BHO

Charles I - volume 282: January 1635

Pages 448-489

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles I, 1634-5. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1864.

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January 1635

Jan. 1. 1. Lord Treasurer Portland to the King. Report on petition of Edward Dendy, one of the King's sergeants-at-arms, referred by his Majesty to the Earl. Petitioner has ever carried himself very faithfully, and has done good service. By certificate annexed of Sir Abraham Dawes, one of the farmers [of the customs], it appears that petitioner's suit is reasonable. The Earl was not aware that Dendy had ever received any reward. [Copy. Indorsed "For Bristol." ¾ p.]
Jan. 1. 2. Christopher Windebank to Sec. Windebank his father. Congratulations on the new year. Begs his acceptance of a new year's gift. Latin. [1 p.]
Jan. 1.
Lambeth.
3. William Dell to Sir John [Lambe]. The bearer, Archbishop Laud's godson, had a business of importance to acquaint Lambe with. The Archbishop prays Lambe to hear him, and with secrecy, and to speak with his Grace about it at his next coming to Lambeth, whether it be a thing fit for the young man to follow or no. [2/3 p.]
Jan. 1. 4. Deed poll, whereby Andrew Halford released to Richard Halford his father, Richard Halford his son, George Halford his brother, Henry Leader, and John Halford, the manor or lordship of Wistow, co. Leicester, as the same was conveyed by an indenture dated 20th September 1625, being a settlement made before the marriage of the said Andrew Halford and Joan Leader. The marriage had taken place, but the said Joan had since died, leaving an only son Richard Halford above-mentioned. [Attested copy. 2¾ pp.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
5. Notes, by Nicholas, of business to be transacted by the Lords of the Admiralty, at a meeting at which his Majesty was to be present: [Margin, "Present: the King, and all the Lords Commissioners, but the Earl of Lindsey."] To consider of the plots of ground belonging to the Office of the Navy and to the victualler. To peruse the certificate of the Officers of the Navy touching the state of the King's ships, and in what time they may be ready for sea service. To move his Majesty touching the casting of the Warspite, long since condemned: [Margin, "Fiat."] To acquaint his Majesty with the dimensions of the two new ships, and to know his pleasure when they shall be launched. [2/3 p.]
Jan. 2. 6. Rough notes, taken by Lord Cottington and Sec. Windebank, of the proceedings at the meeting of the Lords of the Admiralty, above-mentioned; his Majesty present:—Alterations and improvements to be made at Portsmouth, Chatham, and Deptford. The Maison-Dieu at Dover to be examined how it passed from the King, &c. The St. Denis to be surveyed. The Merhonour, the James, and the two new ships about to be launched, to go to sea. The Unicorn and the Charles to be girdled, and their friezes taken down. The Warspite to be cast. [1¼ p.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to Officers of the Navy. To examine ships deemed by them to be unserviceable and not fit to be repaired, and to certify their names and particular defects, and what they conceive best to be done with them. [Copy. Vol. cclxiv., fol. 62 a. ⅓ p.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. To cause an estimate to be made not only of the ordinary charge of his Majesty's ships in harbour, but also of fitting out to sea the same number of ships as were upon the ordinary of last year for guarding of the Narrow Seas, and also for fitting out the pinnaces the Henrietta and the Maria for guard of the Thames and Portsmouth. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 62 a. ⅓ p.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. To fit out the Antelope, and the Ninth Whelp, then at Portsmouth, for guard of the Irish coast, and the same to be ready to put to sea by the 1st of March next. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 63. ½ p.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The King sitting that day in Council concerning affairs of the Admiralty, had given the Lords order to cause the Merhonour, the Swiftsure, and the James, with the two new ships then in dock, to be presently set forth for sea. The officers are to give orders accordingly, and to have the said ships manned, and victualled for six months, and ready to put to sea on the 1st March, the charge thereof being put into an estimate forthwith. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 63. 1 p.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. It is the King's pleasure that there shall be a dry dock made at Portsmouth, and storehouses erected for his Majesty's ships riding there. The Officers are to order a survey to be made, to ascertain in what place in the said harbour a dock may best be built, and to certify the same with an estimate. [Copy. Vol. cclxiv., fol. 63. ¾ p.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to Officers of the Navy. In consideration of the defects in the Unicorn and the Charles, the King has commanded that the former shall have her friezes taken away, and the ship be girdled, and the latter be girdled only. The Officers are to execute these services with all expedition, and to put the charge thereof on the next estimate. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 64. ⅓ p.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. Mr. Lyons intending to make sale of timber growing near Twyford, co. Middlesex, the Officers are to send a purveyor to mark such of the said timber as may be fit for the Navy, and to treat with Mr. Lyons for the prices thereof. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 64. ⅓ p.]
Jan. 2. Another copy of the same. [Ibid., fol. 65. ⅓ p.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Keeper Coventry. Sir William Russell, Treasurer of the Navy, has attended the whole year, ended 31st December last, and is entitled to a liberate for 6s. 8d. per diem, amounting to 121l. 13s. 4d. [Ibid., fol. 64 a. ⅓ p.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. Similar certificate for Sir Robert Mansell, Lieutenant of the Admiralty, at 10s. per diem, amounting to 182l. 10s. [Ibid., fol. 64 a. ⅓ p.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. Similar certificate for one year, from 1st January 1631-2, for Sir Sampson Darrell, surveyor of marine victuals, and his two servants, at 5s. 4d. per diem, amounting to 97l. 6s. 8d. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 64. ½ p.]
Jan. 2. Minute of a similar certificate for the same, for one year, from 1st January 1632-3, for 97l. 6s. 8d. [Ibid., fol 65. 5 lines.]
Jan. 2. The like for another year from 1st January 1633-4, for the like sum. [Ibid. 4 lines.]
Jan. 2. 7. Petition of John Bridgehampton, alias Hickes, master gunner of the Happy Entrance, and the rest of the Master Gunners of the Navy, to the Lords of the Admiralty. In the time of Queen Elizabeth the master gunners wore the rose and crown with the letters E and R, and in King James's time the same emblems with the letters J and R, with a piece of ordnance to each of the said types appendant. Petitioner Bridgehampton presented to the Lords a demonstration or figure of his own invention, in some things variable from the former, with which he has acquainted the rest of the gunners, who all pray for a warrant authorizing them at their own charge to provide and wear the said badge. [¾ p.]
Jan. 2.
Deptford.
8. Peter Pett, master of the Shipwrights Company, to Nicholas. Immediately after delivery of their petition to Nicholas he had access to Sec. Coke, to whom he made known some part of their defects, and their request for relief. The Sec. called to mind many particulars of their charter, especially their surveys, and promised his assistance. Trusts Nicholas's care will not be wanting in so needful a service, without which, besides the neglect of their duties to his Majesty and the State, they are disabled to maintain their great charge of surveys and relief of their poor. [¾ p.]
Jan. 2. 9. Receipt of Richard Leake for 10l. from the farmers of the alum works, being one quarter of his pension. [½ p.]
Jan. 2.
Plymouth.
10. Assessment by the Mayors of Plympton-Earl, Plymouth, Bideford, and Barnstaple, for setting forth a ship of 400 tons, under the King's writ, dated 20th October last. The following are all the assessments above 100l.:—Plympton [St.] Mary, 184l. 16s.; Modbury, 169l. 3s. 4d.; Aveton-Gifford, 105l. 4s. 8d.; Malborough and Salcombe, 156l. 2s.; Barnstaple, 252l. 4s. 8d.; Hartland, 121l. 11s. 4d.; Borough of Plymouth, 185l. 0s. 8d.; Tavistock, 168l. 18s. 8d.; Braunton, 132l. 10s. 8d.; South Molton, 116l. 4s.; Tawstock, 100l. 2s.; Torrington Magna, 124l. 16s. 8d.; Tiverton, town and parish, 206l.; Swimbridge, 116l. 13s. 4d. [1 p.]
Jan. 3. 11. Minutes, apparently of business to be attended to, in the King's handwriting. [C. R. has been written above by some other person.] "The Poore. Orders renewed & the cunstables & other officers not to confyned, but to persew roges & other delinquents into other liberties. Charge to the Justices of Middlesex and Surrie concerning roges, tavernes, alehouses, &c., & thereof once a quarter. The office of the postes ordered forren & domestike. Fryday the 3 of Januarie 1634." [1 p.]
Jan. 3. 12. Petition of Merchant Strangers of the Intercourse residing in London to the King. The late King ratified that the said merchants, who are neither denizens nor handicraftsmen resorting to this realm for merchandise only, and born under the house of Burgundy, should be always freed from subsidies and other taxations as English merchants residing in the Low Countries have been and are freed. By reason thereof petitioners were freed from the grand loan, the late city fleet, and other public contributions. As the King's subjects, by reason of the said treaty, still enjoy their former privileges, petitioners pray discharge from the payments for setting forth the city of London's ships. Underwritten,
12. i. Reference to the Council. 3rd January 1634–5. [Petition and reference, 1 p.] Annexed,
12. ii. King James to the Chancellor and other Officers of the Exchequer. Warrant [under the Privy Seal] to discharge the Merchant Strangers of the Intercourse between this realm and the House of Burgundy of all money assessed on them for payment of three subsidies granted to the said King by a late Parliament and of all other payments of subsidies, so long as the merchants of this realm trading in the Low Countries shall enjoy the like freedom there. [Copy. 6 pp.]
12. iii. Lord Treasurer Marlborough to the [Lord Mayor ?]. Certain Merchants of the Intercourse having claimed the privilege of an ancient treaty with the House of Burgundy to be exempt from all taxes, his Majesty has freed them from payment of subsidies and the Council has exempted them from the loans by Privy Seal. The Ambassador from the States has requested that they might be exempt from contribution towards furnishing the late fleet set forth by the city of London. The Lord Treasurer recommends that request, lest, if their privileges be infringed, his Majesty's subjects under the government of the States should be deprived of those immunities which they enjoy. 21st December 1626. [Copy. ¾ p.]
12. iv. The same to the same. Upon the instance of the Ambassador for the States of the Low Countries, the Lord Treasurer prayed him to forbear levying any contribution towards the City fleet from Merchants of the Intercourse, notwithstanding which, some are pressed to make payment. Entreats him, for the reasons of state mentioned in his former letter, to forbear pressing the said merchants until their case again be examined. 17th March 1626–7. [Copy. ½ p.]
12. v. Order of Council. Reference to the Lord Treasurer and others of the Council, to report what they find in the treaties of Intercourse between this State and the House of Burgundy touching the exemption pretended by the Merchants of the Intercourse, and until further order the Commissioners for Loans within the city of London are to forbear to demand the loans of any of the said merchants. Whitehall, 11th April 1627. [Copy. ¾ p.]
12. vi. The King to the Treasurer and other Officers of the Exchequer. Warrant discharging the same Merchant Strangers from money assessed upon them for the five subsidies granted to the King by the Parliament in the third year of his reign, and from all like subsidies so long as merchants of England enjoy the like freedom in the Low Countries. Westminster, 14th July 1628. [Copy. 2½ pp.]
Jan. 3. 13. Ed. Orange to Nicholas. Desires his help in a little business, which, although the profit thereof is not worth the trouble, yet in respect of the writer's credit and the foul play used by a neighbour who hates the writer and his, he must oppose it. Places his purse at Nicholas's command and desires him to disburse for the writer at present. The writer mentions his son Bull. [Indorsed by Nicholas as from his uncle Orange. Seal with arms. 1 p.] Incloses,
13. i. Statement of the business above referred to. Sir John Dackham [Dacombe] procured for Ed. Orange the stewardship of the manor of Stratton-super-Foss, in co. Somerset, parcel of the duchy of Cornwall, when the King was Prince and Duke of Cornwall, with the fee of 20s. yearly, which stewardship he had ever since executed. On the birth of the young Prince the lands of the duchy belonged to him, and thereupon a question arose as to the validity of the patents of the stewards. Taking advantage of this question and of Orange's presumed negligence in not returning the Court Rolls for three years, John Farwell sues earnestly to one of the secretaries of the Lord Treasurer for an appointment as steward of the manor in question. Orange explains the negligence, shows that he has not pursed any of the King's or Prince's money, and urges Nicholas to cross his enemy. [3¼ pp.]
Jan. 5.
Hinxhill Court.
14. Edward Chute, Sheriff of Kent, to the Council. Had been in every circumstance obedient to their letters in the business of shipping, but for some passages which have happened somewhat opposite to the fair progression of it, which being now pacified by mild persuasions, he hopes to receive the money on the 20th instant, and beseeches the Lords to direct him how to dispose of it. [Seal with arms. ½ p.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to [Montjoy Earl of Newport]. To allow John Morris and Charles Whichcote, owners of the Ruby of London, of 120 tons, to supply their ship with sixteen pieces of iron ordnance from the founder's store. [Copy. Vol. ccxliv., fol. 65 a. ½ p.]
Jan. 5 [?]. 15. John Nicholas to his son Edward Nicholas. Has received no letters from any but himself. For his boys coming to London thinks it were best let them stay till the weather be warm. Perceives a willingness to lay all faults upon the clerks, and some there are as bad as some of the six, and worse cannot be. Would the Lords knew the truth! The ground is covered with snow and the hollow way impassable. [1 p.]
Jan. 5.] 16. Sir Robert Heath to the King. Suggestions that for the supply of any pressing occasion, if it be found requisite to raise any sum of money out of merchandise, the augmentation should be laid on foreign commodities imported rather than on home commodities exported, and among foreign commodities choice should be made of those which are superfluities, of which kind he esteems all things of the same kind as articles manufactured in this kingdom, as velvets, satins, tapestries, diapers, cambrics, linens. He mentions also "drugs of all sorts, the simples of our country being as good for the bodies of our own people." [This paper was probably referred by the King to the consideration of the committee for trade. Windebank has indorsed upon it notes of the proceedings of that committee held this day at Whitehall. "Sir John Worsnam" [Wolstenholme ?] and Sir Abraham Dawes being present. 1½ p.]
Jan. 5.
Office of Ordnance.
17. Officers of the Ordnance to [the Lords of the Admiralty]. Report on expense and waste of powder in the Lion's Ninth Whelp, employed two years on the coast of Ireland, being principally in salutes to the Lord Deputy and others, subscribed by the captain. Underwritten,
17. i. Minute that the Lords of the Admiralty conceive the Officers of the Ordnance should allow that account without sending it to them, and that the proclamation intended not to bar the expense of powder in so small a proportion, in so long employment, and on such occasions as are therein expressed. [Copy. In all, 1¾ p.]
Jan. 6/16
The Hague.
18. John Dinley to [Sir Thomas Roe]. That meek apostle Mr. Durie, who travails to procure a communion of truth in peace, has let the writer know what a great patron Sir Thomas has been of his honest labours, wherein he has found cause of much rejoicing to see them so far advanced as they are by such a public declaration. Sir Thomas had the honour to stir up the spirit of a great King [Gustavus Adolphus], who had he lived would have cherished Durie's endeavours, but God has done his pleasure in that Prince and shown that men are born for his work, but his work depends not on men. Comments on the interference of France in the affairs of Germany. Dinley is afraid that when Germany is in the clutches of Austria and France, those mighty potentates, the Holy Father will step in and reconcile his sons and bid them share the heretics between them, and then deteriora novissima. Durie is the bearer of this letter. He thinks he has gone as far as his own legs can carry him, and that his private industry is at an end since the work is embraced by public power. Dinley beseeches Sir Thomas to procure for this modest deserving man, either a good prebend or the preacher's place at Hamburgh which is vacant, the Archbishop of Canterbury, at the request of the Queen of Bohemia, having bestowed upon the preacher a living of 120l. a year. Sir Abraham Williams will explain all this if Sir Thomas will speak with him. The place at Hamburgh is worth 200l. a year. A Polish gentleman is arriving in England with this passage; his name is Przykowski, he limps on one foot and wears a periwig; he will lodge about Charing Cross; his message is the same which Sir Thomas once told Dinley in his garden at Bulwick. [3 pp.]
Jan. 6. 19. Estimate of John Paperill, engineer, for rebuilding all the lodgings within Southsea Castle which were burnt down some six years passed, with gates and drawbridge: total, 1189l. 3s. 4d. [1 p.]
Jan. 7. Grant to Robert Earl of Ancram, for seven years, as well of the impost of 10s. for every cwt. of foreign starch imported as of a duty of 4s. voluntary ordered by the Company of Starchmakers to be answered to the King upon every cwt. of starch that shall be made by them, on which grant is reserved to the King a yearly rent of 200l. [Docquet.]
Jan. 7. Grant to Percy Church, one of the grooms of the privy chamber to the Queen, as well of the benefit of a recognizance of 500l. forfeited to the King by Edward Lewis for non-appearance at the great sessions for co. Radnor, where he stood indicted for felony, as of the benefit of four several recognizances of 100l. a piece forfeited by the sureties of the said Lewis. [Docquet.]
Jan. 7. Grant of denization to James de Camp, brewer, and James de Rocquigny, goldsmith, born in foreign parts. [Docquet.]
Jan. 7. Royal assent for Matthew Wren, D.D., clerk of the closet, to be Bishop of Hereford. [Docquet.]
Jan. 7. Grant of an almsroom in Christ Church, Oxford, to William Wixon, during his life. [Docquet.]
Jan. 7. Similar grant in Clarke's Hall within Bishopsgate, London, to Mary Bedo. [Docquet.]
Jan. 7. Similar grant in the same place for Hannah Jukes. [Docquet.]
Jan. 7. Similar grant in the Cathedral of Worcester for Francis Goade. [Docquet.]
Jan. 7. Similar grant in the Cathedral of Bristol for John Swan. [Docquet.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to Montjoy Earl of Newport. To supply the Merhonour, the James, and the Swiftsure with ordnance and ammunition for six months' service at sea. [Copy. Vol. cclxiv., fol. 65a. ½ p.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. To supply in like manner the two new ships, one in dock at Woolwich and the other at Deptford, but appointed to be launched in the beginning of February next. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 65a. ½ p.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The Lords having appointed John Lathbury late master gunner of the Eighth Whelp, to be master gunner of the Assurance, he is to cause the ordnance and ammunition in that vessel to be delivered over to the said Lathbury by indenture. [Copy. Ibid., fol., 66. ⅓ p.]
Jan. 7. Minute of a similar letter to deliver over the ordnance and ammunition remaining in the Eighth Whelp to John Cox, now master gunner of that ship in place of John Lathbury. [Ibid., fol. 66. 4 lines.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to Montjoy Earl of Newport. Similar letter to deliver over the ordnance and ammunition of the Mary Rose to Ralph Chessle, late master gunner of the Lion's Fifth Whelp, but now appointed to the Mary Rose. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 66a. ½ p.]
Jan. 7. Minute of a similar letter to deliver over the ordnance and ammunition of the Fifth Lion's Whelp to Robert Tray, appointed master gunner in place of Ralph Chessle. [Ibid., fol. 66a. 5 lines.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to Montjoy Earl of Newport. To supply with ordnance and ammunition the Antelope for eight months and the Lion's Ninth Whelp for one year, for service on the coast of Ireland, the charge whereof (after deducting the remains of gunners' stores returned last year in the Bonaventure and Ninth Whelp) is to be put upon account as stores sent into Ireland. [Copy. Vol. cclxiv., fol. 66a. 1 p.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to the Officers of the Navy. The King having ordered that the Warspite should be either broken up and her timbers be employed in making a dock in Portsmouth harbour, or otherwise be sold, they are to take order that the ship be not continued on further charge in the Navy, but that her timbers, anchors, sails, and other furniture be sold or preserved for use. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 67. ¾ p.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
20. The same to the same. It being his Majesty's pleasure that there should be preparation made of timber and materials for building a ship royal of the burthen of about 1,500 tons, the Officers are to take into consideration what quantity of timber and all other materials will be requisite, and in what place the timber may best be had, and to certify the same with whatsoever else they find considerable for making timely preparation, that the building may begin about Michaelmas next, and they are to send an estimate of the charge. [Copy in the handwriting of Nicholas. The King has inserted, in his own hand, the burthen of the intended great ship, "1500 tunnes," and "about Michalmes next," as the period of commencing to build, ¾ p.]
Jan. 7. Another copy of the same. [Vol. cclxiv., fol. 67a. ½ p.]
Jan. 7. 21. Nicholas's first rough draft of the same. [On the same paper Nicholas has written an explanation of what is meant by girdling a ship, that is, to double plank her for some six or eight strakes. [½ p.]
Jan. 7.
Little Horsely.
22. William Lynne to Sec. Windebank. Received a letter not long since from the Sec. by Mr. Kilvert, to assist in a service acceptable (as the Sec. said) to his Majesty. Craves for executing the Sec.'s command, he may be protected from the rage of Mr. Cotton, who reports that the writer did more than he needed, or than the Sec. will allow of, and vaunts that he [Cotton] has wrought out his peace. His wife told them he expected to have his study searched, and provided to prevent his own sorrows by conveying away such books as might most endanger him, either by hiding or lending them. He offered Mr. Talcott, a minister of Colchester, the sight of a book worthy his view, who soon hastened it back, wishing him to burn it. The like he did to Mr. Prosse, preacher of the Dutch congregation in Colchester, which were manuscripts of the false supposed murder of King James and Prince Henry;—unguibus leonem. He whispers against the State, not sparing the greatest, nor would he the life of the writer if it were in his hands. John Barnish, a professed ruffian, that keeps most at his house, lately was ready to assault the writer with his pocket pistol, had not company appeared at hand. It is certain that Mr. Cotton animated him to revile and wrong the writer, for he was then newly come from his house. [Seal with arms. 1 p.]
Jan. 7.
Christ Church.
23. Dr. Brian Duppa to Sir John Lambe. Should be sorry that any of his actions should run cross to the government of the Church, or that he should hinder any man who tenders the advancement of it, more especially Sir John Lambe, but the question between them was one wherein the writer could not yield without more detriment to the church of which he was dean than either of them could repair. The cause itself might be considered either in the particular, that is, in Mr. Jackson's case, or in the general, that is, the right of nomination. For the former, Sir John knew that, upon the nomination of Christ Church, Jackson was licensed and admitted by Archbishop Laud to that cure during the metropolitical visitation. The suspension which Jackson now lies under for not appearing at Lambe's visitation was passed upon him whilst absent at a distance and sick, so that it was not possible for him to appear. But with all humility he craves release, and the writer suggests that he should be suffered to enjoy what is conferred upon him, at least pendente lite. As for the right of nomination, they [the Dean and Chapter] were persuaded that a cathedral church endowed with an impropriation, where there is no vicarage, has an unquestionable power to nominate a curate, who yet is to be licensed by the Bishop. This is a constant right they have enjoyed in twenty several curacies ever since the foundation of their church. If their lay farmers have brought in any inconformists, it will make them more careful thereafter. Lambe has done worthily in dispossessing those whom he found enemies to peace and order, but that is not enough to make the cathedral willing to part with their right, having so many of their society to be dispersed, and being enjoined by his Majesty not to dispose their churches to any but those of their own foundation if they would accept them; and so much the writer told Mr. Holmes when he first came to the writer, that if none of their own company accepted it, the writer would think of him in the first place, because recommended by Sir John Lambe. [Seal with arms. Endorsed by Sir John Lambe as relating to "Harborrow," probably to Market Harborough. 2 pp.]
Jan. 7.
Colchester.
24. George Harrison to — King. Has sent him by Hummerstone the carrier 7 whole and 14 half firkins of oysters. Could not get any of Goodman Robartes, for the Hollanders have bought all that he has; he has taken of them 39l. for oysters. Hopes King will think of some course to prevent them. [Seal with arms. ½ p.]
Jan. 8. Entry on the Admiralty Register of the appearance of Thomas Askew, of Faversham. He was ordered to attend from time to time until discharged. [Vol. cclxiv., fol. 67 a. 6 lines.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to Officers of the Navy. It is the King's pleasure that his prize ship the St. Dennis should be repaired. The Officers are to certify what is necessary to be done for the present, with an estimate. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 68. ¼ p.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. Complaint has been made by Sir John Pennington that no allowance is given for washing and tallowing the King's ships, and that for want thereof they grow so foul and sluggish as they are not able to do the service expected. The Officers are to take order that the required allowance shall be given for every ship employed in service at sea once every three months. [Copy. Vol. cclxiv., fol. 68. ¼ p.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
25. Order of the King in Council. Upon complaint made to the King by Sir Henry Marten, Judge of the Admiralty, that he had been much abused by George Merefield, an attorney, who had by undue means procured a writ of capias against Sir Henry, in the name of — Huntley, clerk, Merefield was heard what he could say for himself, and it was resolved that he should be proceeded against by the Attorney General in the Star Chamber. And the Lord Keeper was prayed to give direction to the cursitors, that if any original writ came to be sued out against Judges of the King's courts, for any acts of theirs, as judges, they should not issue the same before acquainting the Lord Keeper, and that the Lord Chief Justices of the King's Bench and Common Pleas should give like order to the filazers of their courts. [¾ p.]
Jan. 9. 26. Frances Lady Pelham to her brother Edward Viscount Conway and Killultagh. Desires news of the health of himself and his wife. Passed Christmas with the company of their friends whose best entertainment was to see their neighbours dance gaillardes of their own invention, which agreed best with their clouted shoes and boots. Since Christmas the hard frost has confined all within doors. Hears that Lord Haughton increases in health. [Seal with crest. 1 p.]
Jan. 10.
Wallingford House.
27. Notes, by Nicholas, of business to be transacted by the Lords of the Admiralty at their meeting this day:—To give order for answer to several letters of the Lord Deputy and Council of Ireland: [Margin, "To draw up a letter, and it is fit to allow his lordship the 2,280l. 1s."] In attendance in custody Thomas Askew, complained of by Capt. Cooke; also Webb and Batten, complained of by Giffard the saltpetreman: [Margin, "Webb and Batten to be discharged, and Webb to pay the other's charges."] Lewis, purser of the Merhonour, desires leave to put in a deputy for six months that he may attend the auditors about perfecting Sir Allen Apsley's accounts, Auditor Phelips has certified the account of collectors of tenths of prizes for the port of London, that they may be discharged. Consider certificate of gunner Spencer of ordnance remaining in towns and forts. Consider the agreement made by the Lord Deputy of Ireland between Sir Beverley Newcomen (who has a grant like that of Sir Thomas Button of admiral of ships employed on the Irish coast,) and Sir Richard Plumleigh, and know the King's pleasure thereon. Capt. Phineas Pett certifies a muster of the garrison of Upnor Castle. [1 p.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Order of the Lords of the Admiralty, that Henry Webb and Richard Batten, on their submission and entering into a bond that Webb within three months would procure to be brought into his dove-house as much good and mellow earth fit for the growth of the mine of saltpetre as has been formerly carried out of the same, should be discharged, Webb paying the messenger's fees for both parties. [Copy. Vol. cclxiv., fol. 68. ¾ p.]
Jan. 10. 28. Petition of Thomas Askew, water bailiff to Sir Dudley Digges for the manor of Faversham, to the Lords of the Admiralty. About two years since there coming a command prohibiting the Hollanders to transport any more oysters, petitioner gave them warning thereof, and would not permit them so to do, for which the fishermen did much deride him, saying that the Hollanders had power so to do in all other rivers thereabouts, yet petitioner charged them not to offend. In petitioner's absence (he having occasion to go to sea) the Hollanders have transported oysters, for which he has been sent for by warrant, and is now in the custody of a messenger. The offence having been committed without his privity he prays to be discharged. [¾ p.]
[Jan. 10.] 29. The same to Nicholas. Charged the Hollanders not to transport any more oysters, and when he had so done, the pinnace Henrietta, commanded by Capt. Cooke, came and seized upon the Hollanders' sails, which the writer was very glad of, thinking then he should be blameless, and having occasion went to sea. In his absence the Hollanders had their sails again and transported oysters, but by what means he knows not. [½ p.]
Jan. 10. 30. Officers of the Navy to the Lords of the Admiralty. Have examined the account presented by the Treasurer of the Navy, and affirm the same to be a just and exact account of all moneys issued by the state of Ireland chargeable upon him as Treasurer of the Navy. The other moneys transmitted to him towards the charge of setting forth the Ninth and Fifth Whelps employed on the coast of Ireland in 1631 and 1632 must be accounted for by him, as a private man, to the Lords Justices of Ireland and not here as Treasurer of the Navy. [1 p.] Annexed,
30. i. Declaration of the state of the account of the Treasurer of the Navy as well for 540l. by him received to pay the Fifth Whelp's company in the year 1632, as also for moneys received for the Antelope and the Ninth Whelp in the year 1633, and the Bonaventure and the Ninth Whelp in 1634: the total charge is 7,718l. 9s. 9d., the discharge 9,998l. 10s. 9¾d, leaving 2,280l. 1s. due to the Treasurer. [1¼ p.]
[Jan. 10.] 31. Petition of many poor Creditors, being one hundred in number, as appears by a report, for victuals delivered for the King's use in the voyages to Cadiz, Isle of Rhé, Rochelle, and other his Majesty's services, to Lord Keeper Coventry. The Board had made many orders for relief of petitioners, whereby they might have been long since satisfied, were it not for the cunning practice of John Apsley, executor to the late Sir Allen Apsley, and Stephen Alcock, deputy victualler and accountant, who would not deliver a just state of the accounts between his Majesty and Sir Allen as directed, although the same have been delayed above these ten years, nor will the accounts be ever truly stated unless the Board call back the lands granted by the King in the 4th year of his reign to Sir Allen towards the satisfying of his Navy debts, being of the yearly value of 700l. Petitioners have suffered so much injustice by Sir Allen, by his executor, and by Alcock and his confederates, as was never offered to any subjects before in marine causes. Pray order for their present satisfaction. [¾ p.]
Jan. 10. 32. Bill of Thomas Hickes, apothecary, for medicines for Nicholas and his wife. Among the items is "Ingredients for China broth, 5s." Total, 2l. 6s. 2d., paid this day. [1¼ p.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
33. Sec. Coke to Sir Hugh Hammersley and the rest of the Committee of the City [of London] for the ships. As the committee have now received the resolution of the King and the Board, both for the sum to be allotted for his Majesty's two ships, and for hastening the collections, in both which he doubts not they will give dispatch, by the King's command Coke is now to desire them, whilst the collections are in hand, to make choice out of those seven ships already nominated, and which have been surveyed and approved, of five, the names of which are to be transmitted to Coke in writing, and then forthwith to take in hand the making them ready for the service in due time. Has entreated the Officers of the Navy daily to observe in what forwardness they are and how their workmen proceed. [Draft. 2 pp.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
34. The same to the Officers of the Navy. Yesterday they heard his Majesty's long debate and resolution, so as the writer hopes no further difficulty will be made to set forward his Majesty's service to his full satisfaction. For more expedition he has written to the committee of the city to select five ships and transmit their names in writing, and has also pressed them to put in hand all needful preparations, and has let them know that he has entreated the Officers to look carefully to their proceedings. Recommends this care to them, and that they will acquaint him from time to time with their forwardness or what they observe. [Draft. 2 pp.]
Jan. 11.
St. Martin's Lane.
35. [Sir Thomas Roe] to Thomas Viscount Wentworth, Lord Deputy of Ireland. News from Germany of the French having relieved Heidelberg and designing to force the Electors of Cologne, Mentz, and Triers, and the Duke of Newburgh to take theirs or the Dutch protection. Probable arrangements between them and the Dutch. Sir Thomas thinks we have loosed the reins to the Dutch, and by contempt enforced them to fall into the gulph of dangerous friends. Report that Gravelines is given up to the French, which Sir Thomas commends as men do fish, for the freshness, not for the certainty. Affection of the King of Poland to marry the Lady Elizabeth Palatine, and though no great encouragement has been given him, yet he has resolved it, procured the consent of his bishops, and sent to Rome for dispensation, which if he cannot obtain, he knows the example of the Duke of Bar:—that a pardon will be sooner had, for Rome will lose no more sons for a woman. He wears her picture publicty, and has declared the Lord Guldensteirn, a protestant, his ambassador to comply with his Majesty, who is on the way. Another extraordinary is expected daily from the Swedes, the Lord John Scheyte, who has thrice exercised that function in England, and is treasurer and the third person in that kingdom. Sir Thomas had letters from him of his coming, but cannot penetrate his business. God will have pity upon the distressed Princess [Elizabeth of Bohemia] and her children, and the religion, by a way not thought of by man. Mr. Porter, sent to congratulate the Cardinal Infante, has returned, having received no great satisfaction, for the Prince never moved his hat or foot. What displeased him we may not guess, and his friends excuse him, that it is the style of Spain, and that he never veiled to any since his arrival, but to the QueenMother of France. This at the best is a proud defence, but we think there is more in it, for he offered to write back, but not giving upon his letters the due title of Majesty to our King, Porter refused to bring it. Upon this it was formalized and a week was spent, but in conclusion persisting in the difficulty, Porter has returned without any answer. Some say that his Majesty subscribing "A mon tres chere cousin" and not "Altesse," from thence grew the exception, but it is not the style of Kings to inferiors, but that of Majesty is due from all inferiors to them. This is a great Spanish tumour, and we conclude if the Infante send not a person to reciprocate it, it is a scornful neglect; if he do, and do not give the title, it is a great affront, and Sir Thomas believes that his master will not receive it. —P.S. The report of Gravelines is contradicted. [2 pp.]
Jan. 11.
St. John's College, Cambridge.
36. Certificate of Master and Fellows of St. John's College, Cambridge, of the good conduct of John Jude, B.A., for the five years he had spent in that University. [1 p.]
Jan. 12. 37. Petition of Nathaniel Edwards, William Cane, Robert Seaman, and others employed by petitioner Edwards to Greenland, to the King. The Privy Council of Scotland having taken into consideration the outrages committed against petitioner and his servants by the Greenland Company of London and Captain Goodlad, commander of their ships in Greenland, in July last, and finding the privileges of that kingdom, as it were, trod under foot, have by their letter to the King's Majesty recommended the trial of those grievances, and that recompense be made to petitioner, and that he and his servants for the time to come may peaceably continue their trade in Greenland. Since the question now stands between the two nations, petitioners conceive that it is not convenient for their good to be judged by the Council of England only, wherefore they pray a reference to an indifferent committee to be nominated of both nations. Underwritten,
37. i. Reference for the English to the Lord Privy Seal, the Earl of Arundel, the Earl Marshal, Viscount Wilmot, Lord Cottington, and Sec. Windebank; for the Scotch to the Earls of Morton, Roxburgh, Dightgow [Linlithgow ?], and Stirling, and Sir James Galloway, or any two of each nation. Whitehall, 12th January 1634–5. [1¼ p.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to Montjoy, Earl of Newport. To supply the pinnaces the Henrietta and the Maria, employed to guard the Medway and the harbour of Portsmouth, with ordnance and ammunition for the whole year. [Copy. Vol. cclxiv., fol. 68 a. ½ p.]
Jan. 13.
Wallingford House.
38. Notes, by Nicholas, of business to be transacted by the Lords of the Admiralty:—To consider estimate for the ordinary: [Margin, "This is signed."] Give directions for letter to the Lord Deputy: [Margin, "Approve of the minute."] Thomas Askew attends, complained of by Captain Cooke: [Margin, "Discharged, and Sir D. D. [Dudley Digges] to speak with Sir H. M. [Henry Marten."] Consider certificate of Capt. Pett of the muster of the garrison at Upnor. The town of Colchester is now passing their charter, by which they are to have concurrent jurisdiction with the Admiralty in Admiralty affairs, which is an ill precedent: [Margin, "Speak with the Lord Keeper to stay it at the seal."] Directions upon the certificate of Spencer touching ordnance of brass in castles and forts: [Margin, "The Lords to speak with the King."] Consider agreement made by the Lord Deputy of Ireland between Sir Beverley Newcomen and Sir Richard Plumleigh: [Margin, "The Lords to speak with the King about it."] William Lewis, purser of the Merhonour, desires to put a deputy in his place, that he may attend the perfecting of Sir Allen Apsley's accounts. [1 p.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to Robert Earl of Warwick. To take effectual course that no oysters be exported either out of Colchester or any other place within his vice-admiralty by any strangers or in any stranger's bottom. Bonds to be taken from offenders to be sent to the Lords, with the names of fishermen and others who carry oysters to sea, and there deliver them aboard foreign vessels. [Copy. Vol. cclxiv., fol. 68 a. 1¼ p.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
The same to Anthony Percival, collector of the tenths of prize ships brought into Dover or other of the Cinque Ports in Kent. By Privy Seal dated 13th January 1630–31 warrant was given for 200l. to be yearly paid to Edward Nicholas for his attendance in the affairs of the Navy. Percival is to pay 200l. to Nicholas, out of moneys in his hands, being so much due for one year ended at the feast of St. Thomas last past. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 69 a. ¾ p.]
Jan. 13. Entry on the Admiralty Register that upon submission Thomas Askew was discharged from attendance, paying the messenger's fees. [Ibid., fol. 69 a. ¼ p.]
Jan. 13. 39. Petition of George Merefield, prisoner in the Fleet, to Archbishop Laud. Petitioner unadvisedly made out a writ against Sir Henry Marten and other Judges of the Court of High Commission, for which he is heartily sorry, being a young man, and what he did proceeding out of ignorance. Prays for his enlargement. Underwritten,
39. i. Note signed by Archbishop Laud, that if the Council think fit, he will not be unwilling that the petitioner be released upon giving security for his appearance. 13th January 1634–5. [In all, 1 p.]
Jan. 13. 40. Estimate, signed by the Lords of the Admiralty and Officers of the Navy, of the ordinary charge of the Navy for the year ending 31st December 1635: total, 31,253l. 11s. 9d. [2 pp.]
Jan. 14.
Westminster.
41. Warrant to pay 1,200l. to Sir Edward Denys and Sir John Oglander, 200l. thereof for taking down and preserving the materials of the old castle at Sandown, in the Isle of Wight, and for repair of Yarmouth Castle in the said isle, and 1,000l. for perfecting the fort at Sandown. [Copy. 1 p.]
Jan. 14.
Westminster.
42. The King to Montjoy Earl of Newport. Thomas Powell, keeper of ordnance stores, being lately deceased, the Earl is to appoint trusty persons, together with the officers of the ordnance, to take account of such stores, and to receive the same into his keeping until the King's further pleasure be declared. [Impression of the signet attached. 1 p.]
Jan. 14. 43. Nicholas to the Lords of the Admiralty. They have given order for redress of divers encroachments upon the jurisdiction of the Admiralty, and likewise for regulating the Vice-Admiral's accounts of the profits of the Admiralty. Offers to their considerations certain intrusions and invasions remaining, under which the Admiralty at present labours. 1. Towns corporate have concurrent Admiralty jurisdiction granted to them. 2. Pirates' goods, &c., in Ireland have been granted to David Ramsay. 3. Arrears of tenths of prizes have been granted away in an extraordinary course. 4. Ballastage, an ancient right of the Admiralty, is in danger to be passed away. 5. Grant of an office for registry of all ships, seamen, &c., has been sued for. Nicholas dwells at length upon the importance of each one of these particulars, and concludes that considering an island cannot be secure without a navy, nor a navy be well ordered without an admiralty, nor an admiralty be able to govern unless it be preserved in its jurisdiction, and that seamen cannot be contained in their obedience, if they shall have any other dependency or be subject to any other jurisdiction than that of the admiralty, Nicholas thought himself obliged to represent these things in the performance of his duty. [3¼ p.]
Jan. 14. 44. Fair copy of the same, examined and signed by Nicholas, and with some alterations in his own hand. [6 pp.]
Jan. 14. 45–47. Three other copies. [Two of them 51/6 pp. each, and the otherp.]
Jan. 14. 48. Nicholas's original rough draft of the same. [8 pp.]
Jan. 15.
Westminster.
49. The King to the Lord Chief Justice and the rest of the Judges. Ralph Claxton, for recovery of certain lands in co. Durham, brought his writ of right against Richard Lilborne, who refused that manner of trial, and by his plea waged battle, and tendered his champion to fight. Claxton thereupon petitioned the King, who referred his petition to the Chief Justice and other judges, who certified that they had persuaded Lilborne to waive his plea and manner of trial, and put his right upon the Grand Assize, or try it by a common jury, whereto Lilborne denied absolutely to consent. Since that time the King had required Lilborne to decline the trial by battle, and stand to the determination of a Grand Assize or common jury, which he had contemptuously refused; the King therefore being inclined to relieve Ralph Claxton, and utterly disliking the manner of trial proposed by Lilborne, as not agreeable to religion, required them to assemble themselves, and having examined Claxton's right and the justness of his claim finally to determine the business according to law and justice, notwithstanding the absence of Lilborne, that so the petitioner be no longer delayed, nor the King further importuned. [Copy. 2 pp.]
Jan. 15. 50. Petition of Capt. Thomas Bardsey to the King. Has been commander in King's ships in most services since the King's coming out of Spain. Prays to be appointed to command the ship which is to be set out by the city of Westminster, he being encouraged by the better sort of inhabitants there to be a suitor for that employment. Underwritten,
50. i. Reference to Sec. Coke to take the name of the petitioner and present it to the King in due time with the rest. Whitehall, 15th January 1634–5. [Petition and reference, 1 p.]
Jan. 15. 51. Petition of the Bailiffs of Colchester to the Council. In obedience to his Majesty's writ and the letters of the Council, petitioners joined with the sheriffs, both in calling the maritime towns and making the dividend between the counties, 2,300l. being laid upon Essex. By reason of the number of commissioners in Essex being so few, they had no power to rate themselves, and were forced to leave it to the sheriffs, who have laid upon their town 1,000l., the whole charge being valued but at 5,000l., and for the 2,300l. laid upon Essex, there are 53 maritime towns besides Colchester. There are also divers maritime towns betwixt Gravesend and Burnham not charged at all. This rate upon Colchester amounts to eleven subsidies at least, whereas the charge of Southwark and Westminster amounts but to three subsidies at the most. Pray the Lords that Colchester with Maldon, which is willing to be joined with them, may be eased by those maritime towns not yet charged, being within the hundreds of Dengey, Rochford, Chelmsford and Barstable in Essex. [¾ p.]
Jan. 15. 52. Robert Mason to George Evelyn. It troubles the writer that he cannot afford the requisite time to receive instructions in Evelyn's cause To day he must be in the city in the service of the King, and other matters concerning the city. Friday and Saturday will be taken up by the sessions, and on Sunday he must argue the case between the clergy and the city before his Majesty. [1 p.]
[Jan. 15 ?] 53. Petition of George Evelyn, one of the Six Clerks of the Court of Chancery, to the Council. On Saturday last the 10th inst., being forty miles from London, petitioner was served with process to hear judgment on Monday next the 19th inst. in the Star Chamber, in a cause prosecuted against him by the Attorney General for supposed exactions in his office. Finds that Mr. Herbert, the Queen's Attorney, who was formerly his counsel, in regard to some late relation to his Majesty's service, can no longer continue to be of counsel against his Majesty, and Mr. Recorder, another of his chiefest counsel, having to attend the sessions for London on Friday and Saturday, cannot possibly be instructed so fully as the cause requireth. Prays the Lords to put off the cause from hearing on Monday next. [1 p.]
Jan. 15.
Bangor.
54. Bishop Griffith of Bangor to Sir John Lambe. Thanks him for stopping the appeal of the Vicar of Aber-erch from the Bishop's suspension, and for the advertisements Lambe had vouchsafed him by letter of the vigour of his proceedings against the vicar. Conceived that he was following the direction of the sixty-second canon of the Later Constitutions. Being now come to the knowledge of his error, disputes not the validity of those canons, which as they are bound to have and to read in all their churches, so did he think they had ever passed unquestionable for their authority, but has reformed what Sir John judged blameable in his censure. The suspension a beneficio and per triennium he had released, yet what by law Lambe judged the vicar was liable unto, his carriage and want of submission towards the Bishop when he came last to demand absolution enforced him to lay still upon him. When he comes to understand himself and his carriage better, the Bishop will not be unmindful of the mercy Sir John has recommended. In the meantime being suspended only ab officio, and only for a year, his sufferings are not great. If any, he may thank his pride and sauciness, which since his return from London have been more than formerly. The Bishop hopes he has satisfied the Archbishop. He has not been able without a great deal of disreputation to follow the direction of Sir John's letter. [Seal with arms. 1 p.]
Jan. 15.
Rood Lane.
55. Thomas Witherings to Richard Poole attending upon Sec. Coke. Prays him to show Sec. Coke an inclosed map, and to let him know there are 6,000 new French soldiers arrived at Calais, with a regiment of 1,200 Irish taken up at St. Omers, Boulogne, and Calais. The design is uncertain, but the writer doubts that something is in agitation, the wind having been good these two days and the portmantle of letters not yet come. [1 p.]
Jan. 16.
Westminster.
56. The King to Francis Lord Cottington, Sir Henry Vane, Sec. Windebank, Sir Thomas Jermyn, Walter Steward, one of the gentlemen of the privy chamber, Sir William Balfour, Lieutenant of the Tower, Sir Alexander Hume, one of the gentlemen of the privy chamber, Sir Francis Ashley, King's sergeant, Sir John Bankes, Attorney General, Edward Littleton, Solicitor General, William Elphinstone, Edward Ayscough, Thomas Packer, and Nicholas Pay. Commission to inquire what escapes of prisoners have taken place during the time of the present keeper of the Fleet, Edward Hopkins, and his deputy, and also into certain exactions, extortions, oppressions, frauds, and other offences alleged to have been committed by them. [35 lines on a strip of parchment.]
Jan. 16. 57. Petition of William Herbert, purser of the James, to the Lords of the Admiralty. Petitioner by reason of his employment in the office of victualling cannot conveniently supply his place of purser. Prays that he may be allowed to make a deputy. Annexed,
57. i. Sir Sampson Darrell to Nicholas. Certifies that William Herbert is employed in providing victuals for the ships at Chatham, and is very useful in the service. [½ p.] Indorsed,
57. ii. Note by Nicholas of answer to the petition. The Lords will not give way to any such officer to serve by deputy upon the above or any such like reasons. 12th March 1635–6. [Petition and note of answer. ¾ p.]
Jan. 17. The Mayor and Commonalty of London to the King. Certify that at a Common Council held on the 19th of November 1634, before Robert Parkhurst, mayor, Robert Mason, recorder, Sir Hugh Hammersley, Sir Richard Deane, Sir George Whitmore, Sir Nicholas Rainton, Christopher Clitherow, Edward Bromfield, Sir Maurice Abbot, Henry Garway, Rowland Backhouse, Humphrey Smith, Sir William Acton, Edmund Wright, Anthony Abdy, Robert Cambell, Samuel Cranmore, Hugh Perry, and Henry Andrewes, aldermen, John Highlord, alderman, and John Cordell, sheriff, of the same city, and a major part of the Common Council assembled, it was amongst other things enacted, viz., "the said court of Common Council in all humbleness submitted themselves to your Majesty's most gracious judgment and award touching the offence depending before your Majesty, between the parsons and vicars of London and the parishioners of the several parishes of the same concerning tithes." [Portions of the city seal attached, having been attached upon four scarlet and white ribands intermixed. See Case C., Charles I., No. 1. 11 lines on parchment.]
Jan. 17. 58. Petition of Gabriel Marsh, Marshal of the Court of Admiralty, to the same. Bernard Mitchell, merchant, being taken in execution for not depositing in the said court 176l. 0s. 6d. for freight, according to a decree of that court in favour of Robert Zachary, and remaining in petitioner's custody, in Trinity Term last the then Judges of the Common Pleas sent a habeas corpus for Mitchell, and on his being carried before them committed him to the Fleet. The cause of Mitchell's imprisonment falls under the rules contained in the articles agreed on by all the judges and signed in the King's presence, therefore his being taken from petitioner is contrary to those articles and derogates much from the jurisdiction of the Admiralty. Prays the King to cause the Judges of the Common Pleas to remand Mitchell to the custody of petitioner. Indorsed,
58. i. Note, by Nicholas, that upon this petition the Judges of the Common Pleas were sent for before the King and Council, but Mitchell was not ordered to be remanded, because the judgment in the Admiralty was but an order to deposit money, and so his disobeying it was but a contempt. And likewise the judgment on which he stands committed to the Fleet is for a real debt, and another cause than that forwhich he was committed by the Admiralty Court. And the Judges of the Common Pleas say, that when he has discharged the execution for which he is prisoner in the Fleet, he shall be remanded to the Marshal of the Admiralty. 21st January 1634–5. [1 p.]
Jan. 17. 59. Opinion of Sir John Bramston concerning the legality of a commission to inquire of offenders against the proclamation and orders concerning forestallers, regrators, &c., with power for the commissioners to compound with delinquents. He was of opinion that such commission might stand with the law, but that the composition could not free the offenders without his Majesty's pardon. For the conveniency and fitness of such a commission he took not upon him to judge. [½ p.]
Jan. 18/28
St. Sebastian.
60. Prestwick Eaton to his brother [George Wellingham]. Has received no letters from him these six months. Hopes he makes no scruple of conscience to write to that country. Desires him to receive of Sergeant the writer's eighth part of this last voyage. Wishes to have sent to him, amongst other things, a spaniel dog that can fetch and good for the piece, at the Exchange he may buy them, pewter trenchers, sealing wax, a glass of pin-dust, a keg of good sturgeon, and a small barrel of neat's tongues for Lent. [2¼ pp.]
Jan. 19.
Office of Ordnance.
61. Officers of the Ordnance to Montjoy Earl of Newport, Master General. Having received order for sale of 44 barrels of powder to Mr. Tuck, muster-master of co. Herts, if the same may be conveniently spared, they certify that in 1617 the Lord Treasurer and other great counsellors propounded a supply to make up the store of powder 300 lasts, and in 1624 a committee of the Upper House propounded to make up the store to the same amount, and in 1626 the Council of War propounded a similar supply besides 50 lasts then in store. At this present the store is but 87 lasts 18 cwt. Humbly desire that they may not be judges of what may be conveniently spared, but may receive a direct command for what powder shall be delivered and at what price. [Seal with arms. 1¾ p.]
Jan. 19. Copy of the preceding. [See Dom. Eliz. 1590. Vol. of Admiralty Collections, fol. 148 b.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
62. Order of the King in Council. The King having resolved to take unto himself all the saltpetre that shall be made within this kingdom, and to sell all such powder as shall be made thereof over and above what shall be necessary for his own use, it is ordered, that the Attorney General prepare a warrant to be directed to the Commissioners for the Ordnance, authorizing them to give order to the Officers of the Ordnance to sell to such persons, and at such prices, as the Commissioners shall direct, such quantities of gunpowder as shall be required by the King's subjects, and that the proceeds thereof shall be delivered to the Lieutenant of the Ordnance, and by him be accounted for in the Exchequer. [Copy. 1½ p.]
Jan. 19. 63. Officers of the Navy to the Lords of the Admiralty. Sir Sampson Darrell has made request for William Herbert, purser of the James, to stay at Chatham during the ship's employment. If the Lords admit of his desire, the officers know no man fitter to execute Herbert's place than William Fynney, purser of the St. Dennis. [¾ p.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
Order of the Lords of the Admiralty upon the petition of Andrew Gosfryth. Recite the King's reference of 15th January 1633–4, and order of the Lords of the Admiralty of the 1st March 1633–4, upon which the Officers of the Navy certified that they held it reasonable that petitioner should be satisfied for his munition. Also recite a reference of the 11th April 1634 to the Officers of the Navy to ascertain such value, with their certificate thereon of the 17th April 1634. Whereupon the Lords desired the Earl of Newport to take order for payment of what is due to the petitioner in the ordinary course of the Ordnance Office. [Copy. Vol. cclxiv., fol. 71 a. ½ p.]
Jan. 19. 64. John Nicholas to his son Edward Nicholas. Has now got out of his chamber and can go a little with the help of his staff. Hopes in about eight or ten days to set forth for London. Longs to hear of Mr. Evelyn's success. Nicholas's mother has sent him a turkey. [1 p.]
Jan. 19. 65. Edward Lord Herbert of Cherbury to Sec. Windebank. Desires Windebank to represent the following requests to his Majesty, upon occasion of his writing the Life and History of Henry VIII. 1st. That his Majesty would grant him some public testimony of his favour, which may distinguish him from those who, before, have taken pains in this kind; for though Sir Thomas More and Lord St. Alban's were great personages, yet the lives of Richard III. and Henry VII. were not written by them but in the time of their disgrace, and when otherwise they were disabled to appear. 2. To obtain for him payment of 600l. outstanding of his expenses during his employment in France, which he should not otherwise employ than about his charges in his History. 3. That his Majesty, instead of the lodgings appointed him in Richmond, would allow him some in Whitehall, or rather in St. James's, whereby he might have access to the paper-chamber of the one, and the library of the other house. Hopes Windebank will both effectually move and obtain a good answer herein. He has spoken of them himself heretofore and found his Majesty graciously inclined thereunto. [Seal with arms. 1 p.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Proclamation for prizing wines. For one year next following Canary wines, Muscadels and Alicants, should be sold in gross at 17l. the pipe, and at 12d. the quart by retail; Sacks and Malagas at 15l. the butt in gross, and 10d. the quart by retail; the best Gascoigne and French wines at 18l. the tun, and the Rochelle wines and other small thin wines at 15l. the tun in gross and at 6d. the quart by retail. Where wines are conveyed by land carriage more than ten miles from the next port, 4l. per ton, or 1d. per quart, may be charged extra for every 30 miles of land carriage. [Coll. Procs., Car. I., No. 188. 2 pp.]
Jan. 20. 66. John Nicholas to his son Edward Nicholas. Perceives that he desired his boys should be near him, and that he had provided a schoolmaster for them. They had been good children, and he had no doubt of their scholarship if they be not harshly dealt withal, but Nicholas must call to mind his own fearfulness when at Winchester, which almost cost him his life. They are gone to Mr. Pinckney again, and he hopes are nearly cured of the itch. [1 p.]
Jan. 20. 67. Exceptions taken by Dr. Thomas Rives, Edward Nicholas, and Richard Wyan, to the account of Thomas Viscount Wentworth, ViceAdmiral of Munster, returned to the Court of Admiralty in London. They consist of payments for the bark brought in by Capt. John Reynes, the Spanish ship whereof Vicenti Fita was commander, and the John of Libourne, which, it is contended, ought to be charged against the ship, or paid by the Vice-Admiral out of his moiety. [1½ p.]
Jan. 20. 68. Opinion of certain Ministers constituting the Classis of the Dutch Church in Amsterdam, addressed to Mr. Paget concerning Mr. Damport's [Davenport's] desire privately to examine parents and godfathers before children were admitted to baptism. They state cases in which such examination should not be pressed. Latin. [1 p.]
Jan. 21. 69. The old Soapmakers of London to the King. Pray that they may be made a company incorporate for the well ordering of their trade, and the better enabling them to make good serviceable soap, and that they may have liberty to buy materials for making the same at the cheapest rate. Offer to serve the King's subjects with good soap at 3d. per lb., and to pay his Majesty 4l. for every ton they sell. [½ p.]
Jan. 21. 70. Certificate of Sir Edward Wardour that the last payment made to George Hooker, gentleman, late receiver-general to Queen Anne, upon his pension of 100l. per annum, was 50l. paid the 16th March 1630–1, for half a year ended at Michaelmas 1619. [½ p.]
Jan. 22.
Westminster.
71. The King to the Lord Keeper Coventry. His Majesty having made choice of Edward Herbert to be of [his] counsel, who now also serves the Queen as her Attorney General, his Majesty ordains that he shall have place, precedence, and audience in all the courts immediately after the two ancientest of the King's Serjeant's-at-law and the Attorney and Solicitor-General. [Copy. 1¼ p.]
Jan. 22. 72. Officers of the Navy to the Lords of the Admiralty. The master shipwrights having surveyed the old defective ships at Chatham, with the charge mentioned in the last general survey in 1633, have certified that the Nonsuch, the Assurance, the Repulse, and the Defiance, although old, yet having been formerly so often repaired and strengthened, they conceive, as mentioned in the said survey, that if the defects there set down were perfected with some small addition, for the decay since that time, they will be able for any service upon our own coast, the St. Dennis excepted, which upon decays lately found will require a further charge. [Seal with arms. 1 p.]
Jan. 22. 73. Queries put by Archbishop Laud to the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury touching the statutes of that church. They are ten in number, and relate principally to minute questions of payment and arrangement. The last of them is as follows: "What is the reason the upper form in the grammar school was some twenty years ago able to make and understand any ordinary Greek prose or verse, which now scarce two in the school are able to do ? This must needs be the master's fault, for the head form is not under the usher, and besides, I hear many complaints against his negligence." [Indorsed are three injunctions: 1. Relating to allowances to be made to prebendaries who have the King's dispensation for absence. 2. That a collection should be made of all the known customs of the church. 3. That the unabrogated injunctions of previous archbishops are still in force and cannot be annulled by the Dean and Chapter. In all, 1¼ p.]
Jan. 23. 74. Lord Chief Justice Finch to Sec. Windebank. According to his Majesty's pleasure signified by Sec. Windebank to Sir George Vernon and the writer, he delivered the paper the Secretary gave him with the message to the rest of the judges referees, whereupon they met and had some debate, after which the writer attended his Majesty and acquainted him with their opinion, and thereupon received further directions from him, and has accordingly made true relation to the rest of his brethren. The effects whereof are that they have agreed to the certificate and the exceptions without altering any one letter, which he beseeches the Secretary to acquaint his Majesty with. Sends both inclosed and subscribed by them all, and hopes it is now fully to his Majesty's satisfaction, which he shall ever in this and all other things most carefully and faithfully intend. [Indorsed by Sec. Windebank that he delivered the certificate and exceptions concerning the Bishop of Lincoln, to Mr. Kilvert on the 24th January after he had showed them to his Majesty. Seal with crest and motto. 1 p.]
Jan. 23. 75. Examination of Edward James taken before Attorney General Bankes. The petition now showed him [see Vol. cclxxvii., No. 108.] was sent by him to be delivered to the Council by his wife. He is clerk and deputy keeper of Newgate, under John Laiton, who is keeper of that prison. Thomas Lunsford the younger was committed prisoner to Newgate by warrant from the Council dated 16th August 1633. Explains minutely in what kind of custody Lunsford was at first kept, and how that custody was from time to time relaxed, first, in order that he might prosecute his suit to a gentlewoman worth 10,000l., and afterwards on account of the prosecutions against him in the Star Chamber. Ultimately he was permitted to lodge out of prison, on his father's promise that he should render himself, but he had not done so since the 15th October last. Explains also that Maurice Lewis, who was committed, as Thomas Lunsford the younger was, for an attempt upon Sir Thomas Pelham, and had the same liberty, had made a similar escape, and that Herbert Lunsford, uncle of Thomas Lunsford the younger, who had been committed to Newgate, 13th August 1633, had been permitted to leave the prison because Robert Carrington, one of the under-keepers, affirmed to examinant that the said Herbert was discharged by order from the Attorney-General. [2¼ pp.]
Jan. 23. 76. Estimate signed by Sec. Coke and the Officers of the Navy of the charge of setting forth to sea the Antelope with 160 men for 8 months, and the Ninth Whelp with 60 men for 12 months, to be employed on the coast of Ireland: total, 6,467l. 2s. 2d. [2 pp.]
Jan. 23. 77. Certificate of Daniel Everard of prisoners reprieved, during the time that Richard Evelyn and Sir John Baker were sheriffs of Surrey and Kent. They were Magdalen Dutton, attainted for stealing a purse and 10l. from John Patch, being then with child; Elizabeth Wyn for stealing goods worth 3l. 5s.; William Watson for stealing a mare, and John Whittakers for robbing a house of goods worth 21s. and also for stealing other goods worth 4s. [1 p.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
78. The King to Francis Lord Cottington and others, Commissioners for the Fleet prison. The King appoints Philip Smith to be solicitor to that commission, and commands that he shall have free egress and regress into the said prison, with liberty of speech with any prisoner there, and likewise that he shall have free perusal of all books and writings which may conduce to the manifestation of the truth of that business. [¾ p.]
Jan. 24. 79. Copy of the same. [1 p.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
80. Petition of Dame Mary Hamilton and Dame Elizabeth Savage to the King. Petitioners with great charge have erected several brass-works and have attained to perfection in the manufacture thereof, whereby the plenty of calamine here lately found may have fuller vent. The Dutch and German merchants, to suppress the undertakers, and to beat the English out of this trade, have for some years past engrossed the Swedish copper, being a principal material for the making of brass, and have lessened the prices of their manufactured articles, imported in great quantities into England. Pray for a new impost of 3s. 4d. upon the hundredweight of brass and battery manufactures of brass to be hereafter imported, and in consideration of the pension given to petitioner Lady Savage which is 1,000l. in arrear, and in reward of the long service by both petitioners done to his Majesty and the Queen, to grant to petitioners the said impost for 21 years at the yearly rent of 100l. Underwritten
80. i. Reference to the Committees for Trade to report thereon what they think fit for the King's service and the public good. Whitehall, 24th January 1634-5. [In all, 1 p.]
Jan. 24.
Bath.
81. Justices of Peace for co. Somerset to the Council. According to their directions have inquired concerning market spinners and their abuses, and find that there are divers of them in these parts not suspected of using any abuses, and that the maintenance of the poor spinners of wool much relies upon the trading of the market spinners and of many clothiers. It would be of great consequence for the general good if those that demean themselves well may be encouraged, and the rest be reformed, they being very necessary members in this commonwealth. For effecting which reformation certain rules which are here inserted would, as the masters conceive, prove very useful and effectual. These rules had been approved at a general meeting of the clothiers and market spinners. [2 pp.]
Jan. 24. 82. Justices of Peace for Surrey to some one designated as "your Lordship." Have received certificate from the inhabitants of the tithing of Enton in the parish of Godalming, of the obstinate demeanour of Thomas Collier, of Witley, in refusing to pay all taxations within the said tithing where his estate lies, and having been indifferently rated to pay towards the amendment of the common arms he refuses to pay the same, wherefore they return his name "to your lordship." [¾ p.]
Jan. 24.
Aldersgate Street.
83. Sir Henry Marten to [the Lords of the Admiralty ?] According to their command has perused certain annexed rules touching the regulating of Vice-Admirals in the execution of their places and making their accounts, and well approves of them, and conceives that such Vice-Admirals as are resident within their vice-admiralties should deliver into the registry of the Admiralty their accounts upon oath, and that the rest should cause their deputies to come up to justify their accounts upon oath, or take commissions out of the Court of Admiralty directed to commissioners to take their accounts upon oath. [¾ p.]
Jan. 24.
Llanelwy, among the Welsh Alps.
84. Bishop Owen of St. Asaph to [Sir John Lambe ?] Entreats his lawful favour in a cause concerning the repair of the Church of Wrexham. The church being a fair and well-built pile for a long tract of time wanted little or no reparation, and then, out of a custom which they had gotten, a gathering every Sunday served the turn. In his immediate predecessor's time when the imminent ruin of that goodly fabric, the fairest within his own diocese, began to call for a greater sum than the wonted collection, it pleased him to appoint a levy of 100l. to be made on the whole parish. One half paid and others refused; among whom these appellants and their abettors were principal, and so they continue upon a second levy, which occasions this appeal. He has weighed the allegations, and found them always to be frivolous. That the church needs repair res ipsa loquitur, if the repairing thereof must be left to their courtesy or (if they had rather term it so) charity, surely it will be repaired (as many build castles) in the air of empty words and promises. States the results of endeavouring to raise the required sum by collections in the church. Has given notice to the Archbishop of Canterbury who commends the case to the care of the person addressed. Begs a speedy determination that the repair be no longer delayed. [2 pp.]
Jan 24.
His house in St. Martin's in the Fields.
85. Montjoy Earl of Newport to Sir William Balfour, Lieutenant of the Tower, Sir Francis Rainsford, Sir William Parkhurst, warden of the Mint, George Bingley and John Worfield, auditors of the prests, Sir John Heydon, Lieutenant-General of the Ordnance, Francis Coningsby, surveyor of the ordnance, Francis Morice, clerk of the ordnance, and George Clarke, clerk of the deliveries. Recites the King's warrant to the Earl of Newport of the 14th inst. directing him to take account of the ordnance stores late in the keeping of Thomas Powell, deeeased. [See before in this Vol. No. 42.] Appoints the persons addressed to take the required account in the Tower of London, the Minoritts [Minories], and other places adjoining, and to make fast the same under their seals, to remain with Sir William Balfour until the remains at Woolwich, Rochester, and his Majesty's ships be likewise taken. [Seal with arms attached. 1¾ p.]
Jan. 26. 86. Petition of the Inhabitants of Linton within the wild of Kent, the chiefest of whom have thereunto subscribed their names, to the Council. There is a writ directed to the Mayor and Corporation of Maidstone for levying 340l. towards furnishing a ship for his Majesty's service, by virtue of which the Mayor has sent his warrant for levying 7l. out of the parish of Linton, for payment of which petitioners submit themselves and the monies, but they have never been taxed with or by the corporation of Maidstone until now. Pray that they may not be concluded by the tender of this taxation to be within the charter or liberties of Maidstone, until by the trial of their right they shall be adjudged so to be, and that the sum so taxed may be received by some person appointed by the Lords to his Majesty's use, and not be paid to the Mayor of Maidstone. [Signed by ten persons of whom five were marksmen. 1 p.]
Jan. 26. 87. Capt. John Mason, captain of Southsea Castle, to the Lord Treasurer and other Lords of the Admiralty. Representation of the state of Southsea Castle. Description of the situation of the castle at the mouth of the haven of Portsmouth. Sir John Ogle and the rest of the commissioners in 1624 certified that it was of great use and was conceived to be the most exquisite piece of fortification in this kingdom. By accident of fire in 1626 the whole timber buildings of the body of the castle were burned to the ground, so that there is not any lodging for the captain nor any place for the soldiers where they may lie dry. Never since 1628 has there been any supply of powder, and the remains on the death of the late captain Walter James, were only four barrels. The ordnance are only eight pieces, the garrison but eleven in number, and the whole expense but 139l. 18s. 4d. per annum. Compares this state of things with that of Landguard Fort and the castles at Sandown, Deal, Walmer, Sandgate, and Hurst. Prays order for repair, supply of ammunition, and increase of ordnance and gunners. [1 p.]
Jan. 26.
Aldingbourne.
88. Bishop Mountague of Chichester to Sec. Windebank. Troubles him in a mediation for a small matter, he supposes, to his Majesty, which is, that he would be pleased to grant the writer's son leave to go to Rome in his travel, which he is desiring to do and the writer that he should. It is a clause restrained in his licence, the writer thinks of ordinary course. Does not use the Archbishop because he meddles not that way, and especially because the Archbishop's good friends and the writers would give it out that they had sent his son to Rome to be a priest or jesuit. [½ p.]
Jan. 26. 89. Interrogatories for the examination of Samuel Lockram, master of the ship Hunter, and whereupon he was this day examined by Sec. Windebank. The Hunter was purchased by Capt. Powell and Thomas Newman at Rotterdam, and was freighted from Dover under the English flag with goods and passengers for the Island of Tortuga in the West Indies. In the outward voyage, under a commission of the Prince of Orange they took two Spanish ships, one of which was returned and the other set out as a man-of-war, and made several captures from the Spaniards in the West Indies. Both ships returned with their prize goods to Rotterdam. Powell and Lionel Newman went over thither and received the proceeds. [Lockram's answers to the interrogatories are written by Sec. Windebank in the margins of this paper. 8 pp.]
[Jan. 26.] 90. Interrogatories for the similar examination of Lionel Newman, merchant, relative to his connection with the ship Hunter. His answers to each interrogatory are stated in the margin by Sec. Windebank as those of Lockram are in the preceding article. He supplied the ship with ordnance on her outward voyage, and on the return of the ship to Rotterdam went over thither with Edward Powell, brother of Capt. Powell, to demand the ship and goods on behalf of their brothers, but the same are in possession of the Dutch West India Company, in consequence of a claim made upon the ship by one Roberts a Dutchman, a member of that company. [2 pp.]
Jan. 27. 91. Minute of bond of David Spicer, gentleman, and Henry Pauls, beer-brewer, both of London, to the Mayor, Jurats, and Commonalty of Sandwich in 1,000l. with copy of condition underwritten, that the King being about to grant letters patent for erection of lights on the South Foreland and North Foreland, for direction of ships to be preserved from the danger of the Goodwin Sands, if the above bounden should procure from his Majesty or the patentees, that all ships belonging to Sandwich should be exempted from all taxations for maintenance of the said lights, for all corn, coals, and other victuals to be transported in such ships, that then the said bond should be void. [1 p.]
Jan. 27. Entry on the Admiralty Register that William Browne, of Earcott, co. Gloucester, having been sent for, appeared before the Lords that day, and was ordered to attend from time to time until discharged. [See Vol. cclxiv., fol. 70. ¼ p.]
Jan. 27./Feb. 6.
Druslaisne [Drury Lane ?]
92. Deposition or information of Claude Curry, of Tilly-sur-Meuse in Lorraine, and Jean Blanchard of Tonnay-Charente in Saintonge, shoemakers. On Wednesday, the last of January, new style, deponents being at work in the house of Samuel Hervé, master shoemaker in Duc Plasse [Duke's Place], one Durieux, who calls himself of Paris, addressed deponents, blaming the English nation and accusing them of cowardice, and said that the French were much more valiant, and that one Frenchman was worth five English; that they had taken the Isle of Rhé and had been driven from it like rogues; that the Duke de Soubise was in great want and could not live, but that the King gave him a pension of 50 or 60 thousand livres, and that instead of paying his tailor and shoemaker, to whom he was in debt, he had driven them from his house; also that his sister would die of hunger in Paris, but for a small pension allowed her by the King; that the Duke had never done anything of worth in all his wars, and that his brother, Monsieur de Rohan, would have lost his head if he had not been sent to Italy. French. [1½ p.]
Jan. 27. 93. Bishop Mountague of Chichester to Thomas Vines, clerk, B.A., of Warningcamp, Sussex. Certificate to enable him to obtain holy orders from the Bishop of any other diocese although living in the diocese of Chichester. Latin. [Unsealed. 12 lines on parchment.]
Jan. 28. 94. Petition of Thomas Pincheon to the Council. Petitioner being keeper of the prison at Winchester, by virtue of a warrant under the hands of eight of the Council, delivered out of the said prison one Henry Arthur, convicted for stealing a horse, for which the judge at the last assizes fined petitioner 100l., and he now remains a prisoner in the Fleet on that account. Prays that he may be released from his imprisonment and fine. [¾ p.]
Jan. 28. 95. John Windebank to his father Sec. Windebank. On his return [to Oxford] after a visit paid to his father. Thanks him for his kindness, the waves of which flow on continually. Latin. [¼ p.]
Jan. 28.
New College, Oxford.
96. Thomas Reade to the same, his uncle. Similar letter. Classes Windebank with the illustrious men whom we look up to, not only that we may admire, but that we may imitate them. Latin. [Seal with arms. ½ p.]
Jan. 28. 97. Sir Sampson Darrell to Nicholas. The writer must be the only man ignorant, if he takes not notice of some great sea service likely to be shortly. Has often troubled him with his inquiries after it, not out of curiosity, but that he may use the best foresight he can and preparation for the better dispatch of the King's service when the command comes. Prays him again to take notice and acquaint the Lords, that provisions grow every day dearer, and of some kinds so scarce that they will not be had shortly for any money in such quantity as he conceives the service will require. [1 p.]
Jan. 28.
Leic[ester].
98. William Heaward to Sir John Lambe. Long letter with a multitude of minute particulars respecting the business of the Ecclesiastical Courts at Leicester with notices of some of the clergy. Cannot learn who will be the registrar: Mr. Prigeon or Mr. Lake. Mr. Angel is very comformable. The writer saw that in the pulpit last Sunday that he never saw him do in his life. He presently kneeled down in the pulpit at his first entrance very reverently, and at the Lord's Prayer so low that he was scarce seen at all. He has invited the writer to his house, and sent for him to dinner last week. The new vicar is very conformable, and seems to be an honest man, and the writer thinks that in a little time he would make a good surrogate. He intends to catechise every Sunday in the afternoon, and would have Mr. Angel preach in the forenoon, and sometimes he would help him, and so have but only prayers and catechise in the afternoon. Notices of Mr. Burden, Mr. Bayley, Mr. Baud, Mr. Quarles of Enderby, and the writer's brother Kingston. The snow is so great that no man can travel. [2½ pp.]
Jan. 28. 99. Statement of the costs, difficulties, and losses sustained by Sir Robert Mansell in the business of glass. He was out of purse above 30,000l. before the manufacture could be perfected, the occasion of which he explains in detail. Notwithstanding which, in his absence at Algiers, his patent was declared void by the House of Commons. The consideration of his charges moved the late King to grant him a patent for 15 years, but before he could obtain any fruit of that patent his workmen and servants were drawn into Scotland, and most of the glass here was imported from thence, wherefore he was obliged to purchase the Scotch patent at 250l. per annum. After his men returned from Scotland, they made such ill-conditioned glass that he was enforced to procure a whole company from Mantua. Then Vecon, his clerk, ran away into France, and by his procurement the greatest part of drinking glasses here "spent" were brought in from thence. This importation was stopped by order of Council of 25th June 1632, till when Sir Robert neither reaped profit nor enjoyed peace. Since then he has been at great charge in perfecting the work of looking glass and spectacle glass plates and yet has not raised the price of glass one penny, but on the contrary, has fallen his prices. For window glass the price is now certain, and more moderate than formerly, albeit the assize is more by 40 feet than it used to be. When he received a signification of his Majesty's pleasure for a new patent he had hoped to repair his fortune, but now his men are again drawn into Scotland, glass is attempted to be made in Ireland, and Crispe his tenant endeavours to gain a branch of the patent, and offers for the whole. All which he submits to the consideration of his Majesty. [1½ p.]
Jan. 28. Order of Commissioners for Pious Uses, that Edmund Weaver, stationer, having voided his house (being one of those required for the repair of St. Paul's) but having no shop as yet, may keep his shop open, with books therein, until a fortnight after Midsummer, being the time limited to his neighbours. [See Dom. Car. I. Vol. ccxiii., fol. 39. ¾ p.]
Jan. 29. 100. Petition of the Mayor and Burgesses of Newcastle-uponTyne to the King. Petitioners exhibited a bill in the Court of Exchequer, against Henry Hilton, to suppress a common brewhouse by him of late erected at South Shields, to the prejudice of the said port and town, and contrary to its ancient liberty, in which cause a decree was passed for suppressing the said brewhouse, but stay is made thereof until the King's pleasure be known. Since which, Hilton continues his brewing, which petitioners have no means to restrain till the decree be entered. Hilton's brewing will hinder the resort to Newcastle, and tend to withdraw the inhabitants to Shields, whereby petitioners will be disabled to perform such services as may be chargeable on their town. Pray that the decree may be entered, and Hilton be restrained. Underwritten,
100. i. Reference to the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Earl Marshal, Lord Cottington, and Sec. Windebank, to call to them the Barons of the Exchequer and such others as they shall think fit, and receive information from them of the state of this business, and report thereon. Whitehall. 29th January 1634–35. [In all, ¾ p.]
Jan. 29.
Wallingford House.
101. Notes by Nicholas of business to be transacted by the Lords of the Admiralty:—Read proclamation touching saltpetre: [Margin, "To be read at the council Board."] The town of Colchester is passing a charter by which they are to have concurrent jurisdiction with the Admiralty: [Margin, "To speak to the Lord Keeper, to stay this charter."] Certified account of the collectors of tenths of prizes for the port of London: [Margin, "I am to show this to Sir Henry Marten, and know of him what discharge is fit to be given upon it."] William Lewis, purser of the Merhonour, desires leave to put a deputy into his place, that he may attend the perfecting of Sir Allen Apsley's accounts: [Margin, "Signed the warrant for it."] Officers of the Navy certify in their observations upon the plot of Portsmouth, that all the storehouses in the victualler's charge are in decay, and that he by his contract, ought to repair them: [Margin, "Sir Sampson Darrell to attend about this."] Who shall view the two houses at Portsmouth belonging to the victualler, which Lord Wimbledon complains hinders his fortifications ? [Margin, "Rudd and [Heath]."] Directions what the Lord Deputy shall do with the proceeds of the Duke of Maquedas' ship: [Margin, "To be paid into the Exchequer Court."] [1 p.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to the Keeper of the Marshalsea. Warrant to take into his custody William Browne and Edmund Barker, and to keep them until further order. [Copy. Vol. cclxiv., fol. 70. ½ p.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
The same to John Goodall, of Pittesterie [Petistree], Suffolk. To give his personal attendance upon the Lords, at the Council Chamber, Whitehall, within four days after receipt hereof, when he shall understand the cause of his being sent for. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 70. ⅓ p.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
The same to John Goodwin. By letters of the 15th March last, they gave him order not to permit any strangers men-of-war to come into the harbour at Portsmouth. They are given to understand, that he has lately permitted three men-of-war at a time, having aboard 158 men, to enter the said harbour, and to ride before the dock and storehouses. This, his second negligence in this kind, deserves a severe punishment, as he will find, if he give them not a good account of the boldness he has taken. He is forthwith to command the said strangers men-of-war to hasten out of the harbour. If the ships lately admitted had been any ways distressed they might have sheltered themselves at Cowes or in some other places thereabouts. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 70 a. ½ p.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
The same to the Officers of the Navy. His Majesty has commanded that there shall be a brick wall made to compass the buildings at the new dock at Chatham, and the rope house without in the fields to landward; and for better securing the stores and Navy at that place from any sudden attempt by landing at St. Mary's Creek, his Majesty's pleasure is, that a small block-house or sconce shall be built at the mouth of that creek, and a barricado made to hinder boats and vessels to come in that way. With respect to the barricado near Upnor Castle, the King is pleased that the barricado be repaired, and means timely used to remedy the dwarfing of the channel. They are to send estimates of the foregoing. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 70a. 1 p.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. William Lewis, purser of the Merhonour, having been employed by Sir Allen Apsley in the late expeditions as one of his deputies, is necessarily to attend the perfecting of Sir Allen's accounts. They are to permit Lewis to put in his place a sufficient deputy for six months. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 71. ½ p.]
Jan. 29. 102. Petition of John Giffard, deputy saltpetreman, to the Lords of the Admiralty. Petitioner about two months since, complained of William Browne, for that he denied to carry coals and liquor for making saltpetre, whereupon the Lords granted a warrant to Mr. Barker, one of the messengers of the chamber, to attach the said Browne. Barker, for a sum of money, gave liberty for six weeks unto Browne to make his appearance, so that petitioner had to his great charge attended there for three weeks. Prays that Barker and Browne may pay his charges. [1 p.]
Jan. 29. 103. Sir Thomas Roe to Nicholas. Pain prevents his waiting upon the Lords. Begs Nicholas to read the enclosed, and inform the Lords a truth in behalf of an innocent and honest man, maliciously persecuted by such as would reign over poor men in their office. Would not plead for this bearer [William Browne] before such an audience, and in such a cause as the King's service, but that he was well grounded that Browne performed his duty willingly, and the testimony he has is from the best men in that division. It is not a less heroic and honest work to protect the innocent than to chasten the refractory, therefore he hopes the Lords will give credit to the informations and discharge him. Prays Nicholas to aid Browne, who, perhaps, in such a presence cannot speak for himself. [¾ p.] Incloses,
103. i. Thomas Chester to William Browne. Replies at length to a letter from Browne on the power given to Giffard under his deputation to take carts and ploughs for the conveyance of saltpetre liquor, and his remedy in case of refusal or interruption by appeal to the next Justice of the Peace. Orders for facilitating the service had been made by the justices at Thornbury. Does not believe that Giffard would have any cause of complaint if he appealed to the justices when there was reason for so doing. Alman-Knowle, 19th December 1634. [Seal with crest. 1¾ p.]
103. ii. Inhabitants of Alveston, co. Gloucester, to the Council and Lords of the Admiralty. William Browne has been a willing payer towards carriage to the saltpetre works at Thornbury; also, when his plough was pressed for their parish for the carriage of a load of coal, he agreed with Montague, a coal carrier by horse, to convey it in, because his plough was weak and the ways unpassable. 16th January 1634–5. [1 p.]
103. iii. Inhabitants of Westerleigh, co. Gloucester, to the same. Certify that William Browne never refused rate for carrying water and coal to the saltpetre works at Thornbury, but, being pressed for two places at once, remarked, that he thought it unreasonable, having but one plough, and that many men paid nothing in this service because they kept no ploughs. 18th January 1634–5. [¾ p.]
103. iv. John Street and others to the Council. Certify that the plough of William Browne, when he was warned last for Westerleigh parish, for carriage to the saltpetre works at Thornbury, was unable to carry above half a load, by reason of their poverty and weariness with other carriages, whereupon Browne excused himself to Giffard by letter. 18th January 1634–5. [¾ p.]
Jan. 29.
Bristol.
104. Capt. Thomas James to Nicholas. Sickness utterly disabled him for any employment this year, but his heart is sound. Recommends William Purser, formerly master's mate in several King's ships, and for these two years under the writer. His care and zeal doubly recompense the loss of his hand in the wars between England and Spain, fighting valiantly, in the face of his enemies. He is the best mariner or navigator that ever the writer conversed with, and that not in the superficial learning, but in the ground and mathematical knowledge of demonstration by geometry and arithmetic, and this not alone known to the writer, but to the best mathematicians in England. [Dated "1635," but indorsed by Nicholas "1634." Seal with arms. 1 p.]
Jan. 29.
Leith.
105. Archbishop Spottiswood, of St. Andrew's, to Sir James Galloway, Master of Requests for Scotland, and one of the Lords of the Council there, whom he addresses as "my very good Lord." Thanks for his kind remembrance by the Lord Bishop of Moray. Incloses an information for two young men detained in the Spanish galleys since they were taken in a Turkish vessel, for they were first made captives by the Turks, and compelled to be circumcised, whereof the Spaniard makes a pretence to keep them slaves, alleging them to be renegadoes. Without money nothing can purchase their freedom, and some have collected for that use, but if his Majesty's letter may be had to the commander of the galleys they trust the redemption will be more easy. [Seal with arms. ¾ p.]
Jan. 30. 106. Petition of Capt. Thomas Squibb to the King. Has been divers times employed as a commander at sea by the King and his father, and also in many foreign parts both in private and public affairs with happy success. Prays for the command of one of the ships shortly to be employed. [Nicholas has endorsed that this petition was delivered him that day by Mr. Caldwall, who signified the King's pleasure that petitioner be remembered by Nicholas to the Lords when time serves. ¾ p.]
Jan. 30. 107. Petition of Gerard Dalby to the Lords of the Admiralty. Petitioner has attended Sir John Heydon, and has produced his engine to him, who having viewed the same approves of the firing of it under water. Prays them to know Sir John Heydon's mind, and should he certify of the engine's insufficiency, petitioner prays leave to make some of them at his own charges, and to attend the fleet in the Minikin ketch, and according to the service he shall do to be rewarded. [½ p.]
Jan. 30. 108. Petition of William Browne, prisoner in the Marshalsea, to the same. Upon complaint of Mr. Giffard, master of the saltpetre works at Thornbury, co. Gloucester, was sent for by a messenger and is now imprisoned. Expresses sorrow for any offence and prays enlargement. [¾ p.]
Jan. 30. 109. Petition of Edmund Barker, one of the messengers of the chamber, and then prisoner in the Marshalsea, to the Lords of the Admiralty. Petitioner, for non-performance of his service according to their expectation in fetching up William Browne out of Gloucester, is justly punished. Expresses contrition and prays discharge. Indorsed,
109. i. Note by Nicholas, that petitioner Barker was ordered to pay 3l. towards Giffard's charges, and Browne (see preceding petition) 6l., and then to be freed. 31st January 1634-5. [In all, 1 p.]
Jan. 30. 110. See "Papers relating to Appointments in the Navy."
Jan. 30.
Grey Friars, London.
111. Sir Walter Pye to Sec. Windebank. Can give him full account concerning the wardship of Helyar, in Somersetshire, if it please him to appoint a meeting. The composition is stayed until his pleasure be known. Helyar is the grandchild and heir of Canon Helyar of Exeter. States what the ward's property consisted of, which comprised among other things the manor of East Coker. The Canon is esteemed a man of wealth, but the ward has four brothers that are to be provided for, and the prosecutor is to be rewarded for his charge and pains. [Seal with arms. 1 p.]
Jan. 30.
Deptford.
112. Kenrick Edisbury to Nicholas. Now that Thomas Morgan, purser of the Ninth Whelp, has given an account of the money he received from the Lords of Ireland, the Officers of the Navy intend to frame an answer to the Lords' warrant of 29th March last. Prays the loan of that last account sent from the Lord Deputy. Are at a stand for any proceeding to victual or presting of men for the ships prepared for extraordinary service till they have further order from the Lords. Have no order for preparation of ships for the ordinary of the Narrow Seas this year. Wishes a loosening of the extreme hard weather whereby the river may be freed for transportation by water, otherwise they shall be much hindered in the dispatch of the ships in hand. [¾ p.]
Jan. 30. 113. [The same to the same.] If God send weather to launch the new ship at Deptford on the 9th or 10th of February, as the King has appointed, prays Nicholas to desire the Lords to know whether the King intends to be there to see it, or whether any of the Lords intend to come and bring order to name her, for which the officers desire warrant. [¼ p.]
Jan. 30.
St. Martin's Lane.
114. [Sir Thomas Roe] to Elizabeth Queen of Bohemia. Doubts not she has received his letter by Mr. Nieuport, secretary to the States, here resident. Concerning the employment of "this gentleman" [the Polish Ambassador] desires her Majesty to consider the great advantage to the religion and House Palatine by this match [between the King of Poland and Elizabeth daughter of the Queen of Bohemia]; the power of that King, his inclination to "us," his situation in respect of the Emperor's patrimonial lands and Germany, his aversion from the house of Austria, and his own person, a brave and valiant prince, who will make himself much more considerable by his virtue in the world than the opinion of his northern remoteness promises. And that though perhaps all full satisfaction is not given from hence, yet great affairs must move slowly and by degrees, and she must endeavour to draw on by time and occasion what cannot be obtained at once; for that is the use of wisdom, never to despair, but to court success by flattering it, and not seeing the wrinkles and frowns. Many brave designs miscarry by more intention upon the difficulties than how to overcome them. Something there is of traverse in the negotiation of Mons. Scheyte from Sweden. It is Roe's chance to be trusted by both, and he will do his best to reconcile both. Somewhat thereof the bearer can tell her, but there is more which private negotiators from Sweden secretly propose and have credence from the Oxenstierns, who are of contrary factions to Scheyte in Sweden. Roe has cause to fear that he will disavow some actions of young Oxenstiern which will be a great folly, and will expose that State to scorn from them who will be glad to take the occasion. The Oxenstierns resolve to keep a resident here, and the person chosen by the Chancellor is a Dutchman called Bloome [?] or such a name, and Roe is informed that inwardly he is an Austrian. These opposite negotiations should be converted to a fit peace and settlement, and directed to the advantage of her Majesty's cause and children. No news there but preparations for a grand masque of nine lords and fifteen ladies, and much matter in the Star Chamber which some other may write; Roe dares not judge of judgment yet depending. Shall be glad to serve her Majesty, but desires his letters may be burned. He has lately learned that in the search of Sir Francis Nethersole's papers some of his were found, wherein he was happy, and it is so to be honest, yet he had rather be safe than secure. [Copy. 1¾ p.]
Jan. 31. 115. Lionel Earl of Middlesex to the King. It was 28 years since the writer served James I. in places of great trust, and 11 years since his troubles in parliament began, which he mentions not either to excuse himself or question the true course of his heavy sentence there (his Majesty being an eye witness and the best judge of the proceedings), but rather to magnify his Majesty's goodness soon after to signify his pleasure by the late noble Duke to grant him a free pardon for all matters whatsoever, which being drawn was stopped at the Great Seal upon information that the Earl owed his Majesty 100,000l., whereupon he gave covenant not to take benefit thereof for any debt he owed the King. The debt being referred to the Attorney General, he certified that the writer's discharges, some by payments and some by the late King's grants, agreed with the charge to a penny, and thereupon by the King's warrant the writer's covenants were delivered up to him. By process of Exchequer the writer is again drawn to account for the selfsame sum so formally examined and certified to have been discharged. Submits himself and his grants from the late King to his Majesty's disposal, which, if he shall not accept, and there be no way left him but by a legal defence, he prays that he may not thereby incur the King's displeasure. Doubts not that the King will in due time confirm his grant under the Great Seal and many gracious messages and open declarations, and give an end to the writer's troubles. [2 pp.]
Jan. 31. 116. [The Council] to all Justices of Peace, Mayors, Sheriffs, &c. King James by letters patent appointed the Duke of Richmond and Lennox to be his Majesty's alnager, which patent is come to James now Duke of Lennox, by virtue whereof he is interested in the office of Alnager for surveying, measuring, searching, and sealing all sorts of vendible woollen cloths in as ample manner as either the said late Duke, the Duchess Dowager of Lennox, the Earl of Arundel and Surrey, or any other. The persons addressed are therefore required to be aiding and assisting to the said Duke of Lennox and the bearers,—John Bromall, John Rainshall, and William Hadfield, deputy alnagers under the said Duke within the counties of Derby, Stafford, Nottingham, Leicester, and Rutland in the due execution of the said office, and if any person be so obstinate as to repugn the same, the persons addressed are to take good bond for his appearing before the Council. [Copy. 1 p.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
The Council to William Earl of Derby, Chamberlain of co. Palatine of Chester. Philip Mainwaring and others of the purchasers of the waterworks at Chester having represented that they had notice lately of some persons who can depose materially respecting the business which is still in controversy touching the same, and having prayed that a new commission might be issued to examine such witnesses, the Earl is required to give order for issuing such commission. [1 p.] Annexed,
i. Order [of the said Earl] for issuing such commission. Chester 25th February 1634-5. [Much damaged by damp. 16 lines on parchment.]
ii. The King to John Bostock and Henry Birkhened. Commission out of the Court of Exchequer at Chester to take the examinations above-mentioned. Chester, 28th February 1634-5. [13 lines on parchment.]
iii. Interrogatories to be administered on behalf of Philip Mainwaring, with Robert Harvey, Thomas Aldersey, aldermen and the rest of the purchasers of the Chester waterworks. [Strip of parchment.]
iv. Depositions taken at the house of Foulke Salesbury, of Chester, alderman, on 13th March 1634-5, before John Bostock and Henry Birkhened. The witnesses were
Richard Dutton, alderman, aged 34.
George Warrington, beer brewer, aged 32.
William Poynton, baker, aged 32.
William Taylor, glover, aged 70.
Thomas Prichard, sluner, aged 60.
William Welshman, baker, aged 46.
Edward Haswall, servant to Robert Wright,
baker, aged 24. [Two strips of parchment.]
[See Dom., Charles I., case C., No. 2.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
117. Lords of the Admiralty to Montjoy Earl of Newport. Recite the petition from the Captain of Southsea Castle near Portsmouth (No. 87), showing the present state of the same castle, and the supply of powder therein. He is prayed to give order for a survey of the same castle, and an estimate to be made of the cost of repair, and that a supply of powder and other munition be sent to the same forthwith. The captain being but newly come to his charge is to indent for all the ordnance and other stores. [1 p.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Copy of the same. [Vol. cclxiv., fol. 74a. 1 p.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
118. Order of the same Lords on the petitions of William Browne, of Earcott, co. Gloucester (No. 108), and Edmund Barker, one of the messengers of the chamber (No. 109). Having considered these petitions, and also a note of charges amounting to 9l. 10s. presented by John Giffard, it was ordered that Browne and Barker should be released, Browne paying 6l., and Barker 3l., in recompense of the said charges. Annexed,
118. i. The note of charges of John Giffard above-mentioned: total, 9l. 10s. [¾ p.]
118. ii. Nicholas's rough notes of the above order written upon the concluding portion of a letter of Capt. Richard Gyffard, dated 1st March 1616-7. [¼ p.]
Jan. 31. Copy of the above order. [Vol. cclxiv., fol. 75 a. ¾ p.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to the Keeper of the Marshalsea. Warrant to set Edmund Barker at liberty. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 73. 6 lines.]
Jan. 31. Minute of a like warrant to set at liberty William Browne, with a clause that he should pay 6l. to John Giffard, and all fees. [Ibid., fol. 73. 3 lines.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
The same to Thomas Chester, Justice of Peace for co. Gloucester. In examining the complaint against William Browne, perceive there has been great neglect in Chester, in not assisting the deputy saltpetreman in the performance of his works, and this fault he has aggravated by certifying on behalf of Browne, whom he could not but know to be a delinquent, Browne having been complained of by the deputy to Chester and another Justice of Peace. Forbear to call him to account for this neglect, hoping this admonition will render him henceforth more ready to give assistance in that service as there shall be occasion. [Copy. Vol. cclxiv., fol. 73. ¾ p.]
Jan. 31. Minute that Toby Adkins, saltpetreman, appeared before the Lords of the Admiralty, and is to attend from time to time until discharged. [Ibid., fol. 71. ¼ p.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to Officers of the Navy. It is his Majesty's pleasure that the Bonaventure shall this year be employed for guard of the coast of Ireland instead of the Antelope formerly appointed for that service. They are to cause her to be forthwith repaired and fitted for service. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 72. ¾ p.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
The same to Montjoy Earl of Newport. To supply the Bonaventure with sufficient gunner's stores for eight months' service on the coast of Ireland instead of the Antelope, as previously ordered. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 72. 1¼ p.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Deputy Wentworth. Send him exceptions of the Officers of the Navy to the account of moneys transmitted from Ireland for the ships employed for guard of the coast of Ireland, and their declaration of the present state of the account. There appears to be due to the Treasurer of the Navy 2,280l. 1s., out of which they think should be allowed 2,200l. for the remains in the Antelope and Bonaventure on their return in 1633 and 1634. There have been no remains in the Ninth Whelp, the ship having been kept in constant employment. As to the Lord Deputy's proposition [for a change in the manner of conducting this service] the King has answered it under his own hand. They moved the King that the new ship in dock at Deptford might be sent this year to the Irish coast, and his Majesty was inclined thereto, but finding that both the new ships were over built so much that they are made full as big as the Bonaventure and will be near as chargeable to set forth, his Majesty has appointed them for guard of the Narrow Seas, and directed the Bonaventure and Ninth Whelp to serve on the coast of Ireland. Have sent him some exceptions to his account as Vice-Admiral of Munster and desire the moneys to be paid into the Admiralty. Doubt not he has improved to his Majesty's profit the sale of the Duke of Maquedas' ship, but the writers hold it not fit that there should be any division of the proceeds in case of a private ship taken by any of his Majesty's ships. The profit in such case ought to be entire to his Majesty. Thank him for establishing Smyth in the place of Marshal and Water-bailiff of Ireland. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 73a. 2½ pp.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
The same to Thomas Rudd and Thomas Heath. There are two storehouses at Portsmouth belonging to the Victualling Office which, standing by the rampire or town wall there, it has been desired might be removed. The persons addressed are to view the said houses, and certify whether the same give any impediment to the fortifications, hinder the soldiers in walking the rounds, or the use of the ordnance to clear the passage. [Copy. Vol. cclxiv., fol. 75. ½ p.]
Jan. 31. 119. Deputy Lieutenants of co. Devon to the Council. Certify that they have received certificates that Nicholas Davie, of ZealMonachorum, has not been defective in his arms, only in the showing a morion for a burganet at the last muster, which he promises to amend. They commend his cause to the consideration of the Lords. [¾ p.]
Jan. 31.
Wallingford House.
120. Notes, partly by Nicholas and partly by Lord Cottington, of business to be transacted by the Lords of the Admiralty:—Officers of the Navy and others attend about the estimate for building the great ship: [Margin, "This is signed:"] and concerning the ruins of the victualling houses. What ships shall be prepared for the ordinary guard of the Narrow Seas: [Margin, "Antelope, and speak with the King."] Petitions of Browne and Barker: [Margin, "Browne and Barker to be discharged on certain payments before mentioned."] Matters to be mentioned to the King. Mr. Nicholas's paper. Resolve on dimensions of the great ship. Declare what ships shall be this year on the ordinary. Commanders for the Irish ships. That his Majesty will appoint whether he will be at the launching of the new ship at Deptford, or otherwise command what her name shall be. [¾ p.]
Jan. 31. 121. Brief in a cause in the Arches on behalf of George Vincent, sued by John Wild, clerk, parson of Burnham St. Andrew, for payment of tithes from 1628 to 1631 for half an acre and three roods of land stated to be situate in that parish. The defence was that the land was in the parish of Burnham Thorpe. [Much damaged by damp. 3 pp.]
Jan. 31. 122. Brief in a similar cause on behalf of John Tubbin, sued by John Wild, mentioned in the preceding article, for tithes of the same piece of land from 1624 to 1627. [Similarly damaged. 4½ pp.]
Jan. 31. 123. Brief in a cause in the Arches of Thomas Hooper versus Dennys and Skynner, executors of Thomas Reede, of Exeter, fuller. The question in the cause was whether a bequest of all racks, presses, and necessaries belonging to a fuller's trade comprehended certain hot presses. [Damaged. 1¾ pp.]
Jan. 31. 124. See "Papers relating to Appointments in the Navy."
Jan. 31. 125. Award of Archbishop Laud in causes between Bishop Howson late Bishop of Durham, and since his death between Bishop Morton of that see, Archbishop Neile of York, formerly Bishop of Durham, and Jane Howson, widow and executrix of Bishop Howson, concerning dilapidations of the houses and castles of the see of Durham. The award directed 500l. to be paid by Archbishop Neile and 60l. by Jane Howson to Bishop Morton. [2 pp.]
Jan. 31. Order of Commissioners for Pious Uses, that Robert Bateman, chamberlain of London, should pay to his clerk, Edward Hodgson, 50l. for keeping the accounts in reference to the repairs of St. Paul's. [See Dom., Car. I., Vol. ccxiii., fol. 39 a. ½ p.]
[Jan.] 126. The King to Sir John Finch, Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. The King lately appointed a justice seat to be held for the forest of Waltham, by Henry Earl of Holland, Chief Justice and Justice in Eyre of all the King's forests on this side Trent, to commence the 1st of October last, at Stratford Langthorn, in Essex. The said justice seat was accordingly held and was adjourned to the 20th of [Febru]ary. Requires Sir John Finch to be there present and assistant to the said Chief Justice and Justice in Eyre the better to advise him in such points of law as may fall out before him. [Copy. 1¼ p.]
Jan. 127. "The humble petition and proposition of Sir Sackville Crow [to the King], concerning the converting of your Majesty's woods in the Forest of Dean to the making of iron ordnance." Sir Sackville enters fully into the then present state of the Forest of Dean and gives a list of the furnaces and forges, most of them unauthorized, then existing therein. He proposes that 12,000 cords of wood should be annually set apart for mining purposes and the manufacture of iron ordnance, and offers to conduct such manufacture in such manner as to undersell foreign competitors and bring in large profits to the King. [14 pp.]
[Jan. ?] 128. Petition of John Higham, serjeant-major of the garrison of Portsmouth, to the Council. The Mayor of Portsmouth assessed the garrison and himself for ship-money without his knowledge, and thereupon sent him notice thereof. His answer was that he found it strange that they had sessed the garrison without his knowledge, but since they had done it, he prayed them to send him a list how they had done it, and forbear distraining until he had answer from the Lord Governor. They, "like most splenetive men," as they always had shown themselves to the garrison, came violently into his house and offered to distrain and carry away his goods, and by that means brought him down from his chamber, where he had long lain sick, being an old man. Prays them to take notice of these harsh proceedings, where nothing was done or thought to deny payment. [1 p.]
Jan. 129. Richard Pease to [George] Rawdon. If he will not have little "Konnafeares" for Lord Conway, Pease desires to have it himself. Has signed the acquittance he gave Mrs. Juke. It was but for 6l. [Seal with initials. ¼ p.]
[Jan.] 130. Petition of the undersigned Clothiers of Suffolk and Essex to the Council. Repairing this twelfth market to London, to sell their cloths, as formerly they were wont, they found a stand upon their market, by reason of an Order of Council made upon petition of the merchant adventurers and drapers' shopkeepers of London, whereby it is ordered that no persons should sell any woollen cloths either by wholesale or retail but themselves. At this time 100,000l. worth of cloth lies pawned and in storehouses for want of buyers, and if the number of buyers be lessened petitioners cannot continue their trade. The merchant buys generally only against shipping times, the drapers buy but small quantities and at some special times of the year, and divers others buy of the clothiers when they are most surcharged. The clothiers at all times of the year are driven to repair to London to sell their cloths to pay the wool grower and the poor whom they set on work, and if this restraint should continue, then, except at shipping times, the drapers must be their sole chapmen, who are no way able to buy half the cloths that are brought to London, being the great market of the kingdom, the drapers of London being not 140 families and the worst and hardest paymasters. Show the inconvenience of this dependency and pray the Lords to discharge the said restraint and to grant the same liberty for all as hath been accustomed. [Signed by twenty-two petitioners. 1 p.]
[Jan. ?] 131. Petition of Francis Gamull, mayor of Chester, to the Council. By the writ for levying ship-money, it is required that petitioner should cause such moneys as should be assessed in that city to be duly levied. The cause for the Chester waterworks, which concerns petitioner in a great part of his inheritance, is appointed to be heard at the Council Board the first sitting after Candlemas day next. Prays that either they would dispense with him that he may, without prejudice to the King's service, attend the hearing of his own cause, or else that they would appoint some other time in Easter term next for hearing the same. [1 p.]
[Jan.] 132. Petition of the Company of Watermen on the Thames to the same. Have a heavy assessment laid upon them towards setting forth the shipping. Conceiving by the intention of the writ, and their hourly expectation to be called into that employment, that they should be freed, and especially in so hard a time as this they pray the Council to take their disability into consideration and to grant them some relief. [½ p.]
[Jan. ?] 133. Petition of Richard Harris and John Warde to the same. Have been prisoners in the Fleet for three weeks by their command, only for that some rubbish was laid in Covent Garden near the ground of Lord Wimbledon, and not removed in due time. Pray for their discharge or for the warden to take bond so that they may go abroad with a keeper. [¾ p.]
[Jan. ?] 134. Latin poem by William Baker written on occasion of the Thames being at this time frozen over. It is entitled "Descriptio Brumæ et intensissimi Januario mense frigoris, quo Thamesis omnino congelata fuit, 1634." It commences—
"Jam brevis extremum cursu signaverat arcum
Phæbus, et exiguam lucis concesserat orbi
Usuram et torpor nudis insederat arvis;"
and concludes—
"Hæc rerum facies inamænum fecerat orbem,
Et plebem impulerat varios exquirere ludos
Temperiem Brumæ; cui det finemque, modumque,
A cujus nutu dependent omnia, Numen." [3 pp.]
Jan. 135. Brief collection of all ships of 100 tons and upwards with the seamen, fishermen, and watermen, belonging to several ports in England, taken in February 1628-9, to which is added the number of ships built and repaired since that survey and what number of men are requisite to man all his Majesty's ships and pinnaces at present designed for service at sea. The totals are of men required for service on the coast 7,680, and for remote service 8,480. [14 pp.]
Jan. 136. Copy of the same, with the additions and alterations made in the handwriting of Nicholas. [14 pp.]