BHO

Charles I - volume 447: March 1-14, 1640

Pages 506-549

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles I, 1639-40. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1877.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:
Please subscribe to access the page scans

This volume has gold page scans.
Access these scans with a gold subscription.Key icon

March 1-14, 1640

Mar. 1.
Court at Whitehall.
1. Sec. Windebank to Patrick Ruthven, Lord Ettrick, Governor of Edinburgh Castle. Since the despatch of his Majesty's letters to you of the 26th Feb. the bearer, Mr. Wm. Roberts, was commanded to attend the receiving of the 500l. he now brings to you, and this has been the cause of his longer stay here than was expected. This 500l. is not for satisfaction of any arrears due to yourself and other officers there, but for present payment of the soldiers and other pressing occasions. The arrears, beginning from the time you entered into the castle, will be allowed out of a greater sum, shortly to be transmitted, but which could not safely be committed to one man, considering the times and the hazard of the passage. Care shall be taken to keep you supplied with money. Understanding that there are certain rents and yearly perquisites belonging to the castle his Majesty desires to know their true value, and though, considering you as a person of extreme merit, he is contented that you should enjoy the same over and above the 40 marks Scottish by the day, it is not his intention that this his bounty should be drawn into precedent by your successors in that charge. P.S.—His Majesty has commanded me to let you know that such packets as shall come from you superscribed with your name and dated shall be expedited in the post as if superscribed by the Earl of Traquair, or the Principal Secretary for Scotland, and you are therefore to address them accordingly. [Draft. 1 p.]
Mar. 1. 2. Wm. Roberts to Sec. Windebank. Whereas his Majesty's letters of the 26th Feb. signified that I had then my despatch, I pray you let Lord Ettrick understand that I was immediately after commanded to attend the receiving of 500l., together with his Majesty's further commands. I pray you also to intimate to him that his Majesty is pleased to give him, Mr. Scrymsoure, Capt. Ruthven, and Wm. Roberts, as arrears of pay, all that should have been paid them from 31st July to this day, excepting to Captain Scrymsoure from the 31st December, according to the rates expressed in his letters of the 26th Feb. Lastly, I beseech you to state whether the 500l. be in part payment of the said arrears or to disburse for his Majesty's service. [1 p.]
Mar. 1. 3. Minute of warrant to release James Wilford from the Gatehouse prison. [3 lines.]
Mar. 1. Another copy of minute. [See Vol. ccxcii., p. 114.]
Mar. 1.
Office of Ordnance.
4. Certificate from the officers of the Ordnance what gunpowder was remaining in his Majesty's stores on the 1st Feb. last, with the amounts since brought in and issued by way of sale or otherwise, respectively. Total remaining in store at the Tower and at Portsmouth, 271 lasts 23 cwts. 39 lbs. [=2 pp.]
Mar. 1.
Grafton.
5. Thos. Cooke to Richard Harvey, at Mr. Porter's house in the Strand. You shall receive by Mr. Cornelius a present of poultry sent by Lady [Crane, of Stoke Park], which I desire you to present to Mr. and Mrs. Endymion Porter with her best respects. [Seal with design. ¾ p.]
Mar. 2.
Edinburgh Castle.
6. Patrick Lord Ettrick to the King. The wall of the outer work on the south side of the castle fell on the 25th February, likewise the wall of the north-east side of the outer work on the last of February, built by the Covenanters this year. These are to petition your Majesty to give strict command under highest pain to your master mason to take speedy course for redressing the work, to provide workmen and all other necessaries. I pray take into consideration the plot of this castle with the outer fortification I sent by my secretary, which I believe is more regular and formal than it is presently; also to signify what your pleasure is concerning this. The little money I had for providing your castle I am forced to pay away to the Scotch soldiers. The Earl of Traquair has left warrant here to his under receiver to give me, according to your commands, money weekly for payment of the soldiers, [but] I can have none that way, [for] they will answer none of his warrants. Your Majesty will be pleased to give order for sending money here the most convenient way you may think fit; also a post warrant to all postmasters in Scotland and inland to bring my letters safe and speedily to your hands. Pardon my not answering your last letters, for I have been ever expecting your further directions by my secretary, whom I long for, hoping to receive them by him. For anything I can learn your Majesty may expect no settling of peace in this country. You know best, and what it pleases you to command me shall be punctually obeyed. Endorsed by Sec. Windebank, "Delivered to me on the 8th." [Seal with crest and arms. 1 p.]
Mar. 2.
Whitehall.
7. Notes by Nicholas of the proceedings this day at the Council of War. Ordered that the Earl of Newport take order that a complete proportion of arms, whereof two parts to be muskets and a third pikes, be timely delivered at Berwick to the 400 foot which are ordered to be forthwith raised for reinforcing the garrison there; also that he cause to be provided colours for the four companies of foot suitable to the colours which the companies belonging to the garrison already have, the same to be sent together with drums, partisans, and all other things necessary. Ordered that the Earl of Newport cause to be delivered at York, arms complete for the four troops of carabineers, consisting of 60 horse apiece, raised for reinforcing the garrison at Berwick, and that as many of the said troopers or their officers as shall desire to have saddles and furniture should have the same, paying ready money for what they receive. [1 p.]
Mar. 2.
Whitehall.
The like. This day Sir William Brouncker and others of the captains appointed for reinforcing the garrison at Berwick desired that they might have pay for themselves and their officers from the date of their commissions, which was refused, and order given that they shall not enter into pay till they mustered 40 horse in each troop. Resolved that all the officers of the four companies of foot to be levied for reinforcing of Berwick, from the captain to the drummer included, shall receive pay from the date of their commissions, and to be hastened away with all speed. [Written on the same paper as Feb. 22. See Vol. ccccxlvi., No. 6 ½ p.]
Mar. 2. 8. Thos. Alderne, sheriff of co. Hereford, to the Council. In my certificate of February [see Vol. ccccxlvi., No. 72] I intimated that the constables were to appear with the ship-money collected on 25th Feb., who accordingly came, but with a mind rather to retard than by their endeavours to further the service. I find that the constables of divers hundreds contemptuously refuse either to appear or assess according to my precepts; many also refuse to distrain and sell goods, while others return the menacings and threatenings of the persons assessed. With much care and diligence I have levied about 100l., and have since renewed my warrants according to your commands, the return whereof I have appointed for the 25th of this month, our assizes being so near. [Seal with arms. 2/3 p.]
Mar. 2.
Oxford.
9. Sir Nathaniel Brent to Archbishop Laud. According to your command I have acquainted the fellows of Merton College with the particular informations enclosed in your last of the 28th Feb. I find that Mr. Corbet tendered himself to answer in divinity at the beginning of Michaelmas term last, but no man would appear to oppose. At the end of the term disputations were performed, and at the beginning of this term, and will be, I suppose, likewise at the end. If they be kept twice every term I believe it is as much as your Grace will enjoin, there being but five to uphold that exercise. Mr. Knightley's lecture has not been read because nobody is willing to read it, nor, indeed, any well able for it but Mr. Corbet; neither has any man received any part of the stipend all this while. Some of the debts due to the two chests have been demanded, and I suppose will be paid ere long, but some others are desperate. I will not fail to incite custodes cistarum to do their best for the speedy recovery of these debts. Mr. Corbet protests that he ever did and ever will bow at the name of Jesus. I have often seen him do it, and so have divers of the fellows, as they say; yet sometimes his mind may be otherwise busied, as he saith, and so he may not perform that due reverence which he is always most willing to do. This is his own answer. Mr. Newman was absent three months and more for his preferment in the country, and by public leave of the college, which I suppose you do not hold to be unlawful. Mr. Clarke denies that he has entertained any bachelors in his chamber. I know not how to disprove him, because the informers do not name the parties entertained, nor the time, which they ought to have done. Mr. Hinton has left [Merton] College, and I have not as yet spoken with Mr. Reynolds, the chaplain. A book of statutes was mislaid about Christmas, but has been found. I cannot find that the prayers have been curtailed for a long time, except on Christmas-day last, when the Litany was omitted at the request of Mr. Nevill, who said his sermon would be very long, though indeed he preached not at all, but Mr. Burton for him. The college evidences have been placed in several boxes, ever since my memory; only Mr. Subwarden says that Mr. Simonson, when he left to be subwarden, gave divers evidences to him, being his successor, which he brought into the Exchequer, and does not know now where they are. He and I will seriously think of it. I cannot conceive any man to be so abominably wicked as to steal evidences which can do him no good. I do not know but that some of the junior masters may be faulty in not coming to the beginning of prayers, especially of those which are very early in the morning. I have given them an admonition, and if your Grace's injunctions shall hereafter set any punishment it shall be duly inflicted. I cannot possibly find that the postmasters are faulty in not speaking Latin, and most of them are very well able to do it. Howsoever, I have given them an admonition to be careful herein, and exhorted the principal to look narrowly to them. There has been no book for wood sales, because no money has been received for wood since the order made, but the subwarden, who is registrar by his place, has promised to provide one. Alban Hall commoners have lodged in the college these 50 years, of my knowledge, and I do not remember that you have as yet interdicted them. I do not know that any of them are refractory to the ceremonies of the Church. Howsoever, I will desire the principal to look to them, because I have not any authority over them myself. Mr. Newman's postmaster protests that he ever did and ever will bow at the blessed name of Jesus, and that he always did so when he was at school in the country; neither can I find the contrary by any testimony. Morning prayers, I conceive, are frequented as well with us as in any other college, yet some are faulty now and then, who have not been punished as yet, because no punishment is set for that fault. It is not well done of the informers, under your favour, to say that I knew that Mr. Edward Nevil was desperately in debt, and so occasioned the loss of 60l. to the college. I call God to witness that I did not know it, and all the five seniors voted for him. How can I live quietly with men who will swear what my intentions and secret thoughts were, and will inform what my knowledge is, and all contrary to truth ? It is true that Sir James Leviston has of late got too much acquaintance in the university, but it is with gentlemen of good rank, and some of them his betters by far. This has occasioned him to neglect his book too much, and to haunt the town more than is fit a great deal, but I do not find that he has lost any civility at all, and believe that no gentleman in the university has a more civil and gentle behaviour than he. The remonstrances of myself and his tutor, and our recommendations to his mother to remove him in case he change not his course, have made him a new man of late. P.S.—I conceive the Lady Sidley has no cause to complain of us. We have been careful to find out land to buy with her 500l., and will receive it as soon as she pleases to pay it. [3 pp.]
Mar. 2.
Mincing Lane, London.
10. Officers of the Navy to Sir Wm. Beecher, clerk of the Council. We have received certificate that there are 300 oak trees marked for the King's service in the parish of West Bradingham, co. Norfolk, containing about 200 loads, which timber is immediately to be converted and carried to the water-side at Lynn, to be transported to Chatham. We pray you to procure letters from the Lords to the justices of peace in co. Norfolk to assist the purveyor, and provide land carriage at accustomed rates. [2/3 p.]
Mar. 2. 11. Receipt given on the part of the Government to John Herne, of Lincoln's Inn, for certain specified papers which, as counsel for the tenants of the Dean and Chapter of Durham, he held in his hands; the same appearing upon examinations taken by the King's special command of George Grey and Anthony Smith to relate to a petition subscribed by divers of the said tenants. [½ p. Draft corrected by Sec. Windebank.]
Mar. 2. 12. An accompt of imprest money paid by Sir John Heydon for arms, munition, &c., being part of the 5,000l. received upon the land service; total, 4,497l. 13s., leaving 502l. 7s. [½ p.]
Mar. 2. 13. Note by Capt. Legg of the price of arms sold for the King's advantage the last year. [2/3 p.]
Mar. 2.
Westover.
14. John Ashburnham to [Nicholas]. I perceive you have had some discourse with Lord Goring concerning the place of provider, wherein you both have been careful of my interest, for which I thank you. Why the Lord-General should desire the King might be moved in it I cannot understand, since the pains required for the honest execution of the place ought rather to persuade him to invite any man to accept of it, than that it would become any man to make a suit of it to the King to have it. In that and in all other things I submit myself to be wholly disposed of by you. Since my coming down I have had conference with Mr. Tutt and Mr. Green about the farm of Long-parish, which I expect to obtain. Conditions of purchase. I am much ashamed of John Packer's dishonouring the memory of our dear master by his unworthy behaviour at this time, where he had so fair an occasion to have done him right, but it is impossible to make a base heart noble. I pray you give my brother, who has gone post to London, the best advice you can how to comport himself to the General, that he may gain him as a friend. If Sir Robert Pye has had the canvass for the burgess' place of Westminster, I am glad my landlord has not failed of the fine holland instead of his blue apron. Expressions of gratitude. [1 p.]
Mar. 2.
Edinburgh.
15. Alexander Erskine to his wife. Remonstrates with her for entertaining such harsh opinion of him who had always loved her You say in your letter that it is my kindred and country people who have scandalously wronged you, and would scandalise God himself if he were on earth. Considering this I pray you attach no credence to whatsoever their malice may spurt against me. I entreat you let Capt. Hyham make all possible haste over with his company and if there be possibility send one other company with him, and as many thereafter as you may. As for my business there are 200 men, as I wrote in my last, who will be gone when wind and weather shall serve, which have crossed them this long time, to the utter undoing of the gentleman who is captain. As for Mr. Mowbray you must know that he is not only the chief plotter, inventor, and spreader abroad of all these base calumnies, but he did also, like a fool, vent before his going home, to one whom he thought had not been my friend, that he had taken notes of all words spoken by me in Scotland, and that he would construct and relate them to the Marquis of Hamilton, and so kipper me at the King's hands, that I should have no more pension. This was told me lately by one that will justify it to his face, and many other things that concern you as well as me, so you may think of him accordingly, for I shall find my time. Sir Thos. Dishington will find a carrier for the tablets and powder. I shall present your love to my Lady Rothes. I have no knowledge either of the ring or the picture you wrote about. Be wise and suffer not yourself to be led astray by those who hunt after our disgrace. P.S.—Within 14 days you will hear something which will please you, but as yet I neither must nor can write it. [Seal broken. 3 pp.]
Mar. 2. Commissioners for Saltpetre and Gunpowder to Samuel Cordwell his Majesty's gunpowder-maker, or to Mr. Blythe. Warrant to view the parcel of about 12 or 13 tons of foreign saltpetre in the hands of George Fletcher, merchant, and certify us the quality and quantity thereof. [Copy. See Vol. ccxcii., p. 115. ½ p.]
Mar. 2. Commissioners for Saltpetre and Gunpowder to Sir Charles Harbord, his Majesty's Surveyor-General. There was, about three years since, 2,000l. imprested to Samuel Cordwell for erecting of mills, millponds, and other works and buildings for making gunpowder about Chilworth, co. Surrey, for his Majesty's service; these are to require you to view during this vacation all the said works and buildings, and certify us how much you conceive to have been expended on the same, and what the lands, ponds, and waters there used for these works may be reasonably worth, to be bought after the expiration of the lease already taken for the King's use. [Copy. Ibid. ½ p.]
Mar. 3. Declaration under the Privy Seal that no writs or other process shall be issued and directed to the sheriffs out of the Exchequer for receiving and levying of any his Majesty's revenues concerning Recusants, unless desired by the Receivers. [Docquet.]
Mar. 3.
Westminster.
Letters Patent confirming by inspeximus a license granted by Archbishop Laud for Sir Edward Littleton, Chief Justice of Common Pleas, to eat flesh in Lent, any statutes or proclamations to the contrary notwithstanding. [See Case E., No. 21. Latin. Parchment. 14 lines.] Annexed,
i. License granted by Archbishop Laud to Sir Edward Littleton, permitting him, together with his wife and ten other persons to be by him chosen, to eat flesh at his table in Lent and other days prohibited, during his life, but soberly and frugally, so as to avoid public scandal; with proviso that these letters of license shall not be available except they be confirmed by the King's letters patent. 26th Feb. 1639. [Ibid. Latin. Parchment. 15 lines.]
Mar. 3.
Westminster.
16. The King to Sir Henry Garway, Lord Mayor of London. Warrant to press within the city 200 able men for the wars, and to deliver them at the Tower Wharf before the 12th inst.; the ordering and disposing of the men to be arranged according to directions sent from the Lords. [Copy. ¾ p.]
Mar. 3. 17. Another copy of the same. [¾ p.]
Mar. 3. 18. The speech made to the King by Lord Loudoun in the name of the Scotch Commissioners sent from the Parliament of Scotland. [2¾ pp. Printed in Rushworth, Hist. Col. iii., p. 994-997.]
Mar. 3. 19. Notes taken by Sec. Windebank at the interview of the Commissioners, sent from the Parliament of Scotland, with the King at Whitehall on the 3rd March, the Earl of Traquair and a Committee of the Privy Council being present. [1½ p. These were the original notes jotted down on the occasion, but objected to by the Scotch Commissioners at their next interview on the 9th March. Another version of these notes, fuller in some particulars, will be found printed in Rushworth iii. p. 993.]
Mar. 3.
Whitehall.
20. Order of Council. Resolved that all the horse to be raised, as well those for the garrisons at Berwick and Carlisle as those for his Majesty's army, shall be mustered by appointment from the Lord-General at their first rendezvous, and two certificates of the number so mustered returned, the one to the Lord-General and the other to the Treasurer-at-Wars, that they may enter into the King's pay so soon as it appears by the certificates that 40 horse or more were mustered. It was likewise ordered that there shall be advanced by warrant from the Lord-General to the captains of the troops requiring it, one month's pay for so many of the officers and troopers as shall be certified to be mustered as aforesaid, to bear their charges to their rendezvous at York or Berwick. [Draft. ¾ p.]
Mar. 3.
Whitehall.
Minutes by Nicholas of the proceedings of the Council of War this day. Ordered that a warrant shall be given by the LordGeneral to Sir William Uvedale, Treasurer-at-Wars, to pay to Capt. William Legg, master of the armoury, 200l. for removal of all the arms for horse from Hull to York. Whereas by the list of entertainments there are allowed to every company of foot two drummers, it was this day resolved that one of these to be appointed by the colonel of every regiment shall be drum-major, and shall have 6d. per diem more. Ordered that it should be left to every captain to press his own drummers by order and warrant from the LordGeneral if they cannot otherwise furnish themselves with volunteers. [Written on the same paper as Feb. 22. See Vol. ccccxlvi., No. 6. ½ p.]
Mar. 3. 21. Contract tendered by Sir Wm. Russell and Sir Job Harby. Whereas we have been informed that [Robert] Blake has made a proposition that if his Majesty shall account it a good service to be furnished with all the saltpetre that shall be made where the Emperor of Morocco commands, if neither the former nor latter traders into Barbary will undertake the same, that then his Majesty's letters to that Emperor were desired signifying that as his Majesty had dispensed with his artificers to provide for that Emperor's service as many birding pieces as they could conveniently make, so his Majesty desired that that Emperor would cause his saltpetre works to be employed to make as great a quantity as they could, which Mr. Blake has order to contract for at the rate of 45s. per cwt., to be delivered aboard in the river of Saffi, to be paid for in the same road with such commodities at the usual rates as his Majesty's dominions will afford and his occasions permit. We whose names are hereunder written do undertake, so far forth as it may be accompted a good service to his Majesty, to furnish the Emperor of Morocco with as many commodities in the road of Saffi as shall satisfy for the saltpetre, not exceeding 100 tons, at the rate of 45s. per cwt., unrefined, the saltpetre to be delivered by us to his Majesty's use at the same rate, payment being made upon delivery. [Copy. Unsigned. ¾ p.]
Mar. 3.
Edinburgh.
22. James Broun to Thos. Waad. The castle walls on the south and north have fallen down of their own accord the last week. The Earl of Angus has subscribed the great covenant, and protests that he will maintain it to his end. I have sent you an information to look on at your leisure and to make such use of as you may think best. [Seal broken. 2/3 p.]
Mar. 3. 22a. See "Returns of the Justices of Peace."
Mar. 3. 23. Certificate by Sir Henry Marten, Judge of the Admiralty, to the Council. Upon examination of the petitioner [Francis Tenant] and his witnesses, I find that the annexed petition [see Vol. ccccxxiv., No. 83], so far as concerns the ship and goods seized by the Dantzicers about 12 years ago, is true. Since your reference of this petition to me, the petitioner arrested a ship of Dantzic in the river Thames upon a civil action, supposing her to belong to the Dantzicers who had taken his ship, but the master of the vessel making proof that the owners of that ship were not the men against whom petitioner commenced his suit, he, at the instance of the English merchants trading to Dantzic, released her, although it was by them acknowledged that petitioner had received much wrong from the Dantzicers. Petitioner chose rather to be relieved in such honourable way as your Lordships shall think expedient than to bring the above-mentioned merchants into danger of seizure of their goods at Dantzic, or hazard the event of a long suit. Underwritten,
23. i. The Lords, upon reading this certificate and that of Sir Thos. Roe, late ambassador to Sigismund, King of Poland, thought fit that Sec. Windebank be prayed to acquaint his Majesty therewith, and to understand his directions. Whitehall, 4th March 1639[-40].
Mar. 4.
Queen Street.
24. Algernon Earl of Northumberland to Sir John Pennington. I formerly wrote to you to stay the Bonaventure till the coming down of a vessel to be convoyed to Dunkirk; the same being now ready, you are to require the captain of the Bonaventure to convoy her thither, and so proceed to the performance of his former instructions concerning the Spanish ambassador. [Admiralty seal impressed. 2/3 p.]
Mar. 4.
Berwick.
25. Capt. Charles Lloyd to Sec. Windebank. In my last I certified you of the true state of the town. The weather continues so bad that I am idle; only the smiths and carpenters, the first fair day, will finish the small breastwork round the town. I waited on Sir Michael Ernle at Norham, which place I viewed before, and which requires a small garrison of 50 men and those dragoons. The place being vast and most ruinated would require 3,000l. for absolute repair, but there is an inner place which could be made defensible for 300l. or 400l. in the summer. I have agreed with Mr. Goodman for draining the water from the hills, which formerly broke the stone wall between the bridge and the Newgate, for 20l. I formerly wrote to you, desiring to rent a house called the comptroller's house, now in the possession of an ale-wife, having no stowage for my materials. [1 p.]
Mar. 4.
Berwick.
26. Sir Michael Ernele to Sec. Windebank. I was last week with Capt. Lloyd at Norham Castle, and what he conceives fittest to be done there, he will give you particular account. It is reported at Edinburgh that his Majesty intends to block them up, both by sea and land, to hinder all commerce and trading, and that the lords whom they have sent to his Majesty will return without any satisfaction. They have lately published a little book, wherein they declare that at the camp, when the King was here, all things were agreed upon, and that all conditions were performed on their parts, and that they gave great satisfaction to all the nobility that were then here with his Majesty; that since the Earl of Traquair would never give them other answer, since his being commissioner there, but the King will have it thus. These and divers other things they allege in this pamphlet, which they spread as much as they can, and no doubt amongst Puritanical people may do some hurt to his Majesty's service. Capt. Tillier and Mr. Payler are coming to London, who will inform you of all things concerning this garrison. [Seal broken. 1 p.]
Mar. 4.
Whitburn.
27. [Thomas] Triplet to Archbishop Laud. After thanking you for taking this care of us, that these seditious neighbours of ours may be quelled a little in the beginning of the faction, before it spread to a covenant, or before it grow like their town, which was yesterday but as Elijah's cloud of a span long, but now swells big into a mayor and corporation, I desire to give you a little more satisfaction in the business, and first of Lilburne the great factotum of Sunderland, that rules both the religion and wealth of the town. In a letter which I received the other day from Dr. Duncan I had the following passage, which will help to establish my single report concerning the condition of the man:—"A good jest of Mr. Johnson's Lilburne: he was telling lately his story at Darnton [Darrington ?] of the quarrel between him and Mr. Basier; and a minister, my neighbour, stroke against him, and disputed for the Blessed Virgin, and among other arguments urged the Magnificat, 'All generations shall call me blessed.' Lilburne replied just like an ignaro, a[dding], 'Prove it out of Scripture, or you say noth[ing].' The priest laughed at him and his horrible ignorance, and told him the Magnificat was in St. Luke, which was great news to Lilburne. I am sure of the truth of this incredible passage." Now, I so far agree with the doctor that it is ignorance in Lilburne, but yet not pure and simple, but litigious and affected. This wretched kind of people, my lord, are so infatuated with their rancour against the Liturgy, that whatsoever Scripture is in it, eo ipso, by being there merely, becomes apocrypha to them, like the seaman's needle that loses its virtue when it is touched with the south pole of the loadstone. I say it could not be pure ignorance in Lilburne; for after that, Lilburne was in the High Commission for saying all such as used to give thanks in particular for the Blessed Virgin, did it with a purpose to bring in popery. Mr. Johnson, his parson, chose that text in the Magnificat to confute that senseless opinion, which these of Sunderland have got out of Peter Martyr in English (scarce three Puritans, beside Peter Martyr, of all that have written holding it), viz., equality of glory in the saints. For these wretches stick not to say the[y are] not, each of them in particular, but by their abundant faith to be as glorious as the Blessed Virgin herself. And hence follows another gadfly of theirs, that eggs them on and makes them so ambitious of their pseudo-martyrdom as they are; for they are confidently persuaded that every petty libelling knave amongst them shall have as big a crown for the loss of one drop of blood which the hangman sheds for their sedition, as any of the glorious martyrs and confessors that we meet with in the church story. An ill precedent, too, has this Lilburne given, as they say, in murmuring against the ship-money and suffering a d[istraint] before he would pay it. I say an ill precedent to the simplicity of obedience in these parts, that, before Lilburne grew great, knew not what it was to confront royal authority. I confess it is an honour to the [king]dom to have such towns as Sunderland was, to come up and flourish from small beginnings. But as [these] unhappy times are, I am put in mind of what the Roman history reports of Cato major, who in all business proposed in the senate, delivering his opinion, [said], I think thus and thus, and still of his own accord added, I think Carthage ought to go down. So I think, under your Grace's correction, that the King's Majesty had better for awhile despise that honour and profit that accrues to him that way, if these things be not exactly looked into, than to suffer little towns to grow big and anti-monarchy to boot; for where are all these pestilent nests of Puritans hatched, but in corporations, where they swarm and breed like hornets in [a dead] horse's head. There is one pestilent fellow besides these, that the messenger carries with him, that I cannot yet prove [anything] directly against, besides his zealous letters of counsel written to Mr. Johnson, the parson, when Lilburne was put in the High Commission; his name [is] Husband, the elder, for there are two of that name. But by [his conversation] this fellow has done much mischief in the town, having been among all the Puritans beyond sea. This man is a great associate of this George Stephenson's, and if he be suffered, it [will soon be a] proverb that Sunderland is Husbandied as Newcastle Jenisonied. To make the conspiracy a little more appear to your Grace, you shall [understand that] Justice Cottrell, the mayor, who grinds with all winds, [offered] to take my information upon oath, and now I have discovered the plot. [This town] was not quite free from the sickness, so neither of us thinking it fit for me [to go to him] he came over the water to me. I offered to be sworn for the King to my in[formation, but he refused to take my] oath, though I told him I had a Testament in my pocket, as I had, and took it under my hand only. I asked him the reason. He told me that he was to go to the sessions, and though he himself feared no danger, yet it might scandalise them, to come from giving an oath to one who dwelt in a town infected; whereto Mr. Hicks, the vicar of Monkwearmouth, who was by, replied, "Is it not more danger to take a paper from him than to give him an oath, you or your clerk writing his examination?" whereto he could say little, but put it off foolishly, saying in his ridiculous way of expression which he uses, "I will calcine the paper." So the plot appears thus. He takes the information thus, and being not deposed to, never offers to show it in public sessions, but, by Lilburne's device and his, they show it privately to my lord after the rising from the sessions, and have an ambuscado of Lilburne's friends in readiness to inform my lord, as they had, that the information was not upon oath, that Stephenson was a good religious man, &c.; and so, to say the truth, my Lord of Durham was abused in the business, as the King, and myself most of all, that was made both a slanderer and a liar. But now it appears plainly that it is most true of the mayor of Sunderland what I certified your Grace of in my former letter, viz., that by the mayor of Sunderland's means Lilburne and his man in their journey from Alnwick had intelligence of the business, which made them ride back and tamper with Morrell as they did; for thus it was, when Mr. Johnson, as I desired him, did by letter warn the mayor to proceed as a justice of peace and as the King's good subject ought to do in the business, he was so far from going to work with that advice and wariness as he ought to have done for discovering the business, that he reads the letter aloud among the company that he was in when the letter came; in which company there was one Paul, who is employed here by the customers; and this Paul it was that sends the notice of the business to Lilburne by the way, and to make the conspiracy the more notable this letter from Paul came to Lilburne without a name. Lilburne has reported this himself, and I hear it from Mr. Hicks that heard Lilburne speak it. I am sorry that I knew not this before, that the messenger might have had but one labour. Surely his Majesty has a notable servant of Paul, that being in Sunderland of purpose to do the King service, should be an eminent conspirator in the business. He knew he did a thing that he ought not to have done, as he is cunning enough, otherwise why set he not his hand to it? The reason of the late great league and necessitude between Paul and Lilburne, they two having been deadly enemies not long since, I take to be this. These under-publicans, placed in these maritime towns by the customers, having no great allowance, it may be 100 marks or 100l. per annum, live notwithstanding at great rates and drink sack, to maintain which they must, and I believe do, practise much indirectness. Such fellows as Lilburne, who have all the great doings, that have ships, &c., in order that they themselves may be connived at by these mercenary sub-customers, go a share with them in transporting firkins of butter and such non-licensed commodities. For, my lord, let it be considered, how should such a fellow coming from nothing, who for poverty in his first beginning was [driven to] the miserable necessity of stealing a horse, for which he was or was to [have been punished], how is it conceivable that he should come to be worth a matter of ten thou[sand pounds in this beg]garly country, and such a mean town as that was, when he first began? This is an ordinary course between these customers and the townsmen, as the narratives (here given) of a bark cast away and a storehouse burnt with butter ready for transportation show. I'll undertake, if these two accidents had fallen out against any prosecutor of Puritans, as they fell out against one that abused the King, the Puritans would have reckoned it as a terrible judgment, and Burton would have made a divine tragedy of it. It was put to this Baggs afterwards by a friend of mine as a case of conscience for abusing his Majesty thus. His answer was that he intended not to transport this butter, but to make his market of it among the great navies that were last year riding in the Downs; a likely tale that a man should go from hence and so far about with ill and dear butter, when the plentiful county of Kent was so near to furnish them much cheaper and better; nay, the Kentish men who come in by sea hither will not eat a bit of our northern butter, accounting it in comparison of their own a very noious and rancid thing, as indeed for the most part it is. It seems good butter is so scarce a commodity with us, that my lord of Falkland protested last year that though he had been three weeks in the country or above before he came to my house, yet he had not tasted anything like good butter till he came to our quarter. Besides, my lord, this Paul came at first into his office with much pretended integrity, whereupon [this pi]ous Lilburne, at whom Paul would not connive, because perhaps not sufficiently tempted, was presently in his [sulks], and they had a great ruffle. But when it seems Paul saw that integrity in Sunderland was but a [losing] trade, he began to imitate the burgher's dog of Hamburgh. This dog had often brought home his master's basket of meat from the butcher's safe, defending it and himself stoutly from other invading and essaying dogs, but being once waylaid, set upon, and mastered by an extraordinary band of stout curs, they fell aboard presently with his meat; he thought it best not to lose all, and so came in for a share, and fell to eating with them. I will not say as the old doctor after a long simile in his sermon, when he came to apply it: Even so, beloved, or rather far otherwise; but even so, my lord, and no otherwise do I take Paul's case to be. Now, my lord, seeing I have trespassed thus far upon your patience in matters concerning others, I will beg leave for conclusion to say a word for myself. I am, as I ever was since I knew anything, [down-] right for the King and the Church. I have ever expressed myself sufficiently that way; and it would better [appear] in me, if the times were as I hope they shall never be, when Puritanism should be the way to rise, [for your] Grace remembers such times, when except yourself, my ever honoured dead lord, and it may be [two or thre]e more in the whole university, there was scarce any durst show themselves for the Church, [so great was] the power of prevailing Puritans. I profess seriously that if I may have protection and encouragement, and any reasonable power authorising me so to do, I will have such an eye about my quarter, and so unkennel the covenanting seditious cubs, that not a man of them shall be earthed about me. There came a mendicant preacher about three weeks ago, who got leave to preach at Monkwearmouth, both forenoon and afternoon. To him amain came the Sunderland Puritans like rats over the water, Lilburne and Stephenson, Husband and Humble, and all the pack, forsaking Mr. Johnson, a honester man and a better preacher. These cry him up for a rare and powerful man. I, hearing of this fellow and inquiring after him, learn that his name is Bancks, and that he dwells at Alnwick. The curate of Alnwick was first my curate, and professes kindness and love to me, having been a little piece of the means of his fortune; and though his father is, and his grandfather was, an eager Puritan, yet he makes me believe he is right himself. I ask him of this fellow. He gives him pretty good commendations, that he is a poor man and wants a place, and his preaching neither factious nor seditious. "Say you so," quoth I; "I'll try that presently. I have a chapel of ease now that wants a curate, the place worth some 20 marks a year, more than I have myself from that chapelry; offer him that." He did so, and his choice of another which he could have helped him to at the same time. But this runagate peremptorily denies both, and had rather, it seems, go abroad seeking out knots of Puritans, and be a preacher at large, receiving present pay, than, to the greater credit of the clergy and his own greater honesty, confine himself to a certain cure, and, as this country goes, an honest salary. Whereupon I wrote to Mr. Levir, the curate of Alnwick, and among other things I had this passage concerning the powerful man, "Commend me to Mr. Bancks, and tell him that he had best keep within his bancks, for if I catch him in these parts again, with his seditious, begging, running, canting preachments, I'll have him laid by the heels for a vagrant," of which passage I have yet no answer. If I have any that is considerable I shall acquaint your Grace by the next. P.S.— Since the writing of this letter I hear of two other passages; one that the pursuivant can tell your Grace, how this knave Stephenson denied his name to him, calling himself Nicholson, under which name he ran away and made an escape till he was retried again. If this Puritan makes no bones to lie so manifestly, denying his name, sure he will deny the treasonable words. The other passage is of one Craig, the King's footman, who, if he be examined, can make a notable certificate of Lilburne having spoken in his hearing, and Craig himself the reporter of it, little less than treasonable words, when this Craig came down hither about the river of Sunderland. Dated March 4th, 1639. Endorsed by Laud, "Received March 10, 1639-40. Mr. Triplet." [Much damaged by rats. 2½ pp.] Enclosed,
27. i. The charge preferred against George Stephenson, servant to G. Lilburne, of Sunderland, attested by T. T[riplet]. [½ p.]
Mar. 5.
Scadbury.
28. Sir Thos. Walsingham and Sir Thos. Pope Blount. Your letter directed to the justices of peace at Eltham, Kent, requiring us to take some legal course to lay an assessment upon the estate of Wm. Stoddard, Esq., now prisoner in the Fleet, for the necessary relief of his sisters, that they may not be a parish charge, has been considered by us, being the next justices, but we have not as yet proceeded to cause an assessment to be made, for the reasons stated. 5th March 1639. [1 p.]
Mar. 5. 29. Petition of Robert Sumner, priest and prebendary of the cathedral church of Peterborough, to Archbishop Laud, showing that the Dean and Chapter, having several benefices in their gift, advowsons of some of them have been granted to some of the prebendaries, and one of Northborough, in Northamptonshire, to Dr. Pocklington, which, being now vacant, the Doctor has procured your Grace's letters to the Bishop, that institution might be given him upon the advowson; that this advowson was granted in the late dean's time; that the now dean and greater part of the prebendaries, as petitioner hopes, will present him; that those who enjoyed the benefit of advowsons heretofore, were such as had the benefits fall in the time of the dean who granted them; that if institution should be granted upon this advowson, others who have the like granted in the former dean's time will expect the same benefit; that this rectory of Northborough is not better by 20l. a year than that which Dr. Pocklington should leave. Ever since his being prebendary, petitioner has been resident, solely attending upon the service of the church, and has a great charge, and no other spiritual living or better hopes. Petitioner prays your Grace to take these particulars into your consideration, and to signify your disengagement of the said Bishop in the premises, that he may have liberty to institute such clerk as his lordship in equity and conscience shall think fit. Underwritten,
29. i. I desire Sir John Lambe to speak with Dr. Pocklington concerning this business, and in regard he is to leave a living within 20l. as good as this, and that the petitioner has taken great pains in the church, it were good that some fair end were made of it to his content, which I should be glad to hear. W. Cant. 5th March 1639[-40].
Mar. 5.
Queen Street.
30. Thos. Smith to [Sir John Pennington]. I perceive you are not well pleased that my letters for release of your good [sea]men are so frequent as of late they have been. I would not offend you by any means, yet I am importuned by such friends as I cannot deny, though you may, and not displease me at all; nevertheless, I thank you for what you have done. The time draws nigh that we shall be happy in the sight of you, which I long for. News we have here in abundance, which you shall receive in this enclosed paper. You may communicate the same to whom you please; but not a word from whom you have it, for words now are wrested according to the gall of some who lie in wait to ensnare men, though never so well meaning. I have just come from the Lord Admiral, who has given me order to let you know that these seven ships, being part of the next year's fleet, viz., Garland, Antelope, Mary Rose, Providence, 8th Whelp, Greyhound, and Roebuck, are to be in readiness to go forth to sea by the 1st of April at the furthest, and it will be necessary that the Greyhound be sent in to be graved, &c. You are therefore to give order that the said pinnace be forthwith sent into Chatham, in place of which the Nicodemus is ordered to attend you. My brother, who has the honour to be with you, writes in behalf of Mr. Johnson, an officer in your ship, who desires to have the command of one of the smaller vessels. I nominated this man to the Lord Admiral, who answered that if you would recommend him for this service he would put him into that vessel. Yesterday my lord signed a warrant to you to send away the Bonaventure to fetch the Spanish ambassador, and withal to convoy the vessel which will bring you that warrant from Dover; between you and me it carries powder to Dunkirk, but no man must know the same, and therefore no words but "Mum." Those captains who go with the seven ships are as follows: Fog, Stradling, Price, Hill, Woolward, Wheeler, and Rockwell. Whither they go we know not, but think for Scotland, against the people of which country we make as much preparation and as speedy as if we were to eat them up, but I fear the worst. Mr. Digby, who goes captain of a troop in this business, being now with me, desires to be remembered to you. I think I shall stay behind to wait on the marine affairs, for which I am the less sorry, because I shall by that means have the more opportunity to salute you often and serve you here. [Endorsed in Pennington's hand, "From Mr. Smith, the 5th March 1639-[40]."] Encloses,
30. i. A relation of news from court. Mr. Bagshaw, reader, of the Middle Temple, read but one week, being commanded by the Lord Keeper to surcease. He read upon the statute 25 Edward III., touching the plenarty of benefices:—1st. That an Act of Parliament might be made without bishops. 2nd. That no man in orders can be a justice of peace. 3rd. That no sentence in the High Commission, wherein the cause is not expressed, can be valid in law. Mr. Ludlow, reader, of the Inner Temple, read but one week, likewise by reason, as some say, of his extreme poverty.
Lord Chief Justice Littleton was sworn a Privy Councillor upon Friday last. Letters have been sent from the Board to all officers and judges, excepting Judge Croke, to know what money they will lend the King, and some of them have appeared and promised good sums, but many dispute the business and will not lend, whereof Mr. John Packer is one of note. The Parliament writs to the nobility are gone forth to all excepting the Lords Say, Brook and Mandeville. The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Strafford, goes hence to-morrow, making all the haste he can, in regard their Parliament begins on the 18th inst. We have the sad news that Mr. Essex Devereux, son of Walter, of Worcestershire, with divers other gentlemen of note, were drowned while passing a small river in that shire, about 12 p.m. Yesterday the Scotch commissioners were heard before the King and the Cabinet Council, and behaved themselves very discreetly. When the King spake they gave reverend audience, but when any of the Lords spake they gave them hearing too, but never replied one word to them, but directed their answer to the King. The archbishop took occasion to say that he had heard that there was one called the Sheriff of Teviotdale [Sir Wm. Douglas] that had wished himself at Jerusalem, or banished to any place, so that the King were in Edinburgh to receive plenary satisfaction from his people there, both in the justness of their cause and the readiness of that nation to submit to all his Majesty's reasonable demands. The Sheriff being by, replied to his Majesty that he was the man, and was there ready to justify that he spake those words, and would maintain them with his life. What proceeded further we know not.
The city have chosen their burgesses, Aldermen [Sir Thos.] Soam for one and [Isaac] Pennington, lately sheriff, for another; I know not the rest. The electors of Westminster have chosen theirs in great confusion, Mr. [John] Glyn and Mr. [William] Bell, but it is thought that the last will hardly stand. This 5th of March the Lord Lieutenant [Strafford] went out of town for Ireland, and intends to be here again at the beginning of the ensuing Parliament. [Endorsed by Sir John Pennington, 5th March 1639[-40]. 2 pp.]
Mar. 5. 31. Note of Pells Issue Rolls for certain terms specified during the reigns of James I. and Charles I., described as "unwritten." [These are still wanting on the Rolls, with the exception of the first two. ¾ p.]
Mar. 5. 32. Bond of Anthony Allen, of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, in 100l., for his attendance before the Council until licensed to depart. [Latin and English. ½ p.]
[Mar. 6.] 33. A relation of some passages of the reading of Mr. [Edward] Bagshaw, Reader of the Middle Temple, in Lent vacation. Mr. Bagshaw, a man religious and honest, made choice for his subject of the statute 25 Edw. III. c. 7. He began his reading on Monday, the 24th February, but before he made his divisions he told the gentlemen attending his lectures that he once intended to have read upon Prohibition, but he found that too sharp a subject to deal withal; yet, nevertheless, if he could conveniently accomplish his task in hand, perhaps, in the end, he would give a touch upon that also. He told them that he intended to observe a rule out of Tacitus,—not to follow the truth too near lest it should dash out his teeth, nor yet to follow it too far a distance lest he lost it; and therefore he would keep himself in an equal distance, neither to offend nor to be offended. He then divided his matter into 10 parts, according to his 10 days' reading, and every day's labour into 10 several cases; with these, however, I will not trouble you, saving such as are become the common discourse about town, and these I will express briefly and truly. He put a case whether or no it be a good Act of Parliament which is made without assent of the Lords Spiritual, and he held affirmatively and proved it by the arguments herein stated. The second case was this:—If any beneficed clerk were capable of temporal jurisdiction at the time of the making of that law. He held the negative point, and proved it by the arguments here stated. The third case was this:—Whether a bishop without calling assigned have power as diocesan to convict a heretic. He maintained he could not. His reason was that, albeit, by the bloody statute 2 Henry IV., some supposed that grounds may be raised for maintenance of that authority, yet it is not so full, and besides, which is the main reason, the Commons did not consent to the making of that law, for he searched the records and found that Act only passed the consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, but the Commons are never mentioned in it. Some other matters he handled in point of law. If he had gone forward he would have delivered his opinion both of the High Commission and Prohibition, as mentioned, but he was commanded silence; and within two days after he repaired to the Lord Keeper to know the cause, and carried with him the head of his argument, which the Lord Keeper said was good law, but not seasonably delivered, and told him that as he was prohibited by the King from reading, so he must be set at liberty again by his Majesty, and advised him to move the Archbishop of Canterbury for his proceeding. After that Mr. Bagshaw had been twice at Lambeth without admittance; the third time he spoke with the Archbishop there, who told him that he had fallen upon an unfit subject and an unseasonable time, and that it would stick closer to him than he was aware of. He answered he had not done it out of any evil intention, neither had he taken his resolution of a late time, but that above two years ago, when he knew that he must now perform the exercise, he then made choice of that statute; and that until within this twelve months he never heard of any opposition made against the prelacy, and thinking that the same which was moved against them in another kingdom nothing concerned those, therefore he conceived no offence would have been taken by it; and for him to have altered the frame of his reading, especially before this time, he should have disappointed the house [Middle Temple], wronged himself in his study, profession, and practice, in regard that he should not have been able in so short a time to have performed so great a task as that was. The Archbishop answered that perhaps it had been better he had given it over quite at first, than to suffer that by it which he was like to do. Then Mr. Bagshaw replied that the same which he had [delivered] was good law, and he was able to maintain it, and he would stand by it, and hoped that he need not fear any man's power in regard that his cause was lawful and warrantable, but he humbly desired his Majesty's leave to finish what he had begun; he was answered that his Majesty had otherwise resolved. The reader went out of town on Friday, the 6th March, accompanied by 40 or 50 horsemen in very good credit and applause of the house [Middle Temple] of which he is a member. After his return from London to Banbury, in Oxfordshire, of which town he is recorder, he was chosen a burgess for the Parliament. [An abstract of Mr. Bagshaw's case, as here argued, is printed in Rushworth, Col. iii., 990. 3½ pp.]
Mar. 6. 34. Petition of Chief Justice Littleton and the rest of the Justices of the Common Pleas to the King. That in the fourth year of your Majesty's reign the Commissioners for Examination of Fees required the then judges of that court to certify the fees due to them, which they performed accordingly, both for their own and their clerks' fees, whereof a true copy is annexed. The commissioners not having declared any exception to these fees, they have ever since been paid to petitioners and their predecessors. Pray your Majesty to ratify and confirm the same by Privy Seal. Underwritten,
34. i. Reference to the Lords Keeper, Treasurer, Privy Seal, Lord Cottington, and the two Secretaries of State, who are to call before them the commissioners, to be informed whether the fees in the schedule annexed are fit to be ratified as desired, and then to certify their opinions to his Majesty. Hampton Court, 6th March 1639[-40]. [1 p.] Annexed,
34. ii. Schedule of fees payable to the Lord Chief Justice and other the justices of the Court of Common Pleas at Westminster. Endorsed, Desire to be referred to the Lord Keeper and Lord Privy Seal for the settling of fees of court. [52/3 pp.]
Mar. 6. 35. Note by Thos. Meautys, Clerk of the Council, of business undespatched this day. The Lord Mayor and sheriffs to give an accompt of ship-money on Sunday next. Newfoundland fishing upon the complaint of the merchants of the western ports. The Corporation of Starch-makers. The Association of the Herring-fishing upon the petition of the Lord Chamberlain and the rest of that body. All these his Majesty has appointed to hear himself, but no day set, save only for the first. Counsel on both sides have attended several days according to former appointment. In an order lately made concerning the tin farm it was resolved that the importation of that commodity from foreign parts, either wrought or unwrought, should be prohibited by proclamations, as likewise the using of any measures for retailing wine, beer, ale, &c., other than such as are made of pewter, capable of a stamp, and sealed according to statute. Directions are already given to the Attorney-General to prepare proclamations to be published in England and Ireland, but for Scotland it was respited until upon conference with the Lord Treasurer and others of the Privy Council of that kingdom, now here, his Majesty and the Board should give further order. [1 p.]
Mar. 6. 36. List of the King's servants to be warned to be at the Council Board on Friday in the afternoon, dated March 4, but endorsed March 6. [1⅓ p.]
Mar. 6. 37. Similar list of the King's servants, with the amount each is required to contribute to the loan. In the margin are notes of their replies. Those in this paper now absent to be sent for against Wednesday. [1 p.]
Mar. 6.
Berwick.
38. William Roberts to Sec. Windebank. I am safely arrived in Berwick and hope to be in Edinburgh this night. I should have given you all the intelligence I could gather here, had I not met by the way, betwixt Durham and Darlington, Captain Ridpeth, whom the Earl of Ettrick had sent post with letters to the King; also Captain Tillier and Mr. Payler, paymaster of Berwick, who went this morning from hence post towards London, and who doubtless can acquaint you with all occurrences in these parts. I shall be careful to show my duty in this kind on every fit occasion, with a most hearty desire to do his Majesty all faithful service. [Seal with crest and arms. 1 p.]
Mar. 6. 39. John Innes to the same. I have many times written to you of my miserable estate, being committed by your warrant, to my utter ruin, the death of my wife, and overthrow of all my family. I wish you had given order with your warrant that my head had been struck off, or I hanged; then I had been at rest, but now I am murdered in prison. I am sure his Majesty desires no such cruelty to any, much less to one who has done what I have in his service, and which is well known to his Majesty, having been certified by his Council in Scotland, and by some here, amongst these by the Marquis of Huntley. I entreat you with all speed to take this into your consideration. [1 p.]
Mar. 6.
Lambeth.
40. Archbishop Laud to Sir Thos. Roe. I received yours of Feb. 3/13 with a copy of one to you from Dr. Earnstius. For him let it fare as it will; for your business there it must fare as it may. Service you have done, and very good with the King of Denmark, but as for that for which you were principally sent I never thought from the beginning that any good would come of it. In a disguise and for a delay it began, and I never expected better issue than it has brought forth. For yourself I have prevailed with his Majesty for your present return, and both the Secretaries have promised to send this day and recall you. I pray make as much convenient haste as you can, which I think is an easy suit to you. The truth is I heartily wish you here, and though you cannot come time enough to be of the House, the writs being sent out for the 13th of April, yet I persuade myself you may in your way do some good for his Majesty's service, to whom you are much beholding. So haste away hither, and God's protection guide you. P.S.—I pray remember my thanks to your lady for her frequent remembrance of me by your pen; I fear she will not die of grief for sorrow of your return. [Seal with arms. 1 p.]
Mar. 6.
London.
41. Algernon Earl of Northumberland, Lord-General and Lord Admiral of England, [to Sir Thos. Roe]. In return for yours of the 3rd Feb., I can now send you the welcome news of his Majesty's pleasure for your present repair into England, for which Mr. Treasurer has received order to give you notice. By this resolution I receive much contentment, assuring myself that it will be pleasing to you and very grateful to all your friends. We are here beginning our levies; I have already given out commissions for the raising of 2,000 horse, that are commanded to be in Northumberland by the middle of April. The petitioners or, as some call them, Commissioners sent from Scotland have several times been admitted to his Majesty's presence, but I see little hopes of accommodation without blows, for though they make show of great humility and obedience, yet do they justify and maintain their former proceedings. If in this Parliament the people acquit themselves as becomes dutiful and loyal subjects, all may do well; but, if otherwise, the events are likely to prove unhappy. I have according to your desire provided well for Capt. Minne, having made him lieutenant-colonel to Vavasor, and shall with the like readiness serve you on all occasions. 2 pp.]
Mar. 6.
Drury Lane.
42. Sec. Windebank to the same. You have great reason to press for your revocation, when you have leisure to dispute with yourself whether idleness or business be the greater pain, with which problematic question your letters of the 28th January begin. Your letters came very opportunely to give me occasion at the Foreign Committee to represent your condition, which Archbishop Laud having seconded, his Majesty thereupon took a resolution to give you leave to return, and commanded Sec. Vane and myself to make it known to you. Having his Majesty's license you may now take your leave of those there [at Hamburgh] whom you shall think fit and come away, leaving Mr. Avery there in the same capacity he held before your arrival. If necessary you may have the King's letters of revocation, which I conceive must have been sent if your residence and negotiations had been with any prince or state; but in the condition you now are I think the signification of the King's pleasure in this manner is sufficient. [Copy in Read's hand. 1½ p.]
Mar. 6.
Knowle.
43. Sir John Sackville to Sir Henry Vane, Treasurer of the Household. Mr. Bowles, your chaplain, brought me your commands touching your standing to be knight of the shire [for Kent], and in obedience to them I have laboured since to do you service, and have procured for you most of the voices of this town and parish. I have my Lord of Dorset's bailiff and other agents working for you in the country. I am sorry I cannot wait on you in person, for first I have no voice in Kent, and besides I must be in Sussex at the election. [Seal with crest. 1 p.]
Mar. 6.
York.
44. Sir Lionel Maddison to Sir Henry Vane. I received your letter by Mr. Shafto, and have subscribed my part of the agreement, relying upon your noble intentions and the true meaning of all parties. I have a little business here this week at the sessions at York. The marriage was consummated on Thursday the 27th ult., unto which I beseech the Lord to grant his blessing, and to us all much joy and comfort in it. [Seal with arms, broken. ¾ p.]
Mar. 6. 45. Receipted bill of Humphrey Bradbourne for 4l. 5s. paid by Lord Conway for gloves, &c. [1 p.]
Mar. 6. 46. Examination of Francis Gray, clerk of the peace for co. Northampton, taken before the Attorney and Solicitor General this day. Touching a petition delivered to him at the sessions held at Kettering, 8th January last, by Richard Knighton and the rest of the grand jury [concerning ship-money], when the justices directed the same to be presently read in open court. He has delivered no copies of this petition except one to Sir Christopher Yelverton, sheriff of co. Northampton. [1 p.]
Mar. 6. 47. The like examination of Richard Knighton, of Irtlingborough, He acknowledges that he was foreman of the grand jury at the sessions held at Kettering for co. Northampton the 8th January last, and he and the rest of his fellow jurors agreed upon and framed this petition concerning ship-money, but who penned the same he knows not. [1 p.]
Mar. 7. Grant of the office of Captain of Upnor Castle, Kent, to Thomas Osborne during good behaviour, upon surrender of the same by Sir Charles Howard, with a fee of 30l. per annum for himself, 16d. per diem for a master-gunner, 12d. per diem each to seven gunners, and 8d. each for 20 foot soldiers. [Docquet.]
Mar. 7. Presentation of Thos. Twitty, clerk, to the vicarage of Enstone, Oxon., void and in his Majesty's gift by the minority of the Earl of Down, his Majesty's ward. [Docquet.]
Mar. 7. 48. Account of ship-money for 1639 levied and in the hands of the sheriffs. Total 5,907l., making, with the 1,622l. paid to the Treasurers of the Navy, 7,529l. There had been paid in this week no shipmoney for this present year, nor any arrears payable for any of the preceding years. The arrears at this period stood as follows: 1635, 4,536l.; 1636, 6,954l.; 1637, 16,872l.; 1638, 14,469l. [1 p.]
Mar. 7.
Tower Street.
49. The Treasurers of the Navy to Nicholas. That there has been no ship-money paid in this week, but the sheriffs of Devon and Hants have made up several sums of money to be paid here within 15 days, when we will make an orderly certificate. [⅓ p.]
Mar. 7.
Winterbourne Earls.
50. John Nicholas to his brother, Edward Nicholas. Great need has driven me to write to you, entreating you to help me now at this time, this year being very hard and provision very dear; added to which, my wife and two of my children are very sick. My father and mother still continue their hard courses towards me. [Endorsed by Nicholas, "7th March 1638. Brother John to me." 2/3 p.]
Mar. 7.
Berwick.
51. Sir Michael Ernle to [Sec. Windebank]. I have received your letter, by which I understand that this Stevenson and his master are sent for by a pursuivant. I have examined Morrell, who only confesses that Stevenson said that he thought it was not honestly done to serve against the Scots, for he believed the Scots were in the right. This Morrell has the report to be a very knave. You say you will come hither shortly, which I should be glad to see. [1 p.]
Mar. 8.
Whitehall.
52. Philip Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, Lord Chamberlain, to John Earl of Rothes. Repudiates any complicity or allowance in the designs of the Scottish Covenanters undertaken by other arms than by petition and prayers to the King, as insinuated in Rothes' letter of 29th January before calendared [see page 397], to which this is the reply. I never found loyalty in your Covenant, or duty in your taking up arms. I never affirmed the justice of your cause, neither did I consider so much the merits thereof, as I did your unwarrantable and tumultuous disobedience therein unto your King, with the vexation and disturbance it brought upon the nobility of this kingdom. [Printed in Rushworth's Collections iii. p. 984. Copy. Endorsed, "For Sec. Windebank." 1½ p.]
Mar. 8. 53. Another copy. [2 pp.]
Mar. 8. 54 and 55. Two more copies of the same, to which are prefixed copies of Rothes' letter of 29th January, calendared at p. 397.
Mar. 8. 56. Warrant signed by Henry Earl of Manchester, Lord Privy Seal, and Edward Earl of Dorset, requiring the attendance of John and Peter Cooper at the Council Board on the 26th inst. to answer for the great wrongs done to Benjamin Smith in detaining from him his late wife's portion, she being Anne, daughter of Christopher Cooper, to whom you were executors. [½ p.]
Mar. 8.
Berwick.
57. Sir Michael Ernle to Sec. Windebank. I have received no commands from you of late. Since Captain Tillard [Tillier] and Mr. Payler went hence, there has arrived at Leith from Holland a ship laden with arms, powder, and match, besides 8 or 10 pieces of cannon. The chief lords of the Covenant are summoned to be at Edinburgh to-morrow. I was informed that Stephen Boyde, a bailiff of Edinburgh, was sent to the Governor of the Castle in the name of all the magistrates, to desire they might raise a mound for securing a particular part of the town if occasion should happen, which he [the governor], as he had good reason, denied. I am credibly informed that they are levying men at Edinburgh, but what number I know not. Mr. Roberts when he went by this town desired me to forward you the enclosed. [Endorsed by Windebank, "Received 12th, at 8 in the morning." 1 p.]
Mar. 9. 58. Notes taken by Sec. Windebank at the interview of the Covenanting Commissioners from the Parliament of Scotland with the King [at Whitehall] this day. [Another version of this interview, fuller in some particulars, will be found in Rushworth's Collections, iii., p. 997. 1 2/3 p.]
Mar. 9.
Whitehall.
59. Notes by Nicholas of the proceedings at the Council of War this day. Estimate by Captain William Legge, Master of his Majesty's Armoury, of the number of waggons required for transport of tents, viz., for 20 regiments 100 waggons, value 10l. each, so that the whole will amount to 1,000l. Resolved, that these be provided by the Office of the Ordnance at the King's charge, and that the 300 horses to draw them shall be taken up in the several counties as the last year. Resolved, that timely order be given to the counties for sending not only the 300 horses for carriage of the soldiers' tents, but also 1,100 more for the use of the train of artillery, together with carters, the King's allowance to be after the rate of 1s. for each horse and 8d. wages for each carter per diem. The Lord-General is desired to set down what provisions of victuals for the army are requisite to be provided, at what times and in what places, and to send a note thereof in writing to the Lord Treasurer and Lord Cottington, who are prayed to enter into contracts with fit persons for timely providing the same. Resolved, that Mr. Pinkney shall be commissary of the victuals, and to have 10s. per diem, and for his instructions is to attend the Lord-General. The Lord-General this day declared that he had appointed Sir John Fenwick to be Muster-Master-General of the Army, and that there is now every day occasion to employ him for mustering of the horse which are being raised, whereupon it was ordered that his lordship should be prayed to give order that the said muster-master enter into pay. Resolved, that all the troops of horse now raising for his Majesty's army shall receive their arms at Hull, and shall be quartered in the country thereabouts. Ordered, that none of the horse now raising shall be mustered within 30 miles of London to prevent borrowing of horses, and that as soon as there shall be either 60 cuirassiers or 40 carabineers of a troop mustered they shall enter into pay and instantly march towards Hull, there to receive their arms, and such of them as shall want saddles may there purchase the same out of the King's magazine. Ordered, that when a captain of a troop of cuirassiers shall muster 60 horse or upwards, and a captain of a troop of carabineers shall muster 40 horse or more, that then the captain shall receive half pay for himself and the six horses which he is allowed, and that all other officers and troopers mustered shall have full pay, but so soon as the captain shall muster his whole troop he shall receive his full pay. It is recommended to the Lord-General to set down in his orders to be published that it shall be death for any trooper or inferior officer to show at the musters a borrowed horse, and that if it be done with the privity or connivance of the captain, the latter to be cashiered and imprisoned. Resolved, that three of the four troops to be raised for Berwick shall receive their arms at Berwick, and that the fourth of those troops and the troop to be raised for Carlisle shall receive their arms at York. The LordGeneral having this day declared that he doubted he should not find fit and able officers for so many as 30 regiments, the Lords thereupon entered into consideration that it would be fit to make each regiment 200 men apiece, more or less, and left it to the Lord-General to take the same into his consideration and to form the regiments accordingly, or as his lordship upon advice should think fit, and as he should herein resolve the Lords prayed him to give order to the auditor accordingly to make up the list of the entertainments. Resolved, that Captain William Legge shall have 1l. 10s. per diem for his entertainment as Lieutenant of the Ordnance for this present expedition. [3½ pp.]
Mar. 9. 60. Archbishop Laud to Sec. Windebank. The warden, fellows, and scholars of Wadham College, Oxford, having compounded with the Commissioners for disafforesting the manors or farms of Moor Hall, Montpelier alias Willingales, Shippon, Fryerning Hall, Ray, and the rectory of Hockley-on-the-Hill, with all other lands belonging to the college situate in Writtle, Chelmsford, Fryerning, Ingatestone, Hockley-on-the-Hill, or elsewhere within the county of Essex, in consideration of 240l. to be paid into the Exchequer, his Majesty is graciously pleased to remit the same. If you will speak with his Majesty therein he will give you directions in it, or accept of this my certificate to give your warrant to the Clerk of the Signet to prepare a bill for the King's signature for their discharge of the said 240l. [¾ p.]
Mar. 9.
Raby Castle.
61. William Conyers to Sec. Vane. Not long since I received by Mr. Richeson three letters written by your appointment, one from Mr. Henry Vane, another from Mr. Dingley, and the third from Mr. Cosens. The departure of Mr. Rogers hence is so sudden that I am not able at this instant to answer these letters, but hope within 20 days to give you a full answer to these and all other business here. Concerning the new pale you appointed me to make, it was finished before I received order from you to make it up with a dry edge and quickset. Desires instructions as to West Park. Concerning the valuing of the lands and leases you are about to purchase of Mr. Ewbanke I have already said something in my last letters. A variety of particulars about the management of the property. [2½ pp.]
Mar. 9.
The Hague.
62. Sir John Conyers to [Sec. Windebank]. On the 6th of this present I received your two packets by Sir Nicholas Byron of the 18th and 21st February, together with his Majesty's most gracious and favourable letters in my behalf to the Queen of Bohemia, the Prince of Orange, and the States, for which I return most humble thanks, and thank you also for the pains you have taken. I have delivered those letters, and so are all the rest in behalf of those other noble gentlemen for whom his Majesty was pleased to write delivered, but I now perceive they will not be of any effect, for the Prince of Orange doth absolutely refuse to give leave to any, and, as he usually doth when he intends not to do a courtesy, he has referred the business to the States General, who, I am assured, will do nothing but by his advice. I hope we shall have answer this day or to-morrow, but whether they give us leave or not, I for my part do purpose, God willing, to take the first passage for England to attend his Majesty's commands there. If in the meantime they take my company from me, I shall think it well bestowed, since I lose it to do his Majesty service, and shall be sorry for nothing so much as that I have troubled his Royal Majesty and your honour and have lost so much time in that business, but I hope that henceforward by my diligence and faithful service to his Majesty to repair what hitherto has been wanting in me. [Endorsed by Windebank, "Sir John Conyers. Received by Mr. O'Neale. 21 our style." 1½ p.]
Mar. 9.
New College, Oxford.
63. John Windebank to his cousin, Robert Read. My allowance is so very small that I cannot possibly bring the year about with it. My fees due for my exercise which I lately performed for master of arts stood me in about 30l. I know not how to discharge my tailor's bill in London unless you can procure it of my father. P.S.—This afternoon the whole university are assembled to elect our burgesses. I intend on Wednesday to acquaint my father with the proceedings. I hear already that the vice-chancellor has given order to the masters of arts to name my father [Sec. Windebank] burgess in the first place before Sir John Davers. [Seal with arms. 2 pp.]
Mar. 9.
Bristol.
64. George Knight, mayor, and others of Bristol to Nicholas. Since the receipt of the Lords' last letters mentioning an abatement of 160l. of the 800l. imposed on this city towards preparation of shipping, we have laid the assessment after the rate of 640l., and have proportioned the same upon every ward as indifferently as we could according to our instructions, and have appointed collectors. We hope to send up a good part of the whole assessment by the end of this month. We find the inhabitants more slow to contribute than formerly. We thank you for your care and pains in assisting us from time to time. [Endorsed by Nicholas as received 15th March. Seal broken. 1 p.]
Mar. 9.
Stone.
65. George Carr to William Raylton, agent to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. I am directed by Sir George Wentworth to desire you to send over for Ireland [Rudd] the drum-major he spoke to you of; his name and address you may obtain from Mr. Henry Wentworth, the Earl of Cleveland's brother. As the drum-major will enter into pay upon his arrival in Ireland, Sir George desires his immediate departure hence, that so he may arrive there before the Lord [Lieutenant's] return from thence. [Seal with arms, broken. 1 p.]
Mar. 9.
Bristol.
66. John Chambers to Richard Harvey, servant to Endymion Porter. My brother-in-law, Henry Weston, desires you would take sufficient security for that money which upon accompt shall appear to be due to you. The securities offered are here named. I pray you do my brother all the kindness you may herein; it tends much to the settling of his estate; and let me entreat you to send us a present answer. [1 p.]
Mar. 9. 66. Affidavit of Henry Ludlow. That on the 17th February last, after this deponent had procured the Council order dated 5th February, made between Edmund Ludlow, Esq., this deponent, and his six brothers and sisters, concerning their maintenance and portions, he went to his brother's lodging on the back-side of Drury Lane, but not finding him there he left a copy of the said order with his brother's agent, Mr. Gyles, who refused to deliver it, and so deponent, accompanied by Richard Tommes, took a journey to Coker, in Somersetshire, where he left another copy at his brother Edmund's dwelling-house. [Attested copy. 1 p.]
Mar. 9. 67. Affidavit of Richard Tommes to the same effect as the preceding. [Attested copy. 1 p.]
Mar. 9. 68. See "Returns made by Justices of Peace."
Mar. 10. Presentation of Michael Hudson, clerk, to St. John's Hospital, near Lutterworth, co. Leicester, and diocese of Lincoln, void, and in his Majesty's gift pleno jure. [Docquet.]
Mar. 10. Privilege granted to Robert Chiver, gent., for 14 years for the sole practice of a new way by him invented for improving and manuring of land, rendering to the King one moiety of the clear profit, with proviso, that if found inconvenient his Majesty or the Council may determine the same. [Docquet.]
Mar. 10. License for Edmund Brudenell, Esq., to travel with two servants for three years. [Docquet.]
Mar. 10. Warrant for repayment of 2,000l., lent by Sir Charles Cæsar for his Majesty's present supply, out of the fines for compositions for alienations, payable in the year ending 13th February 1642-3, with interest at the rate of 8l. per cent. per annum. [Docquet.]
Mar. 10. Letter to Henry Earl of Worcester, dispensing with his absence at the next session of Parliament. [Docquet.]
Mar. 10. Warrant to the treasurer of the chamber to pay to Bartholomew Dixon, groom of the privy buckhounds, vice Ralph Reade, deceased, the wage of 13d. per diem quarterly, and 20s. per annum for his winter livery during life. [Docquet.]
Mar. 10. The like to the master of the great wardrobe for a livery of 3l. 16s. per annum for Bartholomew Dixon. [Docquet.]
Mar. 10. 69. The King to Patrick Lord Ettrick. We have understood by your letters of the 2nd present the unhappy accident of the fall of the two walls on the south and north-east sides of the outer works of the castle of Edinburgh, and according to your desire we have by our special letters which go herewith given strict command to our master-mason there to take speedy course for reparation of the same. We have likewise directed our letters to the Provost and Bailies of Edinburgh, a duplicate of which you are now to receive, commanding them to give you all possible assistance in this work. For the work itself you are to order it in such sort as you shall judge most necessary for your defence, and so as it may be finished with most speed, it importing our service very highly that great diligence and haste be used in it, and therefore we recommend expedition most especially to your care. Concerning money there is a supply of 1,000l. sterling delivered to this bearer to be disposed of for our service as you shall direct. There is likewise order taken for the warrant to the postmasters in Scotland for the conveyance of your letters according to your desire. For all other business in your former letters we have fully signified our pleasure to you by your secretary Roberts. Your care in our service shall not be forgotten upon any occasion wherein your interests shall be concerned. We understand there is good agreement between the English and Scotch soldiers in the garrison, and therefore we hold Captain Shipman's stay there unnecessary, and give him license to come away and leave his charge to your disposing, which you are to let him know. Endorsed, "His Majesty's letters to the Lord Ettrick in answer of his of the 2nd of March." [Draft in Sec. Windebank's hand. 1½ p.]
Mar. 10. 70. The King to the Provost and Bailies of Edinburgh. We have lately by our letters made known to you how well we are satisfied with your obedience to our commandments, by the diligence you used and the assistance you gave to the safe and quiet passing of the men and munition which we sent not long since for your security to our castle of Edinburgh. And though we have reason upon so good a ground to expect from you, though unrequired, the like conformity in anything that may concern our service and your good, yet there being now another occasion presented by the fall of some of the works at the castle there, wherein you may, by your like readiness, confirm us in that our gracious opinion of you, we hereby require you to furnish Lord Ettrick, our governor there, with men and materials and all things necessary for the speedy reparation of those works, and to be aiding and assisting to him in this service to the uttermost of your abilities, your own safety and honour, of which we shall always have a tender and princely care, being chiefly concerned herein. [Draft. 1 p.]
[Mar. 10.] 71. Strictures on the arguments advanced in support of the demands made by the Covenanters deputed from the Parliament of Scotland to the King. The notes in the margin are in the King's hand.
1. His Majesty pressing them to declare whether they conceived he had power to prorogue the Parliament or no, they said it should be done by Act of Parliament or by consent of the States; but being pressed for a clear and positive answer touching his Majesty's own power in that particular, they concluded that they knew not what he might do in the extent of his high power.
2. [Margin: "Defyning of the Articles."] Touching the Act which they require for excluding the third estate, and by consequence the taking away his Majesty's royal prerogative, which all the Kings of Scotland have had, in the nomination and choice of some of the Lords of the Articles, they answered that there was no necessity of having any Lords of Articles at all, but only such a committee as the Parliament itself should choose when they were assembled; but when it was represented to them that this was new, and in effect not only an alteration of the whole frame of the Parliament, and an exclusion of his Majesty's just and royal prerogative, they replied that it could not be called new, seeing that way of choosing Lords of Articles was not until the time of Robert Bruce, which was not passing three hundred years since, and one of them [margin: The Sheriffe of Tividall] affirmed that there was now a necessity of this course, for how could they else leave out and exclude the third estate.
3. [Margin: "Castells. Strangers."] They complained that his Majesty had placed English soldiers in some of his castles in Scotland, alleging that strangers ought not to be so employed; whereupon his Majesty affirmed that his English subjects could not be called or esteemed strangers no more than the Scots were here.
4. [Margin: "Monies."] They affirmed that the King had no power to assign values unto money, but gave no reason, law, or precedent for it, and so held a frivolous desire that the Parliament only should do it.
5. [Margin: "Customes."] The reducing of his Majesty's customs and impositions to the ancient rates was ridiculous, for considering three hundred years is new and late with them, who can tell what they will call ancient, and besides they allege nothing for the diminution of his Majesty's prerogative in that particular.
6. Lastly they insisted that his Majesty ought not to place any governor of either nation in any of his forts or castles without consent of the Parliament, which likewise appeared very frivolous, for so upon the death or removal of every governor a Parliament must be called or for ever continued. [1⅓ p.]
[Mar. 10.] 72. Answer to queries submitted on the part of the King to the Covenanters deputed from the Parliament of Scotland, with their answers to the same. These answers are according to the informations given to us by the Parliament who gave us our instructions. Signed by Dunfermline, Loudoun, Douglas, and Robert Barch. [Printed in Rushworth's Collections, iii., pp. 1001-7. 7¼ pp.]
[Mar. 10.] 73. Copy of the preceding. [5¼ pp.]
Mar. 10.
Whitehall.
74. Notes by Nicholas of the proceedings at the Council of War this day. Resolved that the officers of foot shall have allowance for their waggons from the time they shall enter into full pay. Resolved that such of the troops of horse as desire it may be mustered here, about this town, when they are ready, and have a week's pay delivered to them so soon as they have mustered 60 cuirassiers or 40 carabineers, and then to depart towards the rendezvous at Hull within eight days, and after another eight days to be again mustered about 30 miles from this town, when they are to enter into pay, and be mustered again at Hull. [1 p.]
Mar. 10.
Westminster.
75. See "Returns made by Justices of Peace."
Mar. 10.
Staindrop.
76. Nathaniel Ward to Sir Henry Vane. Concerning the trees sent with me and the wines they are disposed of according to your directions. William Towler, the gardener, will not accept of less than 18l. with a house in Raby. Touching the business of providing for the poor and suppressing superfluous alehouses, matters are yet as bad or worse than when you were present. Nor had I ever in my life before so much experience that the express laws of the realm, practised generally elsewhere, might be here baffled, or that men in place who pretend most forwardness should underhand stop what outwardly they seem to further, and I conceive both in these and other matters of this country your worthy son George has learned the humours of the inhabitants in this short time of his abode far better than I should do in the time of a complete apprenticeship. I shall use that patience and moderation in prosecution of your commands this way, that I shall either cause those in place to perform what they pretend or to discover plainly what they inwardly intend, or howsoever shall so far protract the time that a justice of peace may be settled hereabouts, who may make others know we are here as subject to the King's laws as they who live in the southern parts of England. In the meantime I begin to be very troublesome among my parishioners, both to present officers for neglect of their duties and tipplers for their notorious disorders; which course (mingled with all possible indulgence), till I understand the world better, I purpose to continue till either the delinquents are weary of their disorders or the magistrates ashamed of their neglect. [Seal with devise. 1 p.]
Mar. 10.
The Hague.
77. Sir John Conyers to [Sec. Windebank]. As I was about to close this letter I received the States' answer, who absolutely refuse my leave to come to serve the King except I presently quit my company, which I shall not refuse to do, and will not fail by the first ship to take my passage into England to do his Majesty the best service I can. In the meantime I would be thus far more troublesome to you. Here is a young man, my wife's sister's son, his name is Henry Hume, a near kinsman to the Earl of Hume, [also] to the Earls of Ancrum and Roxburgh, and as gallant a young man as any in the States' service of his age; he is about 26 years old, has served nine years, and is now a lieutenant in Abercrombie's Scotch company of horse. He has a good estate in these countries, and therefore the more fit to serve this state. I beseech you be pleased in my behalf and his to beg the King's letters to the Prince of Orange, if not in regard of my 36 years' service, yet for his merits he will be pleased to give him my company, or if not mine, then that which was Sir Thomas Lucas', which they esteem here to be a Scotch company, if the Prince dispose not of it according to his Majesty's letters, which I hear have been sent by Sir Thomas Lucas, to have power to resign it, which it seems cannot be effected, and that his Majesty's letters to that purpose be sent by Sir William Boswell to his secretary here, with order to deliver them to the Prince, and to follow the business, and to give an account of it to you, for I in the meantime hope to be in England; and Lieutenant Hume, though he be here now, may in the meantime be commanded to his garrison, which if he be, that he send for him to Nimeguen, where his garrison is, that he may also come and speak for himself. I beseech you, if M. Arsens, the States' Ambassador, be yet in England, that the business may be powerfully recommended to him, and that his Majesty's letters to the Prince be sent with all expedition. [2 pp.]
Mar. 10. 78. Edward Herbert, the Queen's Attorney and Solicitor General, to Sec. Windebank. Howell-ap-Rees being summoned by presentment to appear before the Bishop of St. David's, articles were exhibited against him for keeping a seminary priest and christening his children after that way, with the like, which his adversary failing to prove, the latter importuned the bishop to tender him the oaths of Supremacy and Allegiance. Rees being an ignorant man, and not understanding the English tongue, desired to have a short respite, which being denied him, he was thereupon committed. In that place the poor man is likely to be prosecuted with vehemency. His suit is to be by his Majesty's gracious favour removed hither, and security taken for his appearance. I beseech you acquaint his Majesty that it is my humble suit to him to have the poor man removed, and to you that it may be without putting him to the expense of a pursuivant, also that the gentleman who out of charity stays in town to follow it may be despatched, as his Majesty shall be pleased to think reasonable. [1 p.]
Mar. 10.
Netton, near Winterbourne.
79. John Swayne to Nicholas. I pray you peruse these few lines, showing how Michael Tidcombe, Sir Edward Baynton's under-sheriff, doth deal with me about the ship-money which I stand engaged for. I was charged in our side of the hundred of Amesbury, Wilts, by the sheriff to collect 196l., of which I have levied 168l., as my acquittances will testify, and Mr. Tidcombe has received the other 28l. in returns, and has delivered them to Robert Kent, bailiff, with some other returns of the south part of our county. I can make it appear that he has levied by distress 23l. or 24l. of the 28l., but I can neither get the sheriff to give me a discharge, nor Kent to be accomptable to the sheriff. I beseech you to take it into your consideration, and to help me in it what you can, for if the bond should be sued upon me it might be part of my undoing. My partner and myself have collected almost 700l. for ship-money. I understand the remainder of the 28l. which Kent has not received is due from some poor people who are not able to pay, and some dead. [Seal with arms, broken. 1 p.]
Mar. 10.
Westover.
80. John Ashburnham to the same. As it is none of my least misfortunes to be, as I conceive, so unworthily matched with a competitor for the place of provider [for the army], so it is none of the least blessings that God has given me, in making me happy in a friend who on all occasions is so sensible of my honour, which is the highest expression that love can pretend to. I wonder that Colonel Goring if he were present [at the Council of War] did not make some distinction of our persons, for when he first spoke to me about it I told him that if the place were not of condition more considerable than would render such a man as Mr. Gibbons, who in the last expedition executed something in the like nature, capable of it, I would not for much more than the profit of the place be nominated for it. According to our appointment we despatched the business of Longparish last night. In absence of an attorney I was forced to draw out the articles which I send enclosed. Though you find in the conditions that you are to pay the whole 1,200l. on the 28th May, yet you shall have grace till 28th June for payment of the half. Further particulars relative to this conveyance. I am going this morning to Stratton to conclude with Lady de la Warr, and to-morrow towards Ashburnham. Jocular expressions about Nicholas and his wife. [Three seals with crest and arms. 1½ p.]
Mar. 10/20.
The Hague.
81. E. Countess of Levenstein to Sir John Pennington. When I see any who know you, I always inquire after your health, for I can never forget your civilities when I had the honour to come over in your ship and care with Lady Strange. Your respects to the Queen [of Bohemia], my mistress and hers, are very much esteemed, and I shall be glad of any occasion to give you testimony how much I honour you. [Endorsed by Pennington, "Received from my Lady Levenstein, this 24th March 1639-40." Seal with coronet and arms. 1 p.]
Mar. 10.
Chester.
82. Robert Brerewood to [Sir Thos. Smith]. Excuses his delay in writing. I thank you for your acceptance of the place of one of the burgesses of our city, which I believe is really meant for you and will be truly performed; yet I would not have you to be oversecure, since you know the inconstant disposition of the people of this city. You would do well to write to your servant, Ned Williams, that he cause all your tenants and friends in the city to be sure to be at the election, which is to be on Monday sennight, and I shall join with him to do the like. I should advise concerning my cousin, your son Lawrence, that you would admit him of the Inns of Court at his now coming to London; the Inn to be chosen is the Middle Temple, where I shall be able to serve him. [1 p.]
Mar. 10. 83. The case between Dr. Balcanqual, Dean of Durham, and the church tenants, as reported to Archbishop Laud. Since Gray and Smith have confessed very nigh all of that wherewith I charged them, viz., that they never held their leases otherwise than now they do, and that Gray purchased his lease with its present tenure, and has never yet been aggrieved by any fine from the Dean and Chapter. Also that in divers corners of the country these two have assembled great companies of his Majesty's subjects, our tenants, of which many of them are of his Majesty's trained-bands, without any power or authority, and at these tumultuous meetings persuaded hundreds of our tenants to set their hands and seals to four several papers, obliging themselves to one another to prosecute against their landlords before any judicatory these two should think fit. Further charges against Gray and Smith. This business being now ready for hearing, I beseech your Grace that I may be heard at the Council table the first day that the King is present. The sum of what I shall deliver shall be to the purpose here stated. I am to solicit his Majesty that we may have an Act of Council not only disliking these tumultuous practices, but strictly charging all our tenants to hold themselves quietly and peaceably to those estates which they now hold from the church [of Durham] and have held since the reign of Queen Elizabeth, notwithstanding an Act of Council in her days pretended by them, but which is since discharged by a proclamation of James I.; commanding them also that if they find themselves aggrieved with their landlords they shall first address themselves to the Dean and Chapter, and make them acquainted with their desires or grievances; and that if they shall then find the fines set upon them for renewing of their leases to be too heavy or unreasonable, then it shall be lawful for them to complain to the Council Board, but so as it be not done upon a public purse, or by way of combination, but every one by himself, as knowing that the determination of the Council Board concerning one must needs conclude for all those who are equally concerned. And for the settling of this great tumult now in the country, I beseech your Grace to move his Majesty for this speedy order. [Endorsed, "Received 10th March 1639-40." 22/3 pp.]
Mar. 10.
Whitburn.
84. [Thomas] Triplet to Archbishop Laud. Five of these enclosed papers I thought it very necessary to send you, being all concerning the business in question. The sixth, being Dr. Duncan's letter, will show that we will not be unmindful of that Bancks whom I mentioned in my last. I entreat you to read ex abundanti the note concerning the bearer, my brother, whose benefactor is Edward Hyde, of the Middle Temple. By the governor of Berwick's letter it will appear to you that [Stephenson] is justly called in question, Morrell having now confessed the half of the charge, indeed enough of itself to make him and his abettors examples of sedition in dissuading from the lawfulness of arms against such rebels. Having so lately trespassed upon your Grace by a very prolix letter [see March 4, No. 27], and now having all these enclosed papers to trouble you with besides, I think it not civil to lengthen this paper too. I will only observe that by all this, that appears by Stephenson and his master, it is somewhat evident that they were the dispersers of that libel which my servant found coming from market on the 10th August, and which I send up by the bearer. P.S.—The pursuivant, as I hear, has had 3l. of Lilburne for giving him leave to stay thus long. They will excuse it because of the High Commission day; but I have reason to believe that it was to gain time to tamper again with Morrell; for Stephenson has been with him again at Berwick since the pursuivant came, as I am assured, though not to much purpose, as appears by Sir Michael Ernley's letter: [Endorsed by Laud, "Received 17th March 1639-40. From Mr. Triplet." Damaged by rats. 1 p.] Encloses,
84. I. The same to Bishop Morton, of Durham. I heard last night that the pursuivant who is come for the mayor of Sunderland, G. Lilburne and his man Stephenson [upon the] information against Stephenson at the last sessions, has given his prisoners [respite from] their journey till Monday next, for this purpose, says my intelligencer, [that they may make] my Lord of Durham a party in the business or may procure his letter, or [may effect this man's] escape the better. I would presume to counsel you to be on your guard against them. You will see that this business, as slight as it was made at the sessions, will prove a dangerous conspiracy, and I would not be in some of their coats for 100l. I hope that they have not surprised you already. If they or their agents come to you, instead of either counselling or writing for them, you may do well to take notice how they have abused you in taking an information concerning high treason without oath, though I offered the mayor to depose to it before witnesses, and this on purpose that it might be needless to call it in public sessions, that it might be only showed in private to you as it was, and they have in readiness an ambuscade of Lilburne's friends, whose testimony concerning the party accused, viz., that he was honest and religious, you would give credit to, and so the business to be shuffled over, as it was, the party concluded innocent, and myself a malicious informer. But Mayor Cottrell [Mr. Cottrell, mayor of Sunderland] shall know, my lord, that my information for the King ought to have been of better account with him, and that Stephenson, as I could have no malice to his person, because before this business I scarce knew him de facie, so he will appear to be an arrant knave and villain, besides his perfect and intestine malice to our church discipline, which will be sufficiently proved against him. His zeal has already dispensed with two famous lies. When the messenger asked him whether his master were within, he answered he knew not, though he came to the door immediately from waiting on his master at supper. When the pursuivant asked Stephenson his name, he said Nicholson. "Why, then," said the pursuivant, "go call George Stephenson, for I must speak with him." "Yes," replied the former, and ran away. So you may see a little what will become of this business, for truth seeks neither to be hidden away in corners nor defended with lies. Before this, there was sufficient matter, as I believe will appear, to some of their costs. Once again I admonish your lordship not to touch or meddle with these fellows. March 3. [Copy. 1 p.]
84. ii. Triplet to Bishop Morton, of Durham. Though your lordship be pleased with me but conditionally, yet I protest that I have discharged my duty to you absolutely, which will appear when it will be evident what care I have taken to discover the plot of this little covenant to misinform and so to abuse your lordship. The Governor [of Berwick's] note to me I have sent up, which being but a certificate of Morrell's confession, I desired Mr. Johnson to entreat you from me to send to Berwick for a copy of the examination, that you may justly charge those who have wronged you in this business, and so make it appear how vain was the mayor Cottrell's boast that the Bishop of Durham would bear him harmless in this business, though he, like a very unworthy justice, refused my oath on purpose that it might be but a private information and to be made to appear so to your lordship. For my part I tell you truly, that if the King's attorney will not prosecute every man of these ex officio I will, if I may have leave, for I can prove that after the mayor was warned to proceed wisely and honestly in the disquisition of the business, he, notwithstanding, so published the matter, that Lilburne and his man had intelligence of it by an anonymous letter before they came home, which made them turn back and tamper with Morrell, their accuser, whom by fees and promises they so far prevailed with, that at that time he denied the words, but since has confessed so much as will make that anti-episcopal Stephenson and his part-takers to be but in a reasonable case. For upshot of all, to make the iniquity of Lilburne and his man complete, the pursuivant serving the warrant upon him and his man on Thursday, instead of taking them off with him on the following Monday, agreed with Lilburne for 3l. to stay ten days longer; in which time he acts two notable parts, one the baffling of the High Commission, pretending to save the forfeiture of his bond, and the other in sending his man Stephenson to tamper once more with Morrell at Berwick, whom, it seems, did cretizare cum cretensi, telling him that he had confessed nothing that would hurt him. If Morrell had told him the truth, I believe Stephenson would have made one escape more from the pursuivant and have joined issue with his brother Covenanters, when he was so near them. [Endorsed, "Copy of my last letter to the Bishop of Durham." ½ p.]
84. iii. Bishop Morton, of Durham, to Triplet. I thank you for your zealous affection, both in the cause and for myself. The mayor of Sunderland was with me two hours before your letter came to me. I gave a brief answer that I would not meddle in this business, they being now called in question about it. They impute the information against them to you, how justly I know not, nor how just the information might be, but I had this reason not to believe them, because I knew you would have acquainted me first with a matter of this nature; however, I again thank you. [Auck] land Castle, 4th March. [1 p.]
84. iv. Triplet to Bishop Morton. I am heartily glad that the mayor of Sunderland was a little before my man to no purpose. Unless I had sent in the night I could not have sent you the news of their design upon you. I suspect that I was but a second to your lordship in this action, for it is reported that your letter was with the Governor of Berwick ten days before mine, and all these parties conclude that, by intelligence from Berwick, this pursuivant comes down, whether by your letter or mine they know not. [Copy. ½ p.]
84. v. The same to Sir Michael Ernle, Governor of Berwick. A pursuivant is come down for George Stephenson, his master, and the mayor of Sunderland. When the pursuivant came to Lilburne's both for the master and man, after he had served his warrant on the master, and Stephenson was lighting him upstairs, the messenger asked him his name, when he, suspecting some mischief, replied George Nicholson, and under pretence of calling Stephenson made his escape. If it be put in execution, my life for yours within a day, or such a matter, the varlet [will con] fess all, and what Stephenson tampered with him at Alnwick, that made him thus deny that [this was] so expressly spoken to me; for though he be a soldier by office, yet I take him to be a coward by disposition; and as for fear of Lilburne he has been thus far a rene[gade to th]e truth, so now for fear of the King and the King's laws he will justify what he has [confess]ed. But though he do relent, seem not easy at first to take hold of it, for fear [of discovering] a plot; but seem to reject it, till such time as he be mightily humbled, and then send [and re]port the whole story in writing from the first to the last. I have sent my man on a dirty journey for the effecting of this good piece of service. Morrell must be kept close prisoner, that neither man nor letter may come to him from Sunderland. [March 5. Copy. 1 p.]
84. vi. Dr. E. Duncan [to Triplet]. I received your letter with one from Mr. Johnson, but not the other, unless it were the one I had given me by Mr. Swinborne. What you do against Puritans, God reward you for; I think the generation of them is most dangerous to this church and state, especially having a Scottish example of anarchy and confusion to follow. I have sent away Vincent and Lapthorne, two very factious lecturers, though I had much ado to effect it you know. If we, who are in the right uay of church obedience, were as zealous in our course as Puritans are, I believe by this day a Puritan had not been a weed in our garden. I shall be glad to see you next week, come to stay three or four days. I have read the book which congratulates the Covenanters for their positions and practice so corresponding to the Jesuits; there is excellent sport in it, especially a good comparison between Loyola, the captain and founder of Jesuits, and Lesley, the captain of Covenanters, both bastards, soldiers, debauched in their youth, lame, fighting under any for pay, converted, &c. I shall inform the Archdeacon of Bancks' outrage ultra ripas. Sir William Bellasis was with me, being lately come from London, and says all is war; 2,000 horse are to come down, the patent of generallissimo is signed to the Earl of Northumberland, and Sir Jacob Ashley is again sergeant-major; 80 ships are providing, and 30,000 or 40,000 men for foot soldiers will be pressed. Durham, 3rd March, late at night. [1 p.]
Mar. 10. 85. Certificate by George Fletcher that he had to bring into his Majesty's stores in the Tower 100 tons of English match at the rate of 45l. per ton, making a total of 4,500l., of which he desires to have 2,000l. by way of imprest. [½ p.]
Mar. 10. 86. The like certificate that he had to provide 50 tons of Flemish match at the rate of 28l. per ton, making a total of 1,400l., of which he had already received 500l. [½p.]
Mar. 11. 87. Notes by Sec. Windebank of proceedings at the Council this day, the King present. An Act of State to be made declaring that the petitioners new come from the Covenanters have no power to give his Majesty satisfaction, but only instructions, and these from a few persons of no great consideration, and not from the Parliament, and those powers which they have by their instructions, come not home to any accommodation. Satisfaction to be given concerning the subscribing of the Covenant by the King's command; but this not in their sense; the Covenant, but not the bond. The new bond was to be sworn against all men, not excepting the King; this was the new one. The old one was made by the King himself. The new one a combination against the King. The old one signed by the Lord Marquis [Hamilton] and [the Earl of] Traquair. We shall mutually assist one another as we shall be commanded by the King or any authorised by him. When any are required to subscribe the Covenant as the Marquis Hamilton and the Earl of Traquair did, and in their sense, they refuse to do it. Nothing done in the general by swearing the Covenant [as] sworn by the Marquis and Traquair that may justify their proceedings. Never any Covenant made in the Christian world where the head was left out or had not a negative voice. Some short treatise to be published, stating what his Majesty expects of his subjects of Scotland, and what he will grant to them. In the first place his Majesty expects civil and temporal obedience. Till they acknowledge that the supreme magistrate must have authority to call assemblies and to dissolve them, and to have a negative voice in them, as it is used in all supreme powers of Christendom, they are not to be heard. His Majesty will first hear them, and they may give matter for such a treatise. [1½ p.]
Mar. 11.
Whitehall.
88. Order of Council, the King present. By an order of the 9th February, upon hearing the business for regulating the trade of bringing in and retailing sea-borne coal, a month was then given to members of the company of woodmongers and society of coal merchants, with the mayor and some of the hostmen of Newcastle or others, to present any new propositions to the Board for the better ordering of the coal trade and the accommodation of the city with coals at cheaper prices, either by a free trade or otherwise, and for securing the King's revenue. On Sunday last the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, with the parties before named, attended the Board, and declared that they had no further propositions to make, but desired that the contract of 17s. and 19s. might be kept, and that thereupon they are willing to submit to the former orders of the Board. It was this day ordered that the former contract made 2nd July 1638, with the society of coal merchants and the former orders of the Board, are to be ratified, and the orders likewise made by the society of coal merchants amongst themselves for better regulating the trade, but heretofore suspended by order of 15th May 1639, are also to be ratified. In case any of the coal merchants, masters, or owners shall exceed the prices settled by the contract of 17s. or 19s. respectively, or shall bring bad or unmerchantable coals, that then, upon complaint of the woodmongers or others, they shall answer their contempts at the Board. By an order of 27th November 1639, Christopher Medcalfe and William Toomes, Surveyors-General of Customs, were required to forbear to demand of the merchants, masters, or owners of ships of the society of coal merchants 9d. for a cocket, complained to be collected of late times as due by virtue of the said patent, until the first sitting of the Board in February, by reason the society of coal merchants alleged they had no benefit of the five in the hundred allowed to other merchants. It was this day further ordered that the 9d. for a cocket and 4d. for the return of the same shall still remain suspended until the Board upon hearing the parties shall give further order. [Copy. 1½ p.]
Mar. 11.
Edinburgh Castle.
89. Patrick Lord Ettrick to the King. I have received yours of the 26th February, also your Majesty's commission with the articles of war, which will encourage me to proceed the more cheerfully in your service. I shall endeavour to show myself most sensible of your gracious favour in granting all my humble suits presented in my letters of the 18th ult. I have, as commanded by the Earl of Traquair, sent you a particular of all the ammunition and victuals within the castle. Sir John Ruthven accepts your gracious favour, and intends to make his speedy repair to your Majesty, while Colonel Francis Ruthven will remain here awhile to settle his brother's estate, but will not enter into any employment, and intends with his best convenience to follow his brother. You commanded me to let you understand what further supply of victual and ammunition would be required to sustain a year's siege. With officers, gunners, and artificers, here are above 300 men, besides a few women and children. I suppose, therefore, as much more ammunition and provisions as are expressed in the particular herewith sent will suffice for a year's siege; but it will require further deliberation to give a direct answer to this question, which I leave to your Majesty's consideration. The people here are of late become far more insolent than they have ever been since I came here, for not only timber and trees are denied me wherewith to repair the walls lately fallen down, but even at the gates of the castle all who bring in daily provisions are much abused and their provisions taken from them by the common people, with whom there is no order taken, notwithstanding my often sending to the Provost about it. I defer to use means to reform these disorders myself, lest it prevent me receiving the money promised by the Secretaries of State for payment of the soldiers. I pray let me receive all intended supplies with all speed, lest they come too late. [Endorsed as received on the 17th March. 2 pp.] Encloses,
89. i. A note of ordnance and ammunition in the Castle of Edinburgh. March 11, 1639-40. [3¼ pp.]
89. ii. The like of provisions in the Castle of Edinburgh. [¾ p.]
Mar. 11.
Edinburgh Castle.
90. Patrick Lord Ettrick to [Sec. Windebank]. I have received by my secretary Roberts the 500l., which, according to your directions, shall be disbursed for pay of the soldiers, and other pressing occasions. I thank you for furthering me in my late suits to his Majesty. I beseech you to be a means that I may speedily receive further supplies of money, lest they come too late. Concerning the rents and yearly perquisites belonging to the castle, I could never yet understand the value of them. I have been often promised a true particular of them, which, as soon as I can obtain, I shall send you to present to the King. I shall endeavour to the utmost of my power to serve his Majesty in all particulars, as may show me sensible of his extraordinary favours towards me. P.S.—If you let me understand that you have given order to all postmasters to despatch packets superscribed with my name, I shall henceforth presume to send my letters in that kind. [Endorsed by Windebank as "Received on 17th and answered the 19th." 1 p.]
Mar. 11.
Berwick.
91. Capt. Charles Lloyd to the same. Reports progress of the fortifications at Berwick. Sir Michael Ernle showed me your last letter. All the prejudice I conceive done him [Sir James Douglas] is cutting sods in his fields, which I must of necessity do for the advancement of the works, but this cannot amount to five marks. The kilns which the town and Sir James are in suit for I set on work by Lady Douglas' own men, who supply me weekly with the quantity [of lime] I require, and I pay them for it according to the customary rate; and this is all the damage I can think of, unless it be a mill which was broken long before we came to the town. [Endorsed as "Received on the 16th." 1 p.]
Mar. 11.
Berwick.
92. Sir Michael Ernle to the same. I received yours of the 5th present concerning Sir James Douglas. I cannot tell in what he has been prejudiced, except in taking of some sods from his grounds for the works; and for the townsmen set on work about his lime, Capt. Lloyd will give you an account. The Covenanters intend sending 1,200 men to Kelso, under the charge of Lord Ker, son of the Earl of Roxburgh, and as many to Getwart [Jedburgh], under the charge of the Earl of Ancrum's son, into both which places arms are already sent. The Marquis of Douglas is come to remain here in Berwick; I told him I heard his eldest son was lately turned Covenanter, which he confirmed. The Marquis also told me that an Englishman was sent to the Covenanters in Scotland, to assure them that they had a very strong party in England, but I could not hear any such thing by anybody else. [1 p.]
Mar. 11.
Newcastle.
93. William Vane to his father, Sir Henry Vane. I have engaged the assistance of all the nobility and those of my acquaintance in these parts in my undertaking, but I confess that I find it very difficult, if not impossible, to raise all my troop here from that class of persons I could wish. Gentlemen will not serve upon 2s. a day, having had more by 8d. the other time, so that I fear finally I shall have to have recourse to the south; but of this and of all else I shall be better able to inform you next week, when I see what progress has been made in my business. The lieutenant whom you mentioned in your first letter is engaged with Lord Clifford. I have been requested by Sir William Darcy and others to recommend to you Capt. John Muschains, who has served in the foreign wars, being an officer under the King of Sweden. He is a very able man, and was employed in the last service at Berwick. I pray you provide for me such handsome outfit as may be required for the present service, either at London or in Holland. [French. 2 pp.]
Mar. 11. 94. List of the King's servants and others required to contribute to the loan, similar to the lists calendared under date March 6, Nos. 36 and 37. These are to be warned to be at the Council table upon Wednesday, the 11th March, at 2 p.m. [In the margin are the notes against the names of those who have been warned, of those out of town, and of the places where others are staying. 1 p.]
Mar. 11. 95. Estimate of ordnance and munition to be presently supplied for furnishing the train of artillery. Included in these particulars are 20 brass drakes, whereof 10 to be of 3 lbs. bullet, and 10 of 6 lbs. bullet; also four whole culverins. These are to be furnished with field carriages bound with iron, with shod wheels, and all other things necessary for their draught, with spare wheels, block car, axletrees of each sort, ladles, sponges, rammers, moulds for cartouches, ropes for draught, &c.; likewise four mortar-pieces, two of a larger and two of a smaller size, with their carriages and appliances. [1⅓ p.]
Mar. 12. 96. Notes taken by Sec. Windebank at the meeting this day of the Committee of Council for hearing the Covenanters deputed from the Parliament of Scotland. [2/3 p.]
Mar. 12.
Auckland.
97. Bishop Morton, of Durham, to Sec. Windebank. I beg your patience in the perusal of these lines, which relate the truth of a business so far as came within the cognizance of my sheriff, Sir William Bellasis, Mr. Richardson, and myself. An information was tendered at the last sessions at Durham by the mayor of Sunderland concerning George Stephenson, servant to George Lilburne, who had spoken certain bold words in the defence of the Covenanters in Scotland, which information, because it was taken without oath, and the informer then a soldier at Berwick, it was thought good that a letter should be directed to the governor of Berwick, there to receive upon oath the party's information, and to return it to John Richardson, J.P., at Durham, whose sudden death made both this and some other country businesses for the present miscarry. While I was about to repair this mischance by sending to Whitburn, recently afflicted with the plague, where these words were spoken, I learned from you that a messenger had taken Lilburne and the rest. This messenger for Lilburne's cause has here dispensed with them for 12 days, although the others were ready to go with him, that so, as appears, Lilburne might affront his Majesty's Commissioners at Durham in Causes Ecclesiastical; for he, being bound to appear before them on Tuesday last to answer articles, put in an appearance, and so freed his bond, and then, under pretence of being his Majesty's prisoner, refused to enter into a new bond, either to answer by himself or his proctor, or to abide the sentence of the court, saying, "It was all one to him whether he was a prisoner at Durham or London." Whereupon he was committed; but the messenger, George Carter, in the face of the court, took him from the gaoler, and so set forward presently on their journey, plainly signifying by their actions for what ends they came thither; and by this means has he freed himself from his bond taken here. Therefore we desire, if it may seem to stand with justice, that Lilburne be compelled to give bonds with your honour to enlaw himself to the Court of High Commission again. [Seal broken. 1½ p.]
Mar. 12.
Chester.
98. Henry Birkened, junior, to his kinsman [Sir Thos. Smith]. I should have written before, but doubted the delivery of my letter, by reason of your purpose of removing from Ashton; but now I hope it has found you, and will be the more acceptable to you because delivered by the hands of those whom you have great cause joyfully to receive. Family matters. [1 p.]
Mar. 12. 99. Articles signed by Archbishop Laud, and proposed on behalf of Francis Earl of Bedford, touching the bringing of certain French and Dutch planters into the lands and fens in or about Thorney, within the diocese of Ely. These articles chiefly relate to the providing of a church and minister, and the use of the Liturgy of the Church of England in French or other language. [12/3 p.]
Mar. 12. 100. Certificate by Lawrence Whitaker that Alexander Maurice had taken the oath of allegiance. [4 lines.]
Mar. 12. 101. The like by Henry Garwaie, Lord Mayor, and two others, justices of peace for the city of London, that Samuel Middleton, gentleman, had taken the same oath.
Mar. 12. 102. Testimonial by Robert Cottesford, rector of Hadleigh, and 11 others, that Gawen Nash, B.D., minister of the Tower church in Ipswich, had lived amongst them three years irreprovably, preached the Word of God constantly and orthodoxally, acknowledging the King's supremacy above the usurped authority of the Pope of Rome, and never had spoken anything in defence of Popery. [1 p.]
Mar. 12. 103. Information by George Okes and Christopher Thornton that, they being at Sellby's Inn in Long Acre, one [Edmond Rychers] maintained that the oath of allegiance to King Charles was of no force in foreign parts, and that an Englishman being in Flanders or elsewhere might bear arms lawfully against the King of England. [½ p.]
Mar. 12. 104. Examination of Edmond Rychers, taken before Lawrence Whitaker. Does not remember that he spake any such words as are informed against him by George Okes and Christopher Thornton, neither is he of any such opinion as those words import, but if any such words passed from him in his drink, he is heartily sorry. Protests that he is ready to draw his sword in the service of his Prince, is a communicant of the Church of England, and is willing to take the oaths of allegiance and supremacy. [2/3 p.]
Mar. 13. 105. Certificate returned to the Council by Martin Bradgate and Thos. Bell, merchants, and William Field and Michael Gardiner, vintners, that, according to an Order of Council of the 9th February last, for viewing of wines in difference between Capt. Langham, Robert Fison, merchants, and Robert Quarterman, vintner; as also between John Johnstone, merchant, and Thomas Symmes, vintner, we, the above-named referees, have viewed and tasted the said wines, and have all agreed upon the loss accruing from the inferior quality of these wines, as here stated, but cannot agree upon the proper incidence of these losses, so that we, Bradgate and Bell, do here deliver our opinions apart. [1 p.]
Mar. 13. 106. The like certificate returned by William Field and Michael Gardiner. [1 p.]
Mar. 13.
Whitehall.
107. Sec. Vane to Sir Thos. Roe. By the occurrences I find that great preparations are made in all places for an early campaign, and it has pleased God so to dispose of the affairs of this island that his Majesty is necessitated to prepare for the same also, as for the sitting down of his Parliament, which approaches near, being the 13th of next month, and I dare assure you it costs his Majesty the expense of much time. Yesterday the King appointed to hear the lords sent to attend him out of Scotland, they having desired to be heard in his presence, and that is now the third time they have been before him. At these conferences Archbishop Laud, Lord Treasurer Juxon, Marquis Hamilton, the Earls of Northumberland and Traquair, Lord Cottington, and the two Secretaries of State have assisted. His Majesty's grace towards these Scotch lords is such that though, by the opinion of the Lords above named and of the Council Board, the powers they brought with them are altogether invalid, and not satisfactory, yet his Majesty will give them a full hearing. [1 p.]
Mar. 13.
Hamburgh.
108. Sir Thos. Roe to Sec. Windebank. Having received your command to persuade good Scotch officers to [volunteer for] his Majesty's service, I could not refuse the bearer, Sergeant-Major Thelwall, who desires to be recommended to the Lord-General, the Earl of Northumberland, he having relinquished his designs here. [½ p.]
Mar. 13.
Hamburgh.
109. The same to the same. The like recommendation for Captain Thurland, of Sir George Fleetwood's regiment. [Seal with arms, impressed. ½ p.]
Mar. 13. 110. Certificate of Gabriel Chickard that he had spoken to Clifton about the ship-money, who said that he had done what he could but could not get anything to speak of, for some paid and some would not; but he would ask Mr. Holborne's opinion concerning the same. [⅓ p.]
Mar. 13.
Bilbao.
111. Prestwick Eaton to George Wellingham. I have received several of your letters of ancient date by Stone with the things you sent me. [Seal with device. 1 p.]
Mar. 14. 112. Certificate by Capt. William Legg, in obedience to the Lords order of the 3rd inst., for viewing of divers cavalry arms remaining in the hands of particular persons in and about London, and for treating with them for the prices thereof according to their several numbers, condition, and quality. List of the arms remaining in the hands of Sir John Suckling, viz.:—76 light horse armours, price 133l.; 57 pair of pistols, price 156l. 15s.; and 68 carbines with firelocks complete, price 102l. In the hands of William Cox, 45 Dutch light horse armours, price 51l. 15s. In the hands of Richard Wright, 35 Dutch light horse arms, price 40l. 5s. Underwritten,
112. i. Order of the Council of War, signified by Nicholas, requiring the Officers of Ordnance to view the arms above mentioned, and having treated with their owners concerning the prices to certify the Lords the number, condition, quality, and prices of these arms, whereupon they will take such further order as shall be best for the King's service. Whitehall, 16th March 1639-40. [Copy. 1 p.]