BHO

Charles I - volume 363: July 1-15, 1637

Pages 276-313

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles I, 1637. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1868.

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July 1–15, 1637

[July 1.] 1. Paper entitled "His Majesty's intention in the Fast now to be commanded." 1. For himself and his family and all his subjects to prostrate themselves before God, praying for his relief to the parts of the kingdom yet visited by pestilence, and his help in the present danger of war. 2. The fast to be kept in London on the 5th inst., and in all other parts of the kingdom on the 2nd August, by which time the book conceived for a form of Common Prayer for that use may be dispersed throughout the kingdom. 3. That the effect of the exhortation in the book be the subject of the sermon, to be had the said day in all places where there is a preaching minister. 4. That the said form of prayer be used for the time following on Wednesdays. [1¼ p.]
July 1.
London House.
2. Notes by Nicholas of business to be transacted by the Lords of the Admiralty. Settle proportions to be assigned to each saltpetreman, whereof the Master of the Ordnance has a list. Consider Thornhill's answer to the Dean of Windsor. Peruse letter from Sir Henry Marten touching Rice Thomas, a gunner in prison; ["discha[rge"], afterwards added]. Consider whether it be fit to call in some of the fleet for ease of his Majesty's charge, which will otherwise exceed the sum paid for shipping. Also a complaint made by Mr. Edisbury against Robert Rigge, of Fareham. There attends the Lords in custody one Jones, a gunner, upon the complaint of John Crofts. Resolve what shall be done with William Richardson, saltpetreman, who has failed to bring in his proportion of saltpetre. [Margin: "disch[arge]."] Consider Mr. Wyan's account and petition. Peruse report of Commissioners appointed to examine Vice-Admirals' accounts touching deputies to be appointed by ViceAdmirals. [1 p.]
July 1. 3. Affidavit of Richard Rowe, that by order of the Lords of the Admiralty he had caused a certain wall to be pulled down at Empacombe in the parish of Maker, co. Devon [Cornwall], and a legal way to be made. [⅓ p.] Underwritten,
3. i. Petition of Richard Rowe, praying that he may have up his bond which he gave for making the legal way above mentioned. [Endorsed by Nicholas, "He is to bring certificate that the Lords' order is performed." ⅓ p.]
[July 1.] 4. Petition of Anthony Kirle to the Lords of the Admiralty. Petitioner has for some years past received at Hull saltpetre from Richardson, the saltpetre maker of Yorkshire, for which he disbursed 3l. for every cwt., and delivered the same, by order of Richardson, at his Majesty's stores in Southwark at 3l. 3s. 4d., of which petitioner is required to give a true account, being sent for up by a messenger, and now attending, which account was annexed from June 1634 to March last. For former years he refers to the account of the store kept by Mr. Brush in Southwark, and he finds that Richardson in October 1635 took one cask into his own dispose, and in April 1636 ordered another cask to be delivered to Walter Hill in Wood Street, and that in January and March last four casks were delivered to Thomas More in Southwark. As petitioner has not willingly offended he prays discharge. [¾ p.]
July 1. 5. Minute of the charge against Anthony Kirle and of the above petition. He appeared in custody on 29th May, and was required to give account of all salt-petre received from Mr. Richardson. The account being rendered, and appearing to be true, and Kirle having sums to pay to Edmund Nicholson for the use of his Majesty, which he cannot discharge without his return to Hull, he craves dismissal. [½ p.]
July 1.
London House.
Lords of the Admiralty to Robert Smith. Warrant to bring before the Lords Robert Rigge, of Fareham, Hants, to answer matters to be objected against him. [Copy. See Vol. cccliii., fol. 37. ½ p.]
July 1. Entry on the Admiralty Register of the discharge of Richard Jones, master gunner of the St. Dennis, sent for to answer matters objected against him. [Ibid., fol. 37 b. 1/5 p.]
July 1.
London House.
Order of the Lords of the Admiralty on petition of John Crofts, messenger, praying them to send for Richard Jones, gunner of the St. Dennis, for assaulting petitioner with a crab staff on the face, endangering the loss of one of his eyes. It was ordered that petitioner might take his course against Jones according to law. [Ibid., fol. 38 b. ⅓ p.]
July 1. 6. Account by Sir William Russell of ship-money remaining unpaid upon writs issued in August 1635. Total, 9,225l. 9s. 2½d. Nicholas has added that there had been nothing paid of these arrears these three weeks, but after several deductions before mentioned (see p. 239), he made the arrear to amount only to 6,225l. [1 p.]
July 1. 7. Account by the same of ship-money received and outstanding under writs issued in 1636. Total received, 137,746l. 0s. 7d.; outstanding, 58,853l. 19s. 5d. [1 p.]
July 1. 8. Account of ship-money levied and remaining in the hands of the sheriffs, 10,453l., making with the 137,746l. above mentioned, 148,199l. as the total sum collected. [1 p.]
July 2.
Greenwich.
9. The King to the Lord Mayor, Recorder, and Aldermen of York. For preservation of the solemnity of divine service in some of our cathedral churches, and for the good of the inhabitants of those cities, we have required the mayors, aldermen, and their companies to frequent those holy places on Sundays and holydays, and that they be there at the beginning of divine service, and whilst they are there to carry themselves as becomes them, in obedience to the canons of the Church, and that they shall not use the ensigns of their authority within the said cathedrals, that hereafter the liberties granted by our progenitors to those bodies be inviolably kept. We require you to take care for the performance of all the said orders in that church, and that you, the Lord Mayor, and also the Recorder and Aldermen, at some solemn times every year, shall receive the Holy Communion in the said cathedral, to manifest your conformity to the orders established in the said church. [Copy. 1 p.]
July 2. Petition of Sir Richard Titchborne and Sir Walter Titchborne, his Majesty's servants, to the King. Your Majesty has granted petitioners your protection for two years past, in which time they have paid and secured 13,000l. of their own and other men's debts. Hearing of the many clamours of importunate creditors, exhibited to your Majesty, petitioners do not become further suitors for protection, but pray your Majesty's commission to the Council or others to call their creditors before them, and mediate such reasonable composition as they shall think fit, and in the meantime petition as your Majesty's servants to be protected from arrest.
i. Reference to Sir William Uvedale, Treasurer of the Chamber, Sir Arthur Mainwaring, Sir Henry Spiller, Sir Henry Knollys, Clerk Comptroller of his Majesty, Sir William Parkhurst and Nicholas Drake, or any four of them, to call before them petitioners' creditors and mediate as above. Greenwich, 2nd July 1637. [Copy. See Vol. cccxxiii., p. 124. 1⅓ p.]
July 2. Petition of Margaret Kirby, widow, late wife of Jeffrey Kirby, of London, merchant, deceased, to the same. There have issued out of the Exchequer several commissions to treat with the pretended commoners of Sedgemoor, Somerset, for draining thereof, and for laying out a part for your Majesty. Petitioner's late husband having paid your Majesty a fine of 12,000l., besides 100l. yearly rent, for your part therein, is entitled by your Majesty's contract to have such commission for perfecting that improvement as shall be requisite. Having lately renewed the commission out of the Exchequer with instructions annexed, and finding that many of the commoners refuse to treat unless the commission be under the great seal, petitioner prays warrant to the Attorney-General to draw a commission which may pass the great seal to the same effect as the former commission, and with the like instructions annexed. Underwritten,
i. Reference to the Attorney-General to certify his opinion. Greenwich, 2nd July 1637.
ii. Attorney-General Bankes to the King. Conceives it reasonable that a commission and instructions under the great seal should be awarded. 5th September 1637.
iii. Reference to the Attorney-General, to prepare such commission and instructions to pass the great seal. Hampton Court, 12th October 1637. [Copy. See Vol. cccxxiii., p. 166. 1⅓ p.]
July 2.
Greenwich.
10. Order of the King in Council. Upon a certificate from the Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench, that the meeting referred from the Board the 21st May last to be before the said Lord Chief Justice, for settling an equal way of rating towards the business of shipping in co. Buckingham, is put off from time to time, by which means the sheriff finds a great stop in his present collection of ship-money, it was Ordered that the sheriff should proceed in his collection according to the assessment already made. [Copy. 1 p.]
July 2.
Claverton.
11. William Bassett, Sheriff of Somerset, to the Council. There is a great sum of ship-money unpaid as yet in Somerset, to collect which I have granted warrants of distress to be executed by constables, who are much disheartened by threats and more than menaces, as you may perceive by the complaint enclosed, which if not redressed there will be little more money paid, though I use my greatest diligence. [Seal with arms. 1 p.] Enclosed,
11. i. Complaint of John Simmes, of West Quantoxhead, that Tristram Evennes [Evans ?] dared him to take a distress for the ship-money, and said he would "scower" [score ?] him and make him an example to the whole parish, and that upon taking a distress he had arrested him. [½ p.] Underwritten,
11. ii. Complaint of John More, of Stogumber. I went to Richard Bingegood, of Stogumber, to demand the shipmoney, who told me that if I dared take his goods he would arrest me; whereupon, he being a turbulent person and full of law, I left him. [⅓ p.] Underwritten,
11. iii. Note of George Hinsh, constable of Williton and Freemanners, that Simmes and More had made the above complaints to him to be sent to the sheriff for redress. [1/6 p.]
July 2.
Claverton.
12. The same to Nicholas. Since my last I have not received 100l. for the shipping, through the threatening of such men as I employ for taking distresses. I desire you to take order for return of some speedy answer that the service may not stick. [Seal with arms. ½ p.]
July 2.
Ludlow Castle.
13. Sir John Bridgeman, Chief Justice of Chester, to Sec. Windebank. I have used all the means I could for discovery of Christopher Ellarkar, who about two years continued in house with William Pickering, of Stanton Lacy, and oversaw a water work then making for Lord Craven. If he were now in those parts he could not be long concealed. Sir Charles Smith, to whose house he used to repair, has dwelt in Leicestershire and Warwickshire, and has lately removed to Winchester. You wish to understand from me the condition of Dr. Clayton. I have perused a presentment upon oath, whereby he is accused—1. For haunting alehouses, and once continuing in several alehouses in Ludlow from Thursday to Wednesday, neglecting to come to his church, being within two miles, or any other church on the Sunday. 2. For tempting the chastity of divers women. 3. For causing the bells to be rung at the bringing beer into his house, making those who brought it drunk, and giving the ringers 2s. I find also an information depending against him before the Council in the Marches of Wales, for beating his sexton with a staff in the church on the 7th March last. For Pickering and his wife, although recusants, I have not heard that they be factious or dangerous. [Seal with arms. 1 p.]
July 2. 14. Sir Henry Wotton to Mr. Johnson, apothecary, Snow Hill, London. I have addressed my servant to you; first, that you would direct him where he may buy one of "your Gerrards" [Gerarde's Herbal ?] well and strongly bound; next, where I may have for my money all kinds of coloured pinks to set in my garden, or any such flowers as perfume the air; thirdly, let me consult with you whether you know any sick of melancholia hypochondriaca, wherewith I have been troubled of late, but more with a symptom very frequent in that passion (as the great Fernelius describes it), namely, with certain very noisome odours which the spleen sends up with offence of my scent and taste, and yet without any imaginable taint of my breath. I go seeking examples to comfort my fancy, wherein you will do me a singular pleasure, especially if you add what has done any such patient most good. [Seal with arms. ¾ p.]
July 2.
[1637 ?]
15. Roger Harvey to his brother, Richard Harvey. Reply to a remonstrance from his brother for giving way to their sister's journey to London. He dissuaded her what in him lay. He knew no way to prevent her journey but imprisonment. Nothing persuaded her but her own airy pate. The issue of her journey is that she has brought all her clothes in trouble in the carrier's hands for 20s., and how she will get them off he knows not, not having anything but her subsistence from him. There is nothing to be had from her mother, not so much as "a spoling tornne" [a spinning wheel ?]. He describes his own course of life as "from my bed to my lombs [looms ?], and from my lombs weary to my bed again," debarred of all societies both of Church and State, and were it not that patience has some rule, he could not subsist. The trouble he is now in concerning Sherman is a most unjust and unconscionable suit. [1 p.]
July 2.
[1637 ?]
16. Her[bert ?] Arnett to his well-wished-unto friend and cousin, Mrs. Alice Carter, at Dinton. Letter of affection written in religious phraseology, and principally founded upon the opinion of a good man, "Mr. Greeãm" [Graham ?], as to the rules to be observed in the selection of a husband or wife. Jethro's choice of Moses as a husband for his daughter is an example commended on many grounds. [1 p.]
July 2. 17. Minute of a petition of the Soapmakers of Bristol, in which they alleged that articles were agreed to in November 1635, by which they were permitted to make 600 tons yearly of soap from olive oil, and to sell the same at 3½d. per pound, paying 4l. per ton to his Majesty. They complained that the soapmakers of London hindered their trade, and prayed that it might be settled in accordance with the said articles. The soapmakers of London were thereupon ordered to attend the Lords, which they did with the answer which is here set down. The agreement alluded to was made without their privity. They leave the Bristol proposal to his Majesty, with certain suggestions for restraining the quantity of soap to be made to the 600 tons above mentioned. [½ p.] Underwritten,
17. i. Request of John Lightfoot that the order in this case might be carefully drawn, and that he might see it before it passed. [5 lines.]
July 2. 18. Minute of the case of William Willis and John Collins, draymen, who wilfully ran their cart against Lord Exeter's coach and overthrew it, he being in it, and when willed to stand still till the coach was passed, they replied, "Hold your prating!" They are in the new prison in Clerkenwell. [½ p.]
July 3.
Hereford.
19. Thomas Church, Mayor of Hereford, to the Council. I received your letter of the 16th June last, purporting that 132l. of the ship-money for Hereford in 1635 is yet unpaid, and requiring me to cause the same to be paid over to Sir William Russell, or otherwise to attend the Board by the end of last term. The letter was delivered the 29th June, which was after the term ended; and as concerning the said moneys I repaired to Walter Wall, mayor of Hereford in 1635, whose answer was that he had paid part of the ship-money charged upon the said city for 1635 to Sir William Russell, and the rest of the money by him collected he would forthwith satisfy. [Seal. ¾ p.]
July 3. 20. Dr. Thomas Rives to [the same]. Upon a petition of Solomon Journeaux, of Jersey, against James Bandinell, of the same island, clerk, which was referred to me, I sent forth my warrant, dated 6th July 1636, requiring Bandinell to appear before me within forty days after sight thereof. Such warrant was showed to him the 20th May last; the 40 days expired about four days since, and no appearance has been made by Bandinell, so that I cannot enter into the merit of the cause. The plaintiff fearing the sudden remove of the Court from Greenwich and the parts near London, has desired me to certify Bandinell's non-appearance, which I do, offering my opinion, that if he shall not appear before the 10th inst., you may allow petitioner his costs, and take such further order for punishing defendant's contempt as to you shall seem fit. [1 p.]
July 3. 21. [Secretary Windebank] to Algernon Earl of Northumberland. The secret treaty with the Infante Cardinal for procuring passes to such fishers of Holland as should take his Majesty's licences, to pass safely to and from the fishing in his Majesty's seas, has failed by the perverseness of the Spanish ministers, and the Hollanders have thereupon refused to take those licences which were sent to Sir William Boswell under the King's hand and signet, nevertheless intending to fish in his Majesty's seas this year, as they have done heretofore, to which purpose many of them are gone towards the north with strong convoys. The King has hereupon commanded me to send you these licences, being about 200, and his pleasure is that you despatch one of the merchant ships under your charge (being not willing to employ any of his own until it appears what the success will be) toward the north, with these licences, to make offer of them to the fishers at the same rates they were taken last year. And if such as take them shall desire to be safe conducted in their return, you are to assure them that his Majesty will cause some of his fleet to accompany them homeward. And thus much his Majesty commanded Mr. Gerbier to make known to the Infante Cardinal and his ministers, but they did not well relish it, nor have yet given any resolution upon it. The like is also signified to Sir William Boswell, who has order to assure the fishers that will take licences, of his Majesty's protection. But if the fishers already upon our coasts refuse these licences, then the Earl is to give advertisement to his Majesty, who will take further resolution. [Draft. Endorsed, "Sent by an express by Witherings." 2 pp.]
July 3. 22. Sir Thomas Reynolds to Sir William Becher. One Partridge, a vintner, has preferred a petition to the Board against me, which is the same in effect which heretofore he preferred to his Majesty, whereunto I made answer, wherewith his Majesty rested satisfied. As this petition has reference to a licence under the great seal, and certain articles from commissioners authorized under the late Lord Nottingham, my suit is that Partridge may produce before you the said licence and articles, to the end I may more particularly answer his complaint. [Seal with arms. ¾ p.]
July 3. Entry on the Admiralty Register of the discharge of William Richardson, formerly sent for to answer matters to be objected against him. [Copy. See Vol. cccliii., fol. 37 b. 1/7; p.]
July 3.
The Leopard.
23. Capt. William Rainsborough to Capt. George Carteret. I pray you at your arrival at Mamora to present the governor with five Portugals and the two French renegades, and if he that is aboard of Capt. Seaman be a renegade, then present him also. [¾ p.]
July 4.
Westminster.
24. Warrant to pay 50l. to John Howsman, postmaster of York, in part of the wages of his office, and a like sum to Alexander Armorer, postmaster of Alnwick, on the like account. [Strip of parchment. 12 lines.]
July 4.
Ipswich.
25. William Cage and William Tyler, bailiffs of Ipswich, to the Council. By reason of infection in Bury St. Edmunds, where the assizes for Suffolk have been usually kept, the judges have appointed the next assizes to be holden at Ipswich on the 31st inst. There are divers other towns visited at this time, but Ipswich is wholly free. There is every year a fair kept in Ipswich on St. James's day, a few days before the assizes. We fear that by the concourse of pedlers, and people who are careless into what places they resort, the town may be infected, which will be of great danger to the country who are to resort thither. For prevention we are suitors that St. James's fair may for the present year be omitted. [Seal with arms. 1 p.]
July 4. 26. Similar letter, but signed by William Cage only. [¾ p.]
July 4. 27. Lord Lieutenant and Justices of Peace for Surrey to the Council. According to your order for payment of money for the visited people in Southwark, all the moneys of these parts have been collected long since, only the parish of Ashstead, whose moneys had likewise been paid in if John Bagg of the same parish had not been defaultive, as appears by certificate of the constable enclosed. [Seal with crest. 1 p.]
July 4.
The Triumph, in the Downs.
28. Algernon Earl of Northumberland to Sec. Windebank. I have received your letter with two boxes of licences. It seems Sir William Boswell has sent me some advertisements of preparations made in Holland for guard of their fishers, but none are yet come to hand; if they were directed to your elder brother [Sec. Coke] I will not wonder at their slow passage. I intend to give Capt. Fielding directions for this service, he being the only man in the merchants' ships capable. You tell me that if the Dutch accept these licences he shall distribute them at the rates given last year; but you give no directions what he shall do if they refuse or avoid coming near him. It is likely to be two or three days before he will be fitted with a pilot and other necessaries; I desire in the meantime you would let me know how he shall behave himself if they prove obstinate, and what means you will direct for his giving notice of his success. If they condescend to what is demanded, and the King resolves to convoy them home, it will require a good number of ships, for they return in small fleets. [Endorsed by Windebank as answered 6th, with despatches of Sir William Boswell of 2nd July and Mr. Gerbier of 4th. 1¾ p.]
July 4.
The St. George, riding at Heleford Slues [Hellevoetsluis].
29. Capt. Edward Popham to Algernon Earl of Northumberland. According to your order directed to the captains of the Pleiades, the Industry, and myself, we wafted to the Brill three vessels with goods and servants of the Prince Elector, and on the 26th June we stood off again to sea. On the 27th there ensued a storm from the N.W., which continued all night. The next day my ship [the Fifth Whelp] took in much water and sprung a leak. I plied the pumps [as minutely described], but she sunk in the afternoon of the 28th June, 16 leagues from the coast of Holland. Seventeen men sunk with the ship; myself and forty men got into a small boat and rowed from four o'clock in the evening until eight the next morning, when we made an English ship riding before the Brill and bound for Rotterdam, where "he" landed me and the rest of my men that were saved. At Rotterdam I had news of some of his Majesty's ships at Hellevoetsluis, where I found the St. George, the Vanguard, and the William, and aboard of these ships I have placed my men. As soon as wind and weather give me leave, I will wait on you with a more full relation, and receive commands for disposing of my men. [2 pp.]
July 4. 30. Receipt of Sir William Russell for 7,024l. 8s. 5d. paid by Henry Capps on behalf of William Paston, sheriff of Norfolk, in part of 7,800l. ship-money charged upon that county by writ of 12th August last. [¾ p.]
July 4.
Office of Assurance, Royal Exchange, London.
31. Policy of Insurance for 800l. on goods shipped on board the Thomas, of Leith, bound from St. Sebastian to Newhaven, in France. The rate of premium was 4l. per cent., and each several assurer underwrote the policy with the amount which he was willing to assure, and gave a receipt for the premium received. [= 2 pp.]
July 4. 32. Petition of Robert Moore to the Lords of the Admiralty. Petitioner buying of John Clutterbuck 13 cwt. of "Barbara" saltpetre, is warned to appear before you to make known where it is. Petitioner sold 10 cwt. to Jasper Selwyn, grocer, who sold the same to Hutchins, a chandler at the Ship on Tower Hill, and the remainder to Heath, a chemist near London Stone. Prays discharge. [½ p.] Annexed,
32. i. Affidavit of John Rowell, haberdasher, of London, that the saltpetre which Moore bought of Clutterbuck was sold for "Barbara" saltpetre. Sworn 4th July 1637. [½ p.]
July 4. 33. See "Returns made by Justices of Peace."
July 5. 34. Paper of notes and memoranda by Nicholas respecting the ship-money, with suggestions for getting in the arrears, and for improving the mode of collection, especially by compelling every sheriff to collect the amount charged upon his county within the year of his shrievalty. Various places are mentioned for inquiry or reduction, as Wokingham, Reading, Wigan, Peterborough, Lynn, Langport Estover, Chichester, Bury St. Edmunds, and Bewdley. [This was probably a paper prepared to be laid before a meeting of a committee of the Council held this day, and which is further mentioned in the next paper. This paper concludes with a brief note of the resolution then passed. 3 pp.]
July 5.
Star Chamber.
Notes by Nicholas of proceedings of a committee of the Council for the business of shipping. Resolved according to his Majesty's pleasure, signified by himself at Greenwich on Sunday last, that every county shall be ordered to set forth ships as in the last year without any alteration. The Lord Keeper said that he had spoken with the judges of assize to advise with the justices of peace about making the rates for all public payments equal. Notes are also given of various new clauses to be drawn by Nicholas, chiefly in conformity with the suggestions mentioned in the preceding paper. [See Vol. ccci., No. 96. 3¾ pp.]
July 5.
Godstone.
35. Certificate of John Evelyn, that there was delivered in June 1636, by William Richardson, a cask of petre weighing 4 cwt. 1 lb. at the then storehouse in Southwark. [¼ p.]
July 5. 36. Examination of John Mohun, son and heir to Lord Mohun, taken by Sec. Windebank. Upon the 3rd inst., about 10 in the morning, examinant, coming down Snow Hill in company of Cassius Burrowes [Borough], son to Sir John Burrowes, king-at-arms, and Obadiah Gossop, chaplain to Lord Mohun, and having with him two of his own servants, crossed the street to avoid a cart, and a coach came suddenly upon examinant, whereupon he struck at the horses to keep them back with a cane which he had in his hand, which the coachman espying lashed at him with his whip; examinant struck the coachman with his cane, and the coachman lashed at him again; then one of examinant's servants, John Ennis, a Dutchman, drew his sword and struck at the coachman, whereupon one that sat in the boot of the coach drew his sword and struck or thrust at examinant, which he bore off with his cane, as appears by a mark thereon. As soon as examinant was disengaged from the coach, he drew his sword and struck at the coach as it passed by, but knows not that he hurt any man in the coach. [¾ p.]
July 5. 37. Examination of Cassius Borough. Details the circumstances above mentioned with some additions. The coach was that of Lord Savage, but they knew it not at the time. Mohun struck the horses "to avoid crushing against the houses." Ennis thought to have cut the coachman's reins, "because he drove away so fast that he could have no other satisfaction." Examinant drew his sword rather to defend himself than to offend others, but struck not at the coach. Knows not how Lord Lumley came hurt. As soon as Lord Savage spoke to examinant and warned him, he retired, and caused Ennis and others to desist. [1 p.]
July 6.
Westminster.
38. Warrant to pay 290l. to Jeremy [Jerome] Earl of Portland, or so much thereof as shall be expedient in building a lodge for Humphrey Rogers, one of the keepers of the Great Park of Richmond, Surrey, estimated at 295l. or thereabouts. [Strip of parchment. 12 lines.]
July 6. Petition of Carr Coventry to the King. Thomas Russell, of Lambeth, had the making of 1,815 tons of soft soap yearly under the corporation of the soapmakers of Westminster, at St. Katherine's. In consideration of a sum of money delivered to Russell, he granted, on 24th March 1634, to petitioner that he should receive 4s. upon every ton made at that house, which for divers months petitioner received, but for two years past he has not received any profit at all. Russell having some share left in the soap, is suddenly to dispose of the same. Petitioner prays a reference to some of the Council, that they may send for the governor and some of the assistants to show cause why they should not give satisfaction to the petitioner. [Copy. See Vol. cccxxiii., p. 93. 1 p.] Underwritten,
i. Reference to Archbishop Laud, the Lord Keeper, the Lord Treasurer, Lord Cottington, and Secretaries Coke and Windebank, to determine these differences. Whitehall, 6th July 1637. [Copy. Ibid., p. 94. ¼ p.]
July 6.
Chatham Hill.
39. Officers of Navy to Lords of the Admiralty. According to your warrant of 23rd May last, for the survey of provisions, we appointed two Trinity masters, with a brewer and a butcher, to view all the victual they could see in preparation for his Majesty's or the merchant ships, and to certify their proceeding for prevention of the abuses which victuallers and pursers usually practised, for delivering and receiving less than their due proportion, as also by remissness in preservation of each sort to continue good, wherein these men have used their utmost endeavours, as by the copy of their certificate herewith sent may appear. Yet we are of opinion that unless the officers in every ship take an exact account of the quality and quantity delivered to them, there may be much fraud, it being not possible for a few men to survey in all places where the victuals are provided, and see it on board the particular ships in due proportion. [1 p.]
39. i. Survey of marine victuals provided since 27th March 1637. The surveyors state what provisions they had inspected, and that the same were very good and serviceable, only the drysalted beef in the storehouse at Tower Hill was somewhat scanty in weight. 24th May 1637. [3 pp.]
July 6. 40. The same to the same. Report on reference of Mr. Fleming's petition (see Vol. pp. 222, 234). By reason of his infirmity (the service requiring an able and active man) we hold it fit that such a change were; but for the gentleman specified, he is best known at Court, where he has been bred. We are so little acquainted with his abilities, that we are not able to inform you of his fitness for the place. [1 p.]
July 6. 41. Sec. Windebank to Algernon Earl of Northumberland. I perceive by your letter of the 4th inst. that the direction which I gave by his Majesty's command, as to what is to be done if the Dutch refuse to take the licences, is not so clearly understood as I intended. There was a passage in my despatch to this purpose, that if the fishers refuse these licences, you are to give advertisement to his Majesty, who will take further resolution. The truth is, his Majesty is not willing to proceed roundly with them, and therefore holds this way of inviting them to acknowledge his right, without sending his whole fleet, which would be a manifest obligation in honour to perfect the work notwithstanding any opposition, which might be of dangerous consequence to the present condition of his affairs. Therefore, in case of refusal, he chooses to have time to consider what resolution to settle. You may instruct the party whom you employ to advertise the success, especially if they accept not the licences, without proceeding further until his Majesty shall give order. For the safe conducting, his Majesty will govern himself according to the success of the former, and the advice he shall receive from you or the party whom you employ. His Majesty is now at Havering, and so I have not the commodity to acquaint him with your last despatch, but I understand his purpose so particularly that you need not doubt to take this way. I send the two last despatches I received from Sir William Boswell and Mr. Gerbier, by which you will understand the ground of what I wrote in my last. [Copy, in handwriting of Windebank. 1⅓ p.]
July 6. 42. News-letter of C. Rossingham. Minute account of Bastwick, Burton, and Prynne being put into the pillory at Westminster, and their ears being cut off. The "light common people strewed herbs and flowers before" Dr. Bastwick, and when Burton's ears were cut off, the people wept and grieved much, "and at the cutting off of each ear there was such a roaring as if every one of them had at the same instant lost an ear." In another place it is stated that "the humours of the people were various; some wept, some laughed, and some were very reserved." Before the Prince Elector's going, the King declared to him that but for his business he was the happiest King or Prince in all Christendom, which is most true. Archbishop Laud's vindication of the right of the bishops to send out their citations in their own name, and opinion of the judges to that effect. A proclamation to be issued that the subject may be more conformable to Bishops' Courts. Lord Stanhope had petitioned the King for some reward on his resignation of his postmaster's office against his will. Sentence in the Admiralty Court in a cause between a Genoese merchant and Capt. Walter Steward. Further progress made in hearing the cause against the Bishop of Lincoln. Archbishop Laud's declaration of his unacquaintance with Kilvert, the solicitor against the bishop. The Attorney-General had remarked that it was not possible to wash the bishop clear of his private tampering with witnesses. Prynne's epigram on the branding his cheeks with S.L., made on his return from the pillory to the Tower:—
Triumphant I return! My face descries
Laud's scorching scars—God's grateful sacrifice.
S.L. Stigmata Laudis.
Stigmata maxellis bajulans, insignia Laudis,
Exultans remeo, victima grata Deo! [4 pp.]
July 6. 43. Richard Poole to Nicholas. Francis Brown, son-in-law to Mr. Burrowes, has been in two [saltpetre] deputations with him. I certify this at Brown's request. P.S.—Brown is an honest and able man. [¾ p.]
[July 6.]
About.
44. Petition of Thomas Horth to the Committees for ending the differences between John Dick and petitioner. At Oatlands, on 3rd inst., the Earl of Linlithgow and some other of the referees, at the instance of John Dick, and upon his pretence that security was given to petitioner to his liking, in the absence of petitioner ordered that he should deliver oils according to agreement, and give security for the same. Forasmuch as neither Dick, Nathaniel Edwards, nor any other for them have given security, although demanded before the ships departed, nor deposited money, and refuse to take off petitioner's adventure as his materials should be appraised by two of the Greenland merchants, or to accept of Greenland whale oil to be delivered at 16l. per ton, and for that the ships set out this year, which are at more charge than 600l. per month, can have no advice before their return to Yarmouth, his suit is that the Committees would call Dick and petitioner before them to put that business to some reasonable end. [¾ p.]
July 6. 45. Receipt of William Murray, groom of the bedchamber, for 50l. paid by John Savile, one of the tellers of the Exchequer, being assigned to Murray out of 300l. payable to Richard Erwin upon his annuity, for one year ended at Michaelmas 1636. [½ p.]
July 6. 46. Receipt of Sir William Russell for 5,000l. paid by Rene Bailly on behalf of John Lucas, Sheriff of Essex, in part of 8,000l. ship-money charged upon that county by writ of 12th August last. [1 p.] Annexed,
46. i. Receipt of the same for 2,100l. paid by Sir Cranmer Harris, Sheriff of Essex, on account of ship-money from that county under writ of 20th October 1634. 26th March 1635. [¾ p.]
46. ii. Another receipt of the same for 346l. 3s. 10d. paid by Sir Cranmer Harris further on account of ship-money from Essex under writ of 20th October 1634. 26th March 1635. [¾ p.]
July 6. 47. Similar receipt for 20l. paid by Rice Gwyn on behalf of James Lewis, late Sheriff of co. Cardigan, in part of 5,000l. ship-money charged upon South Wales by writ of 4th August 1635. [⅓ p.]
July 6. 48. The like for 700l. paid by Robert Sleddall, on behalf of Sir Patricius Curwen, Sheriff of Cumberland, on account of ship-money charged upon that county under writ of 12th August last. [¾ p.] Annexed,
48. i. The like for 15l. paid by Peter Mowson on behalf of Ambrose Nicholson, Mayor of Carlisle, ship-money collected in the said town under writ of 20th October 1634. 14th April 1635. [1 p.]
48. ii. The like for 180l. paid by Peter Mowson on behalf of Richard Barrow, Sheriff of Cumberland, on account of ship-money charged upon that county under writ of 20th October 1634. 14th April 1635. [1 p.]
July 6. Lords of the Admiralty to Algernon Earl of Northumberland. His Majesty approves your proposition for one of his smaller ships, or a merchant ship, and the Swan frigate, to be sent out of the fleet for Sallee, and commands us to give you order to cause a ship, with the Swan, to be supplied out of other ships of the fleet, with two months' victual, and to be hastened to Sallee, to be put under the command of Capt. Rainsborough. His Majesty likewise approves Capt. Rainsborough's stay at Sallee two months longer if he conceives there will be a probability for him to accomplish the business thereby, and you are to cause the Treasurer of the Fleet to send to Rainsborough so much money as you shall think sufficient to bear the charge of supplying his ships with fresh meat from the shore there, which it is affirmed may be easily gotten, and at reasonable rates. [Copy. See Vol. cccliii., fol. 37 b. 1 p.]
[July 6.] 49. Richard Delamain to Sec. Windebank. Since my being with you I have been put to a great deal of travel from place to place and party to party, which I gladly underwent, that so I might not come naked before you, but give full information concerning the place which the Prince Elector moved the King in my behalf, concerning which I was told by Sir John Heydon that one of the engineers mentioned in my petition was Pierre Borre, and that he was dead, or had left the King's service, and that Mr. Burlamachi could inform me. His reply is enclosed. Thanks unto you for moving the King for me, which I will shortly report to the Prince's Highness, who I know will thank you. [1 p.] Enclosed,
49. i. Certificate of Philip Burlamachi. Pierre Borre was in the King's service as one of his engineers in 1627, and about 1630 went beyond the seas, and has since remained there, and, as far as I hear say, is there settled. Dated July 6th 1627, [probably by mistake for 1637. ½ p.]
July [7 ?] 50. Officers of the Mint at the Tower to the King. Report on a proposal of Thomas Bushell for setting up a mint in Wales. Whether such a proposal may be agreeable to his Majesty's service, we submit to his great wisdom. Besides payments to officers, there are many disbursements to labourers and others, necessarily incident to a mint; but if Bushell should pay yearly 100l. for the property of this intended mint, and so take all upon himself at adventure, his Majesty will not be informed of the state of the mint, which we esteem to be a matter of great consequence. It is further urged that mints have been ever erected in cities of great traffic, and now only in the Tower of London, as a place of honour and security, and near his Majesty and the Council, before whom the trial of the pix must be; and that it should be considered whether a mint should be erected before it be ascertained that there will be a sufficient quantity of bullion to employ the same. [1¾ p.]
July 7.
Star Chamber.
51. Order of Council, on the letter of Lord Dunsmore, calendared Vol. ccclxii., No. 62. Having subscribed among the rest of the adventurers for the business of fishing, he ought to pay the money subscribed to Peter Richaut, treasurer of the Earl Marshal's association, without any further delay. [Copy. ¾ p.]
July 7. 52. Draft of the same, slightly differing from the above. [¾ p.]
[July 7.] 53. Petition of inhabitants of Wigan, co Lancaster, to the Council. Wigan was made a borough in 30th Henry III. They have no other means of maintenance, save their small burgages and making pots and pans. The number of their poor is so great, as they are enforced to seek relief from others to maintain them. The former sheriff, who is a stranger to the town, taxed them at 50l. to the shipmoney, and the present sheriff would not alter it without authority. The sum is altogether unfit and disproportionable. Pray a reference to examine the case, petitioners having paid the former sum, and being willing to do as much as their share. [1 p.]
July 7. 54. Order of the Council on the preceding petition, that Wigan shall be left out of the ship-money writ for this year, and be henceforth rated with the country in such indifferent manner as other places. [Copy. Endorsed is a memorandum of probably what the petitioners desired, viz., a reference to the Bishop of Chester, Sir Gilbert Hoghton, Roger Downes, and Mr. Standish of Ducksbury [Dewsbury ?], and that the money for the last year be spared or reduced yearly to 20l. 1½ p.]
[July 7?] 55. Petition of inhabitants of Cranbrook, Kent, to the Council. This town and other parishes adjoining have for many hundred years past subsisted by the trade of clothing, whereby they have not only maintained themselves, but many thousands of poor people within this county and Sussex. Now, John Browne, by a commission for making brass or iron ordnance and shot, has seized upon the greatest part of such woods as were felled, and by petitioners bought, whereby the ancient trade of cloth-making is like to fall to decay. Pray the Lords to restrain Mr. Browne from seizing any woods which petitioners may buy for their necessary provision and trade, and that no furnace may be by him erected within the said parish, wood being at so great rate and of such necessity for their trade, there being many furnaces to be had for his Majesty's use in Sussex, not above 10 or 12 miles off, where cloth-making is not used and woods are more plentiful. [¾ p.]
July 7. 56. Answer of John Browne to the preceding petition. The number of poor and the "assesses" for them in Cranbrook and its neighbourhood is much increased by reason the poor employed by them cannot live upon the wages allowed them. For that he could not supply himself with wood for his Majesty's service, he did by warrant from the Board take some wood from wood-brokers, iron-masters, and clothiers, but not all or the greatest part as alleged. He also, on request of the clothiers, restored them their wood, or sufficient for their occasions, his aim not being to prejudice the clothiers, but to restrain the wood-brokers and iron-masters, who have engrossed great part of the woods thereabouts, raising the price from 5s. to 11s. the cord. He only continues the use of one ancient furnace in Cranbrook. Ordnance and shot cannot be made without wood, but cloth may be made with sea-coals. In London the dyers of cloth and of far richer stuffs use nothing but sea-coal, and the inhabitants of Cranbrook may have their coals conveniently from Maidstone or Newenden. It argues ill affection to his Majesty's service to desire his founder to pull down his works, when they suffer many ironmasters and wood-brokers to buy wood without complaint, preferring a small advantage of their own to 5,000l. charge to the King, in the removal (as they would have it) into Sussex. It would be more convenient for the clothiers to remove into Sussex. Prays that the clothiers may use sea-coals, and that he may take wood at such price as it was at 14 years since. [1 p.]
July 7.
The Star Chamber.
57. Order of the Council upon the preceding petition of the clothiers and reply of John Browne, that they will hear the said complaint on the 3rd November next. Browne is to have notice hereof, and the Officers of Ordnance also may attend. [1 p.]
July 7.
Dartmouth.
58. Thomas Spurwaie, Mayor of Dartmouth, and John Plumleigh to the Council. On 29th June last, Frenchmen to the number of one hundred persons and upwards, being lately taken by Dunkirkers, were brought into Torbay, where they were landed (being left altogether destitute), who, repairing unto that town, are likely there to continue burthensome. Further, the Dunkirk men of war within this year last past have, in like manner, put on shore at Torbay poor Frenchmen and others, to the number of forty or fifty at a time, to the great charge of the inhabitants, and no less disturbance of his Majesty's subjects in several places adjoining. Refer the consideration hereof to the Lords. [Seal with arms. 1 p.]
July 7.
London.
59. John Earl of Bridgewater, President of the Council of Wales, to the same. Report on a reference of a business concerning Henry Lort. The complaint was that Lort had exported corn to foreign parts. The Earl does not find any evidence of it, save that in 1629 he transported corn into Ireland. Roger Lort confesses that his father exported corn in two barks, one to Bristol and one to Beaumaris, but proved that the markets of Pembroke and Tenby were well supplied by him, and that the corn sent away was out of his overplus, he having more corn than the country would buy of him, and it is demanded what should become of it if he might not export it. No corn has been exported since the Lord Treasurer's warrant. There is other evidence upon the subject in the country, Lort imagining the business would have been examined at Ludlow, but the certifiers press that it may be determined here. [1½ p.]
July 7. Entry on the Admiralty Register of the appearance before the Lords of Robert Rigge. He was ordered to attend until discharged. [See Vol. cccliii., fol. 38. 1/6 p.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to Capt. William Rainsborough. Have acquainted his Majesty with your letter from Sallee Roads of 20th May last, and likewise with the articles of peace agreed upon between you on behalf of his Majesty, and the Saint of Old Sallee. His Majesty approves what you have done, and has given order to the Earl of Northumberland to send you one of the ships belonging to the fleet, with the Swan frigate, and likewise order and money to supply your fleet with victuals, whereby to lengthen your stay there two months longer. We much marvel that the pinnaces were not arrived at Sallee before the date of your letter, they being gone out of the Thames in April last. [Copy. See Vol. cccliii., fol. 38. ½ p.]
July 7.
The Triumph, in the Downs.
60. Algernon Earl of Northumberland to Sec. Windebank. Now that by your letter of the 6th inst. I understand his Majesty's intention, I purpose to despatch the captain away, with directions not to engage in a dispute, nor to use any violence to compel the Dutchmen to take the licences, but fairly to intimate to them the occasion of his being there, and overland to give you notice of his success. If they should prove obstinate he is to repair hither again. Two days before I went over to the coast of Holland to wait upon the Prince Elector, I received from Mr. Gerbier an advertisement of some ill-affected persons to this state, who had a purpose to transport themselves from Flanders into England, and therefore he desired me to give warrant to the captains of those vessels under my charge that used those parts not to receive any on board without a private pass from him. Though by this letter I did not understand anything of the business, yet I was careful to give order as desired. Yesterday Cole, a post, wrote me word that, notwithstanding this order, Capt. Buller has admitted aboard his frigate these prohibited persons, which, if it be true, deserves severe punishment. To prevent their landing I sent out three ships several ways to meet him in his passage betwixt Dunkirk and England, and to command him to come to me, not suffering any in his frigate to land. What design these men can have I am not able to guess. I hope Mr. Gerbier apprehends more danger than there is cause for. A poor man came yesterday to me to complain that his bark was lately taken by a sloop of Calais, as he was going for Dunkirk under the protection of Capt. Buller's frigate; he blames Buller very much, but I have not yet heard what Buller can say. This poor man desired your favour, but I could give him very little hope of the recovery of his goods. [2½ pp.]
July 7.
Lambeth.
61. Archbishop Laud to Edward Viscount Conway and Killultagh. Your kindness has put me into great arrear; I have received three letters from you and have not returned one. The truth is, I was never so tired with a term in my life, and we have yet three days to come in the Star Chamber. It was news that they of Sallee were setting forty sail to sea, and that they were prevented by the coming of Capt. Rains[borough]. 'Tis great pity some way should not be thought on to stay him there till it be nearer Michaelmas. I perceive by this that it will be no hard matter, if the King please, to make them of Sallee understand themselves. The beginning of your letter puts me in mind of a poor man, yet a friend of yours, concerning whom you told me that he was the only man that spoke truth in court. For there you tell a story of a wise king and a wise man that came to him, and an honest withal, who left others to tell the news that was bad; after you apply the story and tell me that the weather is too cold (as warm as it is) for honesty nakedly to profess itself, that season being usually as short as a summer in Muscovia, and will easily grow cold if it find not some art to cover it. I will make bold to tell that court acquaintance what he wants, and advise him to clothe it with art or somewhat else against a cold season. And if he be not too old, he will take good heed of that which you have mentioned in so ingenious a way. I am of opinion that if those who have letters of marque are allowed to take goods out of Dutch bottoms it will destroy the King's customs at Dover, and so I declared myself where it was proper to speak. I hope that business is settled. For Nuesman [?] 'tis he should be punished, but that belongs to the Lords of the Admiralty. I hope you have written to some of them about it. I am sorry to hear that pinnaces will be wanting at Sallee, especially such as may serve to take the small boats there; but more a great deal that the pinnaces you have are so ill goers, and that the King loses both his money and business by the want of art of those who think they have enough, which opinion of "enough !" implies very many things bad enough. I will not fail to acquaint his Majesty with this. I am glad the Prince Elector had [a safe] passage, especially considering what befell his topsails, and that [water came in] at the lower ports. That which you tell me under the rose will remain safe, lest I should offend against your apologue of your wise king and his good man. But to say truth I would it had been p . . . ., since it might so easily have been done. [Modern copy made from an original among the Conway papers. 1 p.]
July 7. 62. Modern abstract of the same letter made from the original. This and the preceding article are in the handwriting of the late Mr. Thomas Crofton Croker. [2/3 p.]
July 7. 63. Answer of Bishop Pierce, of Bath and Wells, to petition of Sir Francis Popham, respecting the right of presentation to Buckland St. Mary, Somerset, calendared Vol. ccclxii., No. 114. Gilbert, Bishop of Bath and Wells, collated John Bowbeare to the rectory of Buckland St. Mary on 24th January 1579, it being then void by the death of Richard Batty, the last incumbent, the same appertaining to the bishop's donation "jure sibi devoluto" without mention of lapse. Bowbeare was the last incumbent. He died in the beginning of February last. The bishop took the opinions of Serjeant Glanville and Dr. Duck, who stated that if he collated upon that title, the collatee would enjoy the rectory for this turn, and could not be put out by quare impedit, but the patron's remedy was to bring his writ of advowson. Hereupon the bishop collated his son William Pierce, not for the value, it being only 100l. per annum, but for the goodness of the air, his son being of a sickly constitution. The bishop disputes Sir Francis Popham's assertion that he is the undoubted patron, because he has no manor there, but only a "quillet" of land not worth about 40s. or 3l. per annum. Also denies that Sir Francis's predecessors ever presented to this benefice, and that the bishop's predecessor collated by lapse, and that what he has done tends to the prejudice of Sir Francis's inheritance, for he may bring his writ of right. Refuses to yield to Sir Francis's suggestion to have his right referred, but if Sir Francis will not trouble the bishop's son, and will show his right upon his bringing his writ of right, the bishop will confess it without further suit. Prays the archbishop therefore to allow them both to proceed to a trial of law. [5⅓ pp.]
July 7. 64. See "Returns made by Justices of Peace."
July 8.
Westminster.
65. Warrant to pay 94l. 16s. 4d. to Francis Witherid, surveyor of his Majesty's stables, for new planking the stables at Sheen, against the going thither of his Majesty's great horses, as also for repair of the coach-house, farrier's forge, garner, haybarns, and riding-house. [Strip of parchment. 12 lines.]
July 8.
London House.
Notes by Nicholas of business to be transacted by the Lords of the Admiralty. Sign saltpetremen's deputations; also estimates sent by Officers of the Navy. There attends the Lords Mr. Rigge, sent for on complaint of Mr. Edisbury. Consider Sir Henry Marten's report concerning the Marshal's place of Ireland, and touching ferriage there. Peruse letters from Officers of the Navy and Sir Henry Marten. Consider a paper presented by Capt. Pett to the King concerning launching the great ship, and bringing the Prince into dock at Woolwich; upon which paper his Majesty has written his pleasure. Despatch three or four petitions, in regard the Lords are not likely to meet again suddenly. The Committee appointed to examine the state of the Chest at Chatham have returned certificates to the Lords. Consider Mr. Evelyn's petition. The Earl of Portland presents a petition of inhabitants of the Isle of Wight, with an inventory of the Turkish vessel stayed at Hurst, and sold since at an undervalue. The Earl also desires to know whether the bond taken of the merchant that had the Turks shall be put in suit. [See this present Volume, No. 2. ½ p.]
July 8.
London House.
Commissioners for Gunpowder to the King. Report upon the accounts of Mr. Evelyn as manufacturer of gunpowder for the King from April 1621 to May 1635, with reference to the objections made thereto by the Officers of the Ordnance. The Officers objected that he had brought in 1480 lasts less than the quantity stipulated by his contract. He showed that the petremen had failed in their deliveries to him of 700 lasts, that he had supplied the counties by warrants with 131 lasts, and that he had sold 609 lasts, as allowed by his contract on failure of payment. The Officers called upon him to account for 2,000l. imprested in 1624. He answered that on renewing his contract a reduction of payment for the gunpowder was stipulated, which he consented to on the terms of not being called upon to repay that 2,000l. Lastly, it appeared that he had delivered 47 lasts 7 cwt. of gunpowder made out of his own saltpetre, over and above what he had made from the King's saltpetre. [Copy. See Vol. ccxcii., p. 61. 2⅓ pp.]
July 8.
London House.
Order of the Commissioners for Gunpowder. The saltpetre-makers, upon taking their new deputations, desired that the Commissioners would order that their petre might be received into his Majesty's store as they bring it in, and duly weighed once a week or a fortnight, to the end that they may be paid for the same according to covenant. It was ordered that his Majesty's gunpowder-maker and the clerk appointed to weigh his Majesty's saltpetre take order that such saltpetre should be received and weighed accordingly. [Copy. Ibid., p. 63. 2/3 p.]
July 8. 66. Petition of John Reston, [deputy-] keeper of his Majesty's prison at Dover, to the Lords of the Admiralty. By warrant from the said Lords to the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, command was given for imprisoning 17 Frenchmen upon suspicion of piracy, and thereupon the Lord Warden gave directions to the Mayor and Jurats of Dover for their safe keeping, who, by their warrant of 9th July 1636, required petitioner to take into his custody the said Frenchmen, which he did, and kept 15 of them for 7 months at his own charge. These Frenchmen had two shallops furnished with ammunition, which were sold to John Jacob, sergeant to the Admiralty of the Cinque Ports, in whose hands the money remains. Prays that the sergeant make payment to petitioner for the diet and charges of the prisoners. [¾ p.] Underwritten,
66. i. "The Lords conceive this concerns the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, and therefore think not fit to meddle in it. London House, 8th July 1637." [¼ p.]
July 8. 67. Petition of Robert Rigge, of Fareham, to the same. The Officers of the Navy, upon false suggestions of James Robins, his Majesty's purveyor, required satisfaction from petitioner touching the matters complained of. Their letter came to petitioner on 18th June at Greenwich, upon sight whereof he repaired to Sir William Russell and answered him. Petitioner stayed in London till 29th June, and then repaired to his dwelling 60 miles hence, but he had hardly been at home four days when he was sent for by a messenger, in whose custody he remains. Believes Robins waited his opportunity to cause petitioner to be fetched up as soon as he came home, and that he complains for mere vexation, to keep petitioner from the assizes held on Thursday next, at which he knows petitioner has business, and may by his absence suffer 300l. or 400l. damages. Prays a speedy hearing, or reference to Capt. Towerson, the ViceAdmiral who lives at Portsmouth. [1 p.]
July 8. 68. Petition of Edward Stevens, shipwright, to the Lords of the Admiralty. About 12 months sithence petitioner having 23 masts at Blackwall, he offered them for sale to the Officers of the Navy, and such masts being very scarce, after inspection by Peter Pett, his Majesty's shipwright at Deptford, and Robert Clements, mastmaker, who certified their goodness, the officers purchased them at 284l. 7s. 6d., to be paid upon delivery of the masts. Petitioner states that he had made numerous applications to Sir William Russell, who put him off from time to time, and now denies to pay. Prays relief. [¾ p.] Underwritten,
68. i. Direction that Sir William Russell should send the Lords an answer in writing. London House, 8th July [1637]. [¼ p.]
68. ii. Answer of Sir William Russell. He refused to pay petitioner. i. Because he was in Cambridgeshire when the masts were contracted for, and was noways privy to the contract. ii. Petitioner bought these masts with other goods, and his profit is near 200l. on that parcel, which is not fit to be allowed. iii. Sir William tendered him his masts again or to reduce the price, which he would not do. iv. Of all sorts of masts, these, being Norway masts, are the worst. v. Sir William might have been blamed if he had readily paid him, after he had informed himself of the great gain he had made. vi. Such masts may easily be had, and are the worse for keeping. [2/3 p.]
July 8. Minute of the above petition, and copy of the reference on the same. [See Vol. cccliii., fol. 40 b. ⅓ p.]
July 8. 69. John Basford to the [Council]. On Tuesday, 28th March, I received my despatch, and on Saturday I had my letter of credit, and that night went to Rye, where till Monday night I stayed for a wind. On that day Paul Greensmith, his Majesty's searcher, desired to see my pass. Being in Latin he did not understand it, but demanded my name, and took sixpence for his fee as searcher, and a groat for town dues. That night the wind became fair, and aboard I went. At the last moment, Greensmith and Porter, the searchers, seized my male. I begged them to forbear, assuring them that the contents were letters of state for his Majesty's ambassadors in France and Italy, yet they violently carried my male ashore, which compelled me to follow. At the Custom House they pressed me to open it, yet did not find anything but what I have mentioned, except some pieces of eight and gardecues for my expenses on my journey. Detaining the contents, and having searched my person, they consulted with Bambridge, clerk of the passes, who had formerly said that I had an old pass of Lord Fielding's, whereupon they resolved to hinder my passage, and, alleging that they had authority to detain me for the number of my letters, would render nothing without my Lord Treasurer's warrant. I forthwith returned to London and obtained it; but on my going back to Rye they answered that his lordship might dispose of his Majesty's part, but of theirs he could not, so I was constrained a second time to return for his Majesty's order. I pray you to consider this detention, I having been many years in his Majesty's service in sundry foreign parts, and compel the searchers and clerk to render me satisfaction. [2¾ pp.]
July 8.
London.
70. Sir James Bagg to Nicholas. The Lords' directions for seizing a frigate of St. Sebastian, commanded by Francisco Barnardo, with forty persons in her (see 22nd June) are obeyed, but the gaoler will be scrupulous to receive the crew, for the number is many, and no allowance given for their relief. I entreat you to move the Lords for warrant to the sheriff and justices, that such provision may be made for them, and others of that nature hereafter, as is ordained for thieves or felons on shore, and likewise that they will order commissions of Oyer and Terminer for Devon and Cornwall for the speedy trial of them and others. [Seal with arms. 1 p.]
July 8.
Whitbourne.
71. Bishop Coke, of Hereford, to Archbishop Laud. Since my last to your grace, I have received the enclosed complaint from Mr. Dean's registrar, whom he appointed by your direction to execute the office for the exempts at his visitation. You may see the boldness of this registrar, Lawrence, who, notwithstanding the reference of this whole business to you, is yet full of trouble and threatening, and so much more will he be in his place, if he be suffered to go on without curb. [Seal with arms. 1 p.]
71. i. Allegations by Pauncefoot Wall concerning the registrars of the diocese of Hereford. 1. Notwithstanding the archbishop's letter to the bishop, Fitzwilliam Lawrence has threatened to prosecute me at common law for executing the place of registrar throughout the exempts during your present visitation. 2. Both the registrars caused the writer to be arrested and put in security to answer them at common law this term. He has offered a reference, which they refuse. 3. Mr. Lawrence came into the bishop's court, holden the 17th June, and told the writer, in a proud braving manner, that he was but his deputy, and that he expected the accounts of this visitation. 4. Upon the visitation of the peculiars there came in a churchwarden and sidesman, who alleged that they had been cited, and paid their fees to the other registrars. 5. Since the visitation of the cathedral, Mr. Lawrence has taxed the writer "for not enacting that bold tender" of Lawrence to become your registrar, and threatens to disgrace him. [1½ p.]
July 8. 72. Case of the Master and Warden of the shipwrights of Redrith [Rotherhithe] against Thomas Mayden and William Hooke, shipwrights, who refuse to belong to the said corporation of shipwrights, or to take the oath required by them not to serve any foreign prince, on the ground that they are members of an ancient brotherhood entitled the Free Shipwrights of London. The prejudicial results of allowing this objection are in this case submitted to the Lords of the Admiralty. [12/3 p.]
July 8. 73. Case of the before-named Thomas Mayden and William Hooke in opposition to the claims of the shipwrights of Rotherhithe. They state that proceedings had been formerly taken against them in Chancery by the shipwrights of Rotherhithe, and against John Mutley, another member of the shipwrights of London, for enforcing obedience to the corporation of Rotherhithe, all which had failed. [1½ p.]
July 8.
London House.
Lords of the Admiralty to [the Keeper of the Marshalsea]. To set at liberty Rice Thomas, late master gunner of the Tenth Whelp. [Copy. See Vol. cccliii., fol. 38 b. ½ p.]
July 8. 74. Account by Sir William Russell of ship-money in arrear under writs issued in August 1635. Total, 9,205l. 9s. 2½d., with underwritten memorandum of Nicholas, which reduces the amount to 6,205l. [1 p.]
July 8. 75. Similar account of the ship-money received and in arrear under writs issued in August 1636. Total received, 139,526l. 0s. 7d.; in arrear, 57,073l. 19s. 5d. [1 p.]
July 8. 76. Account of ship-money levied and remaining in the hands of the sheriffs under writs issued in October 1636. Total, 8,953l., making, with the 139,526l. above mentioned, 148,479l. collected. [1 p.]
July 8. 77. Certificates of witnesses against Robert Rigge, undertaker on the part of the county of Hants for the carriage of 1,000 loads of timber to the water-side at Fareham, at 3s. 4d. per load. He is accused of having detained from the carters 4d. on every load. That his servants, bringing timber to Ware's Ash, were commanded by James Robins, the purveyor, to carry it to the water-side, but they refused, alleging their master's direction, so that it will cost his Majesty as much more to bring it from Ware's Ash to the water's edge. His servants also cut the long timber against Robins's order. The Officers of the Navy hired a yard of Widow West, of Busselden, for putting the timber in for safety, but Rigge forbade the workmen to put it there. He was also charged with not repairing the bridge at Fareham Quay, which he is bound to do, he taking quayage. Besides detaining the 4d. per load, as before mentioned, he is charged with desiring to have the King's price paid to him, against which it is contended that if he be allowed to lay the timber where he will, the King's price will not suffice to carry it where it ought to be. [2¾ pp.]
July 8. 78. Certificate of Anthony Kirle and John Clutterbuck, that it was acknowledged the three quantities of saltpetre in question on Richardson's account had been delivered respectively to Mr. Evelyn, Thomas Moore, and Walter Hill. [½ p.]
July 8. 79. See "Returns made by Justices of Peace."
July 9.
Greenwich.
80. The King to Bishop Mainwaring, of St. David's. Among the cares that attend the princely office, that of the Church has ever had the first place, whereupon we, well weighing what havoc has been made of it, and the goodly endowments thereof in former times, and what great inconveniences must arise, both to Church and commonwealth, if the authority of bishops be not supported as it ought, which cannot be if their means of livelihood be taken away, and being informed that the rectory of Kerry, co. Montgomery, is a lease of good value belonging to the bishopric of St. David's, and that the rectory of Glascomb, co. Radnor, is likewise held by lease from the said bishopric, we think it fitting that both those rectories, after the expiration of the several leases, be for ever kept in the hands of the bishop for the time being, or disposed of for his use; all leases granted by any bishop determining upon his leaving the see. [Copy. Archbishop Laud has stated in the endorsement that "Dr. Mainwaring, the bishop, submitted to this by his letters, October 16th 1637." 1⅓ p.]
[July 9 ?] 81. Petition of Bishop Williams, of Lincoln, to the King. Two informations have been prosecuted by your Attorney-General in the Star Chamber against petitioner, one of which is ready for sentence by the Lords, before whom petitioner acknowledges to have had a just and honourable hearing. Petitioner, not relying upon his defence, nor holding himself safe in anything but your Majesty's mercy and goodness, beseeches your Majesty to take a representation of his cause from those Lords who have heard the same, and yourself to be his judge therein, not leaving him to a public sentence. [¾ p.]
July 9.
Greenwich.
82. Order of the King in Council. Recites order of the Board of the 2nd inst., that William Willis and John Collins, the two drawmen [draymen] who ran their cart against the coach of the Earl of Exeter, should be indicted and whipped through the town. Also that the said persons were indicted, but that the jury, contrary to the testimony of four witnesses, had acquit them. It is ordered that they shall be presently whipped publicly through the town, as well for their bold and insolent carriage towards the said Earl as for an example to others, and after their whipping be committed to Bridewell, to be kept at work until further order. [Copy. 2 pp.] Underwritten,
82. i. Certificate that Willis and Collins were on the 12th inst. whipped at a cart, and afterwards committed to Bridewell. [Copy. ¾ p.]
July 9. 83. Another copy of the preceding order, with the certificate underwritten. [In the whole, 1 p.]
July 9. Petition of Dame Mary Croft, widow, to the King. John Bowen, of Carmarthen, being trusted with receipt of petitioner's revenue, refused to give an account or to pay the money, whereupon she was forced to a suit in Chancery, and 965l. was decreed unto her, and upon his refusal to pay he is committed to the Fleet, where he continues still obstinate, for which he is fined by that court 1,000l. As petitioner is still without her money, and Bowen, having been five times an under-sheriff, is a man of ability to pay, she beseeches his Majesty to bestow the said fine of 1,000l. upon her. [Copy. See Vol. cccxxiii., p. 125. ¾ p.] Underwritten,
i. His Majesty bestowing the said fine upon petitioner, the Attorney General is to prepare a bill accordingly. Greenwich, 9th July 1637. [Copy. Ibid., p. 126. ¼ p.]
July 9. Petition of Mic[hael] Oldisworth to the King. It was represented to your Majesty in Trinity Term, from petitioner by Sec. Windebank, that the Prince suffered in his revenue, for that very inconsiderable accounts were made for felons' goods, deodands, &c., within the stannaries of Devon and Cornwall, and that upon a grant of the same to petitioner for 31 years, he would pay your Majesty 10l. per annum, which sum had not been brought in for seven years together. Your Majesty made a grant accordingly. Now, William Marrott, of Blisland, Cornwall, in April became felo de se, whose goods are seized upon by the Deputy Almoner and [the relict]. Petitioner prays his Majesty to signify that the said goods may be kept, so that an account thereof may be made to petitioner in case upon a just trial they shall be found to belong to him. [Copy. Ibid., p. 126. 1¼ p.] Underwritten,
i. Minute of his Majesty's pleasure, that the said goods remain in the hands of the Deputy Almoner and relict until it be adjudged whether they belong unto the Great Almoner or the petitioner, and that all other goods of the said Marrott shall be forthwith seized upon by the Deputy Almoner. Greenwich, 9th July 1637. [Copy. Ibid., p. 126. ⅓p.]
July 9. Petition of Sir Richard Weston to the same. Your Majesty granted a warrant for a patent to petitioner for 14 years for sole making Castile and Venice soap in England, since which there has been direction given that a proviso should be inserted for your Majesty to revoke the patent if you find it inconvenient, and that petitioner have no power to transport beyond seas. Petitioner beseeches that the said proviso may be omitted, for the soap requiring a greater stock than petitioner is able to disburse, others will be discouraged to adventure upon such an uncertainty; and if there should be a restraint to transport, the hope of your Majesty's profit by foreign vent were quite taken away. Prays that the AttorneyGeneral may proceed according to his former warrant. [Copy. Ibid., p. 130. 1¼ p.] Underwritten,
i. The Attorney-General is to prepare the grant without any proviso of revocation or clause for restraint of transportation. Greenwich, 9th July 1637. [Copy. Ibid., p. 131. 1½ p.]
[July 9 ?] 84. Thomas Bushell, his Majesty's servant, to the King. Understanding that your Majesty has granted a mint for Ireland, as well as your predecessors have allowed of mints at Durham, Bristol, and Kidwelly Castle, Bushell states seven reasons why a mint in Wales may prove of great consequence to the King, both by way of honour and profit. The mines worked by Sir Hugh Middleton were drowned by water, but Bushell had discovered how to drain them by way of adit. The quantity of silver was stated to be considerable, and in all mines the deeper they go, it was alleged, that the richer the miner finds the ore to be. The charge of sending up the bullion to the mint, with the great charge of the miners in digging, were stated to have undone Sir Hugh Middleton, the poverty of the people in that country disabling them from maintaining any work that did not make them a present return. Thousands had thus been kept from adventuring on those hopeful mountains, where doubtless a mass of treasure lies covered. A mint in Wales would afford the requisite encouragement. Bushell anticipated the separation of 300l. of silver weekly out of ore, wherefore he prayed the allowance of a mint at the castle of Aberystwith. [¾ p.]
[July 9 ?] 85. A more precise statement of Thomas Bushell's proposal for setting up a mint in Wales. He proposed to establish it in the castle of Aberystwith at his own charge, paying the King his mintage at the same rate as the Tower of London, and presenting to the privy purse every new year's tide a wedge of silver containing 100l. sterling, provided he be discharged of all accounts concerning the profit of the mint, except for answering as to the fineness and weight of the silver coined. He will give the King a clear tenth of all silver wrought in Wales, and will not coin bullion found elsewhere; and whenever the King shall think the mines fit to be taken into his own hands, he will lay them at his feet. [2/3 p.]
July 9.
Greenwich.
86. Order of the King in Council. After full debate and explanation by Bushell himself of his above proposal, and the previous reference to the officers of the mint (see No. 50), it was resolved that the suggested mint at Aberystwith should be erected at Bushell's expense; the same to be regulated by Sir William Parkhurst, warden of the mint, and Bushell to make a yearly account of the profits belonging to his Majesty, with other regulations in conformity with Bushell's proposals. The Attorney-General was to prepare the necessary bill for his Majesty's signature. [1¾ p.]
July 9. Petition of James Weimis to the King. Petitioner sets forth a variety of claims upon the bounty of his Majesty, and being in fear of being cast into prison by his creditors, calls to remembrance a bill of disbursements of 1,100l., besides various other claims, and prays that he be not in a worse estate than the "mackannikest" [mechanicalest ?] man that serves the King, as he has these seven years without receiving one penny, which will redound to his utter ruin if his Majesty take not a speedy way for payment of his debts, which amount to above 2,000l. [Copy. See Vol. cccxxiii., p. 132. 1 p.] Underwritten,
i. Reference to the Lord Treasurer, who, making such abatements as he shall find fit, is to give order for a privy seal for speedy payment. Greenwich, 9th July 1637. [Copy. Ibid., p. 133. ¼ p.]
[July 9.] Commencement of petition of Knightley Duffeild, of Medmenham, Bucks, to the King. It was the misfortune of petitioner, about the 8th June, to kill William Tibbet, for which he has been arraigned before the judges of the King's Bench. [Copy. Ibid., p. 133. ¼ p.]
July 9. Petition of the Commissioners for Exacted Fees and Innovations in Offices to the same. Having spent many years in inquiry, and, amongst others, in examination of the fees taken by Sir Robert Ousley, who has the office of engrossing letters patent, and his great exactions being ready to be certified to your Majesty, to the end he may be proceeded with as other delinquents have been, Sir Robert has now upon two untrue suggestions (that he has taken no other fees than his predecessors, and that he has given the commissioners satisfaction of his honesty and fair dealing) obtained from your Majesty a reference for settling his fees for the time to come, which the commissioners conceive to be both prejudicial to your Majesty and the subject, and a great injury to the commissioners. Pray your Majesty to let this cause take its ordinary proceedings, and if for the future you shall grant any reference in the like kind, first to receive information from the commissioners of the nature of the cause. [Copy. Ibid., p. 135. 1½ p.] Underwritten,
i. His Majesty revokes the former reference in behalf of Sir Robert Ousley, and leaves the cause to the ordinary proceedings. [Copy. Ibid., p. 136. ¼ p.]
July 9.
Greenwich.
Lords of the Admiralty to Algernon Earl of Northumberland. The ambassador extraordinary for the French King, being to repair to France, is to be transported thither. You are to give order to the captain of one of his Majesty's ships to attend at Dover to receive the ambassador with his train, and to transport them to Dieppe. P.S.—If the Queen's almoner be at Dieppe when the French ambassador arrives there, the said captain is to bring him to England and his followers. [Copy. See Vol. cccliii., fol. 38 b. ½ p.]
July 9.
Greenwich.
The same to the same. Send copy certificate presented by the owners of the Concord, of Drogheda, lately taken by some vessel of Calais in her passage towards Dunkirk, being under the convoy of Capt. Buller, of the Nicodemus, by which you may perceive how unworthy the said captain is (if it be as affirmed) to command any vessel of his Majesty's. This carriage of the captain is so foul as we cannot pass it by, and therefore we pray you to examine and send up the said Capt. Buller, and to put some man of more courage and ability to take charge of the said vessel, and if you have received any further relation of this fact, we pray you to send it to us. His Majesty, being very sensible of the boldness of this vessel of Calais, has commanded us to signify to you to apprehend as many of the ships of that town as you can meet with, and to bring them in to some of his Majesty's [ports] to answer the said insolency. We wish you for the future to take order that there be a sufficient convoy sent to accompany such small frigates when they are employed to waft any ships, to prevent the dishonour of their being beaten or taken. [Copy. See Vol. cccliii., fol. 39. 2/3 p.]
[July 9 ?] 87. Petition of Robert Rigge to the Lords of the Admiralty. Petitioner being, upon the unjust complaint of James Robins, his Majesty's purveyor, detained in custody of a messenger, presented his petition on Saturday last, and showed the great damage that might fall upon him by his absence from the assizes (see No. 67). Besides this he has great store of husbandry to look after, by reason whereof he keeps twenty household servants, whose negligence in the approaching harvest may greatly endanger him; and if he should be detained, there may be danger to his life, by the contagious disease now raging. As he hopes to gain the good esteem of the Lords, and to clear himself of the complaints of Robins, he prays a reference to some justices of the county, or his liberty upon bond till some day in Michaelmas term. [Endorsed by Nicholas as received on the 10th inst., but see the next article. 1 p.]
July 9.
Greenwich.
The Lords of the Admiralty to the Justices of Peace for Hants. On complaint of Robert Rigge, undertaker for carriage of timber for the Navy, James Robins, purveyor for the Navy, is bound over to appear at your sessions touching payment for the said carriage. Rigge has much prejudiced his Majesty's service, wherefore we desire you to take order that he be not fully paid for the carriage till he bring a certificate from the Officers of the Navy, or from the purveyor, that the service is performed. The King's price shall be paid as you direct; but Rigge has not produced any order from you that he is to have the same over and above the 3s. 4d. a load, for which he contracted to perform the service. [Copy. See Vol. cccliii., fol. 39 b. 5/6 p.]
July 9. 88. A statement of the proceedings up to this time of the New Corporation [of Tradesmen and Artificers], with an account of the difficulties they experience for want of sufficient powers under their charter, with underwritten petition of Christopher Lewkenor that his Majesty would provide against these hindrances, most whereof would, if truly examined, appear to be but mere shadows. [1 p.]
July 9. 89. Receipt of Sir William Russell for 32l. paid by Owen Davies on behalf of Foulke Salisbury, bailiff of Denbigh, in part of 4,000l. charged upon North Wales by writ of 12th August 1636. [¾ p.]
July 9. 90. Similar receipt for 644l. paid by Thomas Price, sheriff of co. Cardigan, in part of 5,000l. charged upon South Wales by writ of 12th August 1636. [¾ p.]
July 9. 91. Certificate of the performance, by James Wheller and John Frye, of penance enjoined them by the Bishop of Bath and Wells, for that they, being the late churchwardens of the parish of Beckington, omitted to execute the command of the bishop to remove the communion table in the chancel of the church of Beckington, and to place it close under the east wall of the said chancel, in the same manner as the communion table stands in the cathedral church in Wells, and to remove the seats placed above the table. Wheller and Frye stood excommunicated for their contempt for one year, and likewise some days last past stood aggravated, and had been signified to the King for apprehending their bodies, and committing them to the common gaol of Somerset. Upon their submission the reverend father absolved them, and enjoined them to repeat an acknowledgment of their offences, which is here set forth, in their parish church on 25th June 1637, in the church of Frome Selwood on the 2nd July inst., and in the church of St. Peter and St. Paul, Bath, on this day. The performance of the penance in the several churches before mentioned is attested by the clergyman, churchwardens, and one other person of each parish. [Attested copy. 3 pp.]
July 10.
Westminster.
92. The King to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen of London. We understand that upon choice of the commons of the city you have sent for up and press to serve sheriff of the city Sir William Calley, above 72 years of age, who left the city 30 years since, and is so infirm as noways able to perform that office, having, in respect of age, lately obtained leave to resign an office of much easier execution which he held in our service. Our will is that you make choice of some other person who has not so many just reasons to be exempted; and we will that you free him without any fine. [Copy. ¾ p.]
July 10. 93. Draft of the above, over which Lord Cottington has written his attestation of the age of Sir William Calley, with other particulars. [1 p.]
July 10.
Reading.
94. Report of Sir Humphrey Davenport and Sir William Jones, justices of assize for Berks, to the Council, upon a reference made to them on the 17th May last (see Vol. ccclvi., No. 87), as to whether the parish of Sunninghill should be rated as a sixth part or a tenth part of the hundred of Cookham. After statement of all the orders of magistrates and quarter sessions upon this subject, many of which have been mentioned before in the notices of previous papers upon this subject, the referees determined that Sunninghill should pay a sixth and not a tenth part of all rates assessed upon the said hundred. [= 2½ pp.]
July 10. Sir Henry Marten to the Lords of the Admiralty. I have perused the grant of the office of Water-bailiff of Ireland, formerly made to William Ellesworth, and am of opinion that anchorage, beaconage or portage, and ballastage are fit to be put in petitioner's grant, the rather because petitioner is already quietly possessed of them by his present grant, and his predecessor, the said Ellesworth, enjoyed the same for his time. [Copy. See Vol. cccliii., fol. 39 b. ½ p.] Underwritten,
i. Reference to Sir Henry Marten, to cause the grant of the said office to be passed to Robert Smith, the present marshal and water-bailiff of Ireland. Whitehall, 10th July 1637. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 40. 1/6 p.]
July 10.
Whitehall.
Lords of the Admiralty to Sir Henry Marten. We have considered your report concerning the differences between the Company of Shipwrights and Thomas Mayden and William Hooke, whose several cases you have sent unto us. You have been long well acquainted with the said business, and know of what importance it is to have the shipwrights kept under government, which was the ground of the grant made to the company at Rotherhithe. We pray you to consider both the said cases which we return to you, and either to determine the same, or send us your opinion that we may take order therein. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 40 b. ½ p.]
July 10.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The privilege of appointing ferry-boats in Ireland belongs to the Admiralty of England, and patents have been granted thereof by the Lord Admirals. Upon suit of Edward Nicholas, we have conferred on him and his deputies the said office, and pray you to cause a grant of the same to be made, to hold during his Majesty's pleasure, with all fees belonging to the same. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 41. ½ p.]
July 10.
Whitehall.
The same to the Officers of the Navy. It is his Majesty's pleasure that the great ship building at Woolwich shall be launched about the 25th September next, and that the Prince shall be brought from Chatham to Woolwich, to be a help to raising sheers to set the great ship's masts, and then to be had into dock at Woolwich. We pray you to take order accordingly. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 41. ½ p.]
July 10.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. By letter of 20th March last, we gave order to make sale of a Turkish frigate, then in the King's yard at Portsmouth. We pray you to certify whether you have sold the same, and where the money proceeding from the sale is, and how the masts, sails, ordnance, and gunners' stores have been disposed of for his Majesty's service. [Copy. Ibid., fol. 41 b. ½ p.]
July 10. 95. Sir Henry Marten and Attorney-General Bankes to [the Lords of the Admiralty]. Report on a petition of the mayor and others of Bristol and the certificate of the late Attorney-General Noy. We are of opinion that if his Majesty grant power that the mayor, recorder, and aldermen of the said city, associated with one learned in the civil law, may have cognition of pleas belonging to the Admiralty, and hold a court weekly to hear the same, and make execution thereupon, so as his Majesty's Great [High ?] Admiral and the Judge of the Admiralty may come there as often as they will concerning the same pleas, and so as liberty be left to any party aggrieved to appeal to the High Court of Admiralty, the same will further common justice and navigation, as Mr. Noy formerly certified; but we conceive it fit that the former power of exemption granted to the mayor and others, excluding the High Admiral from intermeddling within the city, should be surrendered. [1¼ p.]
July 10. 96. Copy of the above, with an appended note by Sir Henry Marten, dated 31st October 1637, that when a grant to this effect is drawn and he shall have perused it, he shall conceive it fit to pass under the Great Seal. [1¾ p.]
July 10. 97. Petition of Philip White, engineer, to the Lords of the Admiralty. His Majesty, by letters patent of 5th February 1628, granted to Sir George Douglas power for recovering gold, silver, ordnance, and other things out of the sea, reserving to his Majesty one-tenth part of the profit. Afterwards Sir George transferred his interest in the said patent to Robert, now Earl of Ancram, who has deputed petitioner to perform the said work. Prays warrant to the vice-admirals and other officers to be aiding to petitioner in the execution of the said letters patent. Underwritten,
97. i. Reference to Sir Henry Marten to send his opinion thereof. Whitehall, 10th July 1637. [1 p.] Annexed,
97. ii. Sir Henry Marten to the Lords of the Admiralty. Report on the above reference. Thinks the patent defective in not treating things to be recovered under it as droits of the Admiralty, but advises the Lords to assist the patentees for the present, upon caution that next term they will rectify all things that are amiss. 13th July 1637. [5/6 p.]
97. iii. Order of the Lords of the Admiralty, that upon the petitioner's giving caution in the Admiralty, according to Sir Henry Marten's report, the Lords will give letters of assistance as desired. 24th July 1637.
July 10. Minute of the above petition, with copy of the reference on the same. [See Vol. cccliii., fol. 40 b. ½ p.]
July 10. 98. Petition of Edward Stevens, shipwright, to the Lords of the Admiralty. About 10 years since a decree was sued out in Chancery by petitioner's late father and others against the Company of Shipwrights, for debts by the company to them owing, of which there remains betwixt 50l. and 55l. still unsatisfied. In 1634 the company petitioned the Lords to authorize them to impose a fine on the most able shipwrights towards the debt, which the Lords granted, and the fine is imposed, and much money besides for tonnage and other payments has been since received, and yet petitioner remains unsatisfied. Taylor, a shipwright, has 10l., part of the moneys decreed in Chancery, remaining in his hands, and the company has half a year's tonnage due at Midsummer last to receive. Prays that he may receive Taylor's moneys and the tonnage due and such moneys as shall grow due to the company until he be satisfied. [¾ p.] Underwritten,
98. i. Let the master, wardens, and assistants of the company answer to the above in writing. Whitehall, 10th July 1637. [¼ p.]
July 10. Minute of the above petition, with copy of the reference to the same. [See Vol. cccliii., fol. 40. ½ p.]
July 10. Nicholas to Sir William Monson. Minute of letter similar to that sent to Lord Dunsmore, on the 1st of June, for payment of 100l., his adventure in the fishing business. [See Nicholas's Letter Book, Dom. James I., Vol. ccxix., p. 151.]
July 10. The same to George Gage. Minute of similar letter. [See Ibid., p. 151.]
July 10.
The Swiftsure, in the Downs.
99. Sir John Pennington to Nicholas. The two Princes, the Lords, and the principal of their trains went over in the St. George, and all the rest in the Vanguard, and our Admiral and as many of us as were there went along with them, and brought them safe on the Holland coast, to the entering into Gaweres [Goree's] Gat, and there took a loud leave with our guns, for it blew so much wind that they durst not go near to speak with them. In regard of the Princes, he hopes they are safely landed, but as yet those two ships are not returned. Saturday last our Admiral sent away the Unicorn of the merchants to the northwards, to distribute the 200 licences amongst the Hollands fishermen, but I fear their stubbornness will draw a greater inconvenience on us both. The Admiral is likewise sending away the Mary Rose and Roebuck for Sallee to reinforce Admiral Rainsborough. I conceive they will come too late, except they have a sudden and prosperous wind. An enclosure from Capt. Carteret will unfold that business more at large. I perceive he neither dares write to you nor me, but covertly; for these letters were consigned to a friend at London, and from thence to me, though they came over with the same ship that brought our Admiral's, and laid here some time. You will find that all things are not true that Rainsborough writes. Capt. Lewis Kirke refused to go under his command, so my Lord has put Capt. Trenchfield into the Mary Rose to go upon this service, and has ordered Kirke to go in Trenchfield's ship, the Margaret, to his great discontent. Before our going to Holland, the Nicodemus was sent over by the Admiral and Capt. Johnson with a convoy for Dunkirk, and in his going over [Buller] lost one of his convoy, an Irishman, taken from him by a small frigate of Calais. Now I hear that the master of the Irish vessel is gone to the Lords to complain about it, and sets forth my name in it that I should appoint the convoy, which is false, for I did not so much as know of it. Ever since his Lordship's coming all businesses are managed by himself and those in his own ship. I do not so much as hear of them, except it be at second or third hand; therefore I desire I may have no more laid upon me but my own faults, which will be enough for me to answer. Let me know what you do there, and what we shall do here. [32/3 pp.]
July 10. 100. See "Returns made by Justices of Peace."
July 11.
Tiboles [Theobalds].
101. James Marquis of Hamilton to [Sec. Windebank]. I return the petition of Mr. Morgan. His Majesty's pleasure is that such a letter as you wrote formerly to the Judges be again written by you to them. [¾ p.]
July 11/21
The Hague.
102. Elizabeth Queen of Bohemia to Sir Thomas Roe. Now I very much approve of your design of the voyage to Hamburgh, but, as it was abruptly told me, I knew not what to make of it, neither truly do I understand the treaty that is to be there. My sons and I send this bearer to give the King and Queen thanks for their favours to their nephews. He will tell you all particulars here, and how ill a welcome my Lord of Warwick has had by the loss of his son, drowned, most unfortunately, at Ramekins. They are now at the siege of Breda, where my son and the Lords that came over with him are going. I am glad your wife is well pleased with my taking your daughter Rupa. [Seals with arms. 1 p.]
July 11.
Lambeth.
103. [Archbishop Laud] to Elizabeth Queen of Bohemia. Your letters of June 10/20 came to my hands as I had delivered mine to the hands of Lord Craven to be conveyed to you in company with both your sons. Your second letters of June 15/25 are concerning Mrs. Crofts, to second her and her business to the King. Truly this is the hardest business that ever you put upon me, both because his Majesty is not pleased I should trouble him with anything but Church business (and indeed I have enough of that), and because Mrs. Crofts is not satisfied with my seconding her business (which, in obedience to your commands, I am most willing to do), but Mrs. Crofts would have me wholly undertake it. And truly I neither can nor dare do that. So soon as ever I spake with his Majesty about it, I showed him your letters for my warrant, and he instantly told me he had for your sake thought upon something for Mrs. Crofts. So I rested satisfied, hoping all had been well, but afterwards she came to me, and either found that the thing given was mistaken or not answerable to her desires, and so fell back again with more earnestness to have me undertake for her, which certainly I cannot do, but what assistance I can give her I will. [Copy. 1 p.]
July 11. 104. Henry Earl of Holland to Sec. Coke. His Majesty having seen this order, conceives there is a mistaking in the drawing of it up, his purpose being that these fellows should have a public, not a private, punishment (for example to others), that thereby the effects that are desired should follow to terrify and humble these rude and barbarous persons. The inquiry and performance of this his Majesty has commanded me to lay upon you, and to give him an account of it. [Endorsed as "touching the two draymen." See 9th inst., No. 82. 1 p.]
July 11. 105. Thomas Earl of Cleveland, Lord Lieutenant of co. Bedford, to Sir William Becher. Mr. Conquest has submitted himself to the charge laid on him by the Deputy Lieutenants both for finding of horse and arms. Pray let him be discharged. [½ p.]
July 11.
Westminster.
Nicholas to John Lord Poulett. Complaint having been made to the Council that you have not paid the 100l. subscribed by you to the fishing business, you are desired to pay the same before Michaelmas term, or to attend the Board about the middle of that term. [Copy. Nicholas's Letter Book, Dom. James I., Vol. ccxix., p. 153.]
July 11.
The Triumph, in the Downs.
106. Algernon Earl of Northumberland to Nicholas. I have received your letters of the 22nd and 30th June, with several from the Lords of the Admiralty, and am sending Capt. Buller to be examined by the Lords. The term being ended, and everybody retiring into the country, I will seldom direct despatches to the Lords. Hitherto I have met with little worth troubling them or the posts. If anything in this employment happen worthy their knowledge, I will give notice of it. [1 p.]
July 11. 107. Certificate of Robert Rigge. Having caused letters of Privy Seal to be served upon Elizabeth West, widow, and James Robins, I promise to forbear any further proceedings against them. [⅓ p.]
July 11. Entry on the Admiralty Register that Robert Rigge, upon his entry into bond to appear before the Lords at the first sitting after the feast of All Saints next, was discharged. [Copy. See Vol. cccliii., fol. 40. 1/5 p.]
July 11. 108. Speech delivered by Archbishop Laud in the Star Chamber at the sentence of Bishop Williams. The report printed in Rushworth, Vol. II. p. 438, is a very great enlargement of the speech as given in this MS. Many passages are contained in Rushworth which have no foundation in this report, and passages which are here are omitted there; for example, it appears here that the archbishop suggested the increase of the fine to be payable by Bishop Williams to Sir John Monson from 1,000 marks, as proposed by others of the Lords, to 1,000l. He agreed with the rest of the judges in 10,000l. fine to the King, also imprisonment and suspension of Bishop Williams ab officiis et beneficiis. [2 pp.]
July 11. 109. Another copy of the same speech. [2 pp.]
July 12.
Westminster.
110. Warrant to the Exchequer. There being yet due to Edward Hillyard for embroidered robes for his Majesty's sister, Lady Elizabeth, at her marriage, 891l., and to Sarah Miller, widow, daughter and executrix of Alexander Miller, tailor to the late King, 900l.; and Sir Roger Aston and the Earl of Carlisle having departed this life, whose acquittances should have been given upon payment; therefore the Earl of Denbigh, master of the wardrobe, is to be paid 800l., viz., for Edward Hillyard 400l., and for Sarah Miller 400l., in part of the said debts. [Strip of parchment. 15 lines.]
July 12. 111. Dr. Thomas Rives to the Council. According to reference of the 7th inst., the writer assesses the expenses of Solomon Journeaux, in the cause against James Bandinell (see Vol. ccclxiii., No. 20), at 30l., which he ought to be allowed, provided he take oath that he has expended so much. [1 p.]
July 12. 112. Affidavit of Solomon Journeaux, that in two voyages made to prosecute his cause against James Bandinell he is out of purse 30l. [½ p.]
July 12.
Deptford.
113. Officers of the Navy to Lords of the Admiralty. According to warrant of 20th March last, we sold the Turkish frigate with her tackle and furniture, by a candle in his Majesty's yard at Portsmouth, to William Bowles, mariner, for 10l. 15s., being the most that was bidden for her. The money is paid to the Exchequer at Mr. Crane's receipt. For her ordnance, the Officers of the Ordnance have taken notice of them. [1 p.]
July 12.
The Triumph, in the Downs.
114. Thomas Smith to Nicholas. You have already heard enough of the taking of this bearer's bark, by a vessel of Calais, from under the convoy of Capt. Buller. The poor man is very solicitous for redress, and has been directed to us here, upon this ground, that my Lord [of Northumberland] has order to take the barks of Calais. I have advised him not to build upon that, for if his loss be, as he says, 2,000l., all the barks belonging to Calais will not repair him. I have counselled him to make his repair to Court, either to the Secretaries of State or the Lords Commissioners for their letters to the Earl of Leicester, for recovery of his right; which, if he cannot obtain, he may peradventure procure letters of marque. Thus much, at his earnest entreaty, desiring you to assist him as a work of charity. [1 p.]
July 12. 115–116. See "Returns made by Justices of the Peace."
July 13/23.
The Hague.
117. Charles Louis, Prince Elector, to Sir Thomas Roe. I add neither dear, honest, nor worthy, for you are all the good I can imagine, and if I would give it all one name it should be yours. I was as loath to part from you (not from England) as you were sorry to leave me, for besides my knowledge of your worth and zeal to my cause, I never received so much contentment by any man's conversation, which I must not hope for suddenly, except the King give you an employment that way I wish for, which will be very necessary, since we hear the Swedes are forced to retire for want of power and victuals; and there is no certainty yet of the Chancellor's coming over; but you will hear all by Berkeley, who is upon his return for England, with a reasonable good answer, as the bearer will tell you. In the rest of my business your assistance is as necessary as I know you are willing to give it, especially to press the Earl of Holland to hasten the French to do that which the King's minister here has begun with this state. I find many difficulties for the meeting at Hamburgh, that I believe all the confederates will desire to have it here. The states of Sweden have intimated that if the King would enter into a stricter confederation with them, they would send a plenipotens to Camerarius to treat thereupon at the Hague, and I hear that they are not willing to give the Chancellor so full a power for the direction of the German affairs as he demands. I pray you continue to make much of the Lord Marquis, and write me word if my friends are as forward in my business in my absence as when I was with them. I think it the chiefest part of my misfortune to want power to give you proofs of my love. [Seal with arms. 3 pp.]
July 13/23.
The Hague.
118. Charles Louis, Prince Elector, to Archbishop Laud. I am so sensible of your extraordinary respects to me in England, that it is my only affliction (since his Majesty has put my business in so good a way) not to be able to acknowledge it enough. Besides, your counsel and affection have caused such satisfaction in me, that I am confident the same care will always prevail to further any business which shall concern my good. What I have more to say I have committed to the bearer. [Seal with arms. 1 p.]
July 13. 119. News-letter of C. Rossingham. Order to send Bastwick, Burton, and Prynne to their remote prisons, with restrictions to be imposed upon them. Report that the minister of Shoreditch delivered in his sermon that they all incurred damnation which thought well of these three. This made divers go out of the church, for the common people are extremely compassionate towards them. Dr. Leighton, who has lain in the Fleet seven years for the like offences, is also to be removed to some remote prison. Lord Mohun's son committed to the Fleet for drawing his sword on Ludgate Hill and hurting Lord Lumley, who sat quietly in his coach. The King has ordered him to be proceeded against in the Star Chamber. Particulars of the deposition in Bishop Williams's case, which concerned Sir John Monson, with account of Parson Catlin; AttorneyGeneral's reply in that case; the Bishop's application to the King by the Marquis of Hamilton, but the King declined to interfere until after sentence. Long report of the sentence, and especially of the speeches of Lord Cottington, Archbishop Laud, and the Lord Keeper. Marriage of Lord Russell with Lady Ann Carr, with all possible privacy. It was kept at Mr. Carr's house, right against the Burse in the Strand. [4 pp.]
July 13.
London.
120. Isaac Pennington to his cousin, Sir John Pennington. Repeats the contents of his letter of the 28th June (Vol. ccclxii., No. 68), which he supposes not to have been delivered, and adds further particulars of the business to which that letter related. "News I have not any worth your knowledge, neither is it safe to write of anything that passes. All the discourse is now of the great Star Chamber business, of which passages I know you shall have better information than I can give you; but this I can report for a truth, for thereof I am both an eye and an ear witness, these proceedings cause much dejection amongst many good and loyal subjects, make many fly, and many more think of providing for their safety in other places." [1 p.]
July 13. 121. Book of entries relating to the accounts of Sir Robert Rich [?], — Johnson [?], and Thomas Violett, receivers of duties and profits payable to his Majesty by the gold wire drawers, with copies of papers relating to the same. These profits were charged with the payment of 300l. per annum to Jane Countess of Roxburgh, and 500l. per annum to Henry Earl of Holland. [28 pp., of which 11 pp. are entirely blank.]
July 13. 122–123. See "Returns made by Justices of Peace."
July 14.
Stilton.
124. Richa[rd] Scott to Robert Long. Metcalfe, the deputy post, is hastily come up to London for the postship, and has got some friend to speak to Sec. Coke for him. I entreat you to speak with Sec. Coke to prevent his grant to Metcalfe, and I will not only perform the place without pay, but will also give 20l., 30l., or 40l. to whom you think meet. I have sent up my man with a petition, and entreat you or Sir John Brooke to deliver it. P.S.—Mr. Glapthorne remembers his service to you, who told me of your pains to Sec. Windebank, and so has Wyett Parkint, which I am ever much bound to you for. [1 p.]
July 14/24.
The Hague.
125. Colonel Thomas Ferentz to Sir Thomas Roe. Captain Cafe ought not to return without bearing to you the assurance of my thanks for the favours received from you during my stay in England. He will inform you of the dangers of our passage, and the commencement of our treaty, which is delayed by the absence of the Prince of Orange on a very difficult siege, during which he will be very unwilling to displease England. It is strange on the part of France that the conclusion of the treaty has not yet been announced; on the contrary the ambassador Charnassé does bad offices, striving to make it be believed that the intentions of the English are not honest, and that they do not design to do anything. It were well if his Majesty complained of those proceedings to France, to stop the mouth of this babbler. Mr. Cafe will inform you what answer has been given in Sweden to Mr. Berkeley, in case he shall not have arrived in England. It has been communicated to us by Mons. Camerarius, and agrees with what was answered by Mr. Fleetwood, promising to treat at the Hague, and to join to Camerarius some ambassador extraordinary from Sweden. The design of meeting at Hamburgh is not agreeable to them for various reasons which are here stated. The Elector Palatine will pass the remainder of the summer with the army to witness this great siege, and advance as much as he can his private affairs, hoping that his friends in England will continue their good offices with the King, and make a beginning with the business of the West Indies. [French. Seal with arms. 2¾ pp.]
July 15.
Deptford.
126. Sir William Russell to Nicholas. I entreat you to move the Lords for their warrant to Auditor Bingley for examining my accounts for the country moneys. If he has a warrant in general, it will prevent new yearly warrants. My account for 1636 is ready for the auditor, so soon as you can let the charge be also sent. For my account of 1637 he shall, by the bearer or next week, have a declaration thereof. [¾ p.]
July 15. 127. Receipt of Sir William Russell for 2,200l. paid by William Abell and Jacob Garrard, sheriffs of Middlesex, in part of 5,000l. ship-money charged upon that county by writ of 12th August last. [¾ p.]
July 15. 128. Account by the same of ship-money received under writ of August 1636. Total, 141,492l. 0s. 7d. [Underwritten, "There has not been paid a penny of the last year's arrears sithence the last certificate delivered, of the 8th July 1637." 1 p.]
July 15. 129. Account of ship-money under writ of October 1636, levied and remaining in the sheriffs' hands, being 9,603l., making with the 141,492l. above mentioned 151,095l. [1 p.]
July 15. 130–132. See "Returns made by Justices of Peace."