. The late King, on 23rd August, in his 12th year, granted to Sir Henry Wotton and Sir Edward Dimmock [Dymock] the Salt Marshes in Sutton and Gedney, co. Lincoln, deserted by the sea, containing 11,400 acres, reserving a fifth part thereof, which fifth part he granted on the 14th March, in his 14th year, to John Levingston and Matthew Carent, at a rent of 150l. to be paid to the duchy of Lancaster. That rent not having been paid, petitioners pray a grant of the arrears thereof. Underwritten,
34. i. Reference to Lord Cottington [Chancellor of the Exchequer] to certify the true state of the business to the King. Whitehall, 9th April, 1633.
34. ii. Reference of Lord Cottington to Auditor Fanshawe, to inform him the true state of the business. 11th April, 1633. [Petition and references, one page.] Annexed,
34. iii. Report of Auditor W. Fanshawe to Lord Cottington. He does not find the letters patents above-mentioned enrolled before him, nor any rent in charge for the said marshes. If such there be it is with the clerk of the duchy. 12th April, 1633.
34. iv. Report of Lord Cottington to the King. A grant was made by the late King about fifteen years ago to John Levingston of the reserved fifth part above-mentioned, but the grant was never enrolled, and so the rent not in charge. Lady Levingston, widow of John, pretends that the fifth part has not been enjoyed under the grant, and therefore that she ought to be discharged, and besides alleges a royal warrant for pardon of the whole debt. 16th April, 1633.
34. v. The warrant alleged by Lady Levingston being merely a reference to the Attorney General on a petition for discharge, the King directs Mr. Attorney General to certify what he knows concerning these particulars. 4th May, 1633. [Nos. iii. iv. and v. one page.]
April 9. 35 George Peirce to Nicholas. The saltpetre men having a commission to search houses had access to a house of the writer at Richmond, in Surrey, where they digged in some places, and pulled up the planks of two stables, leaving the damage unrepaired. Requests Nicholas to be a means to procure him satisfaction. [Three quarters of a page.]
April 9.
Wokingham.
36. Justices of Peace for co. Berks to Sec. Windebank. Have done their best endeavours to advance the general contributions towards repairing St. Paul's in their division, but have found much remissness in constables, especially in Nicholas Brice, one of the high constables of the hundred of Cookham, as appears in the inclosed information. Pray that a course may be taken for reformation. [One page.] Inclose,
36. i. Information of William Hathorn, high constable of the hundred of Cookham. A warrant directed to Hathorn on 25th March last, and given in charge to Nicholas Brice, to be sent to Hathorn, being his partner, for warning the landholders to appear at Wokingham this day to contribute towards the reparation of St. Paul's, was not delivered to Hathorn until the 7th inst. [One page.]
April 9. 37. Deputy Lieutenants of co. Northampton to William Earl of Exeter, Lord Lieutenant. The parson of Wotton has abused the Council and wronged the writers with untrue suggestions. He is parson of Wotton, and also of Quinton, both in Wymersley hundred, in that county. For Wotton he is charged with a musket, but showed none; he is also charged with 7s. for musters, for 1631, and 3s. for 1632, both unpaid. For Quinton, he is charged with a musket, but showed none, and also with 3s. for musters, which he paid to the constable. In his petition, not mentioning place or amount, he alleges having paid "money," and thereby gives a colour to his complaint. The writers appointed the parson and constable to meet them on the 5th inst. at Daventry, but neither attended. [Two pages.] Inclosed,
37. i. Petition of Jeremy Stephens, B.D., parson of Wotton, co. Northampton, to the Council. Having been sent for by a messenger for not paying money due at the last musters, petitioner shows an acquittance of the High Constable of the hundred, and prays discharge and repayment for the vexation and charges of his journey. [One page.]
37. ii. Certificate of Thomas Eyll, the High Constable before mentioned, that he received the 3s. above-mentioned, 1st February, 1632-3, with an addition in rectification of a mistake as to what he did with the money. 29th March, 1633. [One page]
April 9. 38. Reasons alleged by James Martin [to Sec. Windebank] why he could not hazard himself with Sir Thomas Canon into Lancashire, nor, since his return, to Sir Henry Mildmay, at Whitehall. The reasons are founded upon various legal transactions between Martin and Bishop Bridgman, of Chester, and "a certain knight," who is unnamed, in consequence of which Martin was liable to arrest. He had desired that some principal gentlemen of cos. Chester and Lancaster might be assigned as assistant to Sir Thomas Canon. Mr. Heywood, a Lancashire gentleman of good worth, told Mr. Chambers, chaplain to a noble lord, that if that course had been taken, there had been a full discovery of all the Bishop's exactions, but "the people," said he, "were afraid of Sir Thomas Canon, being a mere stranger, and durst not to him reveal their confessions, but afterwards the Bishop should have plagued them." [Two pages and three quarters.]
April 10. 39. Petition of the creditors of the late Sir Allen Apsley, surveyor of marine victuals, to the Council, On a petition of Elizabeth Peppercorn the Board authorized Sir John Wolstenholme, Dr. Rives, his Majesty's advocate, auditors Phelips and Povey, Edward Nicholas, and Capt. John Mason, to call before them the creditors of Sir Allen Apsley, as contained in the annexed order. It appears to those gentlemen that sundry great sums are owing to petitioners, but some ministers who have the perfecting of the accounts between his Majesty and Sir Allen have so delayed them as to cause insufferable wrong to the petitioners. Pray that those accounts may be forthwith passed. [Signed by twenty persons. One page.] Annexed,
39. i. Order of Council above mentioned. The referees were to examine the debts due, and consider how the same might be satisfied. 29th Sept. 1630. [Two pages and three quarters.]
April 10. 40. Petition of Capt. Dawtry Cooper to the Lords of the Admiralty. Has sustained above 140l. damage by the ship he last commanded, in which he spent his time with diligence and integrity, as even his adversaries testify. Notwithstanding he has been disgracefully thrown out, whilst his adversaries pass blameless. Prays that his master and boatswain may be sent for, and if he prove not that they have deserved death, he desires no other mercy than that he may suffer death. [Indorsed by Nicholas as received this day. One page.]
April 10. 41. Opinions of Mr. Justice Bramston and Sir John Finch (the latter dated the 15th inst.) on the question, whether benefit of clergy be allowed for marrying two wives. They agree that it is allowed. [Half a page.]
April 11. 42. James Martin to Sec. Windebank. In the sheet enclosed he will find the last relation he will present touching the outrages done the writer by Bishop Bridgman, Sir Gilbert Houghton and the Puritans of Preston. Beseeches him to consider whether the parties named may not be convented and convicted. They are able to bear an extraordinary fine. Attributes Mr. Gee's unexpected coming to a special providence. He is able to discover the Bishop's terra incognita. He played many notorious pranks for the Bishop's ends in his rural deanery. Prays he may be commanded to attend, so that he may confront the Bishop with his testimony. He was the Bishop's prime engine, but at last set up for himself, cozened a widow of a great sum, forsook the country, devoted himself to popery, and was reclaimed and preferred by the Archbishop of Canterbury. Understands Mr. Lewis told the Secretary that the writer was reasonably qualified if his brain were settled. Appeals, in answer, to his conduct whilst Lewis and he lived together in Lancashire. Begs the Secretary to retain his favourable opinion of the writer. [Three pages.] Inclosed
42. i. Dramatis personce, or names of the actors in the Bishop of Chester's pageant for Martin's divestiture from Ormskirk and Preston. A narrative of the parts acted against him by John Packer, Edward Flood, Sir Gilbert Houghton, William Lemmon, Adam Mort, Edmund Warden, Roger Langton, and John Singleton. [Four pages.]
April 11. 43. Attorney-General Noy to the same. Sends examinations of the Earl of Holland, Henry Jermyn, Mr. Percy, Lord Weston, interrogatories touching that business, with a draft of the information. Touching the other information, Sec. Coke has written that it is not fit to insert it into the present. The writer has had no instruction about it, but generally that there was an appointment and meeting, and fighting, which is crime enough primâ facie. Wishes some other of his Majesty's council may be joined with him to take some of the care of this cause. [Three quarters of a page.] Enclosed.
43. i. Articles whereupon to examine the Earl of Holland. The fourth article is, whether the interception of the packet in France (said to be sent by Mr. Montagu's direction) was not the chief, if not the only cause of his sending the Lord Weston that challenge. Other articles related to a discourse with his Majesty in the Queen's bedchamber, in which the King justified Lord Weston and restrained him from accepting any challenge on that account. He was also to be asked why he chose his Majesty's garden to be the field of an unlawful combat, and whether he ever heard that the like insolency was offered by any other. Against the fourth article Sec. Coke has written in the margin, "This confessed to his Majesty by him and must not be denied." [Altogether in Sec. Coke's handwriting. One page and a half.]
43. ii. Copy of the preceding in the handwriting of Sec. Windebank or of his clerk Robert Reade. [One page.]
43. iii. Examination of Henry Earl of Holland. On Wednesday last sent Mr. Jermyn to Lord Weston with this message, that he believed himself to have been injured by him, and desired to meet him with his sword in his hand. Lord Weston answered that he did not know that he had done Lord Holland any injury, but that he would send to him. That evening Mr. Percy came from Lord Weston and said that if Lord Holland questioned him about any thing since his going abroad, he could not answer him. Examinant answered, that for a particular injury he thought he was not protected, but that Lord, Weston left him to take his own satisfaction. Mr. Percy went and returned in about half-an-hour, and said that Lord Weston would wear his sword by his side whithersoever he walked. Examinant said he would be in the Spring Garden the next morning. Mr. Percy said he would tell Lord Weston, but came back and said that, upon second thoughts, this was a kind of appointment, and that if he came presently back, Lord Weston would meet him there, if not, that he would not be there. Examinant said, he would walk in the Spring Garden, near Lord Weston's father's house. Remembers that his Majesty justified Lord Weston in taking the packet, but not in opening it; but submits that to his Majesty's memory. Spring Garden was named as a place whither they might come with least notice, being a common garden, where people use to walk. If they had met they would have walked from thence and have done no insolency there. 29th March 1633. [In the handwriting of Sec. Coke. Four pages.]
43. iv. Declaration made by Henry Jermyn before the Earl Marshall, the Lord Chamberlain, Lord Wentworth, and both the Secretaries. States the circumstance of his taking the message from the Earl of Holland to Lord Weston, and what afterwards took place at the interviews between Mr. Percy and the Earl of Holland, to the same effect as in the preceding examination. 24th March 1633. [One page and a half.]
3. v. Declaration of Henry Percy. Explains what instructions he received from Lord Weston, and what took place on the interviews he had with the Earl of Holland. The Earl, as Percy states his answer to Lord Weston's allegation of privilege as an ambassador, replied that he thought that would not hinder his lordship from meeting, "being a cavalier." [Two pages and three quarters.]
43. vi. Declaration of Jerome Lord Weston. He states that he told Henry Jermyn that he was restrained from accepting Lord Holland's challenge by the King's express command The Earl's reply was that that could not hinder him from meeting him as a cavalier. When told the Earl would take some other course, his reply was, that he would go abroad with a sword, to defend himself as well as he could. [Two pages and a half.]
April 12./22.
The Hague.
44. Queen Elizabeth of Bohemia to Sir Thomas Roe. All things go with so slow a pace on Roe's side of the seas, as she fears they will lose time and all. All things go well in Germany. Sir Robert Anstruther well received. Sabatsky is going to England to see if he can make a general peace in Germany. The Queen will do nothing in it rashly. Is glad that young Oxenstiern has been so well entertained in England. There they are hasting to the field. She has sent her son the Elector with the Prince of Orange. She thinks he cannot too soon learn to be a soldier. Colbe will tell him the cause why she came not into England when the King sent for her. He will give such good reasons, that Roe will not blame her, besides that her mind was unfit to go. He may imagine her grief for such a loss, which she shall grieve for as long as she lives. Though she makes a good show in company, she can never have any more contentment. God knows she had none but that she took in his company, and he did the same in hers. His last letter was but written two days before his death, where he writ that his fever had left him, and his physicians assured him the worst was past. He had resolved to have fetched her with him into Germany, the hope of which gave her no small content just when she lost him. Roe may imagine how she was struck with the news though Dr. Rumph told it very discreetly. It was the first time that ever she was frighted; for it struck her so cold as ice, and she could neither cry, nor speak, nor eat, nor drink, nor sleep, for three days. She tells him this, because he may have heard some extravagant lies. Roe lost a dear friend in that dear King, who loved and trusted him very much. He has not a friend who wishes him better than she does. If she had as much power as good will, he should find it. Her best love to his wife. [Three pages and a quarter.]
April 12. 45. Petition of Emanuel Finch, William Lewis, and Anne Webber, on behalf of themselves and others, owners of the Benediction, to the Council. Their ship, after the publication of peace, was surprized by the French, and has been detained at Dieppe, where she lies decayed, and cannot be brought to England. Pray liberty to sell the same there. Underwritten,
45. i. Reference by the Council to Sir Henry Marten, Sir John Wolstenholme and Mr. Burlamachi to certify their opinions. 12th April 1633.
45. ii. Report of the referees above mentioned. The Benediction cannot be brought to England except she be new built. The petitioners' request may therefore be granted. 22nd July, 1633.
45. iii. Order of Council that the Officers of the Navy and the King's shipwrights shall consider the above petition and certificate. 24th July, 1633.
45. iv. Report of the Officers of the Navy. The part-owners have made affidavit that they are willing to sell the ship to any Englishman for 150l. Do not think it prejudicial to the King to give them liberty to sell to any stranger for their best advantage. Mincing Lane, 11th November, 1633.
45. v. Declaration of the Lords of the Admiralty that they think it fit (if his Majesty please) that the request of the petitioners should be complied with. Wallingford House, 23rd November, 1633. [Petition, references, &c., three pages.]
April 12. 46. Officers of the Navy to George Rignoll, trumpeter. Warrant to press five trumpeters, one drummer, and one fife, to serve in the Charles, preparing for service in the Narrow Seas. [Three quarters of a page.]
April 13. 47. Copy of an entry on the Council Register of a declaration made by the King to the Council, that with reference to the quarrel between Henry Earl of Holland and the Lord Weston, and another quarrel depending upon it between Lord Fielding and George Goring, he had commanded all the offenders to make their submissions at the Board, and that he resolved hereafter to prosecute all delinquents in this kind, and prohibited any members of the Board to intercede for any delinquent. Any Privy Councillor sending or accepting a challenge should ipso facto be discharged from his place. As there had been rumours of letters intercepted by Lord Weston during his late embassy, the King avowed the fact as done for his service, and therein justified Lord Weston against all persons whatsoever. It is the duty of ambassadors to intercept, and at their discretion to open, any packet sent from hence to any foreign ministers or persons beyond seas, such packet not having allowance from the King, or one of the Secretaries. This paper also contains copies of all the submissions. [Four pages and three quarters.]
April 13. 48. Another copy of the same entry on the Council Register without the submissions, but with the addition of an order of the King in Council, that no person should send a messenger express with any foreign packet, without licence to pass the seas and ride post. [One page and a half.]
[April 13 ?] 49. Submission of Henry Earl of Holland in reference to his offence in challenging Lord Weston. He asserts that the chief cause of his unkindness taken with Lord Weston was not expressed and had no relation to his employment as an ambassador. Admits his offence both against the King and the Lord Treasurer, in appointing a meeting in his Majesty's garden and near the Lord Treasurer's house. Professes that he did not know that his Majesty had commanded Lord Weston not to accept any challenge concerning his employment. In obeying those commands his lordship had not trespassed against either honour or courage. [Signed by Lord Holland. A word inserted in the handwriting of the King. Two pages and a half.]
[April 13 ?] 50. Original draft of the preceding in the handwriting of Sec. Windebank's secretary. [Two pages and a half.]
[April 13 ?] 51. Copy of the preceding draft with various alterations therein in the King's handwriting. [Two pages and a half.]
[April 13 ?] 52. Submission of Henry Jermyn acknowledging his offence in carrying the challenge to Lord Weston, especially in the house of his father the Lord Treasurer. [Unsigned. Three quarters of a page.]
[April 13 ?] 53. Original draft of the preceding in the handwriting of Sec. Coke. [One page.]
[April 13 ?] 54. Copy of the same draft in the handwriting of Sec. Windebank, with various alterations in the handwriting of the King. [Underwritten is a memorandum that reprehension is to be given to Mr. Jermyn at the Board for his irrespective [originally written, wanton] carriage at his examination. Three quarters of a page.]
[April 13 ?] 55. Submission of Basil Lord Fielding, acknowledging his offence in having challenged George Goring to fight in duel. Appeals to the King's mercy and craves his pardon. [Unsigned. Half a page.]
[April 13 ?] 56. Original draft of the same in the handwriting of Sec. Windebank. [Half a page.]
[April 13 ?] 57. Copy of the same in the same handwriting, apparently made to be submitted to the King, who has made considerable alterations in another paper written on the same sheet. [Half a page.]
[April 13 ?] 58. Submission of George Goring, acknowledging his offence in having accepted a challenge of Lord Fielding upon an offence taken by him at words spoken by Goring. Had no intention to lay any blemish upon Lord Weston, for courage or otherwise, for obedience to his Majesty's commands. [Signed. One page.]
[April 13 ?] 59. Paper probably in the handwriting of George Goring, in which he denied that he had accused Lord Weston of want of courage. [Quarter of a page.]
[April 13 ?] 60. Draft of the submission of George Goring, in the handwriting of Sec. Coke. [One page and three quarters.]
[April 13 ?] Copy of the same draft, in the handwriting of Sec. Windebank. [See this present Vol. ccxxxvi., No. 56. One page.]
[April 13 ?] Another copy of the same draft, with various alterations in the handwriting of the King, suggested, but not finally adopted. In one of these suggestions the King desired the insertion of the following words: "It being the dewtie of all good subjects to confess that it is the trew point of Honnor and Courage to obey Your Mties com[m]ands." [See this present Vol. ccxxxvi., No. 57. One page.]
[April 13 ?] 61. Notes by Sec. Windebank of a speech delivered at the Council Board, when the business above mentioned was brought before them. The speech was probably spoken by Lord Keeper Coventry. It comments upon, and aggravates, the offences of the Earl of Holland and Henry Jermyn. In noticing the appointed place of meeting, under the Lord Treasurer's window, the speaker adds, "where the father, the mother, the Lady Frances (his Majesty's kinswoman), great with child—the whole family—might behold a son, a husband, a brother, either murdered or murdering." In treating of the case of Henry Jermyn he remarks upon his "petulant and fleering carriage before the Lords." [One page and a half.]
April 13. Entry of appearance before the Lords of the Admiralty of Nicholas Carpenter and Richard Tyler, who had entered into recognizance for that purpose before Sir Nicholas Carew. [Minute. Vol. ccxxviii., fol. 40. Quarter of a page.]
April 13.
Cowes Castle at two o'clock in the morning.
62. Francis Brooke to Sec. Coke. The two Holland East India ships are riding at East Cowes with two small men-of-war of their own nation. The warrant for their arrest was executed by the officer, but they refused to come into the command of the fort at Cowes, and resisted the taking away their sails. The chief Dutch commander was on shore, and had been detained there. The writer has procured the Fifth and Eighth Whelps to come out to them, but they will not be able to withstand the Hollanders, and the Eighth Whelp has order for the Downs. Prays further instructions. [One page and half.]
April 13. 63. James Martin to Sec. Windebank. As he has further imparted some particulars to Mr. Dethick, so he has called to mind divers persons of worth for the most part extraordinary libertines, who have never been punished by the Bishop [of Chester], though presented or well known to him, howbeit there is no question but himself or his officers had large sums of them. Mentions cases of Robert Kenyon, Anne Sharples, now wife of John Cooper, Edward Stanley, and various other persons (among them Roger Dodsworth) and incloses two papers respecting them. [One page.]
April 13.
Christ's Church, [Oxford.]
64. Paul Viscount Bayning to Anne Lady Dorchester. Has done all his exercises which belong to his degree, and is now complete Bachelor. There remains nothing but only some scarlet to make him a gown, such as the doctors wear every Sunday. Wishes her permission to send for it to London. The quantity will be four yards and a quarter. His uncle Glemham's scarlet cost 3l. 5s. a yard. Sends her some gloves and others to be distributed as directed. Every one that takes a degree distributes gloves among his friends. [Damaged by damp. Three pages.]
April 13./23.
Heilbron.
65. John Durie to Sir Thomas Roe. The Palatinate will be restored as soon as the meeting is dissolved, which will be within two or three days. The Swedish commanders and garrisons shall be removed, and all enterprises shall be undertaken in the name of the Electoral House. The general command is referred to Lord Chancellor Oxenstiern. Durie's business, which he prosecutes towards the Lutherans, is in suspense, because the Lord Chancellor cannot intend it seriously till the matters of state be settled. The armies prosper in the field. Movements of hostile forces. Has sent him by Mr. Hartlib, whose industry is specially recommended, the proposition made by the Lord Chancellor at this meeting, and will endeavour to send him the articles of the league. [One page.]
April 13. 66. Opinion of Sir John Lambe as to the offence committed by excommunicated persons coming into church at sermon time, and continuing there although warned to depart. Sir John thought them punishable, as disturbers of the preacher. [Copy sent by Sir John Lambe to Mr. Gillett, mayor of Leicester, with underwritten desire to know what course the mayor would take with divers such persons who usually resorted to St. Martin's Church in that town. Three quarters of a page.]
April 13. 67. Copy of the same. [One page.]
April 14.
The Eighth Whelp, in Stokes Bay.
68. Capt. George Carteret to Sec. Coke. Has been stayed from going to the Downs by a contrary wind, and also by the Deputy Vice-Admiral of that place, who required him to go out and ride by two Hollanders that came from the East Indies. He asked the Deputy Vice-Admiral what he should do if those ships should set sail. He said he could not tell; that he had orders to stay them, but not to use any violence, and that he had sent to know the Secretary's pleasure therein. Yesterday about noon the two Hollanders let slip their cables and went away, the wind being N. W. Four hours after it came N.E., and blew so hard that they will not be able to keep the Channel, but will put in at Plymouth or Falmouth. Could not send his boat ashore with information by reason of the great storm. Made no shot at them as he had no order, and the Fifth Whelp had no powder. Is now ready to sail to the Downs, staying only for a fair wind. [One page.]
April 14.
Chichester.
69. John Ashburnham to Nicholas. About various businesses which Nicholas was managing for him. Lease of parsonage offered by Mr. Boyland for Mrs. Barker. Finds there was no order taken by Lord Fielding for his debt to the writer if his lordship had miscarried in his duel with George Goring, therefore wishes Nicholas to press him. Wonders that Mr. Long has failed at his day. Give him as little rest as may be. His house is the White Bear in Friday Street. Purchase of a church lease to be personally discussed next term. Wishes Nicholas to send for his writings out of the hands of his solicitor, Thomas Phillips, in the Little Inns of Court, under St. Dunstan's Church. Nicholas did not send an order about Capt. Powick's men, prisoners in Chichester. [One page.]
April 15.
Westminster.
70. The King to the Lord Mayor and Officers of the Custom House, London. Fifteen tons of logwood having been seized by John Beaple, one of the officers of the Custom House, ought to be burnt according to the statute, but John Lanyon has petitioned for the same to be transported into foreign parts. His Majesty's pleasure is that in regard of good service done by Lanyon the logwood be delivered to him on security for its exportation. [Copy. One page.]
April 15. 71. Nicholas's minutes of businesses to be transacted by the Lords of the Admiralty. To consider instructions for Capt. Pennington; to order victuals for the King's servants of the chapel who are to go into Scotland in the Dreadnought, and to appoint where they are to be received and landed; order for extraordinary employment of the Four Masters attendants; letter to Ireland for charge of the Antelope and the Ninth Whelp; appoint carpenter for the Henrietta Maria. Petitions of Mr. Goodwin, Capt. Cooper, and Heynes. [Three quarters of a page.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
72. Lords of the Admiralty to Sir William Killigrew, captain of Pendennis Castle. To give his personal attendance upon the Lords at the Council Chamber in Whitehall on 4th of May. [Indorsed is a note by Nicholas that this warrant, at the intercession of the Earl of Dorset, was stayed by Sec. Coke's command to Nicholas. One page.]
April 15. Copy of the same. [Vol. ccxxviii., fol. 40. Quarter of a page.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
73. Lords of the Admiralty to Captain John Pennington. Warrant appointing him to take the command of the Charles, and to be Admiral of the Narrow Seas. [One page.]
April 15. Copy of the same. [Vol. ccxxviii., fol. 41 a. Afterwards cancelled with the pen. Third of a page.]
April 15. The same to Peter White, one of the Four Masters of the Navy. Warrant to take command of the Charles as master. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 42. Quarter of a page.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to the Officers of the Navy. For reinforcement of the guard of the Narrow Seas, the Charles and the Henrietta Maria are to be presently fitted, and the Bonaventure to be called in, and her men and provisions to be turned over to the Henrietta Maria. The officers are to see the Charles and the Henrietta Maria manned with 520 men, and victualled for four months. [Copy Ibid., fol. 39. Third of a page.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the Officers of the Ordnance. To supply the Charles and the Henrietta Maria with gunners' stores. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 39. Third of a page.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. To supply similar stores to the Antelope and the Ninth Whelp, appointed for guard of the coast of Ireland; the charge to be put to the account of stores for Ireland. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 39. Three quarters of a page.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to Sir Sampson Darrell. Warrant to supply victuals to the Antelope and the Ninth Whelp, from three months to three months. [Copy. Vol. ccxxviii., fol. 39 a. Quarter of a page.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the Officers of the Navy. Warrant to enter John Waterman master-carpenter of the Henrietta Maria, [Copy. Ibid., fol. 40. Quarter of a page.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
Order of the Lords of the Admiralty on a petition of Benjamin Hinslow. Petitioner was pressed to serve in the Return of London, Capt. Buxton, in the year 1627, and was disabled. Prayed a pension. Referred to the Officers of the Navy to take order for his relief. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 40. Third of a page.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to Capt. [Thomas] Ketelby. Warrant to bring about the Bonaventure to Chatham, that her men and provisions may be turned over to the Henrietta Maria. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 41 a. Third of a page.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the Officers of the Navy. Warrant to enter Thomas Day master-carpenter of the Mary Rose in place of John Waterman. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 41 a. Third of a page.]
April 15.
Newark.
74. Justices of Peace for co. Nottingham to the Council. In March there was not any seasonable weather for repair of the highways, which are in the deep clay; but they hope to have them all repaired before the 18th May. State what has been done to the great bridge over the Trent at Newark. The bridge cannot be suddenly completed; but there is a good ford near to it, which has been passable the greatest part of the winter for horsemen and coaches. [Two pages.]
April 15.
Salisbury.
75. Bishop Davenant, of Salisbury, to Sec. Windebank. Sherfield came to the Bishop on 8th April. The submission, drawn by the Attorney General and allowed by the Lord Keeper, was tendered to him, and the Bishop enjoined him to perform the same publicly in the consistory on the Thursday following. He seemed to make doubts, especially at the place where it was to be done. He consented no further than to make the acknowledgment in the Bishop's own house, in his great chamber; but on the prefixed day he repaired to the cathedral, and being called into the consistory, in the hearing of a very sufficient company, made the acknowledgment in due reverend and comely manner. His business is therefore at an end; but the Bishop's chancellor's petition for his charges is yet depending. Unless the King's favour relieve him, he suffers almost as great a penalty for prosecuting as Mr. Sherfield for commiting the offence. [One page.]
April 15.
Portsmouth.
76. Francis Brooke to Sec. Coke. Slackness of despatches; the Secretary's first packet in this service was 23 hours before it came to hand. Showed in his last letter that the ships were gone. Has ordered Capt. Cartwright [Carteret] to set sail. Originally found the [Dutch ?] ships at East Cowes, where Capt. Tourney has the Deputy Vice-Admiraltyship. [One page.]
April 15.
Portsmouth, 5 o'clock afternoon.
77. Francis Brooke to Sec. Coke. Acknowledges receipt of a further letter. Solomon Smith says that the company of the Dutch ships are gone all but the commander, and he is in the custody of Capt. Tourney. The Bonaventure and Dreadnought have arrived there. Has delivered the Secretary's letter to Capt. Ketelby. When the Dutch ships first came to Cowes they were within command of the castle, and afterwards rode without. It were good to know why they removed. [One page.]
April 15.
Portsmouth.
78. Capt. Thomas Ketelby to the same. Friday sailed from the Downs. Great storm, in which the Dreadnought broke her anchor, and, driving, forced Ketelby's ship to cut her cable. This day received the Secretary's letter, but finds the business dispatched, although not with success. If they had had a little patience doubts not he would have had a better account. Will return to the Downs with the Eighth Whelp. [Two pages.]
April 15. 79. Sir Robert Phelipps to Sec. Coke. Understands the Secretary has favoured the writer in a business presented to the Lords against one Boyse for public and private miscarriages. Begs him to let his Majesty see an inclosed paper. The writer has rested contented with his hard fate. God knows his heart, how right it is set to serve and obey his Majesty. [One page.]
April 15.
Ragley.
80. Foulke Reed to Edward Viscount Conway. Conceives Michael Orbaston [Osbaston ?] will never pay his hundred couple of coneys yearly. Mr. Chamberlaine the feodary has been to view the Oakenheath. Has sent up bay Salisbury, and a draft of a lease to be made to two of Auster of grounds to be broken up. [Three quarters of a page.]
April 15. 81. The same to [George Rawden ?] Recapitulates the contents of the preceding. The messenger [who brought two horses] has 13s. given him for his pains. [Three quarters of a page.]
April 15. 82. John Broughton to Humphrey Fulwood. Came to Gloucester on Friday which was the wettest day that ever he travelled. Interviews with Dick Sheere respecting the purchase of one of two geldings for Fulwood [for the Scottish journey] at 15l. a piece. Wishes to know if the day for the Scottish journey holds. He may send his letter to the Saracen's Head in Carter Lane; the carriers know him well. Mr. Charles Harbord made the writer his deputy surveyor in the forest of Dean. The spoils done are so great that the writer will undergo excessive toil to reform abuses. [One page.]
April 15.
The Tenth Whelp, in the Downs.
83. Capt. Richard Fogg to Sec. Coke. Detained by contrary winds. Sailed from Queenborough that morning. In the Downs received a letter from Capt. Ketelby to follow him to Portsmouth within two days. As the time has elapsed requests instructions. [One page.]
April 15.
West Dean, [co. Wilts].
84. Dr. Matthew Nicholas to his brother Edward Nicholas. Obligations to him for recommending a doctor for his wife, whose health is much improved. His father and mother have inquired about the house at Richmond and approve of that providence for his health. Matthew's boy George has been in some danger "with the falling of his uvalo and swelling of his almonds, which both way had almost stopped up the passage of his wind." Mr. Sherfield made his submission in ample manner on Wednesday last before all the prebendaries of the church and all the vestries in the town, besides other persons of the best quality. The Bishop sent to the writer to be there, but he was not at home to receive the message. Doubts some of Edward's ill luck in horse flesh has seized his gelding. Hopes his wife is with Edward now if the doctor have done with her. [One page.]
April 15. 85. Survey, by Officers of the Navy, of cordage and other stores at Deptford, in charge of John Wells, storekeeper. [Fourteen pages.]