BHO

Charles I - volume 327: June 20-30, 1636

Pages 1-38

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles I, 1636-7. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1867.

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June 20-30, 1636

June 20. Petition of Captain John Millward to the King. His Majesty having granted his protection to petitioner and his son, to prevent the tearing their estates in sunder by violent courses, petitioner presented himself and son and both their estates to the consideration of his creditors, who appointed Messrs. Langham, Cockaine, Gibson, and Lowe to examine the same. They certified that the utmost which the estate would produce was 10s. in the pound. This composition some of his creditors refuse to accept, 62 agreeing and about 25 refusing, by reason whereof petitioner cannot give security to his sureties, receive in any debts, or give satisfaction to such creditors as have subscribed, his estate being liable in future times to be called back again. Prays his Majesty so far to protect him in his estate that he may dispose thereof to such of his creditors as will be content to accept thereof according to the said agreement. [12/3 p.] Underwritten,
i. Reference to Lord Keeper Coventry, Lord Treasurer Juxon, the Earl of Dorset, and Lord Cottington, to mediate with petitioner's creditors. Hampton Court, 20th June 1636. [Book of Petitions. Vol. cccxxiii., p. 34. ⅓ p.]
June 20.
[Hampton Court.]
1. Order of the King in Council, on a petition of the hackney coachmen of London, who sued to be made a corporation, and that 100 of them might have liberty, notwithstanding the proclamation, to work with their coaches in the city and suburbs, for which they offered to pay his Majesty 500l. per annum, and to let their coaches at moderate and certain rates. His Majesty not only rejected the petition, but declared that the proclamation should be put in execution. [Draft. ¾ p.]
June 20.
Hampton Court.
2. Order of Council. Taking into consideration the inconveniences that happen by Hundreds having been granted to private persons, whereby the sheriffs have not requisite assistance by the bailiffs of such hundreds for execution of writs, it was ordered, that the Attorney-General should take care that no such grant be thenceforth passed, and should also bring quo warrantos against lords of hundreds passed since the 12th James I. [Copy. ¾ p.]
June 20.
[Hampton Court.]
3. Order of Council on petition of Benjamin Blaxton, clerk, showing that upon actions of debt he had been prisoner in the Fleet two years, before which time much money was due to him upon specialties from Philip Bull, merchant, deceased, and Elizabeth, his relict, upon whose complaint it was ordered that petitioner should not be discharged from the Fleet till he gave bond, with sureties, to the clerk of the Council, to stand to such order as the Court of Requests should make, which order he being willing to obey, now besought that he might have leave with his keeper to go abroad to do the same. It was ordered accordingly, and that Blaxton, giving bond according to the former order, should be set at liberty. [Draft. ¾ p.]
June 20.
Hampton Court.
4. The Council to the Justices of the Peace for the rapes of Lewes and Bramber, Sussex. Great inconveniences have arisen by the excessive number of maltsters, by means whereof much waste of grain has been occasioned, and scarcity of bread corn, besides sundry abuses, as buying barley on the ground before it be cut, whereby the markets are forestalled, and malting at unseasonable times of the year, whereby it becomes unwholesome. For reformation, his Majesty has resolved to lessen the number of maltsters, and reduce them under government by incorporating in every county some able persons who shall be allowed of, and to restrain the rest. The persons addressed are to send for all the maltsters within their two rapes, and to let them know his Majesty's intentions therein, acquainting them with certain articles inclosed, and certifying the names of such as are desirous to be conformable, who are to address themselves to the Council for further directions. [Copy. 1 p.] Pre-written,
4. i. Copy of the articles above mentioned to have been enclosed in the preceding letter. 1. No person to buy corn but in open market. 2. No brewer or person using any other trade to malt. 3. No maltster to malt in June, July, or August. 4. No maltster to buy malt to sell again. 5. None to malt who are not members of the intended corporations. 6. None to be admitted into the corporations without bringing a certificate of the size of their cisterns or steeping vats. [¾ p.] Underwritten,
4. ii. Notes of the several persons in Kent, Hants, Sussex, and Surrey to whom letters similar to that calendared above were addressed. [¾ p.]
June 20.
Hampton Court.
5. The same to Montjoy, Earl of Newport. To supply the garrison of Portsmouth with two lasts of powder, and match proportionable, together with 200 shovels. [Copy. ¾ p.]
June 20.
Hampton Court.
6. The same to the Sheriff of Middlesex. The Earl of Dorset has acquainted them, that one Smith has lately erected a house near Drury Lane, suddenly, and for the most part by stealth in the night, not only contrary to proclamation, but to the command of the said Earl. Require the sheriff to commit the said Smith to prison, and also to demolish the said house, and to detain Smith in prison until the house be demolished. [Draft. 1 p.]
June 20.
Hampton Court.
7. The Council to the Sheriff of Essex. Understands there are bailiffs of liberties in Essex (where the bailwicks are granted out of the crown), that refuse to execute the warrants of the sheriff issued for the shipping business. He is to require the bailiffs to execute such warrants as he shall issue for that service, and if any of them refuse, he is to bind them to appear before the Board to answer such contempt, or, if they refuse to be bound, to commit them to prison. [Draft. ¾ p.]
June 20.
Hampton Court.
8. The same to all Mayors, Sheriffs, Bailiffs, Constables, Innkeepers and others. Lady Stanley, with her children and servants, are about to take their journey to West Chester, and by reason of the present danger of sickness it is to be feared that some impediments may be given them upon the way. She and her followers are to be provided with convenient lodging and other necessaries, paying for the same such rates as are usual. [Draft. ½ p.]
June 20. 9. Minute, for entry on the Council Register, of five close warrants to the sheriffs of cos. Surrey, Oxford, Hertford, Northampton, and Buckingham, to attend the Lords upon Friday then next at 8'clock in the morning. [¼ p.]
June 20. Similar minute, of a warrant to the Sheriff of Middlesex, to attend the board on the morrow, being Tuesday, at 1 o'clock in the afternoon. [Written on the same sheet of paper as the preceding. 3 lines.]
June 20. 10. The like, of a pass for Robert Curdon of London, gentleman, to go into France for two months. [½ p.]
June 20.
London.
11. Sir Thomas Aston, Sheriff of co. Chester, to Nicholas. Is not able to give Nicholas the particular account required of the charge of the ship-money on every division in co. Chester. The county being charged 1,500l. more than usually it has been rated at in proportion with Lancashire and Staffordshire (which was complained of at the Council table); and the country having been at 7,000l. accidental charge, which had been levied in the ordinary way of taxes the same year; therefore, to appease the discontent of the country, he was constrained to raise a third part of the sum on particular men's personal estates, which brought the commonalty, who had borne the sole burden of the former charges, to pay the rest with contentment. But this being a way much feared by the country to be a dangerous precedent, he was obliged to assemble at meetings all the principal men of every township and procure them to make returns of the persons most able to pay to this service, and ultimately to leave the returns of the money collected with the justices, that they might see that the country had not been injured by raising too much, neither he nor the head constables having any copies of the same. By these means he made up the amount with good content to the country, which is the best account he can give. The other two parts were raised by an ancient tax which they call "the mise," which for many ages has been paid at the creation of every Prince of Wales, and according to which all charges are usually paid by the country. This is the rule most pleasing, because accustomed, but is shown to be unequal in respect of the change of times since it was rated. [1 p.]
June 20.
His Majesty's Fort [near Plymouth.]
12. George Bagg to Sec. Windebank. The enclosed examinations will give the Secretary knowledge that there are four sail of Turks upon that coast, who have taken five fisher-boats of Looe, as they were fishing in the deeps between England and Ireland, and in them 30 persons. Three more of the same place are suspected likewise to be lost, for there are 18 sail of that town come home from the same voyage who report that they saw five fishing boats floating upon the sea with never a person in them, nor sail to their yards, for which reason they could not bring them home, and further, that the three that are wanting had made an end of their fishing voyage, which gives the more cause of fear that they are likewise taken. At St. Keverne and Helford, near Falmouth, there were seven more fisher-boats taken by the Turks on Thurday last. Lamentable complaints of widows and children. Has sent copies of the examinations to the Lord Admiral at sea by the Mary Rose, which resolves, if possible, to set sail that day. [1 p.] Enclosed,
12. i. Examination of Philip Harris of Looe, Cornwall, fisherman. At this season of the year, divers boats of Looe make a fishing voyage between England and Ireland in the deep, where were this year about 27 or 28 sail, of which those that on Sunday last came home (being in all 19 sail), report that five of their company were taken by the Turk, and their men, being six or seven in each boat, were carried away, and only the five boats, without sails or anything else in them, left floating on the water. Further, the company report, that four sail of Turks lately took a bark of Bristol with 30 passengers in her, bound for Ireland, besides two boats coming out of Kinsale, and carried every person of them away. [¾ p.]
12. ii. Examination of Richard Plummer, master of a barge of Plymouth called the Margery. On Wednesday night last he sailed in the said barge, out of Plymouth, with three others to St. Keverne, Cornwall, and arrived there on Thursday morning, where he heard it credibly reported, with sorrowful complaint, and lamentable tears of women and children, that on the 15th instant three fisher-boats belonging to St. Keverne, three others of Helston, and one more of Mollan [Mullion] and about 50 men in them, being on the coast fishing near Black Head, between Falmouth and the Lizard, not three leagues off the shore, were taken by the Turks, who carried both men and boats away. During the time of his abode at St. Keverne, which was from Thursday till Sabbath-day then following, there was no news heard of either men or boats, so that it goes for an absolute truth thereabouts, that they were all surprised by the Turks and carried away. [1 p.]
June 20.
London.
13. Peter Richaut to Sec. Windebank. By the last post he had notice from Signor Spinola of Genoa, that he had paid to Windebank's son 300 pieces of eight, which make 67l. 10s., and had given him credit at Florence for 600 pieces of eight, and to that purpose he sent Richaut a bill of exchange drawn by Windebank's son on his father. Richaut forwarded the bill and a letter to the Secretary by Lord Maltravers, who says that Windebank answered that the money was not then paid. Richaut marvels at this, thinks there must be some mistake, and beseeches the Secretary to write to him what his son says. Incloses Spinola's letter which came with the bill. Has not for a long time been more troubled than by this contradiction. The bearers are some of the merchants who are interested in the goods of Robert Adams; they will declare to the Secretary in what danger of confiscation English goods are in Zealand. [1¾ p.]
June 20.
Portsmouth.
14. John Goodwin to Nicholas. Prays Nicholas to move the Lords how he shall be satisfied for the charge for men to watch at night and to keep the ships by day; he means the Holland man-ofwar and the Dunkirk frigate. He is at 5l. or 6l. charges already, and what will come more he knows not. He sent Nicholas a letter by the packet that he sent to Sir Henry Marten. [Seal with arms. 1 p.]
June 20.
Westminster.
15. Jo[hn] Castle to the same. About a fortnight since, he received letters from Sir Henry Marven [Mervin] which came in the packet to Nicholas. The writer also sent letters to Nicholas's house to take the course of the next that Nicholas should send to "my Lord" [the Earl of Northumberland]. Wishes to know whether he has other letters directed to the writer; and if none, then where the fleet is, and when Nicholas is next to send any packet towards them. [Seal with arms. ¾ p.]
June 20. 16. Statement of Eiday Suttliff, wife of Thomas Suttliff, of Kingston-upon-Thames, innholder, that on Monday the 13th instant, James Knowles, an officer of Kingston, with a gentleman, came to the house of her husband to take post horses. She told them that the horses which were in a certain stable were the King's messengers' horses, and bade them take heed that they did not more than they could justify, nevertheless the horse of Mr. Peachy, one of his Majesty's messengers, was by them taken post. [¾ p.] Underwritten,
16. i. Statement of Anthony Langley, of Kingston, cooper, in confirmation of the preceding. [¼ p.]
June 20. 17. See "Returns made by Justices of Peace."
June 21. Petition of Thomas Southcoate, and of Sir Popham Southcoate, his son and heir, gentlemen of his Majesty's Privy Chamber, to the King. One of petitioners has been very much wronged by his grandfather who had disinherited him of lands worth 20,000l., which should have descended to him, but were alienated to the heirs of his grandfather's third wife. Under tuition of his father-in-law, petitioner, who had married very young, commenced a suit in the court of wards against his grandfather's eldest son by his third wife, but his guardian being weary of law, wrought with the friends of petitioner's halfuncle to compose all differences by an award, which being consented unto by petitioner, then ignorant and overruled, he was defeated of his inheritance. Notwithstanding his half-uncle, who had thus secured to himself an estate of at least 2,500l. a year, had continued to vex petitioner with unjust suits, and so had broken the award, but pretends to have a bond against petitioner to defend himself. Being doubtful to run the hazard of a suit in law, petitioner prays a reference to some of the Privy Council, to determine a course for his redress. [1⅓.] Underwritten,
i. Reference to Lord Treasurer Juxon, the Earls of Manchester, Pembroke and Montgomery, and Dorset, to determine these differences. Hampton Court, 21st June 1636. [Book of Petitions. Vol. cccxxiii, p. 36. ¼ p.]
June 21. Petition of Andrew Hele, to the same. Walter Hele, petitioner's grandfather, had issue two sons, Eliz[eus] and Nicholas, which last died leaving petitioner and a brother, Thomas, his only issue by Christian his wife. On the death of Walter Hele, petitioner's grandfather, his lands descended to his son Eliz[eus], who having issue by Mary his first wife, Walter Hele, his son, after the death of the said Mary intermarried with Alce the widow of Nicholas Eveleigh. After which marriage Walter, the grandson, about fifteen years since died of the stone in the bladder. Alce having no issue by her husband Eliz[eus], and fastening her eye upon his estate and finding petitioner and his brother in her way, persuaded her husband "without any colour of ground" that petitioner's mother was a witch and had bewitched his son by his first wife, Walter Hele, to death, whereby the said Alce caused her husband, being 76 years old, to disinherit petitioner and consign his lands to John Maynard and others to charitable uses. In January last Eliz[eus] died, leaving unto his said wife 600l. per annum during her life, and 10,000l. in personal estate. Petitioner, who is the next rightful heir both to Walter and Eliz[eus] Hele, prays relief and a reference to Archbishop Laud and Lord Keeper Coventry. [1½ p.] Underwritten,
i. Reference as prayed to Archbishop Laud and Lord Keeper Coventry. Hampton Court, 21st June 1636. [Book of Petitions. Vol. cccxxiii, p. 38. 1½ p.]
June 21.
Hampton Court.
18. Order of the King in Council concerning the Archbishop of Canterbury's right to visit the universities metropolitically. After a statement of the case, and of the principal objections, with the counter-evidence in support of the asserted right, his Majesty adjudged the right of visiting both the universities, as universities, and the chancellors, scholars, their servants and all others enjoying the privilege of the said universities, to belong to the Archbishops and metropolitical church of Canterbury, and that the universities should be from time to time obedient thereunto. The order was to be drawn up by the King's counsel and to be put under the broad seal. The universities were exempted from episcopal and archidiaconal visitation, and it was declared that the Archbishop might visit on any emergent cause, but that after his first visitation, he should not visit on any such cause unless the same were first made known to his Majesty and approved by him. [Copy. In the first page are some words introduced in the handwriting of Archbishop Laud, respecting the unsatisfactory nature of the evidence adduced against his claim. The paper bears this endorsement by Nicholas: "This was showed to his Majesty, and the additions [in] it were by his Majesty's especial command." 2½ pp.]
June 21. 19. Copy of the foregoing Order in Council. [4 pp.]
June 21. 20. Minutes of the same order. [Endorsed by Archbishop Laud, and with alterations thought to be in the handwriting of Sir Edward Littleton, the Solicitor-General, afterwards Lord Keeper. 2 pp.]
June 21. 21. Copy of a draft of the same, but ending with the affirmation of the archiepiscopal right, and containing a suggested addition for limiting the power of visitation to such matters only as were of ecclesiastical cognizance and jurisdiction. [2¼ pp.]
June 21. 22. Copy, but without the addition suggested in the last article. [2¾ pp.]
June 21. 23. Copy of another draft of the same. Here the addition suggested in the preceding article but one was introduced into the draft, and power was given to the Archbishop to visit triennially or otherwise upon emergent cause. [4¾ pp.]
June 21. 24. Copy of another draft, which is endorsed as "the last draft." It agrees with the first copy calendered, with the exception of the words finally introduced by the Archbishop upon the King's authority, as stated above. [2½ pp.]
June 21. 25. Draft of the clauses finally adopted for exempting the universities from episcopal visitation, and limiting the archiepiscopal power after a first visitation to the case of emergent cause. [Stated by Nicholas in an endorsement to be "Dr. Duck's alteration to be inserted into Mr. Solicitor's draft." ¾ p.]
June 21. 26. Suggestions made to [the Earl of Holland, Chancellor of Cambridge,] for alterations to be made in the order as drawn up but before it was actually passed by the King. They are made in the interest of the universities. [1 p.]
June 21.
Hampton Court.
27. The Council to the Sheriff of co. Hereford. Of the sum required of that county for ship-money, there is still unpaid 355l. 9s. A fleet of ships, prepared with the moneys of that and other counties being already at sea, and other ships prepared to second that fleet and forthwith to go forth, the service may abide no further delay. He is therefore required forthwith to levy and pay over the 355l. 9s. And if his predecessor has been short in his proceedings, the person addressed is to require him instantly to perform whatsoever is behind. Where he finds any persons (of what quality soever) that refuse to make payment, he is to proceed to levy the same by distress or otherwise, according to the writ and instructions. Lastly, if any constables refuse to do their duties, he is to bind them over to answer their neglect at the board, and if any refuse to enter into such bond, he is to commit them till they shall perform their duties in this behalf, and to take care in the meantime that notwithstanding their refusal the levying of the money proceed by such others as he shall appoint. [Draft. Corrected by the Lord Keeper, and endorsed "Minute of 33 letters to the sheriffs of several counties." 1½ p.]
June 21. 28. Fair copy of the form of the above letter, with memorandum underwritten of the counties to the sheriffs of which it was addressed. [2 pp.]
June 21. 29. Another list of the counties to the sheriffs of which the above letters were sent, with an underwritten receipt of the several letters, (there being one letter only for the sheriff of cos. Cambridge and Huntingdon) to be sent to the sheriffs, dated the 22nd instant, signed "Jo. Graunt." [1 p.]
June 21. 30. The Council to Sir John Bramston, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench. Approve his opinion concerning John Hodges, and pray him to cause bond to be taken as he suggests, and to send down certain enclosed papers to the justices of peace of co. Somerset, and require them to bind over Giles Baker to give evidence. [Draft. 1 p.]
June 21. 31. Minute for entry on the Council Register of a letter to the Lieutenant of the Tower to receive into his custody Thomas Lord Wentworth, son to the Earl of Cleveland, and to keep him prisoner till further order from his Majesty or the Board. [½ p.]
June 21. 32. Similar minute of a pass for Sir Francis Lower to go into the United Provinces for one year, and to take with him one servant. [½ p.]
June 21. 33. Minute of similar entry that John Lockier and John Mainwaring of Weymouth, merchants, having been sent for by warrant, this day tendered their appearance, but are to remain in the custody of the messenger until discharged. [4 lines.]
June 21. Draft minute for entry on Council Register of five warrants for David Scott, John Peniall, Hugh Peachy, Thomas Davis, and Nicholas Pye to be lodged and received, from time to time, as they shall have occasion to travel up and down upon his Majesty's service. [See Vol. cccxxvi, No. 79. ¼ p.]
June 21.
Chichester.
34. Kenrick Edisbury to Nicholas. Being at Portsmouth to settle the navy business for this summer, he rode into the woods to view the Earl of Southampton's timber, which for the quantity is the best parcel that ever he saw, and by reason of the late extreme drought his Majesty's purveyor has been very diligent to get it carried to the waterside for lading, on a promise to the carters of payment from the country, exceeding his Majesty's usual price of 5d. a mile, which is to be levied by the justices of peace. Hopes to have the rest of the bargains carried by Allhallowtide, and with that view returns a letter to the justices of peace of Hants, to be altered from 1,700 to 2,000 loads at 3s. 6d. a load. Hampshire having been at great charge in carriage of timber from "Alsholt" these late years, being 20 miles distant from the water, and stood the country at a mark a load above the King's price, it is desired that Wilts and Dorset may be joined in contribution. Is in treaty for a further parcel of 450 loads which is already at the waterside at Fareham and Brusselldon [Bursledon] river. Philip Holland, cook in the Anne Royal, "took his bane" when the ship sank, and shortly after died. Recommends Hercules Price for the place. Sir John Pennington, with the St. Andrew alone, anchored off St. Helen's point on Sunday night. It is supposed he means to ply westward. [Seal with arms. 1½ p.]
June 21.
London.
35. Jo[hn] Fish to the same. Entreats Nicholas that, to enable the writer to perfect his accounts with the [Spanish] Resident before his departure, Nicholas will cause his man Francis to run over his books from the peace in 1630, and make a catalogue of all the Spanish businesses that have passed through Nicholas's hands. Also to send the writer for the Resident the warrants for delivery of the ship sent in by the Earl of Northumberland, and those for wafting the Dunkirk ship towards Spain. The bearer, who is sent for them by the Resident, will pay Nicholas's fees for them. [2½ pp.]
June 21.
Boston.
36. Sir Anthony Thomas to the same. The delinquents of the fens that were sent for by the messengers, John Santey, and Jasper Heiley, are all brought up, save two. Beseeches Nicholas to assist the just complaints of the undertakers, which concern Mr. Surveyor, from whom Nicholas will have information which he has received from Mr. Smith, his deputy there. Had come up himself to attend the Lords, but that he is forced to stay and solicit the justices of the country for the qualification [sic] of a seditious people that are like to rebel if order be not taken against them. P.S.—Their witnesses cannot possibly be all there before Sunday next. Prays Nicholas to stay proceedings till they come. They are to attend the justices there on Friday next. Begs him to speak with Mr. Surveyor General. [Seal with arms (?) ¾ p.]
June 21.
Wapping.
37. Master and Wardens of the Shipwrights' Company [of Rotherhithe] to Nicholas. Many difficulties yet remaining in settling their corporation, and reducing into conformity the members thereof, and foreseeing the inconvenience of too much lenity to an unruly multitude, they present some part of their present interruptions and request assistance. They have had much hindrance by the boatmakers, some of whom are come in, but so as that they are still labouring to recede both from hand and oath. Herein the Lords declared for a general obedience to their charter. If Nicholas would conceive an order according to the proceeding at the two last hearings before the Lords, they doubt not to determine speedily that difference. In payment of the moneys imposed by Sir Henry Marten, they find much slackness, and in some a wilful refusal. Some of these they now present, beseeching direction to a messenger for their apprehension. In the summons to enter bond not to serve a foreign prince, they find a very great slighting of their officers' warning, scarce one in twenty appearing, For remedy, if Nicholas will assist them, either by warrant dormant to Mr. Smith, or by letters to Sir Henry Marten, they will be enabled with comfort and good success to attend this service, which they protest is only in obedience to his Majesty, and to give his Majesty and the state a good account of their proceedings. [1 p.]
June 21./July 1.
London.
38. H. Tayller to same. On Sunday last he petitioned Sec. Windebank for an order from the Lords of the Admiralty to Capt. Stewart, that on his arrival at the Downs he should convey the Marquis of Mirabell to Dunkirk, which order the writer would fain carry down beforehand himself, that he might have it ready to present to the captain in case the marquis come in his Majesty's ship, of which the writer is now [not?] wholly certain. Begs Nicholas to help him in procuring this most singular favour, which would be such to the writer, for the particular obligations he has to the marquis. [Nicholas has endorsed "Mr. Tayller lies in Holborn, near the Feathers tavern." Seal with arms. 1 p.]
June 21.
His house in High Holborn.
39. Certificate of Thomas Sheppard, Justice of Peace for Middlesex, that Sir Thomas Aston, of Aston, co. Chester, and John Aston, his brother, had that day taken the oath of allegiance. [Endorsed "A certificate for a pass to France for three years." Seal with arms. ½ p.]
June 22.
Hampton Court.
40. The Council to the Governors, Wardens, and Company of the Artificers and Tradesmen within the suburbs of London and Westminster. Having considered the great number of artificers strangers that are now in and about the cities of London and Westminster, and holding it very convenient that there be some order observed in the admittance of them, and that all such of them be not admitted as shall desire it, the persons addressed are to forbear to admit any artificer stranger until further order from the board. [Copy. ¾ p.]
June 22. 41. Minute for entry on the Council Register, of the appearance before the board of James Knowles, constable, of Kingston-uponThames. [¼ p.]
June 22.
The Triumph, over against Plymouth.
42. Algernon, Earl of Northumberland, to the Lords of the Admiralty. On the 16th inst., the wind coming fair to carry them out of Plymouth Sound, by 5 o'clock that morning, they set sail. The weather has been extremely ill ever since that time. The day after they spent their fore-topsail yard, and the Swallow her fore-topmast the day following. From the land news was brought them the other day, that some Turks came out of the Irish seas upon the coasts of England whilst the fleet put into Plymouth, and took above 30 persons out of fisher-boats, near the Manacles. So soon as they had notice of it, they took the best care they could to meet with them, but had not the good fortune, for the Turks made no stay in those parts. He has sent the Adventure and a Whelp to seek after them towards St. George's Channel and about the entrance into Severn, which is a place they frequent. Does not see how they will at all times be able to prevent such accidents, for the Turks can see the King's great ships at a further distance than they can discern them, and being good sailers, avoid them at pleasure. This morning he received the Lord's letter of the 14th inst., and with it hears from Plymouth that an Irish bark brings news of the French fleet being passed towards Dunkirk, and that he met them over against Cane [Caen] in Normandy. The Earl thinks himself very unhappy in missing them, but he hopes within two days to find them. Since morning they are thus far advanced from off the Lizard, and are making all haste towards the east. Desires that he may receive his Majesty's and the Lords' directions at Dover or the Downs. [2 pp.]
June 22. 43. Certificate of Thomas Earl of Cleveland, that this day John Tracy, son of Sir Robert Tracy, of Gloucester, voluntarily took the oath of allegiance before him. [⅓ p.]
June 22. 44. Protest of the Provost and Fellows of Queen's College, Oxford, of their right and interest in the election of the Principal of St. Edmund's Hall, in that university. The protestors contend that they only have the right of such election, founded not only upon a charter of the university of the 1st year of Queen Elizabeth, but also upon a prescription of almost 100 years, and that such right will remain notwithstanding any declaration, decree, or statute to the contrary. [Latin. Copy, authenticated by John French, notary public and registrar of the University of Oxford. Endorsed by Archbishop Laud as received by him on the 31st August 1636; "made," the Archbishop adds, "when the new statutes were sent down." 1¾ p.]
June 23. 45. The University of Oxford to the King, who is addressed as "augustissime regum et hominum divinissime." Return thanks for their statutes, and for the illustrious delegates or commissioners whom his Majesty had sent to lay before them the book of statutes and the royal confirmation thereof under the great seal. [Latin. 1 p.]
June 23. Petition of Sir Cornelius Vermuyden, and the rest of the partners in the drainage of Hatfield Chase, to the King. At the time of petitioners' contracting with his Majesty for draining the level of Hatfield, it was conceived that the manor of Finningley belonged to his Majesty, and it was agreed that all the lands allowed to the undertakers were to be held in free and common socage, but when petitioner Vermuyden was engaged in that undertaking it was found that Finningley had commons which were drained and did not belong to his Majesty, so that he was constrained at a very high rate to purchase that manor, out of which there was allotted to the undertakers for drainage, 852 acres. The undertakers have covenants to have their lands in socage, but the manor of Finningley is held by knight's service, so that their contract cannot be fulfilled unless his Majesty please that the tenure be in socage as was at first intended. Prays licence to the lord of the manor of Finningley to grant the same accordingly. [1¼ p.] Underwritten,
i. Reference to Lord Treasurer Juxon and Lord Cottington, calling to them the Attorney-General, and if they find Finningley to be contained in his Majesty's contract and intended to be passed in socage, to give order for a grant as desired. Hampton Court, 23rd June 1636. [Book of Petitions, Dom. Car. I., Vol. cccxxiii., p. 41.]
June 23.
London.
46. Peter Richaut to Sec. Windebank. The Attorney-General yesterday sent for Richaut, and declared that he had presented to his Majesty the grievances of the adventurers in the fishing of the Earl Marshal's Association, and that the King sent for Windebank and gave him directions to acquaint the Council for the Fishings, that they should consider of a way for redress. This morning the writer has been with Lord Maltravers, who signified his pleasure to send the bearer, the adventurers' officer, John Lawrence, to Windebank, to desire a meeting of the Council for the Fishings to-morrow afternoon at Hampton Court, at which time Lord Maltravers, the Attorney-General, and others will be there. The names of the Council for the Fishings he encloses; Nicholas is their clerk. [Seal with arms, imperfect. 1 p.] Enclosed,
46. i. Names of the Council for the Fishings: for the English, the Lord Treasurer, the Earl Marshal, the Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, Lord Cottington, and Secs. Coke and Windebank; for the Scots, the Duke of Lennox, the Marquis of Hamilton, the Earl Morton, and the Earls of Roxburgh and Stirling, and Sir John Hay. [½ p.]
June 23.
Southwell.
47. Archbishop Neile of York to Archbishop Laud. Thanks fo Laud's great love and favour shown to the church of York at the hearing of the cause betwixt the church and city. Prays him also to present to his Majesty an acknowledgment of his goodness to the same church at his ordering of that cause. The drainers of the level of Hatfield Chase do not employ Englishmen in husbanding, but altogether Frenchmen, and a few Dutchmen, who are already become a plantation of some 200 families, and more are daily expected. There is at present a ship full at Hull, and another at Harwich. This new plantation has set up among themselves the form and discipline of the French church. A barn of Sir Philiberto Vernatti's is the place they use for their church, and thither the whole company resort on Sundays; they baptize in a dish after their own manner, and administer the sacrament after their homely fashion of sitting. For their government they have their consistory of the minister, three lay elders, and three deacons. The barn wherein they perform their divine service is on the very edge of Lincolnshire, adjoining Yorkshire; by advantage whereof they pretend licence given them by the Bishop of Lincoln non in scriptis, sed verbo tenus, to have their exercises of religion according to the form of the French church, as it is permitted in other parts of the realm. Their minister, who has been with them these two years, is Peter Bontemps, admitted into the ministry, as he says, by the French ministers at Leyden; the writer has spoken with him, and from his mouth had the effect of that he has here written. He sends a letter of Bontemps which he wrote to the sharers of that level, whereby Archbishop Laud will see how it is endeavoured to bring the form of the French church into England, which the writer will ever to the uttermost of his power oppose, and trusts his Majesty will uphold him therein, and enable him to bring them to the practice of the Book of Common Prayer in the French tongue, whereof they may have as many books already printed as they desire. The writer had made known to the Council that Sir Philiberto Vernatti had moved him that the strangers might build a chapel for divine service, whereto the writer had answered that he would afford them all lawful favour, so as they would conform themselves to the Church of England, otherwise not. At which time he also moved the Lords that if Sir Philiberto should move them to any other purpose, they would second the writer in his resolution and answer, of which the Lords well allowed, and he now beseeches Archbishop Laud to move his Majesty that neither Sir Philiberto nor any other may obtain anything to the contrary. Upon the answer that he gave Sir Philiberto, he made recourse to the Bishop of Lincoln, and perhaps obtained as much as is aforesaid. They have burned bricks and are preparing materials to build a chapel in Lincoln diocese, to which all the inhabitants of the level might repair, but the writer will prohibit those that live in his diocese to go thither. He is very confident that Laud favours him in this resolution, and will assist him in constraining them to conform to the Church of England, and he leaves to his Majesty's consideration with what conveniency such a plantation should be permitted of strangers, men of very mean condition, that may become as vipers nourished in the bosom, that take the bread out of the mouths of English subjects by overbidding them in rents of land, and doing more work for a groat than an Englishman can do for sixpence. If Laud knew in what cottages these people live, and how they fare, he would wonder at it. The writer's brother, Dr. Newell, in a late letter signified Archbishop Laud's desire that the writer would provide 500l., to be paid in Yorkshire for lead for St. Paul's church, to be repaid in London; if the time and place for payment be signified, the amount shall be ready on a few days warning. The writer and his whole family are in health and safety; a rumour to the contrary was untrue. Dr. Duncon is now at Winchester; on his return the writer will be glad to hear of Laud's good health, and to receive answer concerning the French plantation in the level of Hatfield Chase. [4 pp.] Enclosed,
47. i. Peter Bontemps, pastor of the Gallo-Belgian church, to the proprietors of land in the level of Hatfield Chase. That district being inhabited by natives of France and Belgium, of whom the greater number are ignorant of English, it is necessary that they should be allowed to worship according to the French church, as was promised them, and on which account he had been called out of Holland. Propounds to the landholders that if they intend to encourage the French church, it is necessary— 1. To set apart a place for worship. 2. That according to the King's grant, the ministers should not be subject to any prosecution. 3. That a stipend should be settled for the minister, to be paid in common by the participants in the drainage. 13th June 1636. [Latin. 1 p.]
June 23.
Croydon.
48. Archbishop Laud to the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury. Now they are in one of their general chapters, suggests to them some subjects for amendment. Thinks some of their farms should be visited every year, and that for such service a mark a day, with oats and other corn, is a sufficient allowance, so that the overplus might go to the choir, the dean contributing as well as the receiver. Complaint has been made of a decree made by three or four prebends in the absence of the dean; wishes them to search their register for precedents and confirm or abrogate the decree accordingly. As to the permission for the inferior officers of the church to execute their offices by deputies; thinks such men should be appointed as would execute the offices by themselves, but that in any case a deputy should be approved by the dean and chapter. Suggests a regulation of the practice of the dean, nominating to these meaner offices none but his servants, and reminds them of the King's order against their renewing the leases of premises within the close. [Copy, in the handwriting of William Dell. 1¾ p.]
June 23. 49. Bond of Sir James Pryse, of Maengwyn, co. Merioneth; Sir Andrew Corbett, of Morton, co. Salop; and Robert Corbett, of Homfreston, co. Salop, to Archbishop Laud in 400l., conditioned for payment of 200l. to the Archbishop in the hall of his manor house at Lambeth, on the 30th December 1639, towards the repairs of the west end of St. Paul's Cathedral. [Seals with arms. The Archbishop's receipt endorsed for 100l. paid on 4th December [1639], the other being promised in the following Easter term. 1 p.]
June 23.
[1636 ?]
50. Bill of Edward Brooke for 29l. 0s. 8d., for lights or candles supplied to [Endymion] Porter, between May 1635 and February 1635–6. They are charged at 5s. 10d. the dozen lbs. [1 p.]
June 24. 51. Petition of William Carringham and John Carringham, in behalf of themselves and four orphans more, brothers and sisters, to the King. Petitioners having a gift given them by William Carringham of Albury, Surrey, their uncle, of 90l., to be divided within three months after his death, these six orphans are all under age, unfit for suits, and have no guardians, insomuch that they are likely to lose the said gift by means of Alice Carringham, executrix, who denies to pay them or give security. Pray his Majesty to give power to Sir Ambrose Browne and [Richard] Evelyn, justices of peace of the said county, to hear and determine for the relief of petitioners. [¾ p.] Underwritten,
51. i. Minute of the King's pleasure, that the committees desired, with one other of like quality, to be chosen by the adverse parties, should order and end the complaint according to justice. Hampton Court, 24th June 1636. [¼ p.]
51. ii. Sir Ambrose Browne and Richard Evelyn to the Council. Report that in pursuance of the above reference they summoned Alice Carringham to attend them, and make choice of one of like quality with themselves to join with them in mediating the said difference, all which she refused to do. They heard the complaint of the petitioners, which appears to be true. 7th July 1636. [1 p.]
June 24.
Hampton Court.
52. The Council to Lord Treasurer Juxon and Francis Lord Cottington. Upon the 21st January 1634–5 they signed an order to the late Lord Treasurer and Lord Cottington, for issuing 50l. 8s. 6d. out of the Exchequer to Capt. John Talbot, administrator to Lieutenant Grimshaw, in satisfaction of his arrears, which not being yet paid he has again made suit for the same. Pray them to give order for issuing the same if it be still unpaid. [Draft. 1 p.]
June 24. 53. The same to Francis Earl of Bedford. There are buildings erecting upon his ground in a passage or alley leading from Covent Garden to St. Martin's Lane, not being many feet in breadth. Request him to stay the said buildings until further order. [¾ p.] Underwritten,
53. i. Memorandum that a like letter was written to the Commissioners for Buildings. [2 lines.]
June 24. 54. The Council to the Mayor of Weymouth. John Lockier, late mayor of that town, in the time of his mayoralty did his endeavours for levying the ship-money under the writ issued in 1634, but the obstinacy of divers ill-affected to that service caused 70l. to be in arrear, and he being out of office has not been able to get the same, yet he has paid Sir William Russell the 70l. The person addressed is to take order that out of the moneys levied in that town for that year's service Lockier be reimbursed; and if any refuse to pay the moneys assessed by Lockier, the person addressed is to certify their names that further course may be taken. [Draft. 1½ p.]
June 24.
Hampton Court.
55. The same to the Court of Assistants of the English merchants at Rotterdam. Enclose a petition of the creditors of Henry Vincent, Thomas Skinner, and Daniel Vincent, deceased, wherein they will perceive that 30,000l. is owing to them, and that the greatest part of Vincent and Skinner's estates is in debts and merchandise in Hamburgh, Rotterdam, and other places beyond the seas, as also that with the liking of Vincent and Skinner, they authorized Thomas Clutterbuck to attach, in the hands of Robert Kilvert, all debts, moneys, &c., but Kilvert denied the delivery of the merchandise or giving an account. Request them to call Kilvert before them, and cause him to deliver an account of the estate of Vincent and Skinner, and if he refuse, to return a certificate that further course may be taken. [Draft. 1 p.]
June 24.
Hampton Court.
56. Order of Council. Considering the extraordinary pains taken by Sir Henry Spilman upon sundry occasions for his Majesty's service, the Council conceive that he well deserved a recompence of 300l., and thought fit that his Majesty should be moved therein, and that the Attorney-General prepare a bill for a privy seal. [Draft. ½ p.]
June 24.
Hampton Court.
57. Similar order. The Lords, considering the letters patent granted for sealing purls, cut-works, and bone laces, and that the same casts a heavy burden on divers of his Majesty's poor subjects, and works not that effect for prohibiting foreign commodities as was intended, it was ordered, that the further execution of the same be stayed until further order. [¾ p.]
June 24.
Hampton Court.
58. The like. The Lords having referred to the Solicitor-General a difference between the parishioners of Merton, Surrey, on the one side, and Thomas Hunt on the other, concerning his detaining from the parish half an acre of ground, the Solicitor-General returned his report that Hunt was content the parish should enjoy the land in question as formerly they did, and would give 5l. for the mesne profits, which the churchwardens accepted, but Hunt had not yet made satisfaction thereof. It was ordered that Hunt should be required to pay, not only the 5l. mentioned in the report, but 2l. more for the trouble and charge he had put the parishioners unto. [1 p.] Annexed,
58. i. Affidavit of Robert Marston and John Frickley, both of Merton, that they showed the annexed order to Thomas Hunt, and that he promised and made appointments to pay the said 7l., but has never done so. Sworn 16th May 1637. [½ p.]
June 24. 59. Draft of the same order. [1 p.]
June 24. 60. Minute for entry on the Council Register of a pass for Jaques de Mayerne, son of Sir Theodore Mayerne, Isaac Chouart, and Daniel Treswell, to go to Mons. de Mayerne's house near Geneva, and to take with them two servants. [½ p.]
June [24.]
Hampton Court.
61. The Council to all Mayors, Sheriffs, and other Officers. To permit Capt. Philip Skippon to embark himself, with his wife and four children, two men servants and a maid, at any of his Majesty's ports for their passage into the United Provinces. [= ½ p.]
June 24. Minute for entry on the Council Register of three warrants, viz., to Edmund Barker, George Carter, and William Butts to travel up and down [upon his Majesty's service]. [Written on the back of the preceding paper. ¼ p.]
June 24. The like of similar warrants for Joseph Butler, Simon Wilmott, and Tobias Know. [Ibid. ¾ p.]
June 24. 62. The like of a pass for John Tracy, son of Sir Robert Tracy of co. Gloucester, to travel into foreign parts for three years, with a proviso that he repair not to Rome. [½ p.]
June 24. The like of a similar pass for Sir Thomas Aston, of Aston, co. Chester, and John Aston, his brother, and to take with them three servants. [Written on the preceding paper. ½ p.]
June 24. 63. The like minute for entry, that James Knowles, constable of Kingston, sent for by warrant for taking a messenger's horse post, having given the messenger satisfaction and paid all fees, was discharged. [¼ p.]
June 24. The like of the discharge of John Lockier and John Mainwaring. [Written on the preceding paper. ¼ p.]
June 24. 64. The like of a warrant to Joseph Butler to fetch before the Lords, Edmund Phipps, high constable of Stoke, and Joshua Halsey, constable of Chesham, Bucks. [⅓ p.]
June 24. The like to George Carter, to fetch the constables of Great Hampden of and Dunton, Bucks. [Written on the same paper as the preceding. 1/5 p.]
June 24. The like to Hugh Peachy, to fetch William Fowler of Ippollitts, William Field of Lilley, Thomas Nutting of Baldock, and Robert Watson of Baldock, Herts. [Ibid. 1/5 p.]
June 24. Minute for entry on the Council Register of a close warrant to Sir Peter Temple, to attend the Board at Oatlands on Sunday morning next, the 3rd July (sic). [Written on the same paper as No. 64. 3 lines.]
June 24. The like of a warrant to Edmund Barker, to fetch Robert Beeton, high constable of Hamfordshoe, and John Harryatt, chief constable of the hundred of Higham Ferrers. [Ibid. 5 lines]
June 24. 65. Petition of the Wholesale Tradesmen of London that frequent the two annual fairs at Bristol, to the Council. On 25th July next, one of the usual fairs is held at Bristol, whereunto petitioners resort with their servants and goods for supply of most of the counties of this kingdom and also of Ireland and Wales, at which fair divers of their chapmen and debtors meet (many nowhere else) to be furnished with new credit and pay their old debts. Petitioners have been informed that the Council of Bristol intend, upon pretence of the infection in London, to inhibit both the persons and goods of the petitioners. Pray order that petitioners, bringing a certificate from the Lord Mayor of London that none of their families have been this year infected with the plague, may be permitted to have access as formerly, and as lately they have had both at Exeter and elsewhere. [½ p.] Annexed,
65. i. The reasons of the wholesale men's petition. They set forth the damage it would be to credit if they were debarred this customary mode of receiving their debts, as well as the great hindrance to trade. Many drapers, skinners, leather-sellers, and "upholsters" ride to Bristol (it is stated) to bestow many thousand pounds; but there are petty tradesmen that live in obscure places about the city that go to take a little money, but give no credit; as also many loose people resort thither. [2 pp.] Written under the petition.
65. ii. The Lords holding it requisite that petitioners should not be debarred of their usual trade at the said fairs, unless there be more than ordinary cause, and being not willing to make any express order therein until they see how the infection at London increases or diminishes, remit the consideration of this petition until Sunday next come sen'night. Hampton Court, 24th June 1636. [1 p.]
[June 24.] 66. Petition of the Inhabitants and terre-tenants of Ilchester, Somerset, to the same. Ilchester lies within the hundred of Tintinhull, and was ever rated with the hundred until writs came for ship-money, when they were charged 30l. by themselves, which is above a quarter part more than their proportionable part with the hundred, by reason whereof Sir Henry Berkeley and others have refused to pay without being distrained. Pray the Lords to direct the sheriff that Ilchester may be assessed with the hundred of Tintinhull, as the towns of Taunton and Langport are with the hundreds in which they lie. [½ p.]
June 24. 67. Petition of Henry Isham and John Isham, of London, merchants, to the Council. Petitioners have bought 100 lasts of grain in London, which came from foreign parts. In respect it has lain long upon their hands and is not fit to be vended in this kingdom, they pray licence to transport the same to the United Provinces, paying customs. Underwritten,
67. i. Reference to the Farmers and Officers of the Customs to certify what sorts and proportion of grain brought from foreign parts petitioners have on their hands, and what they conceive fit to be done. Hampton Court, 24th June 1636. Annexed,
67. ii. Reference from the referees above mentioned to the Bakers' Company. Custom House, 30th June 1636.
67. iii. Report of the Bakers' Company. They have viewed several parcels of foreign wheat and rye. It is defective, and not vendible to be spent in London. 1st July 1636.
67. iv. Report of the referees above mentioned. Annex a certificate from the collector inwards that there have been imported 310 quarters of wheat and 400 of rye, which make 71 lasts of foreign corn: also annex certificate from the Bakers' Company. Custom House, 2nd July 1636. [1 p.]
June 24.
Hampton Court.
68. Lords of the Admiralty to Capt. George Carteret, of the Happy Entrance, in the Downs. The abbot Escalia is now at Dunkirk or Brussels expecting a passage for England. Carteret is either to stand over to Dunkirk, or to send some of his Majesty's ships under his command, to bring the said abbot to England. As soon as Carteret or any other captain comes into Dunkirk road, he is to send into the town, and if the abbot shall not be come thither, to send to Brussels to let him understand the cause of the captain's being there. [Admiralty seal. 1 p.]
June 24. 69. Giles Penn to Nicholas. Being with Lord Cottington concerning a relation Penn gave him, touching the suppressing those Moorish pirates of Sallee, his answer was, that the relation was well liked, and was remitted to the Council of War or Admiralty, and he commanded Penn to repair to Nicholas for his assistance to give it despatch. The writer is shortly to go beyond seas, before which he should be glad to do his King and country service in this particular. Doubts not but the charge of sending to Morocco may be excused, and his Majesty's subjects there captives, be brought thence without any cost, either for presents or else by the course he will declare. Nicholas is prayed to direct to him at the sign of the Black Boy, in Ave Maria Lane near St. Paul's, a mercer's house. P.S. Endymion Porter, Mr. Wakerley [Weckherlin], or Sec. Windebank's secretary, can tell Nicholas who the writer is. [1½ p.]
June 24. 70. Robert Corbett, Sheriff of Salop, to the Council. Reports, that on examination, as directed by the Lords, he found the facts to be as stated in the annexed petition of John Weld, whereupon he ordered that Mr. Haughton should restore the cow mentioned in the petition, or pay Mr. Weld 4l.; and also restore 15s. to Roger Moane and John Uxley, unto which order, Mr. Weld, to avoid further trouble, condescended; but Mr. Haughton refuses to perform the same. [1 p.] Annexed,
70. i. The Council to the Sheriff of Salop. Send him petition of John Weld. Require him to take examination of the alleged facts, and if the petitioner has been charged beyond the rateable proportion, to cause repayment to be made. [1 p.] Inclosed,
70. i. i. Petition of John Weld, Town Clerk of London, to the Council. The liberty of Wenlock, in Salop, being rated for the ship-money at 295l., the bailiff thereof rated petitioner for his lands therein at 5l., and the sheriff also rated petitioner for other lands lying out of the liberty at 5l. more, which petitioner paid, although he had been lately rated as a resident in London at 17l., as a full proportion of his estate, and had readily paid the same. Afterwards, the sheriff finding he wanted of his proportion, laid a new tax of 100l. on the county, after the rate of 20s. upon every allotment, being a hundred allotments, and directed his warrant to Francis Haughton, Bailiff of Wenlock, to levy 7l. upon seven allotments within that liberty, of which 7l., Haughton rated 40s. upon petitioner, and 13s. 4d. upon one Thompson, petitioner's household servant, and several other sums upon other petitioner's tenants, and because petitioner's servant, conceiving the bailiff's action unequal, delayed to pay the 40s., the bailiff distrained a cow of petitioner's which cost 5l., and sold her for 4l. Prays them to direct such course, that those who are conformable may not be grieved by unequal rating or partiality. [1 p.]
June 24. 71. William Mansergh, Undersheriff of Westmoreland, to Nicholas. A former letter having miscarried, he certifies, that in the assessment for shipping he proceeded by a general taxation, with a certain sum of money at every pound rent. The county being divided into four wards was thus rated:—Kendal ward 156l., Lonsdale ward 65l., East ward 152l., and West ward 123l.; and he assessed Kendal in 15l., and Appleby in 5l., for that the latter is most miserably poor, and Kendal not rich; and the clergy were assessed but in 18l., in regard of their small benefices, great charge, and the directions of the Council for their favourable usage. The whole assessment was 534l., but very many little sums imposed on the poorer sort, both of the clergy and laity, cannot be gotten in. [¾ p.]
June 24. 72. Edward Fenn to the same. Has not received any moneys on account of the shipping business since the last certificate. [¼ p.]
June 25.
The Triumph, riding in the Downs.
73. Algernon, Earl of Northumberland, to the Lords of the Admiralty. At their arrival there last night, late, they found themselves abused in the advertisments of the French fleet's being come into those parts, yet they came with so much appearance of truth that made him rather lose a few a days in coming thither, than suffer them to lie long in those seas without speaking with them. If it be their pleasure that he attend again his service in the west, he will hasten thither. Dunning's frigate has taken two frigates of Calais: one of them had three guns, four murtherers, and 29 men; the other had but one brass gun and 22 or 23 men. Prays the Lords to send order to Dover, how the men and vessels shall be disposed of. Some of these men have been the principal pillagers both of his Majesty's ketch and other English barks. Some of their ships have almost spent their proportion of victuals. He, yesterday, met Sir John Pennington, and found the Assurance in the Downs. Within a day or two he will give an account of all things there, and send the opinions of the seamen concerning carrying those ships to the northward about the fishing business. [Seal, with crest and garter. 1 p.]
June 25.
The same.
74. The same to Nicholas. Thanks for his last letter, accompanied with a packet from Lord Scudamore. By the preceding letter Nicholas will see how the Earl has been abused in the report of the French fleets. [1 p.]
June 25.
Twitnam [Twickenham] Park.
75. Sir Theodore Mayerne to the same. The passports of the Council to quit England have of late been very much enhanced in price. The writer having lately required one for his son, whom he is sending to his house in Switzerland, Mr. Willis, who serves Nicholas, reckoning at an angel per head, required of the writer's servant 50 shillings, besides a fee to himself for having written it, a further sum which he said was required for the seal, and some gratuities for the porter and others. Having, on many previous occasions never paid more than 20s. for the licence of the Secretary of State, and 10s. for the seal, when the passport was granted by the Council, Nicholas will not think it strange if the writer sends back the passport until he understands from the President or some others of the Council, whether any new imposition has been put upon such matters. If it be so he will pay whatever is necessary. [Seal with arms. 1¾ p. French.]
June 25.
The Office of Ordnance.
76. Edward Sherburne to the same. They are despatching a bark for the Isles of Wight and Scilly, and within two or three days shall put aboard the provisions and munition which they have been ordered to send thither. Prays Nicholas to move the Lords to appoint a convoy for the said bark, and to deliver the warrant to the bearer. The bark is the Grace of Weymouth, of 80 tons; John Beere, master. [1 p.]
June 25.
Westminster.
77. Robert Smyth to the same. Sends various letters left for Nicholas, especially one from Dr. Marten, in answer to which Nicholas is requested to send word what he thinks the Lords will do. Sir Henry Marten came to town yesterday, and purposes to leave again about the middle of next week, and so does Thomas Wyan. If Nicholas thinks requisite, Sir Henry Marten will write letters to the Lords or Nicholas on Dr. Marten's behalf. Mr. Holland has not heard of Sir John Harvey lately. He had offered some security to pay the men's wages in Virginia, but the officer would not yield to that, but wished him to provide either the money or good security there in town to pay the wages on the ship's return. Holland entreats Nicholas to speak to Sir John about this particular if he sees him. Sir William Russell will be in town next week. —PS. Has sent away Nicholas's letters to Capt. Percival. [1 p.]
June 25. 78. Bond of William Hall, of Thimbleby, co. Lincoln, husbandman, in 50l., to the King, conditioned for performance of orders made by the Commissioners of Sewers, in that county, and not to do any act to the prejudice of lands drained by Sir Anthony Thomas. [¾ p.]
June 26.
Croydon.
79. Archbishop Laud to Elizabeth Queen of Bohemia. Answer to her letter of June 1/11, (Vol. cccxxv., No. 18.) Thinks there may be some mistake in her assertion that the Emperor had deluded the Kings, her father and brother, for 16 years. He was scarce ever put home to show himself till now ; but now he must declare one way or other, and then the King will do what shall best beseem his wisdom. If Lord Arundel mistook either Elizabeth or the Prince of Orange, the Archbishop cannot help it; but if the latter said that if the Lower Palatinate were restored freely he might accept it, the King never spoke or thought of less than the Lower Palatinate, nor to take it in any other way. But the Queen adds, that both she and the Prince of Orange think that neither the Emperor, nor Spain, nor Bavaria will do this but upon dishonourable terms; this is the very thing in question until Lord Arundel have his answer. She says that if the recovery be gotten by arms it must be by pieces; but if by treaty, and they mean really, they may as well give all as a part. True; he that is in possession and renders by treaty 'may' give all at once, but there's never a "must" upon him so to do. She denies that she said to the Lord Marshal that she had rather her son were restored by force than by treaty, but she grants that it is all one to her by what way he be restored. Under favour, it cannot be all one to recover by effusion of Christian blood and without it. Hopes and prays that she may have real comfort in the good end of the whole business. [Draft. 2 pp.]
June 26. 80. [Robert Reade to his cousin Thomas Windebank.] Received a letter this day from his cousin Frank, from the fleet which is now at Plymouth Sound, expecting to be affronted by the French and Dutch, which are met, and make about 50 sail. The Dutch have as yet been very mannerly, and it is thought the French will be so too, though the Ambassador and some others of that nation give out that they will not strike sail to us. Our other 10 ships are making ready, which will make a very considerable fleet. Of the news of Flanders he need say nothing; it will be with him sooner than better; yet he does not hear that there is anything yet lost of great consequence. The writer's aunt [Lady Windebank ?] begins to be very impatient of the stay abroad of the person addressed, especially since he has expressed his desire of staying in Spain next winter. [Draft. 1 p.]
June 26.
The Holy Lamb, over against St. Dunstan's Church, in Fleet Street.
81. Capt. Edmund Rossingham to Nicholas. There is a private report in town that the Lord Admiral is fallen very sick at sea, and is coming home. He hopes both these reports are false, but has sent a messenger to be resolved of the truth. [Seal with arms. 1 p.]
June 26. 82. William Nicholl to Sir Humphrey Mildmay, High Sheriff of Essex, at his house at Danbury. Tendered the assessment to John Glasscock, whom Sir Humphrey intended for one of the collectors, but he refused the service, saying that there be divers other John Glasscocks of Stanford Rivers whom it may concern, he not being set down by any special name. Thomas Sumner, of the same parish, also refuses the service by reason of his sight failing him and other impediments. [¼ p.]
June 27. 83. Warrant for payment to the gentlemen ushers, daily waiters, gentlemen ushers, quarter waiters, yeomen ushers, yeomen hangers, groom, porter, and bed carriers to the Queen, for apparelling and making ready of houses for three years ended at Michaelmas 1633, 620l. 12s. 8d.; the same to be paid to Sir Henry Uvedale, Treasurer of the Chamber, to be by him issued to the persons before-mentioned. [14lines on parchment.]
June 27.
Aldersgate Street.
84. Sir Henry Marten to the Lords of the Admiralty. Has received their letters of 24th inst., sending him examinations taken at Portsmouth touching the Bull of Amsterdam and a Dunkirk frigate surprised by her at Helford, and likewise the petition of John Pero, captain of the frigate, with directions to proceed against the Dutch captain. Pero is arrested for robbing the King's subjects, much iron and other things found aboard the frigate being goods of the King's subjects at whose suit Pero is arrested. If therefore the frigate was surprised as alleged, yet it would not be just to restore it to Pero until he makes satisfaction to the King's subjects for the goods of which he had robbed them. The offence of the captain of the Bull of Amsterdam is first the dishonour done to the King in his haven, and 2nd in respect of the Dunkirker, but if Capt. Pero, when he was surprised, was a pirate, that quality will draw ill consequence upon him and entitle the King to his ship. The writer advises that the captain of the Bull should put in security for his appearance in the Admiralty Court next term and so be enlarged, and his ship be appraised and good security given for the value. This course is necessary in this dangerous time, when the registrar is fled for fear of the plague which is come within some few houses of the Admiralty office, and none of the inferior ministers of the court left, and the writer upon his departure into the country. [1 p.]
June 27. 85. Copy thereof. [3 pp.]
June 27.
Aldersgate Street.
86. Sir Henry Marten to the Lords of the Admiralty. Has received their letter of the 25th inst., with examinations concerning a sloop of Calais apprehended by Capt. Lewis Kirke, captain of the Repulse, for pillaging his Majesty's subjects, and sent into Plymouth; against which vessel and company the Lords require Sir Henry to proceed. If Sir Henry is so to proceed, it must be criminally as against pirates, in which case the parties and witnesses must be brought up to London, and if now brought up Sir Henry will not be there, for he hopes he shall have liberty as other men have to secure his life by departing from this contagious place, whence the registrar is resolved to fly away presently; and as for the marshals they are daily so conversant in places infected that he has no great desire to have much of their company. Besides they can keep no sessions till the begining of Michaelmas term if they were there. Suggests that they should be tried in the Vice-Admiralty court of Plymouth, and that the Lords should write to the Vice-Admiral to hold a sessions and in the meanwhile to furnish themselves with proofs. In this way the business will be despatched with much convenience and facility, the pirates receive their deserts, and justice be done to the honour of the King and security of his subjects. Vice-Admirals should understand that as they have many profits, and nothing is so incident to their office as proceeding against pirates, they should so manage business of this nature that pirates should not escape unless they be brought up thither, which requires that they accustom themselves to more frequent keeping of sessions. ViceAdmirals are very apt to seize private goods but have no great zeal to punish their persons. Urges upon the Lords the great necessity at this time that the Vice-Admirals should do as appertains to their offices by keeping sessions. [1¾ p. Seal with arms.]
June 27. 87. Sir Thomas Roe to Charles Lewis, Elector Palatine. Archbishop Laud having dined with Sir Thomas he had fit opportunity to show him the advice the Elector had left with Sir Thomas. The Archbishop read it over twice and Sir Thomas dilated upon it. He was warm at the clause that there was more zeal in England for recovery of Lorraine than the Palatinate (which he said was false), and that this advertisement should have come from a man of esteem in London. The negotiation with Denmark he understood not, but Sir Thomas opened it, and from the whole circumstance concluded that they only purpose to steal away the opportunity, and not to perform sincerely that which the King's patience merits, and the justice of the Elector's cause requires. The Archbishop judged it very necessary to acquaint his Majesty timely that he might prepare his resolutions against the first advice from the Lord Marshal. He promised to show it the next time he went to court, and said he would expound and comment upon it, and make the best use he could to do the Prince service. Sir Thomas advises the Prince to speak with the Archbishop upon it on Sunday, and suggests to him what remarks he should make, in order amongst other things to discover who was the "persona multum estimata" who had expressed the opinion respecting the feeling in England as to the Palatinate and Lorraine, and also to impress upon the King that they presume they can cozen him, but generous princes and great hearts can digest a scorn worse than an injury. [Copy. 2 pp.]
June 27./July 7.
Paris.
John Lord Scudamore to Sec. Windebank. Yesterday evening, about ten o'clock, Sir Francis Crane departed. In the whole course of this business he has behaved himself like a stout and humble christian and member of the church of England. His nephew, Mr. Crane, that is fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, lays the fault upon the surgeon. The wound grew to an ulcer and gangrene. His body will be carried into England. [Extract. See French Correspondence.]
June 27.
Sunninghill.
Nicholas to Algernon Earl of Northumberland. Had received his letters dated from the 2nd to the 22nd inst. but not the original examinations of the French relative to the sloop sent into Plymouth. It seems Sec. Coke had them. The copies of those examinations had been sent to Sir Henry Marten, with command to proceed against the captain and master of that vessel, and also against the vessel legally on the King's behalf. The Lords were dispersed; would not meet again till Sunday next at Oatlands. Sends 100 licences signed by the King, with blanks, to be given to Hollanders for their liberties and security to fish in the King's seas. There is a report that Dunkirk is besieged by sea and land, both by the French and the Hollanders, and that the Infante Cardinal is coming towards it with 10,000 men. The French King had drawn great forces out of Normandy into Picardy. A letter was sent by the King's command to Captain Stewart to transport to Dunkirk the Marquis of Mirabell after he had landed the Spanish Ambassador. When the Lord sent that letter to Capt. Stewart there was no news of the Earl standing for those parts, therefore the letter was directed to Capt. Stewart and sent by Mr. Tayller, the Infante's agent, who proposes to go to Dover or the Downs to attend the arrival of the Victory from Spain. [Copy. Nicholas's Letter Book,. Domestic James I., Vol. ccxix., p. 123.]
June 27.
Moor.
88. Sir Charles Harbord, Surveyor General, to Nicholas. Was at Hampton Court last week and found not Nicholas there. Had not time to visit him at Sunninghill and is now on a second journey to the Fens. He and his wife purpose to ramble into Windsor Forest this summer to find Nicholas out and see their friends at Easthampsted. In the meantime wants to know how he likes his new habitation. Sir Robert Pye has bought Orston of the Duchess. [1 p.]
June 27.
Compton.
89. Sir Grevill Verney to the same. Since his letter of last week about the ship-money has received 200l. so that now he has 400l. to be paid in. Still goes on distraining and collecting, but meets with so many interruptions touching the inequality of the levies as occasions new assessments and hindrance to the service. [Seal with crest. ½ p.]
June 27.
St. James's Church, Dover.
90. Sentence of Dr. Thomas Rives in the Court of Admiralty at Dover in a cause of Charles Lloyd, merchant of London, against the Swan of Flushing and Martin Williamson, captain of the same, respecting 47 barrels of tallow by the same ship taken upon the high seas and carried into Flushing. The ship was adjudged to Charles Lloyd, as security for 540l. damages and 10l. costs. [Copy, attested by Dr. Rives. Latin. 2 pp.]
June 28. Petition of all the Fishmongers of the city of London using that trade, to the King. In the corporation of fishmongers there are divers members of other professions, who being men of great estate have become masters and governors to advance their own particular ends, and though they have no knowledge in that trade yet have kept the government and succeeded one another, neglecting petitioners who are of the profession, and to whom by charter the government properly belongs. Petitioners, who have been bred up in and subsist only upon the mystery of fishmongers, and best know both the enormities past and the dangers likely to ensue, pray a confirmation of their charter, with such rights and privileges as were formerly granted by Edward III., Richard II., and Henry VI., whereby the company may be governed by the experienced men of the trade, and they to have the benefits and privileges to the said company belonging, they being best knowledged how to dispose of the same for the good of the company. Underwritten,
i. Reference to Lord Treasurer Juxon, Lord Cottington, and [Sec. Windebank?], who calling to them the Attorney General, are to certify their opinions. Hampton Court, 28 June 1636. [Book of Petitions, Vol. cccxxiii., p. 40. 1½ p.]
June 28.
Office of the Ordnance.
91. Officers of the Ordnance to the Council. According to commands by letters of 27 June 1636 the writers have made a collection of ordnance delivered for supply of Portsmouth and of the residue not delivered. They conceive it necessary that the residue should be delivered, but they require present money. The estimate delivered was 1,078l. 8s. 4d. of which 653l. 12s. 10d. was paid, so that there remains 424l. 1.5s. 6d., on issue whereof the stores shall be sent with all diligence. P.S. Since subscribing the above a warrant has been received for supply of two lasts of powder with match and shovels for Portsmouth, which shall be sent accordingly. In the former estimate nothing is inserted for freight, which will amount to 120l. which must be added to the 424l. 15s. 6d. above mentioned. [1¾ p.] Enclosed,
91. i. Account of part of a proportion of munition heretofore sent to Portsmouth. 28th June 1636. [=3 pp.]
91. ii. Estimate for freight of the munitions sent and remaining to be sent to Portsmouth. 28th June 1636. [1 p.]
June 28.
Office of the Ordnance.
92. The same to the same Acknowledge receipt of their letter dated 14th June 1636, with a list of Sir James Bagg's demands of munitions for supply of the forts at Plymouth and St. Nicholas Island, requiring their opinion of the said demands, and also what increase of fortifications and men have of late been made in the said fort and island. They cannot certify whether the demands be requisite before a survey thereof, by which the present remain would appear; also the pay of the men not being within the account of that office, they cannot certify anything therein; neither as to enlargement of the fortifications, because no officer of that office has been employed therein. [1 p.]
June 28.
The Triumph, riding in the Downs.
93. Algernon, Earl of Northumberland, to the Lords of the Admiralty. Having received command to repair about the end of the month to the northward, and discoursing with some about it, he found them apprehensive of going into those seas with those ships, whereupon he called together all the captains and masters, and they all agree that if they go into those parts it had need be within 14 days, when they shall find the Flemings beginning their fishing to the northward of Bockness [Buchan Ness?], betwixt that and Shetland; from thence they must come along the coast with them to the back side of the sands of Yarmouth, where they end their herring fishing, but that channel is not for the Earl to stay in, only to pass through, without great hazard of losing the ships. Pilots for this service may be best got from the Cinque Ports, Aldborough, Easton, and Yarmouth, without whom none of these masters will undertake the employment. The objections they make are; i., that between the Downs and the furthest place they are to go, there is not any harbour or road where they can put in, but the Firth; and ii., that those seas are unfit for ships that go so deep as they do, and that the biggest men-of-war that go thither draw not above 12 feet water, and yet carry 50 and 56 guns, as great as are in any of our ships. Leaves these statements to be considered, and attends their pleasure for the time of their departure. [2 pp.]
June 28.
Chatham.
94. Officers of the Navy to the same. Having made a provision of knees and treenails to be brought into his Majesty's yards out of Ireland, if they may be delivered free from custom, they shall be able to deal for their transportation on such terms as may best answer the expectation of the Lords. [Seal with arms. 1 p.]
June 28.
Chatham.
95. The same to the same. They have contracted about Tunbridge, Warnham, and in Surrey and Sussex, for 800 loads of timber, which will have to be carted by land 14 or 15 miles, at a cost of 8s. 9d. a load, over and above his Majesty's usual rate of 5d. a load per mile, amounting to 350l. or 400l., which in respect of other jobs of land carriage in other parts of Surrey and Sussex will be somewhat burdensome to those counties. Pray letters to the justices of the peace not only of Surrey and Sussex, but also to those for the west parts of Kent, requiring them to cess the county to contribute to the surplusage of the said land carriage to be performed this summer. [1 p.]
June 28. 96. See "Papers relating to appointments in the Navy."
June 29. 97. Draft entry on the Council Register of appearance before the Council of George Goodson, of Weston Turville, and Alexander Ginners [Jenings], of Aylesbury hundred, sent for by warrant; they are to remain in custody of the messenger. [¼ p.]
June 29. The like draft entry in relation to Joshua Halsey, constable of Chesham, co. Buckingham. [¼ p.]
June 29. The like in relation to Edmund Phipps, high-constable of Stoke, co. Buckingham. [¼ p.]
June 29. The like in relation to Thomas Nutting, of Baldock and Robert Watson, of the same place. [¼ p.]
June 29. 98. Receipt of Sir William Russell for 142l., paid by Henry Fielder on behalf of Sir William Balfour, Lieutenant of the Tower, in part of 5,500l. charged for ship-money on Middlesex by writ dated the 4th August last. [1 p.] Annexed,
98. i. Similar receipt for 223l. 19s. 1d., paid by William Walley on behalf of Sir William Balfour, ship-money collected by him in the liberty of the Tower under writ dated 20th October 1634. It is added in an underwritten note that there was 40l. more within the collection of the Lieutenant of the Tower, which was assessed upon the forty warders and which the Council discharged by order dated 14th February 1634–5. Dated 17th June 1635. [1 p.]
June 29. 99. List, certified by Stephen Alcock, of his Majesty's ships then at sea, with the several times up to which they were victualled. [1 p.]
June 29.
Cambridge.
100. Hugh Grove, saltpetreman, to Nicholas. Thanks for presenting his petition respecting the obstacles thrown in his way at Cambridge (see Vol. cccxviii., Nos. 42, 43) and returning him an answer. Unless the Lords restrain others from doing the like he shall not be able to do the service. Incloses various certificates which prove not only a refusal of five persons one after another in one day, but a braving of the mayor and constable. Incloses also a certificate of his own as to what he had been enforced to do since the warrants were issued to charge the various persons to provide carts. Martin Pearce, the mayor, had died, and Mr. Foxton had succeeded. [Seal with arms. ¾ p.] Inclosed,
100. i. Testimony of Hugh Grove as to the circumstances complained of. Coming to Cambridge to work in the King's service in February 1635–6, he repaired to Martin Pearce, the mayor, who made his warrant to the constables to provide carts. The constables, Thomas Amos, John Aspland, and Edward Kent charged certain inhabitants accordingly, but they refused. The constables certified the mayor, and solicited him to take a course with the refusers. He delayed, whereupon the number of refusers increased, and Grove was obliged to remove his vessels out of the town. The mayor having died the refusers remain unquestioned and the work hindered. [1 p.]
June 29.
Feering.
101. Dr. Robert Aylett to Sir John Lambe, Dean of the Arches. A paper stated to be inclosed is a kind of defence of Mr. Sym, a Scotchman and minister of Leigh, in Essex, being questioned by the writer for bidding and keeping a solemn fast in his parish church on Wednesday in Ascension week, when the people, as the writer was informed, remained all day in the church, fasting, praying, and Mr. Sym preaching. It is in Rochford hundred, and in Essex archdeaconry, where the writer hears there are many such kinds of preaching and fasting, whereof, if he be commanded by the Archbishop, he will better enquire, though it more properly belongs to the Archdeacon or his official. Has caused many of the communion tables in his officialty to be railed in, and the people to come up and kneel and receive at the rail, although with much opposition, because they see no such thing, they say, in the churches in London, but since the article-books for the metropolitical visitation were delivered, they have found an article, which as they conceive gives them leave to remove the table at the time of celebration, and place it as may be most convenient for the parishioners to come about it and receive, which in some places, where the minister is willing to please his people, undoes all the writer has done, and lays on him an imputation as if it were his own invention, crossing the articles delivered by the Archbishop's visitor. For this the writer desires to know the Archbishop's pleasure and intentions. Reminds Sir John of Robert Sorrell, who opposes the authority of the writer's proctors appearing for their clients. For more than four months he had practised in open court, before all the clients, to oppose all their proceedings in causes of instance by virtue of his Grace's commission, as if all were illegally done. Wishes Parsons or Flamsted were sent to him to Pleshey to teach him better manners. Desires Sir John to show all lawful favour to Mr. Brigham, brother-in-law to Mr. Booth of Aldersgate, a minister of Kent, in an appeal from the official of Canterbury. Sends humble service to the Archbishop. The hops are ready to preserve and shall be sent as soon as safely they may. [2 pp.]
June 30.
Westminster.
102. Warrant for payment to Sir Richard Wynne, Treasurer to the Queen, of 2,000l. for the expenses of the Queen's progress for this and the last year, the King having yearly bestowed upon her Majesty 1,000l. towards the expenses of her progress, which for the past year she received not. [8 lines on parchment.]
June 30.
Westminster.
103. Similar warrant for payment to James, Marquis of Hamilton, Master of the Horse and Steward of the House of Hampton Court, of 150l. to be disbursed in and about the bowling alley and mending the park pales there. [The like.]
June 30. 104. Petition of John Finch to the King. Petitioner being not above 16 years of age and of good parentage, by the instigation of one Evans, a bricklayer, was drawn through his ignorance to accompany him to the Temple, where Evans in the day time took money out of the chamber of Mr. Audley of the Court of Wards. Petitioner was condemned at the last sessions at Newgate but is reprieved. Prays a pardon. [½ p.] Underwritten,
104. i.Reference to the Recorder of London to certify the quality of petitioner's offence. Oatlands, 30th June 1636. [¼ p.] Annexed,
104. ii. Certificate of Thomas Gardiner, the Recorder, to the King. That Finch and Jeffrey Evans, now in goal, with Edward Rily and Henry Woodward who are not yet taken, upon Ascension day last, between twelve and one in the day-time, raised a ladder against the study window of Hugh Audley, three stories high, in the Inner Temple, no person being therein. Evans entered at the window, and delivered to Finch upon the ladder, out at the window, 200l. and upwards, which money Finch delivered to Rily and Woodward in the Temple church, and they escaped therewith. Then, Finch returning up the ladder to Evans, they were both apprehended in the manner, and about 550l. found about them, which they had taken out of Mr. Audley's study. They were both convicted, but upon a legal doubt conceived by the court, judgment has not yet been given. Evans is a plasterer's son, who used to work with his father about the Temple, and plotted the mischief, Finch being very young and a stranger. 6th July 1636. [½ p.]
June 30. 105. Petition of James Gresham, gentleman, on behalf of himself and Elizabeth his wife, of Greenwich, to the King. Petitioner about five years since married the widow of Roger Hurst of Greenwich, brewer, one of his Majesty's servants, who left behind him his mother, a very aged woman, and seven small children, whereunto the marriage of petitioner with the widow has added three more. He left also debts amounting to 1,300l. to be paid out of his estate, which amounted not to above 300l. In respect of the great danger of the times the debts of Hurst are now called upon to be presently paid, which petitioner cannot discharge, having many debts owing to him from his Majesty's servants, and 100l. due from his Majesty's late mother for glass-dialling in divers of his Majesty's houses done by Roger Hurst, whereupon petitioner prays a protection. [¾ p.] Underwritten,
105. i. Reference to the Council to do therein as they shall think good. Oatlands, 30th June 1636. [¼ p.] Annexed,
105. ii. Statement by James Gresham of the value of his brewhouse and stock therein, and that his father being lately deceased his creditors conceived that some great estate had thereby accrued to him, which was not the case. [½ p.]
June 30.
Oatlands.
106. The Council to Sir John Finch, Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. Send him a petition from the bailiff and burgesses of Ilchester, and an answer made thereto by Sir Robert Phillips, with two letters from the Board on former complaints about assessing Northover at 10l. towards ship-money as a member of Ilchester, when they are liable to pay with the hundred of Tintinhull. The difference was referred to the Bishop of Bath and Wells, and has been settled by him, and the money is paid to the sheriff accordingly. Pray him at the next assizes to consider the matter, and if he sees no cause to alter the directions of the bishop, to confirm the same and punish those who persist in troubling the Board with frivolous petitions. [1 p.] Annexed,
106. i. Petition of the Bailiff and Burgesses of Ilchester to the Council. For raising 8,000l. for shipping Ilchester with its members was rated at 30l., and the hundred of Tintinhull at 130l., which was paid, yet in January last Sir Robert Phillips procured a reference to the Bishop of Bath and Wells, alleging that Northover, which was taxed with the borough, belonged to the hundred, and that the 10l. paid therein should be paid to the constables of the hundred, which the constables say is to go to Sir Robert Phillips for his charges, and that he requires 10l. more, which Sir Henry Berkeley and others refuse to pay. Pray that the 10l. paid by Northover may be accepted as part of the 30l. on the borough, and that paying the other 20l. they may be at quiet. [¾ p.]
106. ii. The plain and true answer of Sir Robert Phillips to the preceding petition. Ilchester being assessed at 30l., Dawe the bailiff and one Smith, two factious men, most injuriously encroached on an adjacent parish of Northover, rated it at 10l. as a member of their borough, and cunningly got into their hands the greatest part of the money. The inhabitants of Tintinhull conceiving themselves injured petitioned the Board, a reference was made to the Bishop of Bath and Wells who found Northover to be a distinct parish, and directed the bailiff to pay over the money collected in Northover to the sheriff towards 130l. set upon the hundred, which was done. The allegations against himself are most scandalous and false, preferred by the two turbulent men, Dawe and Smith. [1½ p.]
106. iii. The Council to Bishop Pierce of Bath and Wells. Copy of the letter whereby the dispute above mentioned was referred to his decision. 10th January 1635–6. [1 p.]
106. iv. The same to [Henry Hodges], Sheriff of Somerset. Apprise him of the reference contained in the preceding and require him to obey such order as the bishop shall letter set down. 10th January 1635–6. [Copy. 1 p.]
June 30. 107. Draft of the letter from the Council to Lord Chief Justice Finch, calendared on the preceding page. [1 p.]
June 30. 108. The Council to Sir Philip Landen, — Cunny, W. Landen, George Ashton, and Rutland Snoden, Justices of Peace for co. Lincoln. Divers insolences have been lately committed, and more daily threatened, in the level of fens on the north-east side of the river Witham, co. Lincoln (now drained by Sir Anthony Thomas) by the inhabitants of Easter Keal, Wester Keal, the Higher Toynton, Nether Toynton, Halton Hollowbeck, and some others, a list of whose names is enclosed. As their offences are such as are not to be suffered in a civil commonwealth, the persons addressed are to call the parties before them, and if they find cause, to bind over some of the principal delinquents to appear at that Board on the 2nd of September next. [Draft. 1 p.] Underwritten,
108. i. List of the names of the offenders; 17 in number. [¾ p.]
June 30.
Oatlands.
109. The same to the Justices of Peace for Surrey. His Majesty has bought about Tunbridge and Warnham in Surrey and Sussex 800 loads of timber to be brought to Deptford this summer, but considering the burthen would lie too heavy on Surrey and Sussex the Lords have thought fit to join the west part of Kent, allotting 300 loads to Surrey, 300 to Sussex, and 200 to the west part of Kent. The persons addressed are to take order accordingly. [Draft, with underwritten memorandum that similar letters were addressed to the justices of peace for Sussex and the west part of Kent. 1 p.]
June 30.
Oatlands.
110. The same to the same for the west part of Kent. Similar letter to the preceding. [Copy. 1 p.]
June 30.
Oatlands.
111. The same to the same for Hants. His Majesty has bought of the Earl of Southampton 1,700 loads of timber out of Titchfield Park, and of others thereabouts 300 loads, all which is to be brought to Fareham Quay by Allhallowtide next. The Council have thought fit for the ease thereof to apportion the same as follows; 1,000 loads to be carried by Hants, 500 loads by Wilts, and 500 by Dorset. The persons addressed are to take order accordingly. [Draft, with underwritten memorandum that similar letters were addressed to the justices of peace for Wilts and Dorset. 1 p.]
June 30. 112. The same to the Mayor of Banbury. By the King's writ he was directed to levy within that town 40l. for ship-money, which sum the Council are informed he not only refused to pay to the sheriff but had forborne to pay in to Sir William Russell, the Treasurer of the Navy. The Council cannot pass by this great neglect without letting him know that if they should call him to so strict account as he deserved he could not answer the same; he is therefore required to levy the said sum, and within a month to pay the same over to the sheriff or the Treasurer of the Navy; and if he finds any person, of what quality soever, that refuses, he is to levy the sum assessed by distress, according to the writ. [Draft. It appears from the endorsement that similar letters were written to the bailiff of Chipping Norton for 30l. and of Burford for 40l. 1 p.]
June 30.
Oatlands.
113. The Council to the Bailiffs of Kingston-upon-Thames. The Lords have been informed by a petition of the landholders of Kingston, that a warrant has been directed to the constable of that town to warn 12 carts to carry 15½ loads of ship-timber from Alsenholt to Hamhaw, or to pay 12s. 6d. per load. There being but 12 remove carts in Kingston, the burthen is like to lie upon petitioners, the other landholders that have no carts refusing to contribute. In levying ship-money all landholders are proportionably entered and pay accordingly, and all landholders in Surrey are charged towards the carriage of timber. The bailiffs are required to cause such order to be observed in the said carriage as is practised in the hundred adjoining. [Draft. 1 p.]
June 30. Draft entry on the Council Register of minute of the appearance before the Council of Thomas Millerd, of Dunton, and Thomas Millerd of Great Hampden, co. Buckingham, sent for by warrant. [See No. 97 in this volume. 3 lines.]
June 30. Similar draft entry of the appearance of Robert Beeton, high constable of the hundred of Hamfordshoe, and John Harryatt, chief constable of the hundred of Higham Ferrers, sent for by warrant; they are to remain in custody of the messenger. [Ibid. 5 lines.]
June 30.
The Happy Entrance, in the Downs.
114. Capt. George Carteret to the Lords of the Admiralty. His Admiral had commanded him to send the examination of the men belonging to the small men-of-war of Calais which Capt. Dunning took last week. Instead of bringing them to the writer, Dunning carried them to Broadstairs pier, where, for want of a good guard, many of them ran away, but they have all since been taken, and to the number of 20 are now in Dover Castle, besides the two captains. The rest are still where they were first landed. Thirteen of those in Dover Castle confess, that on the 5th inst., being at sea in a manof-war which is now at Calais, they met with a Scotch bark which is now at Dover, and the master called George Campbell, which bark they pillaged of goods to the value of 100l. Three others confess that they were in the vessel that took his Majesty's ketch with the packet. There is nothing yet proved against the captains, but all say that this is their first voyage. Sends the examination with an inventory of things found in the two ships. Capt. Dunning has left them in Broadstairs pier. The biggest is of 20 tons, with three pieces of ordnance, four murderers, and 30 men ; the other is of 14 tons, with one small brass gun, two murderers, and 20 men. They belong to the president, judges, procureurs, and advocates of Calais, and so do six or seven more. The Whelp which is to convey the ammunition for Jersey and Guernsey is still in the road; she has been three times at sea, and still forced back. The Second Whelp, which went to Holland to carry Lord Arundel's chaplain, is not yet come back, nor the True Love and the Roebuck which convoyed a fleet of merchant ships to Ostend. [2 pp.]
June 30.
The Downs.
115. Captain George Carteret to Nicholas. Those of Calais have not meddled with the King's subjects since Carteret's admiral went to the westward, but with a Scotchman coming from Dunkirk on the 5th inst., whom they pillaged. States the capture by Capt. Dunning of the two vessels mentioned in the preceding letter, with the contents of their examinations. Those that were at the taking of Capt. Dunning, in the King's ketch, say that he shot first at them three pieces of ordnance and a musket, before they meddled with him, and that he had his flag in the main-top, and that they had but four guns and the ketch seven. As for Capt. Slingsby chasing a Calaiser, the writer does remember it. Some three weeks since he chased a Dunkirker, after she had struck her top-sails. He shot three pieces of ordnance and killed some of her men, which occasioned some of the True Love's men to be beaten at Dunkirk. Carteret's admiral had information that the French fleet was before Dunkirk, which made him haste back to the Downs. He stays to hear from the Lords before he goes back to the westward. [1 p.]
June 30.
Aldersgate Street.
116. Sir Henry Marten to the same. Not having been able to see him on his visit to Westminster this day, has sent the bearer, the registrar of the Admiralty, Thomas Wyan, down to him at Sunninghill, to confer with him on certain pending Admiralty matters. Recommends that the Lords write to all Vice-Admirals that if ships or suspected persons be sent into their vice-admiralties they should arrest them to his Majesty's use, and that examinations should be taken of the prisoners and of all persons able to testify against them, and that the latter be bound to appear at the next sessions. And because most of the vice-admirals are ignorant or unwilling to proceed against pirates, the writer advises that Wyan should be sent down to Plymouth and afterwards to Portsmouth to instruct them and settle the course of proceeding. Also that Solomon Smyth, the marshal of the Admiralty, be sent with the registrar to see inventories taken, to sell what cannot be kept and cause the rest to be safely kept. The registrar being very expert will be able to direct the weakest vice-admiral or judge of Admiralty, and the marshal being a very able minister and obliged personally to his Majesty for his place, will see his Majesty's droits honestly answered. Has written already about the Bull of Amsterdam. Does not conceive the captain can be charged with piracy, and yet his offence may deserve the confiscation of his ship, as a contempt done to the King. [1¾ p.]
June 30. 117. Copy of the greater part of the preceding. [4 pp.]
June 30.
Oatlands.
118. Philip Paine to Mr. Hayles, one of the teller's clerks of the Exchequer. The writer desires Hayles to speak to Sir Robert Pye to let him have 10l. due to him out of his pension, for he is to go the progress with the Queen and is unprovided for the journey. [½ p.]
June 30. 119. Thomas Jones to George Rawdon. A high hand having taken the writer off the preferment he was qualified for, he solicits Rawdon's help in procuring him the next presentation to the living of Hun[t]sham in the gift of the Court of Wards, the incumbent being 75 years of age; or an exchange with one of Lord Conway's chaplains beneficed near Warwick, so that he may be nearer Lord Conway and his own friends. [Seal with arms. ¾ p.]
[June ?] 120. Petition of John Browne, the King's founder of brass and iron ordnance and iron shot, to the King. States the circumstances mentioned in the calendar of previous papers under which the King had granted petitioner a protection for twelve months, and prays a removal of the same for another year. [¾ p.]
[June ?] 121. Petition of a hundred of the King's poor subjects, coachmen, housekeepers in London and Westminster and the suburbs, to the same. Recites proclamation of 19th January 1635–6, calendared under that date, whereby hackney or hired coaches were forbidden to be used except to travel at least three miles out of London. The offences grown by the general use of coaches have been occasioned by chandlers, innkeepers, brokers, and other tradesmen, intruders into the profession of coachmen, who have set up coaches and hired men to drive them, and for the faults of these intruders petitioners are like to be undone, and many inconveniences to arise in times of entertainment of ambassadors and removes. Pray a charter of incorporation, with power to put in execution such good orders for the future government of hackney coachmen as shall be established by the Lord Keeper and the Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench. [¾ p.]
[June ?] 122. Case laid before the twelve judges as to the power of his Majesty to make several sheriffs in the instances in which it had been the practice to appoint only one sheriff for two counties, with the underwritten opinion of the judges. They deemed that his Majesty might do so if he thought it convenient. [Signed by all the twelve judges. 1 p.]
[June ?.] 123. Petition of the Mayor and Commonalty of Bristol to the Council. Divers goods with several men and women have been brought into Bristol upon certificate from the Lord Mayor and others of London that they did not come from houses infected. But understanding that the contagion in London is much dispersed, and that the manufacture of goods for St. James's fair, Bristol, is carried on in Holborn and places adjoining, where the infection is the most, petitioners from this time will not permit any goods to be brought in, and shall not allow those of London and other infected places to keep the fair. All which they submit to the consideration of the Lords. [¾ p.]
[June ?] 124. Petition of Thomas Nutting and Robert Watson, of Baldock, co. Hertford, to the same. Petitioners being assessed to ship-money, denied not the payment, but only answered they had not then moneys to pay the same. Having been sent for by a messenger, express contrition and pray to be discharged. [¾ p.]
[June ?] 125. Petition of Thomas Nutting to the Council. Petition similar to the preceding, but of Nutting only. [½ p.]
[June ?] 126. Sir Peter Wentworth, late Sheriff of co. Oxford, to the same. Answer concerning the collecting of ship-money imposed upon the parish of South Newington in that county. After many journeys, and appointing divers meetings for executing his Majesty's writ, and having lost his labour, the sheriff sought after the constables to imprison them according to the tenour of his letters of instructions from the Council, but could not find them. At length there was produced the answer sent by Michael Willett (see Vol. cccxviii., No. 75) and already calendared. On receipt of that answer, the said town being levied [assessed?] at 12l., the sheriff took so many beasts as amounted to 12l., which are still in the sheriff's hands for want of buyers, for the country refuse to buy them, pretending the sheriff has not power to sell them. The reason whereof is in regard of the speeches of Thomas Roberts, of South Newington, who has given out, especially in the hundreds of Bloxham and Banbury, that people should forbear the payment, and that he would excuse them for a pottle of sack. And since the distress Roberts has demanded a replevin, and being denied used very uncivil language. In all which the sheriff craves the directions of the Board. [1¼ p.]
[June ?] 127. John Newton, late Sheriff of co. Salop, to Nicholas. Sends a note of what the clergy, and what every hundred and corporate town were assessed to the ship-money. [½ p.] Annexed,
127. i. Note or account above mentioned. The total sum was 4,500l., of which the clergy were assessed at 161l. 17s. [1 p.]
[June ?] 128. Petition of Emilia Lanyer, widow of Capt. Alphonso Lanyer, his late Majesty's servant, to the Council. Recites an order of 21st April last, in the cause between petitioner and Clement Lanyer, that he should pay petitioner 20l. per annum according to a former order, or otherwise surrender a grant mentioned in the same, or stand committed to the Fleet within 10 days after a copy of the said petition and order should be showed to him. States endeavours made to serve him with a copy of the order, and that he had tendered petitioner 4l. and required a general acquittance, swearing that he had great friends who would alter whatsoever the Lords set down. Prays that-the 20l. may be settled upon her for the time of her patent. [¾ p.]
June.
Hampton Court.
129. The Council to all Mayors, Sheriffs, and all his Majesty's loving subjects. David Stotte [Scott ?] one of the messengers of the Chamber, having given and being about to continue his attendance on the Lords for his Majesty's service, all subjects are to receive and lodge him as he shall have occasion to travel up and down. [Draft, without date of day. ½ p.]
June.
Hampton Court.
130–4. The same to the Sheriff of a county in arrear of his ship-money. Peremptory directions to levy and pay in the sum in arrear, according to the writ and instructions of the Board. Also, if any constables neglect to do their duty, to bind them over to answer at the Board, and if they refuse to be bound, to commit them, and that in the meantime the necessary levies proceed by such others as the sheriff shall appoint. [Five copies, signed by the Lords of the Council, with blanks left for names and amounts. 2 pp. each.]
[June ?] 135. Petition of Anthony Kirle to the Lords of the Admiralty. Petitioner being sent for from Kingston-upon-Hull by a messenger from the Lords, made his appearance on the 30th May, and on the 3rd inst. annexed to a petition, then presented, particulars of the receipt and disposal of all saltpetre delivered to him by William Richardson, saltpetre master of co. York, whereupon the Lords discharged petitioner from the messenger, but commanded his attendance. Having to pay for the account of his Majesty 1,050l. to Edmund Nicholson, for pretermitted customs in the port of Hull, part whereof cannot be procured without petitioner's personal attendance, and not having wilfully offended, he prays to be discharged. [½ p.]
[June ?] 136. Note by Capt. Henry Dunning of the particular character and armament of the two French sloops taken by him and carried into Bradstowe [Broadstairs] pier, and since fetched by the Lord Warden's officers into Dover pier. [¾ p.]
June. 137. Statement of reasons why certain newly invented pendent furnaces are most safe, saving, and commodious to have on board ships. [Endorsed by Nicholas: "Dr. May, touching a pendent furnace. 3 pp.]
June. 138. Petition of the Canons, Residentiaries, and Prebends of the Cathedral of Exeter, to Archbishop Laud and Lord Keeper Coventry. The persons addressed, on a reference from his Majesty, have appointed to hear a cause this day, depending between the petitioners. The ways being somewhat dangerous in regard of the sickly season, they pray a prorogation of the day of hearing until Michaelmas term. [½ p.]
[June?] 139. Memorandum, in the handwriting of William Dell, Secretary to Archbishop Laud, that the parish of St. Botolph without Bishopsgate, having about 6,000 communicants, had had from this Lord Mayor but 14l. towards relief of the poor. Last week there died 22, of whom 4, instead of 12, were set down to die of the sickness. [½ p.]
[June ?] 140. Note, by Sir John Lambe, that Raphael Britten, of Olney, lace buyer, said there was good news that the King had fallen out with my Lord of Canterbury and had cast him off, and we should have a Parliament. Afterwards asking George Castle why Worrell did not read the book, he said he need not. Castle saying that my Lord of Canterbury had punished some in the High Commission for it, Britten said "No matter! He is a papist; no good man will read it or cause it to be read." [¼ p.]
[June ?] 141. Anne Smedley to Nicholas. Her Grace [of Buckingham] is as much troubled that Nicholas is disappointed as he can be himself. If her Grace does not receive the money that day, the writer is to wait on Nicholas at night with that which is a great deal better than money, till the money be paid, which will not be long. [1 p.]
[June ?] 142. Edward Conway to George Rawdon. Thanks for his care of the writer, who came safely to Marlow, where he met his uncle Popham. Next day they came to Littlecote, where he met his grandfather, who was to take his journey home the day after, so that he waited on him home and was welcomed of everybody and specially of his mother, whom at first sight he scarce knew. [1 p.]