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Charles I - volume 507: April 1645

Pages 379-445

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles I, 1644-5. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1890.

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April 1645

April 1. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Manchester, and Lauderdale, Lords Say, Wharton, and Warristoun, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir G. Gerard, Sir A. Haselrigg, Sir Ph. Stapleton, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierrepont, Wallop, and Barclay. Ordered,
1. That the Commitee of Coventry's letter concerning the Committee of Worcestershire be delivered to Col. Purefoy, Sergeant Wilde, and Mr. Salway, to see if they can accord the business among themselves.
2. That Col. Massie's letter of the 21st ult. with the paper and articles enclosed be communicated to Col. Purefoy, who is to compare them with the letters now presented by Massie, and give his opinion concerning them to-morrow.
3. That the M. P.s for Lincolnshire with Col. Rainsborough be desired to be here to-morrow.
4. That the Committee of Militia be represented at this Committee tomorrow, and be supplied with a copy of the Commons' order, about a Governor for Farnham Castle.
5. Answer to be given that, according to former order, Major-Genl. Crawford do return towards Bucks., and receive his orders from Sir Thos. Fairfax.
6. That the Berks. request concerning a troop of horse be referred and recommended to Sir Thos. Fairfax.
7. To speak with such of the dep. lieuts. of Middlesex as are in town touching one or two regiments to be sent into Reading.
8. Warrants to be issued for the apprehension of one Burgess.
9. That Major-Genl. Skippon be desired not to stay for any regiments, but to go at once on his service.
10. To write to the Committee of Militia to hasten the press.
11. That the opinion of this Committee is that the proportion of men levied upon Surrey should be raised in the county without Southwark, of which the gent. of Surrey are to be informed.
12. That Major-Genl. Browne's regiment be recruited to 1,200 men, and to include Col. Sparrow's company. To write to him to send officers hither for that purpose, and to signify what money will be necessary, or what other way he will propose.
13. To inform the Committee of Essex that Col. Sparrow's regiment is reduced to a company.
14. To take care that more forces be sent to Major-Genl. Browne before the regiments of Cols. Pickering and Ayloff be drawn away.
15. That Mr. Robinson the firework maker shall be sent to Abingdon.
16. The agent for Abingdon to go the Committee for the Army to learn what is done about the dragoons which were to be sent to Abingdon.
17. To report to the House to hasten away the money for Abingdon.
18. To learn if the Committee of the Militia can spare any guns to be sent to Abingdon.
19. The wheelbarrows to be provided at Abingdon by Major-Genl. Browne.
20. That the sub-committee for Foreign Affairs do meet at 8 a.m. to-morrow.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 168–170. Copypp.]
April 2. 1. At the Committee of both kingdoms. Ordered, that the Committee for taking the Accounts of the Kingdom be desired to take the accounts between the Eastern Association and the garrison of Newport Pagnell, and report the state thereof to this Committee. [½ p.]
April 2. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earl of Manchester, Lord Wharton, Sir G. Gerard, Sir Ph. Stapleton, Sir Chas. Erskine, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Pierrepont, Browne, Kennedy, and Barclay. Ordered,
1. That the Committee of Coventry do continue to observe the motion of the third party in Warwickshire, and endeavour to suppress them if any inconvenience should arise, and to give advertisement [to this Committee].
2. To return answer to the gent. of Lincolnshire that this Committee is still of opinion that it is not advisable to withdraw Col. Rainsborough's regiment from that county till its place be supplied some other way.
3. That Sir Christopher Wray and Sir Anthony Irby be requested to speak in the meantime with the Committee, whereof Mr. Scowen hath the chair, concerning the order for calling away Col. Rainsborough's regiment, so that the business may be accommodated between them.
4. To inform the Committee of Norfolk that the money for Col. Crawford is to be paid out of the arrears due by the [Eastern] Association, and that this Committee has not power to dispose of money.
5. That the Committee of Accounts be desired to take the accounts between the [Eastern] Association and Newport [Pagnell], and report the state thereof, and that it be signified to the Committee of Norfolk.
6. To report to the Commons that the Committees of the [counties forming the] Eastern Association have always had allowances for their attendance on the public service by Ordinance of Parliament, which is now expired, and that they will retire from the service unless some course be taken for their charges.
7. To write to the Committee and Governor of Cambridge to send up Doctor Brownrigg in safe custody.
8. That the sub-committee for Foreign Affairs be warned to meet to-morrow morning.
9. Warrant to be sent to the Governor of Cambridge to deliver to Lieut.Genl. Hammond's nominee the waggons and other necessaries contained in the list given in by Sir Walter Erle.
10. That the business of Worcester be considered to-morrow.
11. Warrant to Erle to send to Sir Samuel Luke at Newport Pagnell 100 wheelbarrows, spades, shovels, mattocks, and 50 iron crows.
12. That Col. White do give in the proportion of arms and ammunition desired by Lord Fairfax.
13. To write to the sub-committee at Grocers' Hall empowering them to treat for loans towards the advance of the 4,000l. for Munster.
14. To report to the House [of Commons] that the remainder of the 40,000l. [for] arms and ammunition may be speeded away to the Scottish army.
15. Warrant for 30 barrels of gunpowder with match and bullet proportionable to be sent for Shrewsbury and the other garrisons in Salop.
16. To report to the House the letter from Lincolnshire, leaving it to them to give order concerning the money.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 170–172. Copy=2 pp.]
April 2.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to the Committee of Cambridge. Upon the Earl of Manchester's information we have taken care to report to the Commons that you and the rest of the Committees employed in the [Eastern] Association upon the public service have previously had allowances by Ordinance of Parliament which now is expired, and that you are now to retire from the service unless some course be taken for your charges. We therefore desire you and the rest of the Committees to continue in that service till you hear further from us. Sent by Mr. Butler. [Interregnum 20 E., p. 77. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 2.
Derby House.
The same to the same, and to the Governor of Cambridge. Upon information of some miscarriages lately committed by Dr. Brownrigg we desire you to send him up in custody. Sent as above. [Ibid. Copy. ⅓ p.]
April 2.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Norfolk. In reply to yours of the 13th and 26th ult., we have given order to the Committee of Accounts of the Kingdom to take the account between the garrison of Newport [Pagnell] and the [Eastern] Association, and present the state of it to us, when we will send to you and give further order therein. As to your letter of the 26th, we wrote to have that money furnished to Major-Genl. Crawford out of the arrears of the [Eastern] Association due to Manchester's army, and not out of that part assigned to Sir Thos. Fairfax by express Ordinance of Parliament, which we cannot dispose of to any other purpose. As for the 1,000 men to be sent to Watford both those and the rest with Major-Genl. Crawford are to be disposed of by Sir Thos. Fairfax, as also the draught horses you mention. For the assessments and money mentioned in your letter this Committee has not the disposal of them. We very much approve of your care for the safety of your [the Eastern] Association, whereof we shall ever be very tender, as of that wherein we hold the whole kingdom [to be] most concerned. We doubt not but by this army, to the payment whereof you contribute your proportion, you will be protected in safety. We hope you will not be troubled [any longer] by the enemy's alarms, as we trust this army [of Sir Thos. Fairfax] will give them employment further from you. And as for alarms from the sea, we trust when this summer's fleet has put to sea there will be no marine force of which you need to have any great apprehensions. Sent by Sir John Potts' care. [Ibid., pp. 78–79. Copy. 12/3 pp.]
April 2.
Derby House.
The same to the [Committee of the] Militia of London. We before wrote to you to press 2,500 men towards completing Sir Thos. Fairfax's army, which service is of very great concernment, and cannot with safety of the public receive any delay. Hearing that no proceeding therein has as yet been taken, we again urge you to put the order for pressing in execution, as the time of year is already far spent, and our forces ought to be in the field. Also certify us if you can spare any ordnance out of your store for the use of the Abingdon garrison, and if so how many and of what sort Given to some of the Committee then here. [Ibid., pp. 79, 80. Copy= 2/3 p.]
April 2.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee at Grocers' Hall. We have received yours of the 31st ult., desiring to be empowered to treat with any persons about the present furnishing of the 4,000l. for Munster. The business is of so great consequence, the safety of that Province depending very much upon it, that we desire you to treat with any one you conceive may advance the money, and do give you power to ascertain the security for the whole or any part of it upon the Ordinance in such way as you propound, and to allow 8 per cent. interest. [Ibid., pp. 80, 81. Copy=2/3 p.]
April 2.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Coventry. We have received yours of the 28th ult., containing the information of a third party likely to arise in your county, and of some correspondences with them [the Clubmen]. The thing may be of dangerous consequence, and we thank you for your timely advertisement of it. We desire you to keep a watchful observance upon them, and if there shall be any sudden eruption, or anything of present exigency, that you will do your utmost for the suppressing thereof, and still advertise us of their motion if they shall proceed. We doubt not to be speedily in a posture to give a remedy to any inconvenience that may thereby arise. [Ibid., p. 81. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 2.
Derby House.
The same to Major-Genl. Browne. We have seen your letters of the 28th ult., and considered both them and your propositions given in to this Committee by the gentlemen here, soliciting your business. We have upon the whole resolved that your own regiment shall be recruited to the number of 1,200, whereof the remains of Capt. Sparrow's regiment to form a part, and the rest to be recruited here. But send some officers hither, and inform us what money you conceive will be required for that purpose, with your opinion as to what recruits may be obtained there or in any other place. Before the regiments of Cols. Pickering and Ayloffe be called away [from you] we will take care that their place be supplied by other forces. If we can learn where Mr. Robinson, the fireworker, is, we will send him to you, as he has done good service in that employment in other places. We use the best means we can that the money voted for you by the House may be hastened to you. For the ordnance you desire for your works although, the army being in the field, we hope you will be out of danger, we have sent to the Militia to see if they can spare any out of their store, our own stores being so much emptied in supplying the garrisons, and on their return we will give you further answer. The wheelbarrows, we conceive, may best be provided there. For the dragoons desired it has been reported to the House, and care taken that they be provided, of which we will give you notice. We would have you name the two or three garrisons you speak of, that we may return answer to that particular. We would also be informed what can be laid to the charge of the spy you speak of, and what proofs exist of it, that he may be apprehended, if we can light upon him. Given to a commander of that garrison. [Ibid., pp. 82–84. Copy. 2½ pp.]
April 2.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Surrey. We formerly wrote to you to press 350 men for the recruiting of Sir Thos. Fairfax's army. We are informed that if you press in Southwark there will be great confusion between the execution of your warrants and those of the Militia, who are also to press there. You had, therefore, better forbear to raise any within that borough. Given to Sir Richd. Onslow. [Ibid., p. 84. Copy. ½ p.]
April 3. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, Loudoun, and Lauderdale, Lords Saye and Wharton, Sir Ph. Stapleton, Sir G. Gerard, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierrepont and Wallop. [It would appear that the Committee met in the morning, but nothing done.] Afternoon sitting.—Ordered,
1. That the Lord General, Mr. Recorder, and Mr. Solicitor be added to the sub-committee for Stafford business, and that they consider thereof and make report to this Committee.
2. That Capt. Stone's petition be referred to that sub-committee.
3. To supply copies of the letter to Shropshire concerning the Earl of Denbigh's regiment to such as call for it.
4. That a sub-committee be appointed to examine the business of breaking open the Scotch Commissioners' letters, and that they examine Sir Edward Bainton and others implicated. Names of the persons to be warned to attend.
5. To report to both Houses the abstract of Lieut.-Genl. Leslie's letter.
6. To write to Sir Thos. Fairfax about sending Capt. Nicholas's troop to Malmesbury.
7. That upon notice given to the chairmen of the Committees by the Earl of Irvine they have power to sign warrants for delivering to him such prisoners, out of the jails of the garrisons within the Parliament's quarters, upon indentures to be sent up to this Committee, as are willing to go with him out of this kingdom into France.
8. That the Commons would be pleased to determine the Nottingham business reported from this Committee.
9. To write severally to Waller and Cromwell signifying that this Committee have had no intelligence from them of their proceedings in the west, and that they know not how to dispose of their other forces in relation to the business of the west.
10. To report to the Commons the necessity of paying the first and second fortnight's pay to Essex's two regiments, as without these this Committee knows not where to get horse to employ towards Gloucester and those parts.
11. That Sir Ph. Stapleton and Mr. Solicitor be added to the Committee for Foreign Affairs.
[12.] That 400l. be imprested to each of the Commissioners to be sent to Ireland the better to enable them to perform their service during their abode there.
[13.] That all the propositions made by the gents. of Ireland, with the answers and resolutions of this Committee, shall be communicated to them.
[14.] That the Committee [for Ireland] shall be required seriously to consider the affairs of that country, and to report to this Committee what they conceive fit to be further done for the advancement of this summer's service there, so that it entail no further charge than the sum already allotted.
[15.] That 2,000l. be sent along with the Committee to be solely employed for the public service, viz., intelligence, fortifications, transportations by sea and land, and drawing in considerable persons or places.
[16.] To write to the Lord Admiral [Warwick] that all ships employed on the coasts of Ulster and Connaught be appointed to observe such instructions as they shall receive from the Committee [for Ireland].
[17.] That the Committee [for Ireland] shall be empowered to call such officers of the army to their assistance as they shall think meet. Also that they may sit with the Council-of-War.
[18.] That the Committee shall have instructions to press the army to advance at once into the enemy's quarters in order to be ready by harvest time to make provisions for planting winter garrisons there in places most convenient and of greatest advantage for the service of Ulster.
[19.] That the provisions appointed for the forces there be issued according to the strength of the regiments, and not otherwise.
[20.] That the [Irish] Committee shall have power to treat and compound for delivering up of places of strength to the use of the Parliament.
[21.] That the [Irish] Committee may divide themselves upon occasion, and may remove to such parts of the kingdom as they shall conceive may most conduce to the service.
[22.] That Sir Frederick Hamilton desires to have his name out of the paper about undertaking to carry on the war, forasmuch as he hath no trust but of his own castle.
[23.] That the officers of Drogheda be recommended to those of Ulster to be employed if they can, or else that they be employed by the [Irish] Committee to be sent over.
[24.] Sir Robt. King desires that he or his deputy may be named in the warrant for receipt of the soldiers' pay, and that they may have it without [the payment of] fees.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 173, 174, and 176–178. Copy=4 pp.]
April 3.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Thos. Fairfax. We have received information that the garrison of Malmesbury is in great want of horse, for supply of which the Committee of Wilts. suggests that the troop of arquebusiers, which was the Lord General's own troop under Capt. Nicholas, may be sent thither. If you have not designed them for other service, we desire that they may be forthwith sent to Malmesbury. Send back by this messenger your resolution, that we may give an answer to the Wilts.' Committee. Sent by Mr. Jennings. [Interregnum 20 E., p. 85. Copy. 2/3 p]
April 3.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Wm. Waller and Lieut.-Genl. Cromwell. We have received very little intelligence from you since your going westward, and know not either where you are, or what is the state of affairs in those parts, or the state of your forces. For want thereof we know not how to dispose of the rest of the forces in relation to the west. We therefore desire to have frequent advertisement from you of your state and motions, and of those of the enemy, that we may the better give order in all the public affairs. Sent by Mr. Newman. [Ibid., pp. 85, 86. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 3.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Aylesbury. We have ordered Crawford's return to the parts about Aylesbury, for the better disposing of his forces into the army of Sir Thos. Fairfax. Signify to him what quarters thereabouts will be fittest for him that he may dispose himself accordingly. Sent by Mr. Binding. [Ibid., p. 86. Copy. ½ p.]
April 3.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee at Grocers' Hall. This is a duplicate of the letter of April 2 to the same. [Ibid., p. 87. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 3.
Derby House.
The same to the Lord Admiral [Warwick]. We are informed that there is a Flemish vessel laden with 80 pieces of brass ordnance, designed for swift sailing, but not having above 12 or 14 men, bound for the Irish coast. There are two Irish men-of-war appointed to convoy this frigate to Wexford; likewise an English ship at Dieppe, and two other ships at Newhaven with ammunition bound for Ireland. We desire your Lordship that some care may be taken of these ships. It is desired by the Committee appointed for Ireland that such ships as shall be designed for the Provinces of Ulster and Connaught may, after the arrival of the Committee in those parts, be appointed to observe such instructions as they shall receive from that Committee for performing service upon the coasts of that kingdom, and for transporting of men, provisions, and ammunition to any other parts of the kingdom. We desire you to write your opinion, and how it may stand with those other services in which they are to receive instructions from you. Sent by Pidcock to the Earl of Warwick's house, to be forwarded to him. [Ibid., pp. 87, 88. Copy. 1⅓ pp.]
April 4. 2. Bond of Mr. Edw. Bagshaw and two sureties in 2,000l. for his return to the prison of the King's Bench, after the lapse of six weeks, he having been allowed out on good bail by order of the House of Commons for that time. [Three seals with arms or crest. Latin and English. 1 p.]
April 4. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Manchester, Loudoun, and Lauderdale, Lords Saye and Wharton, Sir Ph. Stapleton, Sir G. Gerard, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Pierrepont, Wallop, and Kennedy. Ordered,
1. To write to the gent. of Sussex to be careful of [the enemy] fortifying Sir Richd. Norton's house at Rotherfield, and with those of Surrey to take some course for the security of those parts.
2. To report to the Commons that the Committee of the Militia of London have propounded Col. Whichcott to be Governor of Farnham Castle, but that the gent. of Surrey and Harts., who are to bear the charge of that garrison, have selected Mr. Fielder for that charge.
3. Likewise that 2,000l. may be provided for a fortnight's pay for the cavalry regiments of the Earl of Essex and Sir Wm. Balfour, which are now in Herts.
4. To write to Capt. Ellis to transport himself with his 60 men who are at Portsmouth to Duncannon fort, for present service there.
5. The first thing to be dono to-morrow shall be that of the life-guard.
6. The letter from Bury St. Edmunds to be sent to Sir Thos. Fairfax.
7. To move to-morrow for the liberty of the Irish prisoners.
8. Warrant for ten barrels of gunpowder for the garrisons of Worcestershire.
9. To report to the Commons that although this Committee have written divers letters to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen of London to expedite the bringing in of the money for Ireland, yet none has come in, and therefore to desire the House to send to them to quicken it.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 175, 176. Copy. 1½ pp.]
April 4.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to the Governor of Dunkirk. We are informed that a bark bound for Plymouth put into Dunkirk by foul weather, Lest the men in her should by loss of time be hindered from their commanded service, we hereby entreat you to take order that she be suffered presently to depart. We promise for ourselves according to the observation of the treaties a like friendship betwixt this and that nation. [Interregnum 20 E., p. 89. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 4.
Derby House.
The same to the Lord Admiral Warwick. Being informed that a bark which should have carried some men and ammunition to Plymouth had by the late foul weather been driven into Dunkirk, we wrote to the Governor for its release, so that she might proceed on her intended journey. We transmit the letter to you, that if the case be found true, you may forward it with yours for getting the bark free. Give orders for a convoy for the safe return of the bark. Sent by Mr. Crips. [Ibid., pp. 89, 90. Copy= 1 p.]
April 4.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Sussex. We are informed that the enemy has a design of fortifying Sir Richd. Norton's house at Rotherfield which, if effected, would be of very great inconvenience to those parts. We desire you to take means to prevent that mischief and to consult with the gentlemen of Surrey for the preservation and safety of those parts. Give us notice of what you may do herein. Sent by Mr. Gardner on the 7th. [Ibid., pp. 90, 91. Copy = 2/3 p.]
April 5. this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland and Lauderdale, Lord Wharton, Sir Chas. Erskine, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierrepont, Wallop, Kennedy, and Barclay. Ordered,
1. To write to Sir Thos. Fairfax to call away such of Lieut.-Genl. Cromwell's troopers as are now at or about Dorking.
2. That the commission be signed for Lord Blayney [to have] the regiment which was Lord Conway's.
3. That the letter from Aylesbury be sent to Sir Thos. Fairfax, and he be desired to direct them to appoint their quarters.
4. That Capt. Greenvile be directed to march with his troop to Abingdon, where he will receive orders from Major-Genl. Browne.
5. That the first article of the desires of the Committee of the 3 cos. [Oxon., Berks., and Bucks.] concerning necessaries for Henley [on Thames] be reported to the Commons.
6. That the horse, foot, and dragoons lately under the command of Capt. Abercrombie do repair forthwith to High Wycombe, there to be in readiness to serve the garrison of Henley[-on-Thames] upon order from its Governor, and that Sir Thos. Fairfax be acquainted with this order, and that it was ordered formerly by the Lord General [Essex] at the desire of this Committee.
7. Capt. Greenvile's troop to march to Major-Genl. Browne according to his desire.
8. That Thos. Bulstrode, Governor of Henley[-on-Thames], Henry Arnol[d], and George Baldwin are authorised to beat their drums [for recruits] and levy men in the 3 cos. [Oxon., Berks., and Bucks] for the service of the garrison at Henley in the interim, while waiting to receive their commissions from Major.-Genl. Browne.
9. That Sir Thos. Fairfax be desired not to withdraw the whole of the regiments quartered at Henley-on-Thames before the said Governor and captains can levy their men for the garrison of that place.
10. That Dr. Brownrigg be committed to the prison of Winchester House, being accused of publicly preaching a seditious sermon in Cambridge.
11. That the persons who brought up Dr. Brownrigg be allowed their charges.
12. To report to the Commons the letter from the Committee at Cambridge.
13. Likewise the report for Portsmouth that was ordered 27th of February.
14. That Lord Brabazon and Sir Henry Tichborne be allowed the liberty of the Tower.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 178, 179. Copy. 12/3 pp.]
April 5.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to the Committee of Suffolk. Upon receipt of your letter concerning the disturbance made in your county by some old soldiers returned home, we have sent down to you Major Jubbes and Captain Axtell, two officers of Col. Pickering's regiment, to receive such soldiers as formerly belonged to that regiment, and to bring them to Reading. We desire you to furnish them with some clothes, as is expressed in your letter, and money for their supply, that they may be brought thither without burdening the country. If any other soldiers will come along with them and serve in that regiment these officers will take charge of them. Sent by Col. Pickering. [Interregnum 20 E., p. 91. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 5.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thos. Fairfax. We are informed that there are some of Cromwell's troopers about Dorking in Surrey, send for them that they may be employed as you see fit. By the enclosed you will see the complaint of Buckinghamshire concerning the quartering of forces under Major-Genl. Crawford, take order that they may be presently brought to some place where they may be reduced or recruited, and so ordered that they be not burdensome to the country. Sent by Mr. Bulmer at night. [Ibid., p. 92. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 6/16. 3. Dr. [Stephen] Goffe to Henry Lord Jermyn. Concerning the sale of the tin, Sir Wm. Boswell and I must proceed together for many reasons. It will be necessary to obtain an advance, so that Her Majesty [Queen Henrietta Maria] may be enabled to pay the interest until the tin be sold to pay the sum borrowed. I proposed to the Prince of Orange immunity [for the tin] from the customs, who was very willing, and Greffier has promised to do the best he can in this business. He has also undertaken to bring Allen and Haesdonck safely out of Dunkirk, but in the meantime I am to write to them to go forth if they can, there being no Holland ship there to trouble them for the next ten days. If there were any wit and duty in those who govern about Falmouth and Truro, they would do well to stay any tin until this be sold. The Queen's letters are gone to [James Ketteler] Duke of Courland for assisting the Marquis of Montrose, I hope to good purpose, but it is necessary to send the copy of the Queen's letter to the King of Denmark for free passage for his ships through the Sound, and a letter of credence in the Queen's own hand to Mons. Vicford, who from time to time may do the King good service by it with him. But the thing which gives Sir Wm. Boswell and me most pain in this place is the fear of the next interest day for the jewels, May 16, on which it is necessary to continue the credit begun, but above all to redeem those parcels which lie so dangerously in Cletcher's hands, besides the acquitting ourselves of the multiplied promises made to Mr. Vicford for the redemption of his. It is evident that nothing in the world is of so great importance for the King's service as to find money for the ships for Dorp, but in the next place these occasions mentioned must be served, and therefore it is very unfit to defer any longer the ratification and procurations which Webster desires, but how to transmit them to England and receive them from thence I know not, since the Ambassadors of Holland are come away. If you please to let the King know the fitness of doing the thing this week, Sir Wm. Boswell and I will prepare the instruments and send them several ways, but the likeliest is by Paris, to you, unless we may address ourselves to the Portugal Ambassador, which yet has not been done. I shall obey your order in sending "Saint Ibal's" jewels by Mr. D'Estrade, though they might be of use here, but if that design be pursued, as it must be, unless peace can be made, you will as easily send them back and more money with them by D'Estrade, as also together with them the orders from France for preparing the ships in the King of France's name. Mr. Hemflett [John Kirkhoven, Lord of Hemfleet] and Lady Stanhope [Katherine, widow of Sir Henry Stanhope] are very thankful to you for the business of their son [Charles Henry Kirkhoven], hoping that it shall be represented in the form desired, that is, for the title of Lord Wotton [not granted till 1650], which will be the greatest contentment to them in the world. [In cipher, but deciphered and numbered 12 on back, therefore probably one of the papers taken near Sherburn, and submitted to Parliament on the 3 Nov. 1645. 2¼ pp.]
April 7/17.
[The Hague.]
Dr. [Stephen] Goffe to Henry Lord Jermyn. The Prince of Orange was very inquisitive this week after my letters from Paris, hoping to be resolved precisely concerning the sum of the [marriage] portion [expected to be given with his daughter], as I perceived by his discourse. For that point I gave him this answer, that the portion alone could not be of that consideration as to conclude the marriage [with the Prince of Wales] unless he were able to give the King such succours as might probably restore his affairs, which the sum demanded could not do, and that therefore I was ordered to assure him that, if the other articles were accorded, the treaty should not break off upon the amount of the portion. From thence we came to the [consideration] of the other particulars, and the resolution was this,—that the affair of the Duke of Lorraine was to be pursued with all vigour, and for that end ships should be sent from hence to meet at the time prefixed, [so] that when the Ambassadors are returned [from England] all endeavours shall be used to induce the States [of Hol and] to a league defensive and offensive, and that Monsr. D Estrade shall return home fully instructed in these particulars, that is, to demonstrate the impossibility, as they call it, of the passage for Holland, and to facilitate the other to and from Dieppe; and for the second [point] to persuade the sending of an Ambassador from France hither to that purpose, which yet notwithstanding the Prince of Orange thinks will be very difficult by reason of the King of Denmark's war, to which the Hollanders are violently carried; however, the rumours [are that] all endeavours are and shall be used to bring them to our desires, for which end I proposed that in the meantime we might at least have justice from them, and such acts of amity as by their past alliance they were bound unto, such as are, first, the liberty of their ports to our men-of-war and the freedom of those [ships] now detained; secondly, liberty to sell our prizes here as we may do in Flanders, at least that both sides may sell in their ports; thirdly, the dismission of [Walter] Strickland; fourthly, the permitting of arms and money to be exported for the King both from hence and from Dunkirk, with the refusal of the same [concession] to the rebels; fifthly, an open and public declaration of the dislike of the rebels' late propositions sent to the King [of England], according as in conscience they are bound to declare, thereby to preserve this people from the guilt of approving the rebellion in England; that in so doing they should declare no war against the Parliament, and it would be a great preparation for the work in hand. This the Prince of Orange seemed very much to approve of, and hath ordered me to prepare my papers in this kind against the time that their [the Dutch] Ambassadors come from England, and began to ask me concerning the design, and whether I had received any orders about it, for that I told him I should be particularly instructed by the next post. He likes this very well, and D'Estrade shall be instructed about it. This was all that pa sed since the receipt of yours, besides that, for conclusion, the Prince of Orange would know whether, if the Duke [of Lorrain] should fail us. our treaty were at an end. I answered, No, for if the States [of Holland] would be brought to declare for the King [of England], and with shipping and in other particulars as should be presented to them [assist us], I did not doubt but that the King would quickly subdue the rebels, which was the end we pursue in this affair; to which when he [the Prince of Orange] replied with more cheerfulness than has been usual of late, that all endeavours should be used, I took my leave of him. I do [assure] your Lordship there is no danger in discoursing as you find [advisable] concerning the [marriage] portion, for the conditions for the Princess must be proportionable to it, and, if other things be accorded, they will be solicitous themselves to enlarge the portion; for that end the Princess of Orange is very civil to me, and desires much the business should go on. I should be instructed what to say concerning the condition and habitation of the Princess before her going into England. [Written on the same paper as that of April 16. It is in cipher, but deciphered, and is printed in Ludlow's Memoirs, ed. 1751, Appendix, pp. 483, 484. It is endorsed "12," and was therefore probably amongst the papers taken at Sherburn, and read in Parliament on 3 Nov. 1645. =2½ pp.]
April 7.
Paris.
4. Mr. Brown to Thos. Webb, Secretary to the Duke of Richmond and Lennox, at Court. I received safe what you sent me by Lord Percy. Being upon my departure from hence I have no time to reply to either of yours, except that I am most sensible of the Duke's favour towards me, and the friendship you continue for me. I shall punctually observe what you desire for both our considerations. Lord [Henry] Percy has already waited on the Queen, and certainly will meet with less difficulty in clearing of himself than what either he or others imagined when he left Oxford. Project for transfer of certain fee farm rents. If this were consented unto the creditors could use means to take off the sequestration, and so both relieve themselves and free in a shorter time the Duke of Richmond, my brother, and Mr. Blancard of their present engagements. Addressing your letters for him or me to Sir Richard Browne will be the securest way for you. [Probably one of the letters taken near Sherburn, in Yorkshire, being numbered 5, and endorsed "Not read quite out." Seal with crest. 2 pp.]
April 7. 5. Order of the House of Commons. That the third part of the sequestration money formerly assigned to the Earl of Manchester be referred to the disposal of the respective Committees of the several counties for relief of sick and maimed soldiers, scouts, intelligences, and other emergencies, and for the defence of the respective counties. [Printed in Commons' Journals iv., p. 102. Copy. ½ p.]
April 7. 6. The Committee of the Navy being informed by the Commissioners of the Navy that a proportion of the beef and pork appointed for last year's fleet is still remaining in store, but cannot be used for this summer's service, being over salt; it is therefore thought fit that these be disposed of by the Commissioners of the Navy to the best advantage of the State. [2/3 p.]
April 7. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earl's of Northumberland and Loudoun, Lord Wharton, Sir Ph. Stapleton, Sir Chas. Erskine, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Pierrepont, Wallop and Kennedy. Ordered,
1. That Wm. Batten's letter of 5 April be reported to the Commons.
2. That the gents. of Worcester do attend to-morrow.
3. That the papers from Sir Wm. Brereton be referred to the subcommittee for Derbyshire.
4. To inform Major-Genl Crawford of the orders given to Sir Thos. Fairfax for directing the forces under Crawford's command to such place as they may be best reduced and disposed into the new army, and that he take care the soldiers in their march be not burdensome to the country.
5. To desire Lord Fairfax to send 600 horse to Col. Rossiter, with whom they are to stay till they receive further orders from hence.
6. To acquaint Col. Fleetwood herewith, who on the coming of the 600 horse is to repair to Sir Thos. Fairfax.
7. To acquaint Col. Rossiter with these orders.
8. That the Committee of Derby and Nottingham be desired to send their horse to Col. Rossiter for straitening the enemy's quarters about Newark, and preservation of those parts.
9. To report to the Commons that money may be provided for Waller's soldiers, they being now in a bare country, also that this Committee has received but one letter from him since his going down.
10. To inform Waller and Cromwell that this Committee hold it very convenient that they should stay in those parts, and that the House has been moved to provide money for their forces, also that it would be well they sent more frequent account of their proceedings, that this Committee may know what assistance to send to them.
11. The answer to the propositions made by the officers of Ulster, viz.:—
1. This Committee will send over a person to see the victuals, &c., distributed.
2. Will give present order for warrants to pay the common soldiers. Have written to quicken the levying of the London, Westminster, and Middlesex moneys, and yet the money comes not in, so they have desired the House of Commons to send to the Lord Mayor and others for its speedy collecting.
3. Will move the Commons to determine their pleasure for the month's pay for the officers, and will report the reasons given in the same.
4. The assignments out of the 80,000l. have been summed up, and there is only 1,800l. left.
5. Order given for 100l. for transport horses for each regiment and 10l. for each troop.
6. This Committee will speedily resolve of Committees to be sent over into Ireland, with directions and fitting instructions for carrying on the service of Ireland.
[7.] And will give order for Mr. Annesley, Sir Robt. King, and Col. Beale to join with the Scotch Commissioners to form a Committee to go into Ireland. An Ordinance to be prepared for authorising them.
[8.] Warrants to be ordered for 900l. for themselves and 2,000l. to go with them according to former orders.
[9.] The directions for disposal of the victuals, &c., for Connaught, to be [directed] to Sir Chas. Coote, who is to obey the orders of the Committee.
[10.] That the part allotted to Sir Frederick Hamilton be disposed [of] to such as he shall appoint.
[11.] Warrants for the soldiers' money for Connaught to be presently issued to Sir Robert King.
12. Form of warrant for delivering prisoners to the Earl of Irvine approved of.
13. That Col. Greaves' horse be paid, and those who are dismounted in those two regiments shall receive the same pay as the rest.
14. That Mr. Frost do deliver the 2,000l. to Capt. Vernon to be paid to the two regiments of the Lord General Essex, which lately mutinied.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 180–182. Copy. 22/3 pp.]
April 7.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Major Genl. Crawford. We have written to Sir Thos. Fairfax to take order to bring those forces now with you to such place as they may be best reduced or recruited and disposed into the new army. We suppose before this he has sent to you concerning it. We desire you to march according to the appointment you shall receive from Sir Thomas, and to take especial care that the soldiers be as little burdensome as may be to the country. Sent by Mr. Arnold at 7 at night. [Interregnum 20 E., pp. 92, 93. Copy= 2/3 p.]
April 7.
Derby House.
The same to Col. Fleetwood. We have appointed your regiment to march into these parts to [join] the army of Sir Thos. Fairfax, and to supply its place have written to Lord Fairfax to send 600 horse out of Yorkshire to join with Col. Rossiter for the better security of those parts. We desire you, upon the coming of those Yorkshire horse, to march to such rendezvous as Sir Thomas shall appoint Sent to him, being then in town, by Mr. Fleetwood. [Ibid., p. 93. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 7. 7. The Commissioners from the Parliament of Scotland to [the Committee of both kingdoms appointed to treat with them]. We shall send your Lordships' desires, contained in your paper of the 5th inst., to the Committee residing with the Scottish army; and are confident that, upon receipt of the remainder of the money, arms, and ammunition, they will with all possible speed take the field and advance southward, for which they are [now] preparing themselves, and will so direct their motions, by advice of the Committee of both kingdoms, upon the place, as may most promote the public service. And in respect the troubles of Scotland, by Irish rebels and malignants, occasioned by the engagement of that kingdom in this cause, are a hinderance to the present strengthening and recruiting of that army from thence, and that upon their marching southward there is a necessity of leaving behind them such forces as may secure the garrisons there; we desire you to move the Houses speedily to put the northern forces in such a posture as there may be a competent strength for defence of those parts, to join with the Scottish army for opposing the enemy in case their forces shall draw northward; and that the armies in the north and south may, with all possible speed, be put in such a condition and readiness as they may be mutually aiding and assisting to each other, for the active carrying on of the war, which since the disappointment of our hopes, in [the failure of] the late treaty [at Uxbridge], seems to be the only means left us, for the present, for settling a blessed peace, and we are desirous to consider with your Lordships the best ways and means, how by the joint counsel and forces of both kingdoms, the service may be promoted and a happy end may be put to these destructive and unnatural wars. All which we desire may be made known to both Houses of Parliament. By command of the Commissioners of the Parliament of Scotland, signed [Sir] John Cheislie, 8 April 1645. [Endorsed: "Scots' paper of the 5th of April, delivered the 9th of the same to both Houses." Copy. 1 p.]
April. 8. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, Warwick, Manchester, Loudoun, and Lauderdale, Lords Saye and Wharton, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir Ph. Stapleton, Sir Chas. Erskine, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Pierrepont, Crew, Wallop, and Kennedy. Ordered,
1. That it be reported to both Houses of Parliament that the paper brought in by the Dutch Ambassadors is of that nature that it requires a longer time to consider of it. That there are other things that are coincident with this, and that the Committee will with all convenient speed give an account of both.
2. That Loudoun, Vane, Crew, and Mr. Solicitor shall form a sub-committee for the narrative concerning the Dutch Ambassadors.
3. That the Commons be reminded to give order for the release of Sir Wm. Riddell, according to the articles of capitulation of Tynemouth Castle, and that Sir A. Haselrigg be desired to make report of that business to the House.
4. To report to the Commons that this Committee is of opinion that Sir John Henderson should be set at liberty to return to Denmark, but in the letter to that King it be suggested that in future it would be better not to employ any who have been actually in arms, and are within the compass of the Declaration of both kingdoms, as Sir J. Henderson is, and so might have been justly censured and punished according to his demerits.
5. That the settling of the business of Sir James Lumsden's commission be considered to-morrow afternoon.
6. That the paper of the Committee of both Houses of Parliament concerning the advancing of the Scotch army, and the two papers of the Scottish Commissioners, be reported to both Houses.
7. That the petitions of Major Wm. Hurry and Capts. James Boswell, Wm. Masterton, and Alex. Ramsay be recommended to Mr. Scowen's Committee, whose answer is prayed for Friday.
8. That the Commons be desired to provide money speedily for the life-guard, and to determine how they are to be employed for the future.
9. That Dr. Brownrigg be committed to Mr. Dillingham's house.
10. A sub-committee named to peruse Dr. Brownrigg's sermon, with power to take examinations, and then make report to this Committee.
11. That Mr. Culemburg shall receive 10l., and be discharged from further attendance.
12. That Crawford's note of the places where the horse and foot under his command do quarter be sent to Sir Thos. Fairfax, who is to recall them from those parts.
13. To write to Col. Sheffield and the officers commanding the foot to march to such places as Sir Thos. Fairfax shall direct.
14. To recommend to the Commons the appointment of Lieut.-Col. Gray to take command of the regiment in Lincolnshire, vice Col. Rainsborough, he being strongly recommended by the gent. of Lincolnshire.
15. To inform Sir Thos. Fairfax that 2,000l. is to be sent to Reading, for which he is desired to supply a convoy to conduct it thence to Abingdon. Also that the pressed men may be at Gravesend on Wednesday or Thursday next. That the Treasurers be desired to send this money safely to Reading.
16. That Sir Thos. Fairfax be desired to send what guns can be spared from Windsor, of the sizes desired by Major-Genl. Browne for Abingdon, with shovels, crows, pickaxes, &c.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 182–184. Copy= 2 pp.]
April 8.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Wm. Waller and Lieut.-Genl. Cromwell. We have taken care for reporting to the Commons that money may be provided for the encouragement of your forces, and do hold your continuance in those parts very convenient. Since your marching hence we have only received one letter from you concerning the condition of your affairs, and the proceedings in those parts, notwithstanding our desire to hear frequently from you, and do now renew our request; that upon notice of the state of your affairs and the strength of the enemy's forces, we may know what need there is of sending further assistance to you. Sent by Mr. Potter. [Interregnum 20 E., p. 94. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 8.
Derby House.
The same to Col. Massie. The Committee of Worcestershire have raised some forces for the service of the Parliament, and have garrisoned Strensham and Hawkesley [House] in that county, which may be in some danger by reason of the strength of the enemy in those parts. In case they should be straitened assist them. [Ibid., pp. 94, 95. Copy= 2/3 p.]
April 8. The like letter to the Committee of Warwickshire. [Ibid. p. 95. Minute.]
April 8.
Derby House.
The same to Captain Nicholas. We have appointed your troop of horse to be employed at Malmesbury for aid of the garrison, and have signified so much to Sir Thos. Fairfax. You are to march thither and receive orders from the Governor of that garrison. Given to Nicholas here. [Ibid. p. 95. Copy. ⅓ p.]
April 8.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thos. Fairfax. It being ordered by both Houses that a fortnight's pay shall be presently paid to Essex's and Balfour's regiments of horse quartered in Herts., we desire you would give order to Col. Pindar or Mr. Herbert, Commissioners of Parliament, and to the Commissary of the Musters, to repair into Herts. to the several quarters of the horse and there muster these regiments. The money is to be paid to the officers of these regiments at St. Albans, according to the instructions given to Capt. Vernon, who is to be on Thursday with the money at St. Albans. These regiments having received their fortnight's pay, we desire you speedily to appoint them some other rendezvous where they may be reduced as you shall think best. Sent by Mr. Binding. [Ibid., p. 96. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 8.
Derby House.
The same to the same. We have herewith sent you a list of the places where the horse, foot, and dragoons under Major-Genl. Crawford are quartered. The places mentioned are such as pay weekly assessments to the maintenance of your army. We desire you to order them to come to such rendezvous as you shall appoint for their reducing. We have sent direction to Col. Sheffield and their commanders to obey your orders. Sent by John Priestley. [Ibid., pp. 96, 97. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 8.
Derby House.
The same to Col. Sheffield and the chief officers of foot under Major-Genl. Crawford. You are to march to such rendezvous as Sir Thos. Fairfax shall appoint. Sent by Mr. Bulmer on the 10th. [Ibid., p. 97. Copy. ½ p.]
April 8.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thos. Fairfax. Being informed that Major Douett has forsaken the service, and that his troop not being employed, but lying upon the country, will be lost unless speedy order be taken for its employment, we recommend the same to your care, that it may be employed for recruiting of such others as you shall think fit. We desire that Capt. Nicholas may march with his troop of arquebusiers down to Malmesbury. [Ibid., p. 98. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 8.
Derby House.
The same to Lord Fairfax. We desire Col. Fleetwood's regiment of horse to march up to Sir Thos. Fairfax, but this cannot safely be removed from the service of Lincolnshire until some arrive from you to join Col. Rosseter. We desire you to send 600 serviceable horse to stay with Rosseter for service in those parts until they receive further orders from this Committee. Sent by the post. [Ibid., pp. 98, 99. Copy = 2/3 p.]
April 8.
Derby House.
The same to Col. Rosseter. We have sent to Lord Fairfax to supply you with 600 serviceable horse, who are to stay with you till we give further orders; and when they shall be joined with you we have ordered Col. Fleetwood then to march with his regiment of horse to Sir Thos. Fairfax, but not before, as his regiment is wanted for service in your parts. Sent by the care of Major Harrison. [Ibid., p. 99. Copy. ½ p.]
April 8.
Derby House.
The same to Col. Fleetwood. We have written to Lord Fairfax to send 600 horse to join with Col. Rosseter; and when these have joined, you are to march with your regiment to Sir Thos. Fairfax, but not before, as we would not have your regiment to remove from the service of those parts. [Ibid., p. 100. Copy. ½ p.]
April 9. 8. Resolutions relative to the Scottish army passed in the House of Commons this day. That two or more members of this House be speedily sent down with such instructions as they shall receive from this House. The members chosen were Sir Henry Vane, senior, Henry Darley, and Mr. Hatcher. Also that Vane be added to the Committees or Commissioners of both kingdoms appointed to reside with the Scots' army. [Printed in Commons' Journals iv., 105. 1 p.]
April 9.
Derby House.
9. Warrant of the Committee of both kingdoms to Capt. Francis Vernon. Out of the 2,000l. you are appointed to receive out of the Excise office, you are to pay to the officers and troopers of the regiments that were the Lord General [Essex's] and Sir Wm. Bolfour's fourteen days' pay, according to a muster to be presently taken, and to the establishment of 1644. And whereas divers troopers have lost their horses in the service, and are now on foot, you are, for this time, to pay them as horsemen. Subjoined,
9. i. Receipts given for money paid on the 15th and 16th April to the officers, clerks, and others of the above-named regiments. [4 pp.]
April 9. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Essex, Northumberland, Warwick, Manchester, Loudoun, and Lauderdale, Lords Wharton and Saye, Sir A. Haselrigg, Sir G. Gerard, Sir Ph. Stapleton, and Messrs. Pierrepont, Browne, Crew, Wallop, Kennedy, and Barclay. Ordered,
1. To report to the House of Commons the two letters from Lord Inchiquin of the 18th March, concerning respectively the ship and the state of Munster; also Lord Broghill's letter of the 24th March from Youghal.
2. That the former letter of Lord Inchiquin concerning the state of Munster and Lord Broghill's be communicated to the gent. of Ulster.
3. To report to the House that many soldiers do daily make application to this Committee for their arrears, supposing it proper [to do so], because the directing of the war is referred to it, but as the Committee is restrained by vote to entertain any private business, it would be well if the House were to provide some way that these soldiers may have their petition heard.
4. That Lieut.-Col. Dodson's petition and the draught of fortification for Croyland [in Lincolnshire] be reported to the House.
5. That Waller do send to Col. Massie 500 horse if he can spare them. This letter to Waller to be suspended.
6. That Mr. Recorder and Mr. Crew do go to the Committee of the West to treat about sending Col. Fiennes' regiment from Waller to Massie.
7. To write to the Committee of the Militia [for London] that only Englishmen be impressed for this service, unless such strangers as be inhabitants and resident.
8. That the consideration of the magazine of victuals be taken up tomorrow. That 100 horse from Northampton, two troops from Newport [Pagnell], one troop from Aylesbury, and 200 horsemen from Warwick shall [be ordered to] march for the assistance of Col. Massie.
10. To write to Northampton, Aylesbury, and Newport [Pagnell] for those horse to march to Warwick, and from thence to Col. Massie as he shall order.
11. To inform Col. Massie that he may give his orders accordingly.
12. That Col. Fiennes' regiment be sent to the assistance of Col. Massie if the Committee of the West can spare it.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 184–186. Copy= 1½ pp.]
April 9.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to the Committee of the Militia of London. Upon complaint made to this Committee of some abuses committed in impressing diverse of the Scottish nation and other strangers who are not inhabitants here, for service under Sir Thos. Fairfax, we have thought fit to desire you forthwith to give order to such as are employed that no strangers be impressed for the future, unless they be inhabitants and resident here, and all such as have been so impressed may be released. Sent by Mr. Crips. [Interregnum 20 E., pp. 100, 101. Copy= 2/3 p.]
April 9.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thos. Fairfax. We desire you to appoint a convoy for the 2,000l. to be sent to Reading, and from thence to Abingdon, for the service of that garrison. There is also want of some guns at Abingdon, which we would have supplied from Windsor, we therefore desire you to see this performed, as also spades, shovels, crows, and pickaxes from thence. [Ibid., p. 113. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 10. 10. Order of the Committee [of the Army] requiring Mr. Sackford Gonson to be High Collector for all moneys assessed within Kingston, Elmbridge, Copthorne, and Effingham hundreds [of Surrey], and to pay over the sums received to the Treasurers-atWar at Guildhall appointed for maintaining of the forces under Sir Thos. Fairfax by Ordinance of Parliament. Signed by Francis Drake and five others. [1 p.]
April 10. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Manchester and Lauderdale, Lords Saye, Wharton, and Warristoun, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir G. Gerard, Sir A. Haselrigg, Sir Chas. Erskine, Mr. Recorder, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Wallop, Crew, Kennedy, and Barclay. Ordered,
1. To write to Waller to make up a regiment of 600 for Col. Cooke out of such forces as are neither of the new model nor of the western forces, and send him with it to Col. Massie's assistance.
2. To report to the Commons that this Committee had it in consideration to send the 500 men who were at Gravesend to Waller, but the Committee for the Army and the Committee of the West inform that shipping could not be got ready in a month, so those forces could not be sent. The Sussex forces come in so slowly that they are inconsiderable, and, as Sir Thos. Fairfax is now recruiting, the Committee cannot advise the sending of any foot from him.
3. Likewise for a fortnight's pay for the horse of Northampton, Newport [Pagnell], Aylesbury, and Warwick, being 400 or 500 who are to go to the assistance of Col. Massie.
4. To write to Col. Ludlow to draw all the troops, whereof a list is to be sent him, in Surrey together, and to march with them to Waller.
5. Commission for Mr. Fielder to be Governor of Farnham Castle.
6. That Robt. Cunningham's petition be referred to the Committee now going over into Ireland.
7. To report to the House that the Commissioners of Excise refuse to pay the 2,000l. for Essex's two regiments, and the necessity for sending it this night to Sir Thos. Fairfax.
8. To write to Sir Wm. Brereton desiring him to continue his assistance to Salop, and informing him that the great wants of his forces have been reported to the House of Commons, and 5,000l. requested for their supply.
9. To write to Shrewsbury that this Committee has ordered 30 barrels of gunpowder for their supply.
10. To write to Stafford for assistance to [be sent to] Sir Wm. Brereton.
11. To report to the House the extreme necessity and wants of Brereton's forces, which require at least 5,000l. to be sent speedily, without which they will all disband.
12. To write to Stafford to send what forces they can to the relief of Salop, and provisions to Brereton's army.
13. That Portsmouth, Abingdon, Coventry, and Gloucester be propounded to the Committee of the Army as fit places for a magazine of victuals; a month's provisions to be stored at each of the two first named, and a fortnight's at each of the latter.
14. That the business of the government of Newcastle be considered tomorrow at 4 p.m. That the letter of April 10 from Bury St. Edmunds be reported to-morrow to both Houses of Parliament.
15. That security in 3,000l be entered to Mr. Frost for the ship "Rainbow."
16. To report to the House Brereton's letter of 4th April.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 186, 187. Copy. 2 pp.]
April 10.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to the Commissioners of Excise. We are informed by Capt. Vernon that he cannot obtain the 2,000l. appointed for payment of Essex's two regiments of horse which lately mutinied, and are now to be reduced. Let the money be forthwith paid, being for a service of so great importance. The King's forces are already in the field. These horse lie useless to the service, and do very much burden and spoil the country. We have sent to Sir Thos. Fairfax to send a commissary and Commissioners to St. Alban's to muster them who are there this day. We have promised them that they shall have their pay there for those horse upon their muster, which, if it should fail, may be of extreme ill consequence. We therefore desire you that it may be forthwith paid to Capt. Vernon, [so] that it may be there this day without fail. Sent by Capt. Vernon. [Interregnum 20 E., p. 101. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 10.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Warwickshire at Coventry. We have appointed one troop of horse from Aylesbury, two from Newport [Pagnell], and 100 horse from Northampton to march to Warwick, there to receive orders from Col. Massie for the execution of such service as we have appointed him. We desire you to have 200 of your horse ready there for the same service. This service being of so great concernment it is not capable of any protraction. Sent by John Arnold. [Ibid., p. 102. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 10.
Derby House.
The same to the Governor of Newport [Pagnell]. Send two of your best troops of horse from your garrison to Warwick, where they will receive orders from Col. Massie for the execution of such service as we have appointed him to do. There must be no delay, this service being of great consequence. We have written to Aylesbury to send a troop, Northampton 100 horse, and Warwick 200 for the same service. Sent as above. [Ibid., pp. 102, 103. Copy = 2/3 p.]
April 10. Mem.—The like letters for Aylesbury and Northampton, mutatis mutandis. [Minute. Ibid., p. 103.]
April 10.
Derby House.
The same to Col. Massie. The better to enable you to do service upon the enemy in those parts, we have appointed one troop of horse from Aylesbury, two troops from Newport [Pagnell], besides 100 horse from Northampton, and 200 of Warwickshire to repair to Warwick, where they are to receive your orders and march as you shall appoint. We have also written to Waller to make up a regiment of 600 horse for Col. Cooke, that he may march to your assistance. We have advertised you of this that you may send your orders accordingly to Warwick for the march of those forces. Sent as above. Underwritten,
Put in cipher. [Ibid., p. 103. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 10.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Wm. Waller. The better to prevent the King's forces recruiting in cos. Gloucester and Hereford where the Princes now are, we have appointed to send some horse to Col. Massie from the garrisons of Newport [Pagnell], Aylesbury, Northampton, and Warwick. We desire you to make up a regiment of 600 horse out of such forces as do not belong to the new [modelled] army, and send it under Col. Cooke to the assistance of Col. Massie, whom we have conceived to be the fittest [commander] for that service, in regard he is a gentleman of that country. We intend sending you as a supply from these parts Captains Middleton, Blachford, Swallow, Saville, and Draper. We desire you to keep as near the King's forces as you can for the better preservation of those parts. Sent by Mr. Crips the next day. [Ibid., p. 104. Copy. 1 p.]
April 11. 11. Petition of William Ryley, Lancaster Herald, and one of the clerks of the Records in the Tower of London, to the Committee of the Revenue. That petitioner has diligently attended the service of the Parliament, and has had no support or maintenance at all, except from this Committee, for these three years, and has owing to him 13l. 6s. 8d. for half a year's wages as Lancaster Herald. Prays order for payment of this sum, he being not otherwise able to provide bread for his wife and 7 children, nor to attend to the service of the State. Underwritten,
11. i. "Ordered. 11 Apr. 1645." [1 p.]
April 11. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Manchester, Loudoun, and Lauderdale, Lords Saye and Warristoun, Sir Ph. Stapleton, Sir G. Gerard, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierrepont, Crew, and Wallop. Ordered,
1. That all the field officers be paid according to the former establishment.
2. That Col. Ludlow's letter of the 10th inst. be recommended to the consideration of the Committee of the West.
3. That the Ordinance concerning the managing of the war in Ireland be reported to both Houses.
4. To write to Sir John Gell to continue his horse with Sir Wm. Brereton, who is to be advertised thereof.
5. That the commission now read be granted to Mr. Fielder. That the like be granted to Col. Whichcott.
6. The members of this Committee to be all warned to attend on Monday, when the business of Holland is to be taken first.
7. To write to Waller desiring him to acquaint this Committee in what condition he has left the garrisons, how many foot he has, and where he left them, what horse and in what condition they are, what is the state of the enemy's forces, and directing him to use all advantages against them; likewise in what forwardness the 600 horse are, which are to go to Gloucester under Col. Cooke, and to require him to despatch them away with all speed.
8. To report to the House of Commons that 1,000l. may be provided for Waller's horse going to Gloucester to assist Col. Massie; likewise that the 1,000l. for the horse to be sent to Gloucester from Northampton, Aylesbury, Newport Pagnell, and Warwick may be speedily provided.
9. That Sir Thos. Fairfax be acquainted with the news from Sir Wm. Waller, and desired to hasten the recruiting of his forces to the end that he may speedily take the field.
At the Committee of both Houses.
10. That the commission to be granted to Sir James Lumsden be drawn up and presented to this Committee.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 188, 189. Copy. 1½ pp.]
April 11.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Thos. Fairfax. We have just received a letter from Waller, dated the 9th, giving notice of his retreat to Salisbury, and that he regards that place as an excellent head-quarter for his foot and fittest for a junction with such forces as shall be sent for his assistance. Thus much we thought fit to signify to you, and to desire you to hasten the recruiting of your forces that you may speedily take the field. Sent by Mr. Craven. [Interregnum 19 E., p. 119. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 11.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Wm. Waller. We wrote to you yesterday desiring you forthwith to make up for Col. Cooke a regiment of horse out of such forces whose officers do not belong to the new army; we desire to know from you in what forwardness that regiment is, and, so soon as it is ready to march, despatch it with all expedition. We desire also to understand in what condition you have left the garrisons upon your retreat to Salisbury, how many foot you have, and where you left them, what horse and in what condition they are, what is the state of the enemy's forces and where they do now quarter, and that you do take all the advantages you can against them. Sent as above. [Ibid., pp. 119, 120. Copy = 2/3 p.]
April 12. Resolution passed at the Committee of the Navy, That by the Ordinance of Parliament, 7 March 1643–44, any merchant, either of the fellowship of the Levant Company or strangers, bringing into this kingdom goods which have been brought into the Levant seas, ought to be liable to contribute towards the charge of that Company for maintenance of their ministers and government as shall be imposed upon those goods by that Company. Underwritten,
1 May 1645. Committee of the Navy. [Levant Comp., vol. i., No. 103. Copy. ½ p.]
April 12. 12. Interrogatories for the examination of the witnesses Walter Clinch, Thos. Gallilee, Anthony Roworth, and John Higgins, as to their knowledge of John Goodlad, of Shadwell, mariner. When Goodlad would run away with the ship called "The Goodlad, of London" to Bristol for the King's use, what rewards, and what persuasions or violence, were offered you [to get you] to run away with him? Annexed,
12 i. Examinations of the three last named witnesses. [3 pp.]
April 12. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Manchester, and Loudoun, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir A. Haselrigg, and Messrs. Pierrepont, Browne, and Barclay. Ordered,
1. That it be reported to both Houses of Parliament, that all trumpets and messengers sent to and from the enemy about military matters be referred to the Speakers of both Houses or to Sir Thos. Fairfax, and for all civil matters to the two Speakers.
2. That the two reports which should have been made by Mr. Pierrepont concerning Portsmouth and the desires of the three counties [Oxon., Berks., and Bucks.] be reported on Monday.
3. That Manchester, Haselrigg, and Crew are to form a sub-committee to consider of the Ordinance for Newport [Pagnell], and of the least proportion that can maintain it.
4. To the order for 10 barrels of gunpowder for Worcestershire, to add match and bullet proportionable.
5. The sub-committee for Newport Pagnell to consider of the lessening of the charge for that garrison, and to report to this Committee.
6. The sub-committee for Ireland to meet on Monday and consider the propositions of the gent. of Ulster.
7. To acknowledge the receipt of Sir Samuel Luke's letter, and to require him to send at least 100 horse; also informing him that this Committee has sent to the counties for bringing in money for payment of his forces.
8. That Mr. Crew do speak to Sir John Curzon to send to Mr. Wheeler that he may if he please give over his negotiation.
9. To write to his Excellency the Earl of Leven to give orders to Lieut.Genl. Leslie to advance to the assistance of Sir Wm. Brereton should the latter be oppressed by the enemy, but this is not to be understood so as to hinder his Lordship marching [southwards] with the whole [Scottish] army so soon as he can be ready.
10. To write to the same effect to Lieut.-Genl. Leslie, and to let him know how acceptable his late assistance was, enclosing Brereton's letter, of which Brereton to be informed.
11. To write to Major Hurry to carry Sir Thos. Read in custody to the Committee at St. Alban's, who are to examine the whole business and report to this Committee.
12. That the paper given in by Sir Christopher Wray be referred to the sub-committee [here named], who are to consider of it, and to treat with the gent. of the several counties therein mentioned, and having put the business into a way of settlement to report.
13. To report to the Commons that the gent. of the [Eastern] Association may be desired to meet the gent. of Lincolnshire and Notts. upon Monday afternoon, to prepare something to offer to this Committee concerning some propositions given in by them, which may be of good consequence.
14. To recommend to the Committee of the West that Capt. Sadler's troop be recruited by them, and directed to march with Capt. Nicholas for the assistance of Malmesbury garrison, for which service he is the better fitted having been born near that place.
15. To write to Sir Thos. Fairfax, enclosing Capt. Buller's propositions, and signifying their inclination for sending Capt. Buller and his troop with the other forces which are to go for Gloucester garrison; with the necessity of which service Sir Thos. is acquainted, but they refer to his consideration the second part of Buller's propositions.
16. That Sir John Oglander be discharged of his bond for staying within the lines of communication, which bond Mr. Frost will deliver up to him.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 189–191. Copy. 2½ pp.]
April 12.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Captain Middleton. We appointed your troop, together with the 4 troops of Capts. Blachford, Saville, Swallow, and Draper, to march to Sir Wm. Waller to be employed with the regiments to which they severally belong. You are to march thither with all speed. We have desired the Committee of Surrey to take care for the effectual execution of these our orders. Sent by Mr. Durand. [Interregnum 20 E., p. 105. Copy. ½ p.]
April 12. Mem.—The like letters were sent to the other four captains, mutatis mutandis. [Ibid. Minute.]
April 12.
Derby House.
The same to the Earl of Leven. We are very sensible of what advantage the sending of Lieut.-Genl. Leslie to the aid of Sir Wm. Brereton was to the public service. This, upon late intelligence from him concerning the enemy's forces, has moved us to desire you to give order to him to afford what assistance he can to Sir Wm. Brereton in case he should be again oppressed by the enemy's forces, which we doubt not you will so order as it shall be no hinderance to your marching with the whole body of your army, but that you will advance southward so soon as you can be in readiness. Sent by the ordinary courier. [Ibid., pp. 105, 106. Copy=2/3 p.]
April 12.
Derby House.
The same to Lieut.-Genl. Leslie. We are very sensible how seasonable the late assistance given by you to Sir Wm. Brereton was, and how acceptable your service while you were in those parts. This has moved us to desire you to hold correspondence with him, and to assist him in case he should be again oppressed with the enemy's forces. Sent as above. [Ibid., p. 106. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 12.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Wm. Brereton. We have received your several letters concerning the state of your affairs and the employment of your forces. We approve of your having sent assistance to Salop, which we take to be a very good service. We desire you to be still assistant to them as their exigencies may require. We conceive that your forces now, in the absence of the enemy, cannot be anywhere more profitably employed, in order to your other designs, than in reducing that county. We have taken care to have it reported to the Commons that 5,000l. is required to supply the want your forces are in, that it may be speedily provided and sent to you for their supply. We have just received information from Waller that the Princes [Rupert and Maurice] are marched westward, but should they return towards your parts we will give you timely advertisement and order supplies for you. We have, at the request of Sir Thos. Middleton, written to Sir John Gell for the continuance of the Derbyshire horse in those parts. P.S.—Since the writing of this we have received yours of the 8th, and have written to General Leslie [Leven] and to Lieut.-Genl. [David] Leslie to afford you what assistance they can with their forces about Halifax, in case the enemy's forces shall return to your quarters, whereof we desire you to give notice from time to time to Lieut.-Genl. Leslie. Sent by Sir William's messenger. [Ibid., pp. 107, 108. Copy. 1½ pp.]
April 12.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thos. Fairfax. We are informed that there are two broken troops in Surrey, Capt. Stevens' and Capt. Bruce's, both unarmed. We desire you to send for them and employ the troopers for recruits, and send the officers hither to have their accounts audited that some provision may be made for them. There are besides these five other troops, viz., those of Captains Middleton, Blachford, Swallow, Saville, and Draper, which belong to the regiments with Sir W. Waller, whom we have appointed to march hither to be joined with their regiments, and disposed of together with them. Sent by Mr. Durand. [Ibid., pp. 108, 109. Copy = 2/3 p.]
April 12.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Stafford. Although Shrewsbury is now recovered for the Parliament, there are still many garrisons in Salop remaining in the enemy's hands, and thereby that county much in their power. It is the desire of the Committee there to attempt to remove these garrisons, so we have sent to Sir Wm. Brereton to afford them what assistance he can spare, and we are informed that he has already sent some forces. We desire you also to assist them in reducing the enemy's garrisons, which, if it could be done, would tend much to your own safety; and the enemy's forces would not be so ready upon all occasions to move that way. Sent by Sir Wm. Brereton's messenger. [Ibid., p. 109. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 12.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Lancashire. To the same effect as the preceding letter to the Committee of Stafford, but with the following addition. We are also informed that by reason of the great forces recently in Cheshire, both of the enemy and our own, provisions there are very scarce, which may much prejudice the opportunities the enemy's absence give to Sir Wm. Brereton against Chester and the adjacent garrisons. We therefore desire you to give him what assistance you can of provisions as he shall signify his wants, that he may not for want thereof be taken off from the prosecution of his designs. Sent as above. [Ibid., p. 110. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 12.
Derby House.
The same to Sir John Gell. In regard of the opportunity there is of service to be done in Wales by Sir Thos. Middleton, with whom at present the horse of your county is, we desire you that those horse may still continue there to attend that service. Sir Thos. Middleton will take care to give them content and satisfaction. We have spoken to Sir John Curzon concerning it, who conceives that they may be spared for that service. We therefore desire you to send them your order to continue there. Sent by Mr. Fleetwood. [Ibid., pp. 110, 111. Copy = 2/3 p.]
April 12.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thos. Middleton. We have upon your request written to Sir John Gell that his horse may continue with you in those parts, the better to enable you to carry on that service you have in hand, and we doubt not you will both give content to them and make the best improvement of them for those parts. Sent by Sir Wm. Brereton's agent. [Ibid., p. 111. Copy. ½ p.]
April 12.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Surrey. We have appointed Captain Middleton's and four other troops of horse to march forthwith to Sir Wm. Waller, to be there employed in conjunction with those regiments to which they belong. We have also appointed Captains Stevens' and Bruce's to go to Sir Thos. Fairfax to be employed in the new [modelled] army. You are required to see that these forces be sent away and not continued there to the spoil and burden of that county and the neglect of the service appointed to them. Such of the old forces in Farnham Castle as are willing to stay are to be put under the command of Mr. Fielder, which garrison is to be further made up of such as Mr. Fielder and the Committee shall think fit. Committed to Mr. Fielder's care. [Ibid., p. 112. Copy. 1 p.]
April 12.
Derby House.
The same to Major Hurry. We are informed that you have Sir Thos. Read in your custody; carry him to the Committee at St. Alban's, who are desired to examine the whole matter concerning him, and to report the state thereof to this Committee. [Ibid., p. 113. Copy. ⅓ p.]
April 12.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Samuel Luke. We have received yours of the 11th, but considering the necessity of this service we cannot but desire you to send at least 100 horse with all expedition. We have written to the several counties for money for payment of your forces. [Ibid., p. 114. Copy. ½ p.]
April 12.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Salop. We will give you all the assistance we can for the complete reducing of that county, knowing it can contribute but little to your forces while it lies under the power of so many adverse garrisons. We had before the receipt of your letter, upon the 2nd inst., issued a warrant for 30 barrels of gunpowder, with match and bullet proportionable for the use of your garrisons. We have written to Sir Wm. Brereton to continue his forces with you and to be otherwise assistant as you shall have occasion, as also to the Committee of Stafford. We hope with their assistance you will be freed from those garrisons and have the affairs of your county put into a good posture. We are advertised that the Princes [Rupert and Maurice] are both marched westward, which we hope will be an opportunity to settle the affairs of your parts while you have no considerable enemy near you. Sent by Sir Wm. Brereton's messenger. [Ibid., pp. 114, 115. Copy. 1¼ pp.]
April 13.
Conway.
13. John Williams, Archbishop of York, to George Lord Digby, principal Secretary to the King. I have written sundry letters of late to you concerning the state of the King's affairs in these parts but unsigned, and having no reply from Oxford all this while I conceive they have miscarried, and am sorry for it. By this bearer I shall not need to write, his knowledge in those particulars being no way short of mine. He is a valiant and faithful servant of his Majesty, and has acted all that is done for the defence of Beaumaris Castle. Sir John Owen is likewise Governor of this place, and intimates a desire to have the government of this castle, which his Majesty, before any commission granted to any of the three Princes, had, upon high and dear considerations, passed over to me and my assigns, and which from bare walls I have repaired, victualed, and supplied with ammunition at mine own charges, and for which I am more likely to give his Majesty a good account than this gentleman is, who without my costs and charges was never able to have repaired the town as now it is, nor hath he any arms but what I lent him to defend it. Colonel Sandys can tell you how I set him out from this county to drive the rebels out of Denbighshire. But I know not by what means he is much abated of what he was in the esteem of these counties. I only hope he may give no worse account to his Majesty than the Bishop of York hath done for these three years; valour will not do the business, he must have prudence and experience withal, who will govern a country environed by enemies, and destitute of all money. This man professes openly he will consult no man nor join with any of his fellows and betters, the Commissioners of Array in this county, as his predecessors and the two Princes have hitherto done. If the King should deliver to you any papers received by this bearer, they are copies of petitions which these three counties have addressed to the King and Prince Rupert upon some rumours which Sir John Mennes and Wyatt, some months ago, scattered about. I beseech you to represent to the King and Prince the effect of them, and I shall pray God to put into his Majesty's heart a discerning spirit to distinguish between such as have done and suffered so much for him and his just cause, and these sharks and children of fortune, who know not how to subsist but by this foul way of lying and imposture. For myself, as I have lived so I am resolved to die, which now I expect daily, his Majesty's most faithful servant. [Seal with arms broken. 1 p.]
April 14/24.
[The Hague.]
14. Dr. [Stephen] Goff to Henry Lord Jermyn. I doubt not my letters of last week are received, and if so you perceive that the whole negotiation here depends upon full instructions how to proceed in the particular treaty of the marriage; wherein the several circumstances being understood and agreed, it will quickly appear what the Prince of Orange is at, and willing to do with the States [of the United Provinces] for the King [of England's] assistance, without the actual performance whereof, it is to be declared that the private articles shall not be signed. For this purpose, if the copies of former treaties cannot be had, it were necessary to set down particularly what houses and what dowry the Queen will prescribe for the [Dutch] Princess, and for the [marriage] portion, the lowest sum that must be admitted of, with the times of payment. Yet herein it cannot be prejudicial to leave much unto debate here, it being resolved that nothing shall be concluded till the States do fully declare in defence of the King [of England]. Whilst their hands are busy against Denmark, whither they are now sending 60 men-of-war and 6,000 foot, it cannot be expected that they should be induced to supply the King with any forces presently. Yet these things following will be in their power, and may be expected from the Prince of Orange's negotiation with them as soon as their Ambassadors return [from England]. Statement of particulars [see Ludlow's Memoirs]. It is apparent that the King must needs overcome the rebels, if he can but keep his person and the Prince [of Wales] out of their hands till his friends that are joined in league with him can send more powerful assistance. Though the [marriage] portion were as much as was demanded it would not suffice to serve the King to any effect, unless these things mentioned were likewise obtained, whereby London might be impoverished, which is and will be the fountain of all this mischief. Upon these considerations I believe you may approve what I wrote by M. D'Estrade, and send some orders accordingly for proceeding in the treaty of marriage apart from other things. It will be very necessary to write to Sir Wm. Boswell that, upon return of the Holland Ambassadors, he be instant with the States to perform the duties of their former alliances with the King. In the meantime, it is the opinion of the Prince of Orange that the business of shipping is without question the sole thing which ought to be intended by the Queen, and might probably restore the King's affairs again, though the Duke of Lorraine's voyage and the Prince of Orange's endeavours should fail. The intention of this expedition is that the whole execution is to be disposed of by the King as absolutely as if they were English ships and the commanders English, the intention being, not for P[rince] and Q[ueen], but for the honour and service of the King, for which purpose Dorp desires to have large and particular instructions. Till London be humbled the rebels can never be reduced to reason. For the garter which is designed for the young Prince it is very earnestly desired by them all [here], and shall be constantly worn by the Prince in the same manner as in England. [Written in cipher, but deciphered. This letter is printed in Ludlow's Memoirs, ed. 1751, Appendix, pp. 484–486. One copy is numbered "20," and the other which is less complete "11," showing that they formed part of the papers taken near Sherburn and submitted to Parliament on 3 Nov. 1645. One copy=4 pp. and the otherpp.]
April 14. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Manchester, Warwick, Loudoun, and Lauderdale, Lords Saye and Warristoun, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir G. Gerard, Sir A. Haselrigg, Sir Chas. Erskine, Mr. Recorder, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Crew, Wallop, Browne, Kennedy, and Barclay. Ordered,
1. That the 300 men and 400l. allotted for Duncannon be applied to the service of Munster.
2. That the Committee of Gloucester's letter be reported to both Houses of Parliament.
3. That Major-Genl. Browne's letter be referred to Saye, Crew, Browne, and Wallop, who are to confer with the gent. of the three counties [Oxon., Berks., and Bucks.].
4. That the letter to Sir Thos. Fairfax concerning Capt. Buller be despatched away.
5. To recall Major Childe with his trained bands into Kent, where he will receive directions from this or the Committee of Kent.
6. Order for Col. Ludlow to march to Croydon, where he will receive further order from this Committee.
7. The Commons to be moved to provide money to pay the forces under Waller, which are not to be reduced, and that they be paid at the same time as those which are to be reduced.
8. That two members of the Committee of the Militia be desired to be here at 3 o'clock.
Afternoon sitting.
9. That the letter from the Governor of Poole be referred to the Committee of the West, to give their opinion. To write to the Earl of Leven.
10. To write to Lord Fairfax, desiring him to send what forces he can spare to the assistance of Sir Wm. Brereton, and those to be the best of his horse.
11. To press Col. Purefoy to speed the horse away to Gloucester, which is to be done by a letter to the Committee at Coventry.
12. A letter to the Committee of Lancashire and Staffordshire to take order that their foot march presently to Sir Wm. Waller, money being sent to them.
13. That an abstract of the letters of news from Scotland concerning the defeat given to James Graham, sometime Earl of Montrose, be reported to the House [of Commons].
14. That the Committee of the West be desired to be here to-morrow at 8 a.m.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 192, 193. Copy. 2 pp.]
April 14.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Anthony Weldon and the rest of the Committee of Kent. We have appointed horse and dragoons to march to Croydon, and will send thither further supplies, being very apprehensive of the great mischiefs that may grow from small beginnings. The western gentlemen who think themselves much beholding to your county readily consented to Col. Ludlow, who is in their pay, going to your assistance. He will be to-morrow at Croydon to receive further order as there shall be occasion. The Houses of Parliament are upon settling martial law, and we doubt not will give redress upon all just complaints against the officers of Excise. [Interregnum 20 E., pp. 115, 116. Copy=2/3 p.]
April 14.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thos. Fairfax. We send enclosed Capt. Buller's propositions, and considering the necessity of increasing the forces of horse at Gloucester, we desire that the said Captain and his troop may be speeded thither as well as the rest of the forces which are to go from the garrisons mentioned in our former letters. Not doubting but this captain, whose valour is well known, may be very useful in this service, the emergent necessity whereof you are already sufficiently informed of. As for the second part of his propositions, the same is herewith referred wholly to your consideration to do thereupon as you may think best. Sent by Capt. Buller. [Ibid., p. 116. Copy. ½ p.]
April 14.
Derby House.
The same to Major Childe. Upon information just received of commotions in Kent, which if neglected might cause some dangerous effects; we therefore desire you to march back with the trained bands of Kent under your command, and there obey such further directions as you shall receive from this Committee or that of Kent. Sent by Mr. Butler. [Ibid., p. 117. Copy. ½ p.]
April 14.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thos. Fairfax. We send a copy of the Committee of Kent's letter communicating intelligence of an insurrection there. They are not many as yet, but are like to increase if not speedily suppressed. We know not of any horse near and fit for service, except those in your army, and therefore desire you to send to Croydon two troops of horse and 100 dragoons of those that may be soonest there. We write earnestly herein because a far greater strength may be too little if these should [not] come with all speed. Sent by Mr. Hanbury at noon. [Ibid. ½ p.]
April 15.
Guildhall.
15. Orders of the Common Council held this day at Guildhall. By Ordinance of Parliament, 3 Dec. 1644, 5,482l. 10s. 3d. is charged upon the City and liberties monthly, for six months commencing from 1 Nov. last, to pay the charge of fortifications and guards, and for satisfying the great debts thereby already incurred and other necessary uses. It is hereby ordered that Mr. Alderman Langham, appointed Treasurer for receipt of this money, shall issue out the same by warrants to be signed by 7 or more of the Committee of Arrears, sitting at Weavers' Hall, whom this Court doth hereby appoint a Committee for that purpose. They are to call before them the collectors from time to time, in order to hasten the paying in of this money to the Treasurer, they are also empowered to examine what is owing to the gunners and matrosses, the timber merchants, carpenters, bricklayers, and others employed about the fortifications in and about London, and into the sums due to innholders for baiting horses, &c., who have petitioned for payment of their arrears and so to direct their warrants to the Treasurer for payment of 1,000l. to the gunners and matrosses, and to the innholders a third part of their debts. The Committee are also to deliver unto this Court in writing an account of what is justly owing to the said petitioners. Further, it is ordered that this Committee do give like warrant to the said Treasurer for payment of 1,000l. to the Committee of Fortifications to be paid by them to such as they think fittest amongst the said creditors and artificers. Likewise that a third part of the money to be raised by virtue of the late Ordinance shall be paid for and towards the raising and maintaining of the forces for guarding of the forts in and about the City, and that the Committee of Arrears do periodically direct their warrants for this purpose to the Treasurer. These payments are to continue till this Court shall take further order therein. Ordered further, that the Committee of Arrears shall forthwith lay out 500l. for gunpowder to the City's use, to be repaid out of the money to be raised upon this Ordinance for fortifications. [Certified copy=2 pp.]
April 15. 16. Order of the Committee of the Navy that the Commissioners of the Navy do give present order for the St. Andrew, being appointed for one of this summer's fleet, to be carried into the Downs. [⅓ p.]
April 15. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, Manchester, Lauderdale, and Loudoun, Lords Saye, Wharton, and Warristoun, Sir H. Vane, senr, Sir A. Haselrigg, Sir Ph. Stapleton, Mr. Recorder, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Crew, Kennedy, and Barclay. Ordered,
1. That the regiments which were under Cols. Dalbier and Behre shall forthwith march to Col. Massie, from whom they are to receive orders.
2. That Major Hurry and the Scots under him shall be excepted from going to Gloucester.
3. To inform Sir Thos. Fairfax of those two regiments being sent to Gloucester.
4. Warrant to supply them with 150 pairs of pistols.
5. That the Government of the [Eastern] Association do consider of the propositions of the Lincolnshire gents. and give their opinions when they are desired to attend this Committee on Friday.
6. To write to the Lord Mayor of York to receive what money comes in upon the Ordinance for the Scots.
7. To report to the Commons that money be provided out of Haberdashers' Hall for the 150 pairs of pistols and 100 saddles for the horse ordered away to Gloucester.
8. That the servants of Lord Brabazon and Sir Henry Tichborne be at liberty [to go] out of the Peterhouse [prison] to attend on their masters in the Tower, so as they remain there.
9. To inform Sir Thos. Fairfax that we have no further use of those horse and dragoons which were desired of him for Croydon.
10. To write to Col. Ludlow so to dispose his horse about Guildford, that they may intercept any of the Kentish runaways coming that way, and when apprehended to send them up.
11. To move both Houses to send to the Committee of Kent a commission for martial law, and to enable them to execute such of the late rebels as they shall apprehend and may judge necessary.
12. For a letter of thanks to the Committee of Kent, noticing their care in suppressing the late commotion, and promising a commission of martial law.
13. To consider on Friday the providing of arms to be in readiness for disposal by this Committee.
14. That Captains Bernard's and Sadler's troops [of horse] be sent to reinforce Malmesbury garrison, and that their recruiting be left to the Committee of the West.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 194, 195. Copy. 2 pp.]
April 15.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Lieut. Genl. [David] Leslie. Since our last to you of the 12th we have received intelligence from Coventry of the return of Princes Rupert and Maurice toward Chester and those parts, whereof we enclose a copy. We earnestly desire you to return thither for the assistance of Sir Wm. Brereton, whereof your readiness to advance on the last occasion and the good service done by you while there give us very good confidence that you will perform this with all expedition. We have written to the adjacent counties to take care to send you provisions, and to Lord Fairfax to send all the forces he can spare for that service, these to be of his best armed men and ablest to do service. We are also sending a considerable force to Col. Massie for diversion of the enemy's attention. Sent by the ordinary post. [Interregnum 20 E., p. 118. Copy. 1 p.]
April 15.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Warwick. We before wrote to you to send 200 horse to Col. Massie, signifying of what importance this service was to the public. If your proportion be not already with Col. Massie, send them without further delay to such place as the Colonel shall appoint. [Ibid., p. 120. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 15.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Wm. Brereton. We received this day a letter from Coventry, signifying the return of Princes Rupert and Maurice toward your quarters, of which we enclose a copy. Upon consideration hereof we have seconded our former letters to General Leslie [Earl of Leven] and to Lieut.-General [David] Leslie for the return of that party [of their army] lately with you, for your assistance. We have also written to Lord Fairfax and the Committee of Lancashire to send what forces they can spare, and the House [of Commons] has appointed 5,000l. to be provided out of the credit of the Excise for the encouragement of your forces, which will be speedily sent. Care has likewise been taken by the Commons and by this Committee to direct the adjacent counties to send you provisions. We are also sending a considerable party to Col. Massie for diversion of the enemy. Sent by his own messenger. [Ibid., p. 121. Copy. 1 p.]
April 15.
Derby House.
The same to the Earl of Leven. Since our last of the 12th we have received a letter from Coventry giving notice of the return of the Princes Rupert and Maurice toward Chester. We earnestly desire your Lordship to order that party under the command of Lieut.-Genl. Leslie, lately with Sir Wm. Brereton, to return for his assistance. The rest to the same effect as the preceding. Sent by Sir Wm. Brereton's messenger. [Ibid., p. 122. Copy. 1 p.]
April 15.
Derby House.
The same to [Ferdinando] Lord Fairfax. Return of the Princes Rupert and Maurice toward Chester. We have written to General Leslie for the return of that party [of the Scotts' army] now about Halifax for Brereton's assistance. We desire you to send with them all the forces you can spare for that service, which you know to be of very great consequence, not only to the safety of the northern parts, but of the whole kingdom. We do the rather press this matter, as for the present we have no forces to send from these parts to their assistance. We desire you to send at least so many as were formerly with Sir Wm. Brereton, and those to be of your best armed and ablest men to do service. We are also sending a considerable force to Col. Massie for diversion of the enemy. [Ibid., p. 123. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 15.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Lancashire. Return of the Princes Rupert and Maurice toward Chester. We doubt not but you understand how much the forces sent by the Scots and Lord Fairfax to Brereton's assistance may contribute to the safety of those parts, and particularly in relation to your county. We therefore desire you to use all expedition in the sending of all manner of provisions required by them, which your county can afford, and which those parts whither they are to march cannot supply by reason of their present barrenness. We likewise desire, since money is appointed you for that service, that your foot do march up forthwith for Sir Wm. Brereton's assistance. [Ibid., pp. 123, 124. Copy= 1 p.]
April 15.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Stafford. To the same effect as the preceding, but with the omission of the last clause concerning the march of the Lancashire foot. [Ibid. Minute.]
April 15.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thos. Fairfax. We understand by Mr. Crew your willingness that the regiments of Commissary-General Behre and Col. Dalbier should be employed to go to Col. Massie. We have accordingly ordered those two regiments to march thither, with the exception of Major Hurry's troop and the Scotchmen under his command, of which we thought good to give you notice. Delivered to him in town. [Ibid., pp. 124, 125. Copy=2/3 p.]
April 15.
Derby House.
The same to Col. Ludlow. The soldiers lately pressed in Kent have broken out into rebellion, and intend, as we are informed, to take their course toward Surrey. We desire you to draw your forces toward Guildford, and wait upon their motions upon the downs, and such as you shall light upon send hither to be dealt with as there may be cause. Sent by Mr. Gardner. [Ibid., p. 125. Copy. ⅓ p.]
April 15.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thos. Fairfax. We have received intelligence that the rebels of Kent are in some measure dispersed, therefore your horse and dragoons ordered to Croydon may be recalled and disposed of as you please. Sent to him, being then in town. [Ibid., p. 127. Copy. ½ p.]
April 16.
Paris.
17. Sir Thos. Bellasis, Viscount Fauconberg, to his son, John Lord Bellasis, at Oxford. This gentleman, your near kinsman, hath done his Majesty extraordinarily good service, and is not yet resolved whether he will continue his sea service or serve by land. He is understanding and valiant, and fit to have a colonel's place under you if you get a command. Many such men would beat back the false Scots. I pray you respect him well, and let him acquaint you with his desires.
April 16. 18. Petition of Francis Bickley to the Committee of Lords and Commons for Sequestrations. That Henry Jay, late of London, then and now Gentleman Usher to Prince [Charles], in 1640 entered into a bond of 500l. for payment of 250l. on a day now past. But petitioner, taking a house of Mr. Jay in the City of the rent of 40l. per annum, it was arranged that petitioner should repay himself by reserving the rent as it became due. Petitioner has always adhered to the Parliament, and has disbursed 1,200l. at least for their service. The Committee of London having lately sequestered the rent of the said house, he has no means by which he can reimburse himself his just debt. Prays that it may be referred to a member of this Committee to examine the whole matter and certify you the truth, that order may be made for his relief, and in the meantime all proceedings to be stayed. [Damaged by damp. 2/3 p.]
April 16. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Essex, Manchester Warwick, Loudoun, and Lauderdale, Lords Saye and Wharton, Sir Ph. Stapleton, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir A: Haselrigg, Sir G. Gerard, Sir Chas. Erkine, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Crew, Kennedy, and Barclay. Ordered,
1. To report to the Commons that a fortnight's pay be provided for the regiments late under Behre and Dalbier, but which are now to be employed to Col. Massie.
2. That commissions be drawn up for Capts. Buller and Salkeld to be majors of these regiments severally.
3. That Capt. Pym's troop be reduced into Major Salkeld's troop.
4. To write to the Committee at Newcastle to take notice of the discontent in Westmoreland, and be careful that no discontent be given by the country to the Scots' army, which we doubt not will be shortly upon their march into the south.
5. The like letter to be written to Lord Fairfax and the Committee at York to take care that there may be no discontent given to the Scots in their march, as the Scots' Commissioners here have promised they shall be as little burdensome to the country as possible.
6. To report to the House to inform themselves of the state of the 10,000l. at Goldsmith's Hall, and to quicken its sending to the Scots.
7. Likewise to see that the Committee of Provisions for Cheshire do increase the proportions, as the Scots' forces may be appointed speedily to march that way.
8. Resolved upon the question,—That it is the opinion of this Committee that the commission granted by the Earl of Essex to Sir John Norwich to be Governor of Rockingham Castle is good and valid, not meddling concerning the choice.
9. That the gent. of the west do attend and speak with this Committee about the business of the west, and that Mr. Solicitor [St. John] do go to the House [of Commons] for that purpose.
Afternoon sitting.
10. That the Lord Chancellor, Sir H. Vane, and Mr. Crew do draw up some heads touching the Dutch Ambassadors, for a preparation to be sent to Mr. [Walter] Strickland on Friday evening.
11. That the sub-committee [for Foreign Affairs] do meet about the declaration touching the States' [of the United Provinces] Ambassadors, whereof the Solicitor [General] is to take care to bring the same to this Committee as soon as he can.
12. To write to Col. Ludlow to return to his quarters about Farnham.
13. That Mr. Cromwell, Mr. Knightley, and Mr. Hammond have liberty to carry into Holland such common soldiers, prisoners to the Parliament, as shall be willing to go thither and serve under their command, provided that they send over [with] them officers for that purpose; and that Sir Gilbert Gerard do give notice hereof to Mr. [Walter] Strickland, and that this Committee is desirous to put any respect they can upon Lieut.-Col. Killegrew, but cannot condescend to the recruiting of that regiment from hence in manner aforesaid, the colonel thereof being now in arms against the Parliament, but would be willing thereunto if that regiment were under the command of Lieut.-Col. Killegrew.
14. That the English and Latin letter to the Queen of Sweden be sent to the Speakers of both Houses to be signed, and afterwards to the Scottish Commissioners, that it may be sent away.
15. That the letter from Lewes of the 10th April be sent to the gents. of cos. Surrey, Sussex, and Hants.
16. That the Earl of Northumberland do show the letter of 12th April from Lewes to the [Committee of] Lords and Commons appointed for providing fit persons for the void places of those who were members of the House [of Commons].
17. That Capt. Ramsay's be paid the same as other troops employed in the like service.
18. That the three papers of the Scottish Commissioners concerning the army in Ireland, ships, and the Scottish officers be reported to both Houses.
19. Likewise that answer may be returned to the many papers given in by the Commissioners of Scotland concerning the goods of the Earl of Roxburgh.
20. Mem.—That Mr. Frost de send to Sir H. Vane, senr., to-morrow morning the letter and paper from Grocers' Hall.
21. The Committee to meet at 8 o'clock to-morrow, when the Committee of the West be desired to attend.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 196–198. Copy. 3 pp.]
April 16.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to the Treasurers at Grocers' Hall. We are informed some money has been collected in Derbyshire and other parts for Ireland, but as there will be trouble and danger in bringing up the money we desire you to give order to the collectors there to pay it to such persons as Mr. Davis, or his partners Thos. Rodbard and John Cheston, will undertake for, and upon the producing of whose receipts for the same they will here give you their own receipts, by which means there will be less delay in payment of those moneys. As money shall come in out of the several counties let it be paid out upon the several warrants, that there be no discouragement given to Mr. Davis and his partners. We desire that he may be compensated, for the money improperly diverted for other payments, out of the London money, so that the agreement made with him may be made good to him. Sent by Mr. Rodbard. [Interregnum 20 E., pp. 125, 126. Copy. 1⅓ pp.]
April 16.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of both kingdoms [in the Scottish army] at Newcastle. We are informed by Lord Fairfax and the Committee at York of some distempers lately grown in Westmoreland amongst the people there against some of the Scots' soldiers, which, if it should continue or increase, might prove of very ill consequence. We therefore desire that all endeavours may be used to pacify and quiet them. We hope the Scots' army will very speedily be ready to march southward, the exigencies both of the north and south requiring it, and then those quarters will be freed of those burdens which are unavoidably incident to the long stay of an army in any place. We hope therefore the people will the better be persuaded to bear that which will lie upon them but for a short time. We desire that the soldiers may be persuaded to be moderate in their demands that they be not further burdensome than of necessity they must. We are very sensible of the great pressure on the country, and are also sorry that any affronts or discontent should be given to the soldiers. We recommend it especially to your care to endeavour the composure thereof by all fair means. Sent by Mr. Bulmer that night. [Ibid., pp. 127, 128. Copy. 1½ pp.]
April 16.
Derby House.
The same to Ferdinando Lord Fairfax and the Committee [at York]. We have received yours of the 13th, giving notice of some distempers lately arisen amongst the people of Westmoreland against the Scots' soldiers, which we conceive may be of very ill consequence if it be not speedily appeased, for which purpose we have written to the Committee of both kingdoms at Newcastle [requesting them] to endeavour the composure thereof. It would be very disadvantageous to the public affairs should the people of your county follow this example now, especially when the Scots' army is about to march southward, we therefore desire you to take especial care that no affronts or discontents may be given them in their passage southward. We know it cannot be expected but that where armies do march there will be some unavoidable burdens upon the country, but we hope it will be endured with the less reluctancy when it is not to continue. The Commissioners of Scotland here resident have written to the commanders of that army to take especial care that the army may not burden the people in their passage beyond what they must of necessity. We trust that by your and their care their march shall be speedily accomplished through your county without any discontent on either part. Sent by Mr. Bulmer at night. [Ibid., pp. 128, 129. Copy. 1¼ pp.]
April 16.
Derby House.
The same to Captain Buller. In regard of the opportunity there is of some service to be done by Col. Massie, we have thought fit to increase his forces. We desire you therefore to march forthwith with the [two] regiments which were lately under the command of Commissary-General Behre and Col. Dalbier, excepting only Major Hurry and the Scotchmen of his troop, to the assistance of Col. Massie, whose orders you are to follow. Given to himself, being then in town. [Ibid., p. 130. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 17. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, Warwick, Manchester, and Loudoun, Lords Saye, Wharton, and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, Sir Ph. Stapleton, Sir G. Gerard, Sir A. Haselrigg, Sir Chas. Erskine, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Crew, Wallop, Kennedy, and Barclay. Ordered,
1. To report to the Commons how far the Committee proceeded concerning the printing of the paper given in by the Dutch Ambassador. They have examined the printer, who produced a warrant of one Mabbot to print it, and he avows that the Ambassador's secretary would have it printed.
2. To consider to-morrow the business concerning trade between this kingdom and the Dutch.
3. Warrant to Erle for 50 barrels of gunpowder, with match and bullet proportionable, to be delivered to Sir Arthur Owen for General Langherne's forces, according to the Commons' order of 24th March.
4. Warrant to Erle for 100 barrels of gunpowder out of the Tower for the use of Sir Thos. Fairfax's army to be again supplied by the Committee for the Army.
5. This Committee is of opinion that 3,000 foot cannot at present be sent to Salisbury.
6. That after these forces be reduced, a sufficient strength shall be sent into the west.
7. That such proportion of horse and foot shall be maintained in the west as this Committee, after conference with the Committee of the West, shall agree upon.
8. To write to Sir Thos. Fairfax to send to Waller to bring his forces from Salisbury to some place near his where they may best be reduced.
9. To write to Waller to that effect. That such [of his forces] as are not [to be incorporated] in the new army shall be employed in the service of the west, and shall have like present pay as the rest have. That he send what foot can be spared to strengthen the garrisons so that they belong not to the two regiments. That the Plymouth horse shall receive orders from the Committee of the West.
Afternoon sitting.
10. Warrant for 26 days' pay for the Ulster officers.
11. That Mr. Annesley and Sir Robt. King be desired to go into the City to hasten the coming in of the money.
12. That the Ulster officers be desired to attend on Tuesday next.
13. That the Clerks of both Houses be desired to send to Mr. Weckherlin, for the present use of the Committee, such papers concerning the Dutch Ambassador as have not yet been sent unto him.
14. That the two papers given in by the Scots' Commissioners, the one concerning the ships for guarding the seas between Ireland and Scotland, and the other the Scottish officers, be to morrow reported to the House of Commons, as also the Earl of Roxburgh's paper.
15. To write to the officer in command of Capt. Abercrombie's dragoons to march to Henley-on-Thames to strengthen that garrison.
16. That the Earl of Warwick do recommend the petition of John Todde to the Judge of the Admiralty, and see that Capt. Plunkett make restitution to the petitioner.
17. That the drakes now at Henley be left at Phillis Court for the defence of that place.
18. To write to Sir Thos. Fairfax to inform Browne that there are [only] a few musketeers in Sherborne House, which, if he shall think fit to take, then Sir Thomas to supply him with some of his horse. To notify the same to Major-Genl. Browne.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 199–201. Copy. 3 pp.]
April 17.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Wm. Waller. For the more convenience and security of reducing the forces under your command, we have thought fit they should be brought from Salisbury towards Reading to such place as Sir Thos. Fairfax shall appoint, whither you are to march accordingly. A copy of what we have written to Sir Thomas we send enclosed. The officers who are to be reduced, but who are not to be of the new army, shall have the same pay upon their reduction as the other officers who are [not] reduced. They are to be recommended to the Committee of the West to employ such of them as they may have occasion to use. We desire you to send such foot as you can spare for the security of the garrisons, especially of Poole and Wareham, so that they be not of those two regiments which are to be of the new army. The regiment of Plymouth horse will receive orders from the Committee of the West. Sent by Mr. Jennings. [Interregnum 20 E., pp. 130, 131. Copy= 1 p.]
April 17.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thos. Fairfax. To the same effect as the preceding. In making choice of the rendezvous for Waller's forces we desire you to select such place as they may have the best accommodation that may be of what is necessary for them. Send word by this messenger to Sir William of the place appointed, to which we have written to him to march accordingly. We desire all possible expedition may be used in the reduction of the armies, and your own recruited and completed, so that it may be speedily in a posture for the execution of what is designed. The enemy must not have more time given them to increase their forces, which they are endeavouring to do with all diligence. Sent by Mr. Jennings. [Ibid., pp. 131, 132. Copy=1¼ pp.]
April 18. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, Warwick, Manchester, and Loudoun, Lord Warristone, and Sir G. Gerard. No committee this day for want of a member [to complete the quorum]. A letter was sent to Mr. [Walter] Strickland. [Interregnum 8 E., pp. 202. Minute. ⅓ p.]
April 18.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Captain Sadler. In regard of the good use there may be made of some more force about Malmesbury, we have in addition to Capt. Nicholas's troop determined to send thither your's and Capt. Bernard's, which are to remain there for the service of that garrison. You are to march thither and receive orders from the Governor there. [Interregnum 20 E., p. 133. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 18. The like letter to Capt. Bernard, mutatis mutandis. [Ibid. Minute.]
April 19. 19. Order of the Lords and Commons. That Sir Henry Vane, senr., be added to the Committees or Commissioners of both kingdoms appointed to reside with the Scots' army. [½ p.]
April 19. 20. Return made by those of Offord-Cluney, in Hunts., of the money due for soldiers quartered there from 10 March till 19 April 1645. Subjoined,
20. i. Order by the Committee at Huntingdon. That Mr. Fullwood, the Treasurer, do pay to Francis Bladwick, of Huntingdon, 56l. 17s. 8d. for payment of the several quarters mentioned, which he is immediately to discharge. April 29.
20. ii. Receipt of Francis Bladwick for 42l. 13s. 3d., being three parts of the sum above specified, received of Gervase Fullwood for discharge of the soldiers' quarters at OffordCluney. June 21, 1645. [Damaged by damp. 4 pp.]
April 19. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earl of Manchester, Lord Saye, [other names not filled in]. Ordered,
1. To inform the garrisons of the west of the necessity for retreating the forces at Salisbury in order that they may be reduced and return to the west with a greater strength.
2. To write to Col. Cooke to receive orders from Col. Massie.
3. To report to the Commons that whereas the 1,000l. ordered for payment of such horse as were to go from the garrisons of Aylesbury, Newport Pagnell, Northampton, and Warwick, is now transferred to the payment of Buller's and Salkeld's forces, it will be necessary that another 1,000l. be provided instead thereof.
4. To write to Sir Wm. Brereton [to see] that the forces sent into Wales make distinction between such as are friends to the Parliament and others; and that care be taken to prevent plundering for the future.
5. To send to the Committee of the army to know if Sir Thos. Fairfax be willing that Capt. Humphreys should come to Phillis Court, and if so, then to give direction to him to march hither with his company.
6. To write to Sir Thos. Fairfax to take care that cos. Bucks., Berks., and Oxon. may be preserved as much as may be from spoil and plunder, they having suffered so much by both armies.
7. That the sub-committee appointed to examine into the intercepting of the letters of the Scottish Commissioners make report on Monday.
8. That the letter concerning appointing a Governor of Chichester and the petition concerning a Governor for Arundel be sent to the Committee of Lords and Commons for filling the vacant places of the members of the Houses.
9. Mem.—To send to the Earl of Warwick to take the chair on Monday morning.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 202, 203. Copy. 1⅓ pp.]
April 19.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Wm. Brereton. Considering of what concernment it is to advance all that may be the carrying on of the war in Ireland against the rebels there, and of what importance to this kingdom to make an effectual diversion of them from hence by keeping them employed at home, we have thought fit, at the desire of this gentleman, Sir Francis Hamilton, to desire you to give him your best assistance in procuring so many volunteers as you may conceive fit to be permitted to go over with him into Ireland for the completing of his regiment there, and to afford him so many and such prisoners as shall be willing, upon the taking of the Covenant, to go along with him and take service there in his regiment, being such as you conceive may be trusted for that employment. We also desire you to permit him to carry over such horses as he may have occasion to transport, either for his own use or for serving the necessities of his regiment, so that it may not be to the prejudice of those parts. Sent by Sir Francis Hamilton. [Interregnum 20 E., pp. 133, 134. Copy=1 p.]
April 19.
Derby House.
The same to Col. Massie. The better to enable you to make use of such opportunities against the enemy as may be offered, we have taken care to furnish you with 600 horse under Col. Cooke, and nine troops under Majors Buller and Salkeild, besides one troop from Aylesbury, two from Newport [Pagnell], 100 horse from Northampton, and 200 from Warwickshire, some of which we hope have already come unto you and the rest on their march, all having direction from us to follow your orders. We doubt not you will make the best improvement of them you can, and being thus supplied will be able to give a good account of those parts. Sent by Mr. Cox's care. [Ibid., pp. 134, 135. Copy=1 p.]
April 19.
Derby House.
The same to the Sub-committee at Grocers' Hall. The provisions to be made for Ireland with the 80,000l. being all shipped away, and nothing wanting for the despatch of the officers, who have long attended here, to their several charges, but payment of the ready money that is appointed for them and their soldiers, we desire you to use what means you can for the advance of so much as may pay those warrants which shall be brought to you, there being no money yet come in to the Treasury for that purpose. The season is like to be lost, and that kingdom also, unless there be present course taken to put those forces in the field, which the [officers] cannot possibly do without their supplies. We hereby do empower you to treat with such as may presently furnish [4,000l., in margin], allowing 8 per cent. interest until it can be repaid. The exigency of this affair is so great as we know you cannot but be very sensible of it, and doubt not you will so act in it as with all expedition to effect it. [Ibid., pp. 135, 136. Copy. 1½ pp.]
April 19.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thos. Fairfax. We are informed that there are only a few of the enemy's musketeers in Sherborne [House], and if it were taken in it would be of use towards blocking up Oxford. If Major-Genl. Browne shall send any foot to take that house we desire you to assist him with some of your horse. This we leave wholly to your judgment as you shall see cause. [Ibid., p. 137. Copy. ½ p.]
April 19.
Derby House.
The same to the Commander of the dragoons lately Captain Abercrombie's. The Lord General has already sent you orders to march with the company of dragoons under your charge to Henley [on Thames], but we are informed that you have not yet started, and therefore write to order you to march at once to Henley, where you will receive further orders from the Governor of that garrison. [Ibid.,p. 137. Copy. ½ p.]
April 19.
Derby House.
The same to Col. Cooke. We wrote to Sir Wm. Waller to send you with 600 horse to Col. Massie for service in those parts, where we hope you are now, and doubt not but you will in all things endeavour to promote the public service, especially in that county. We have given order to Col. Massie to take the command both of them and of other forces, you will therefore follow his orders and directions in that service. [Ibid., p. 138. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 19.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee [of the West] and [to the] Governors of Poole, Wareham, Weymouth, Lyme [Regis], and Taunton. That you might not misapprehend the cause of the retreat of Sir Wm. Waller's forces on this side Salisbury and receive discontentment thereby, we would let you know that they are retreated only for the more convenience of reducing them, and only for that time, and that in order to the settling of a constant force for the future service of the west. We intend providing for those parts according to their present exigency, and therefore desire you to take courage to yourselves, and to animate those about you, for this retreat is in no sort to desert you, but that there may be a speedy and more effectual relief sent unto you, of which you may assure yourselves. We shall in no sort be unmindful of nor be wanting in anything wherein we may assure your safety. Sent by a messenger from the House [of Commons]. [Ibid., pp. 138, 139. Copy=1 p.]
April 19.
Derby House.
The same to Major-Genl. Browne. We are informed that Sherborne House is a suitable place for a garrison to straiten and block up Oxford, and that at present it is kept only by a few musketeers. If you judge it convenient to be taken in and garrisoned, and shall for that purpose employ some foot, we have written to Sir Thos. Fairfax to favour you in that enterprise with some of his horse. If you give him notice of your intention herein we conceive the affair may succeed, but this we leave to your own judgment. Sent by Mr. Crips. [Ibid., pp. 139, 140. Copy= 2/3 p.]
April 20. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland and Lauderdale, Viscount Saye, Sir Henry Vane, senr., Sir P. Stapleton, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Crew, Browne, Kennedy, and Barclay. Ordered,
1. To write to the Committee of Kent to inform themselves of the reasons of the coming away of these troops of Sir Michael Livesley's [Livesay's] from Sir Wm. [Waller] and in such manner, and to acquaint this Committee. Likewise to quarter them for some few days, so as they may not straggle, till further order.
2. To write to Lieut.-Genl. Cromwell (upon information that horse is come to Oxford to bring the King and his ordnance from hence), that he, with his regiment and such other forces as are under his command, as also with Col. Fiennes' regiment, do march to lie betwixt [Oxford and London] and hinder the said enemies, doing upon them all [the execution] he can. Likewise that he keep good correspondence about the same, for their mutual assistance, with Col. Massie and Major-Genl. Browne.
[3.] To write to the same effect both to Cols. Massie and Browne.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., p. 202, 203. Copy =2/3 p.]
April 20.
York House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Lieut.-Genl. Cromwell. Being informed that the enemy have mounted their ordnance at Oxford, and that Prince Maurice is come thither with 1,000 horse to convey his Majesty and those ordnance to join with the forces of the two Princes in Hereford and Worcester shires, and considering of what advantage it would be to the public to prevent this design of the enemy we have thought fit to employ in that service your two regiments, Col. Fiennes' and the rest of that party which went with you into the west. We therefore desire you to take those forces into your charge, and marching the nearest way for interposing between the party from Oxford and the forces about Hereford and Worcester, to hinder the passing of those ordnance and to take all advantages you can against the enemy for the public good. We desire you also to hold correspondence with Major-Genl. Browne and Col. Massie, who will be ready to take all occasions to advance this service. Sent by John Priestley. [Interregnum 20 E., pp. 140, 141. Copy. 1¼ pp.]
April 20.
York House.
The same to Sir Thos. Fairfax. Having received intelligence that Prince Maurice with 1,000 horse is come to Oxford to conduct from thence his Majesty and the ordnance to their other forces about Hereford and Worcester, we have given orders to Lieut.Genl. Cromwell, the copy of which we send enclosed, Sent as above. [Ibid., p. 141, Copy. ½ p.]
April 20.
York House.
The same to Col. Massie. Prince Maurice has come to Oxford to conduct the King and his cannon towards his forces in Worcestershire. We conceive it of importance to prevent that juncture [of the enemy's forces], and therefore have appointed Col. Cromwell to march with a considerable body of horse between Oxford and Gloucester. We know you are best acquainted both with that country and with the present posture of the enemy, and therefore desire you to write immediately your opinion to Col. Cromwell to what place he were best to march, and likewise your opinion to him in any other thing which may conduce to his advantage in that service. Give him what assistance you can with your forces upon all occasions. Besides these forces under Col. Cromwell, we have ordered the three regiments of Cols. Behre, Dalbier, and Cooke, with horse out of several garrisons to come to stay under your command. Sent by Thos. Pidcock next morning at 9 a.m., and a duplicate by Mr. Potter. [Ibid., pp. 142, 143. Copy. 12/3 pp.]
April 20.
York House.
The same to Major-Genl. Browne. To the same effect as the preceding. We have written to Cromwell to take with him his two regiments of horse and Col. Fiennes' regiment, and to use his best endeavours for hindering the passage of those ordnance and the junction of that party with the rest of the enemy's forces. Correspond with him and give what assistance you can in this service. Sent on the 21st by Mr. Gardner. [Ibid., p. 143. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 20.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Kent. Understanding that some of your troops are come away from the army and marched into Kent, we thought it necessary to desire you speedily to inform yourselves of the cause of their coming away and communicate the same to us. What horse you shall find to be thus returned you must take care to quarter so that they may neither disband nor straggle, but be kept together for some few days until further order. We desire you to enquire after Sir Michael Livesay, Capt. Hoskins, and Capt. Owen, and if they be in Kent send them up to this Committee, that upon their fuller information, such further course may be taken as shall be requisite. [Ibid., p. 144. Copy. 1 p.]
April 21./May 1.
[The Hague.]
21. Extract of Dr. Stephen Goff's letter to Henry Lord Jermyn, by whom it was sent to Lord Digby. [See May 2/12]. I have discovered this last week a thing which hath perhaps given me all the impediments I have met with, and is, without doubt, the cause of the sudden and positive demand which Hugh made me from the Prince of Orange. It is the overture of the match [of the Dutch Princess] with [the Marquis of] Brandenburg revived and pursued now these last weeks by an express from the Marquis. [The messenger] returned last Wednesday in all haste with order to bring the Marquis of Brandenburg to Cleue [Cleves] or thereabouts by the end of this month, for which purpose he said he would ride day and night. This is, that you may be assured of the party himself having discovered the whole business of Monsr. Hemfleet, who with much passion for the King's interest told me what he had found, and afterwards, as it was concerted between us, made the same relation to the Princess of Orange, and said that he had it from me. She was extremely amazed, as he says, how I could get knowledge thereof, but in conclusion confessed the thing. How far the business hath proceeded appears not yet, but by what the Prince of Orange discovered last night with me I am confident that nothing is done to the prejudice of the Prince of Wales's pretensions, nor shall be if our demands can be performed by them with ease, I say with ease, for I cannot promise any violence and hazard of ruin to effect it. Notwithstanding all this I do hope, upon particular instructions, to give a better account of the business, however, it shall clearly appear that there was perfect integrity on her Majesty's part, and that the frustration did wholly owe itself to them, not so much for want of desire, for that is not to be doubted of, but that they did not endeavour to effect those things which were most reasonable for the King to demand, and perhaps not impossible for them to do in the opinion of all that shall come hereafter to examine what hath passed.
The Prince of Orange, with many testimonies of his great desire of the honour of it, fell to speak of the Garter, and in sum professed how glorious an addition it will be to him and his son, and if it may be sent by the beginning of this campaign, that his son, who hath the honour to be allied to the King [of England], will think himself, as long as he lives, much honoured in wearing that Order after the manner that it is worn in England, wherein he was very particular in describing the several marks used, and gave me an account of his own election to that Order, which was managed with so much insolency by the Ambassador [Sir Dudley] Carlton, that it is easy to collect what was the cause of his not wearing it at first, and because not at first, never since; he added likewise that Henry IVth wore it always. He adviseth that a letter should be written from the King after the usual manner under the signet to the States [General], wherein his Majesty may be pleased to express the honour he hath done his son-in-law; such a letter was written concerning Prince Maurice and himself, and is to be kept by the States; this ought to be presented by Sir Wm. Boswell if no Ambassador be here, and after that either a herald, with the robes and the Order, should be sent with Sir W. Boswell into the field, where it may be done with more triumph, as he says, or in sending [it] to Sir W. Boswell an excuse may be made for deferring the formalities and the Order [be] worn presently. I told the Prince that I hoped after the return of the Dutch Ambassadors our affairs here would be in so good a condition that it would be necessary for Lord Jermyn to appear here as Ambassador, not only to present that but to conclude all other affairs which he said he hoped, and that now in short time we should see what was to be expected from hence, with which after many kind promises he ended. Since my writing this letter I have been with the Prince of Orange, where I find such coldness and objections, now that the portion is like to be accorded, against the whole business, public and private, that I believe what I write has taken place and our business is at an end. [Sent in Lord Jermyn's letter to Lord Digby of 2/12 May. It is endorsed, "Received 17th of May, read 3 Nov. 1645," and numbered "18 & 140," showing it to have been amongst the papers taken near Sherburn, and read in Parliament on 3rd Nov. 1645. It is written in cipher, but deciphered. 2¾ pp.]
April 21.
May 1. [The Hague.]
Dr. S. Goff to Henry Lord Jermyn. Since the writing of my other letter I have been with Secretary Muis, who gives great hopes of the States [of Holland] inclining to the King, and adviseth the Queen to use all means which have been spoken of, that alone, though the Duke of Lorraine should fail, will bring all about that we desire. He confessed the treaty [with] Brandenburg, but [said] that he knew for certain the mind of the Prince of Orange was if possibly he could to make the match with the Prince of Wales, so that however the Prince be wavering and fearful in regard of the King's affairs, yet the Prince of Orange is resolved to try what may be done rather for the Prince of Wales than any other. [Written on the same paper as the preceding, and like it in cipher, but deciphered. =½ p.]
April 21.
Court at Oxford.
22. Warrant under the Privy Seal to the Exchequer. To pay to Col. Wm. Legge, Governor to the city of Oxford, 1,500l. for provision of wheat for the garrison in that city, upon accompt. Underwritten,
22. i. Enrolled in the Clerk of the Pells' Office, 7 Aug. 1645. [Strip of parchment.]
April 21. Copy of the same. [Vol. ccccxcviii., No. 8., p. 50. 2/3 p.]
April 21.
Newcastle.
23. Declaration to the inhabitants of Westmoreland, signed by the Earls of Leven and Callander and Sir Wm. Armyne, in the name of the Committee of both kingdoms, and of his Excellency the Lord General of the Scottish army now in the service of the Parliament of England. Upon delivery to us of a paper by Gervase Benson, Mayor of Kendal, Mr. Henry Massie, minister of Kendal, and others stating certain grievances specified as grounds and reasons of the late tumultuous assembly in Westmoreland, we desired particulars might be condescended unto, and some were presented, and others proffered to be produced upon examination; some of the Scottish officers then present returned answer, which was delivered to the Mayor of Kendal and his company, setting forth that never did any complaint of wrongs or injuries from any of the country people come to their knowledge but they were ready to redress them, which was acknowledged to be true by those who presented that paper. All which being carefully considered by the Committees, it is ordered that due examination shall be taken of the particulars named, and all others of that kind, and upon sufficient proof made upon the place, the parties found guilty shall be severely punished according to law. And to the end the inhabitants of Westmoreland may have no colourable pretence to keep in a body as they have done for some days past, we hereby declare that no taxes or cesses shall be laid upon them but what is or shall be appointed by the Parliament or their Committees, according to the power given them, and the Ordinances of both Houses. If upon this assurance from us they shall depart quietly home, none of the Scottish army shall molest or trouble them by quartering or sending parties to demand anything from them. [Copy. 1 p.]
April 21.
Newcastle.
24. Letter from the Lord General Leven and the Committees of both kingdoms to Cols. Lawson, Cholmeley, Bellingham, Briggs, and the members of the Committees of Cumberland and Westmoreland. The distempers of the people in Westmoreland have been so notorious we need say nothing of them, but those in Carlisle have by sundry papers, some of which we have seen, endeavoured to stir up the humours of the discontented people in Westmoreland, and we have taken into consideration their grounds and reasons, as they pretend, for the commotion amongst them, to which answer is returned, that ought to give them satisfaction if they be our friends, but if this should not content them we trust that you and all honest men will join with us to suppress such intolerable insolencies; as also that you will consider what you are able to do, for raising and maintaining sufficient forces to keep in the garrison at Carlisle, which if you can undertake to perform the Scottish horse may be drawn away from Carlisle out of those counties. But if you cannot do it, what help or assistance you desire, either of horse or foot from the Scottish army, shall be afforded you, provided that a way may be laid down for their maintenance during that service. We desire your particular answer to the matter contained in these letters. [Copy. 1 p.]
April 21. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Manchester and Lauderdale, Lords Wharton and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir G. Gerard, and Messrs. Crew, Browne, Kennedy, and Barclay. Ordered,
1. That the Earl of Leven's letter of the 17th be reported to-morrow to both Houses.
2. To desire the Earl of Pembroke to direct his Deputy Governor of the Isle of Wight and his Vice-Admiral, with others, to search the barks wherein Madame Chevereuse was apprehended for papers and bills of exchange, it being reported that she has brought bills for great sums. Likewise to search her company and examine the master of the barks and [his] company, keeping her safe till further order.
3. That the Earl of Manchester and Sir H. Vane do go to the Spanish Ambassador about the business of the Flanders' merchants, and that the Earl do attend here to-morrow at 8 a.m.
4. To report to the Commons that the 1,000l. for Cols. Dalbier's and Behre's regiments be made up, 1,300l. to be repaid by the Commissioners of Excise to the Gloucestershire gents. at the end of six months.
5. Mem.—That orders were given verbally to Major Buller and he desired to advertise Major Salkeld to march upon receipt of the 1,000l., leaving the 300l. to be sent after them.
6. To report to both Houses that John Hay and Christr. Clause, who have long been Captain Lieutenants in Cols. Dalbier's and Bebre's regiments, may be made Captains in the same regiments, which are now to go to Col. Massie.
7. That Captain Ramsay's troop be paid as the other troops in Sir Wm. Balfour's regiment have been.
8. To report to the Commons that their order of 15th March for payment of 490l. from Haberdashers' Hall to Mr. Frost to be disposed of by this Committee may be sent up to the Lords for their concurrence, for that the same money was formerly otherwise disposed of by order of both Houses.
9. Likewise that 4,000l. may be provided to pay the officers of both armies who are left out [of the list] and not employed in the new [modelled] army.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 202, 203. Copy= 1½ pp.]
April 22.
Newark.
25. The Commissioners of Notts. and Lincoln to George Lord Digby. The harsh imprisonment to which Mr. Roger Le Strange is subjected excites us to move your Lordship for your speedy consideration for his exchange, or else to procure his better usage till that can be had. [1 p.]
April 22. 26. Sir Nicholas Cole to his wife the Lady Cole, at Newcastle. Mr. Boswell has promised me he will go to Sir Archibald Johnston. The press [here] is so hot I dare not send my man abroad. I am sorry to hear the plague is so hot at Newcastle and all about you. I will send my man Sadler by sea to bring you up with Ralph and Margaret, if you think so fit, but send up Ralph that I may put him to school here. Mr. Farniby, that famous schoolmaster, is prisoner in Ely House, where my father Cole is, and he is very desirous to have him with him; let him come by sea, that being the safest way. I think you may live as cheap here as at home, but stay not in Newcastle if the sickness increases, as I fear it will. To day my brother James is gone to Goldsmiths' Hall to get his liberty. He has either more wit or money than the rest of his friends. For my part I am well content in that state I am in, and trust to be delivered in time. It is plain our adversaries' aim was to get our coals and colliery. Underwritten,
26. i. John Watson, Sir N. Cole's man, being examined, confessed a bond of subscription for 3d. a [chaldron] for coals to G. Bayliff for 12 months if the garrison continued so long in Newcastle, of which he saith there was 100l. paid. Subjoined,
26. ii. Sir Nicholas Cole to his servant, John Watson. Touching the payment of 3d. on coals according to the bond of subscription. Underwritten,
26. iii. Received the 6th of Jany. from Lieut.-General Baillie a letter, wherein was enclosed the bond of subscription, formerly sent him to Scotland by my Lady Baillie. Newcastle, 8 Jany. 1644–45.
26 iv. Received of Sir Nicholas Cole, Knt. and Bart., for the use and by the appointment of Lieut.-Genl. Baillie, 100l. James Thorne, 22 April 1645. [2 pp.]
April 22. 27. Notes in a cause of Prynne, plaintiff, v. Clement and others, defendants, ordered by consent to refer all differences to Mr. Clowberry and Mr. St. John, merchants, according to the former orders. The referees make an unjust and imperfect certificate. The 100l. discharged in the Committee of Obstructions by special order and consent, yet by these referrees charged upon the plaintiff's account or left imperfect. Pray reference to the former referees Sir John Cordwell, and Mr. Harvey. These proceedings extend from April 1643 to April 1645. [¾ p.]
April 22. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Manchester, and Lauderdale, Lords Wharton and Warristone, Sir G. Gerard, Sir H. Vane [senr.], Sir Ph. Stapleton, Sir A. Haselrigg, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Crewe, Browne, and Kennedy. Ordered,
1. That John Hooper, the engineer of the Isle of Ely, be for the present employed in the service of Nottingham garrison, of which Col. Walton to have notice.
2. That the Committee of Examinations be desired to make a return to this Committee to-morrow of the names of the gent. of Ulster who have signed and who refused the Covenant, as they are to receive their despatch from this Committee to-morrow, in order to repair to their charges in Ireland.
3. That the Committee of the Admiralty be desired to provide a ship and victuals for the gent. of Ulster and their servants who are to go to Ireland, and give in a list of their and their servants' names.
4. To report to the House the several petitions of Major-General Holborne, Col. Barclay, Col. Mills, and Major Ennis mentioned in the paper of the Scottish Commissioners of the 16th inst.
5. That Sir Robert Adare's personal pay for 26 days be paid to Mr. Davis.
6. That the business of free trade be taken into consideration on Saturday.
7. That the letter from the Committee of Henley[-on-Thames] be recommended to Sir Thos. Fairfax.
8. That the letter from Sir Thos. Fairfax with the enclosed list [of officers] be sent to the Committee of the West to select whom they will employ, and signify the same to this Committee that they may give order for the employment of the rest.
9. Warrant for assistance to be rendered to Capt. Taylor in conducting the pressed men to Windsor.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 204, 205. Copy= 1⅓ pp.]
April 22.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Wm. Brereton. We have received information that since your late march into Wales some exorbitancies have been committed by your soldiers towards those poor people without due distinction between those well affected to the Parliament and such as are disaffected. Among other spoils we notice that of Plâs Teague, to which you had formerly given protection, and in which Sir John Trevor is concerned. We desire there may be especial care had in that case of full restitution, and that such as commit these insolencies may be exemplarily punished, otherwise the consequence can be no less than the exasperating of their spirits against you and the loss of their service to the Parliament. In all places there are some disaffected, and so it is like there are among them, yet all should not suffer for the fault of some. Give order to your forces so to carry themselves that the inhabitants be not further alienated, nor have cause to complain while your forces are there. Given to Mr. Coxon. [Interregnum 20 E., pp. 145, 146. Copy. 1⅓ pp.]
April 22.
Derby House.
The same to the same. You will see by the enclosed the assistance that is coming to you, whereby we trust you will be enabled to carry on your design without any interruption. There being a ready willingness amongst them to come into those parts we desire there may be so good compliance between you and the commanders of those forces that a good understanding may be maintained between you, and thus an unanimous prosecution of the service in those parts be established to the public advantage. Sent as above. [Ibid., pp. 146, 147. Copyp.]
April 22.
Derby House.
The same to Captain Humphreys. We have appointed your Company to form part of the garrison to be put into Phillis Court, near Henley[-on-Thames], whither you are to march forthwith, and receive orders from the Governor of that garrison. [Ibid., p. 147. Copy. ½ p.]
April 22.
Derby House.
The same to Philip Earl of Pembroke. We are informed that the Duchess of Chevreuse was apprehended by Captain Hodges while entering into Dartmouth, and is now brought to Newport [in the Isle of Wight]. Upon some informations given to us, we desire you to order your Deputy Governor to keep her safe for the present, and in a few days he will receive further directions. We desire you to appoint some discreet persons to join with your Deputy Governor and Vice-Admiral for searching Madame and her company, as also the two barks taken with her by Captain Hodges, for papers and bills of exchange, which we hear she has brought with her for great sums of money. They are also to examine Captain Hodges and his company, with others, and give account of their whole proceedings to this Committee. [Ibid., pp. 147, 148. Copy=1¼ pp.]
April 22.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thos. Fairfax. Having considered the enclosed from the Committee of Oxfordshire at Henley, we recommend to you their request concerning Captain Semple's troop, which, if bestowed upon them, they promise to recruit. Without some assistance of horse, they affirm that all the charges they have been at for that garrison will be lost. [Ibid., pp. 148, 149. Copy= ½ p.]
April 22.
Derby House.
The same to the same. The Kentish regiment which you write to have sent you is in a mutinous distemper, which the county is endeavouring to suppress. They have raised their forces for that purpose, apprehending that in their discontent the soldiers may endeavour to go over to the enemy. We therefore desire you to send a regiment of horse to lie in such parts of Surrey as may be fittest to intercept the Kentish men if they should attempt it or to suppress them if they continue in mutiny. The forces of Surrey will be in readiness to assist upon occasion. Let the regiment which you send keep intelligence with the Kentish Committee for the better carrying on of this service. We desire you to send such a regiment as is listed, that they may pay for what they take, so as the country be not disabled to pay their assessments. You are to call away the troops of Sir Arthur Haselrigg, according to the instructions in our other letter. Sent by Mr. Cadwell. Ibid., p. 150. Copy. 1 p.]
April 23.
Exeter.
28. Sir Richard Grenvile to George Lord Digby. I received yours with one from his Majesty of the 15th inst., when I was in extreme pain and weakness, but now I have good hopes of a speedy recovery from the wound, which was very dangerous. I only desire my recovery and life that I may employ it in his Majesty's service. I wish heartily that all other men's intentions were as clearly without their own private ends. I shall not fail in punctually performing my duty. [Seal with arms and crest. 1 p.]
April 23. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, Loudoun, and Lauderdale, Lord Warristone, Sir H. Vane, Sir G. Gerard, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Crewe, Browne, Kennedy, and Barclay. Ordered,
1. Warrants for the 4,000l. intended for Lord Inchiquin to be paid to Mr. Betsworth and Col. Jephson.
2. Warrant to release Henry Warrington, servant to Sir James Ware, now prisoner in Peterhouse.
3. That order be sent to the Lieutenant of the Tower that any servants of the Irish gent. coming to them there shall be retained as prisoners with their masters, and not go abroad.
4. To write to Sir Thos. Fairfax that some troops of Col. Haselrigg's regiment are lying in Surrey upon free quarter, and send out their warrants for provisions. Care to be taken that these troops do not oppress those countries from which the maintenance for his army is to come, and that they pay for what they have taken ; also that they may not lie in those counties.
5. That order be given to dept. lieuts. of Surrey to secure the horses and arms of Capt. Savile's troop, and send them to Sir Thos. Fairfax, as also the captain who is to answer for his not obeying the order given them.
6. To report to the Commons for 1,000l. to be presently provided for the horse under Major Buller and the rest who are to go to Col. Massie.
7. To write to Col. Massie notifying him of what was done by the Worcestershire and Warwickshire forces, and desiring him to give all the assistance he can to it.
8. To write to Col. Cromwell to give notice of that success, and to desire him to do what he can to prosecute that victory.
9. To write to the Coventry Committee to afford all the assistance they can to those of Worcestershire.
10. Likewise to Col. Bridges, noticing his good service and thanking him. Also to desire him to give all accommodation to those of Worcestershire now at Warwick. Letters of thanks to those of Worcestershire.
11. To report to both Houses the letters of Major Bridges and the one from the Worcestershire gent. to their Committee here.
12. To suggest to the Committee of the Admiralty to provide a convoy for the vessels carrying victuals and provisions to Ireland.
13. Appointment of a sub-committee to consider of the propositions given in by Captain Morgan.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 205–207. Copy= 2 pp.]
April 23.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Col. Massie. By the enclosed you will see what success God has given to the forces of Warwick and Worcester, and which you have probably already heard from themselves. You can easily judge of what advantage this may be if it be well followed up. We know your readiness to improve all advantages, and therefore desire you to afford assistance, both of horse and foot, as may stand with your own affairs, for the prosecution of those opportunities which may now be offered in those parts. Sent by John Craven. [Interregnum 20 E.,p. 161. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 24. 29. Agreement signed between the Colonels and Committees for cos. Cumberland and Westmoreland, undertaking the whole siege against Carlisle, in response to a letter from his Excellency the Earl of Leven and the Commissioners of both kingdoms. [See April 21.] The county of Cumberland will provide for the siege 2,000 foot and 400 horse sufficiently armed to do service there, and Westmoreland 1,000 foot and 200 horse. In regard Cumberland is likely to receive more benefit by the removal of the Scots' [army quartered there] than Westmoreland, it is agreed by the former, and the Colonels and Committees there, that the said Committees shall cause 8d. a day to be paid to 500 foot of Westmoreland so long as this service shall last, but Westmoreland to pay all their officers. The above forces to be ready to lay down the siege by this day fortnight, i.e., 8th of May. A muster-master to be chosen reciprocally for either county. [Certified copy. 1 p.]
April 24. 30. Another copy of the same. [1½ pp.]
April 24. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, and Warwick, Sir H. Vane, Sir G. Gerard, and Mr. Crew. Ordered,
1. That the letter to Surrey be signed and sent.
2. To write to Sir Thos. Fairfax to send a regiment of horse into Surrey to intercept the Kentish horse if they should attempt to go over to the enemy.
3. That Mr. Crew be added to the sub-committee for the propositions of South Wales, and that they have power to examine witnesses.
4. To write to Sir Thos. Fairfax to send 20 barrels of gunpowder, with match and musket bullets, for supply of Abingdon garrison, which will be again supplied to him from hence.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum, 8 E., p. 207. Copy. 2/3p.]
April 24.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Thos. Fairfax. We are informed that there are some troops of Sir Arthur Haselrigg's regiment now lying in Surrey upon free quarter, and sending out their warrants for provisions to the great oppression and discontent of the people. This will disable the inhabitants to pay their assessments for the maintenance of your army. We therefore desire you to remove these troops out of those parts from whence the pay of your army is to come, and command them to pay their quarters from the time of their listing. Let no more be sent into any of those parts to the further discontent of the people. Sent by Cadwell Interregnum 20 E., p. 149. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 24.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Kent. Upon receipt of your letter we wrote to Sir Thos. Fairfax to send a regiment of horse to lie in Surrey for intercepting your [mutinous] regiment should it endeavour to go over to the enemy, or to suppress the mutiny should it continue. We have likewise appointed the Surrey forces to be ready to assist you if there be occasion. We desire you to hold correspondence with them, and with the regiment to be sent from Sir Thos. Fairfax for the better accomplishment of this service. Sent by Sir Thos. Walsingham's care. [Ibid., p. 151. Copy. 1 p.]
April 24.
Derby House.
The same to the dept. lieuts. of Surrey. We formerly sent order to Capt. Savile to march with his troop to join Sir Wm. Waller, which we hear he has not done. We therefore desire you to secure the horses and arms of the said troop and send them, as also the troopers of Sir Thos. Fairfax, to be employed in the [new] army as Sir Thomas shall see cause. Let the captain be also sent to Sir Thomas to answer his disobedience to orders. Sent by Sir Richd. Onslow. [Ibid., p. 152. Copy. 2/3 p,]
April 25.
May 5. Paris.
31. Henry Lord Jermyn to George Lord Digby. This week letters have come from you and the King, by way of the Portugal Ambassador, 21 and 20 March. All your letters that way are very long [in coming]. We perceive by them that some of ours go in ten days, therefore your messenger may be faulty. I had another from you to-day of 4th April [old style] sent me by G. Martin; you will do well to continue to write by that way. There is in it only the proposition for the Duke of York's going to Ireland, to which the Queen [Henrietta Maria], not being yet well enough to speak of business, desires you to stay till next week for her resolution; she is now recovered of all but weakness; a little cough and looseness remain, but neither are of danger or trouble. You say that if the Queen could have been in estate to have sent the King any money, [or] if her ship had come in time, that would have kept her from the want, she spake of, induced by the stop [of supplies] ; the credit that would have been raised by the return of the ship would certainly have enabled her to have sent some; so the thing is true she might have sent, and yet that did not necessarily keep her from wanting in the meantime, and truly she was reduced to pawn some little things for her present supply, but you shall hear no more of this matter. She was promised some other ways of supplying the King, upon which were also built the assurances you received from her in which she hath been delayed beyond expectation, and what will yet be the issue is not to be known. M. Haesdonck she hath found means at last to send away. I hope he has before this arrived. He hath good proportions of arms and ammunition, and I know not yet what. I send you Dr. Goff's letters of this week, by which you will see, and by those of the last [transmission], what hopes there are of his negotiation. The next week will absolutely determine the Duke of Lorraine's resolution. The way proposed by the Prince of Orange of treating the marriage apart, and all the other matters by themselves, ought to find no difficulty on our part for he doth not expect, no more is it reasonable or possible that we should, that anything be concluded in the marriage until we have our reckoning in the rest. The Queen doth therefore desire that the King would send to her with all the speed he can particular instructions for this treaty of the marriage, wherein there may be only such things as, according to their fancy in Holland, for so they have expressed it, pertain to a treaty of marriage, as demands of portion, assurance of jointure, and what houses will be comprised in that jointure, how her own house shall be settled, what officers she shall have, and if you please to send a project of something in this kind, it will be very necessary, and in the meantime they shall be entertained from hence with assurances that these things are coming, and that if we can agree in others, there can be no difficulty in these. The proposition for the execution which you will find in Dr. Goff's letters is undoubtedly a great and useful design, and if we could by this marriage bring that about, and a conjunction of France and Holland with the King, [and] that should be accompanied but with those advantages that inevitably flow out of such a conjunction, it would be a foundation laid against all possibility of ruining this cause, and it would certainly give us time and breath to overcome at last, even if the present great helps of forces from either of them or the means of passing the Duke of Lorraine should fail, for I must confess by the last despatch I am less confident of his intentions than I was; I make you all this discourse to the end you should see, that I conceive though the present fruits [which] were expected from this negotiation are not in good hopes as I thought them heretofore, yet the treaty in these more remote ones is to be continued, and the news of this week doth much encourage me in this opinion, for I find all things in England to be in another kind of posture than a month ago, which I look on with comfort; the reputation of our affairs is increased to that point, that if we decline not I should not despair that they might be willing here to proceed in the conjunction, and that would certaily bring in the States [of the United Provinces]. The only reason why they here are so little disposed to it is the apprehension of the Parliament's ships, believing that [to be] the only power able to trouble them in their designs, but if our design for our [alliance] in Holland could be gone through with, that might perchance be the greatest inducement here of any other to embark them in our affairs, for which purpose I desire to know your opinion in one particular. There must go on our part 50,000 pistoles to the setting forth of this expedition. If we should [be able] to get the money here I would know whether you would choose to have it employed to that effect or sent to you. We hear nothing yet of our tin stayed at Falmouth, there are 496 blocks. Pray remember to send an order to Sir Nicholas Crispe and others who may be concerned in it to deliver it to any whom the Queen shall appoint to receive it, if before she send they can have no good occasion to send it. This bearer, Sir Wm. Davenant, is infinitely faithful to the King's cause ; he hath been lately in Holland, so that he met there with the knowledge of our treaty, so that it was neither possible nor needful to conceal it from him. The treaty of the marriage and the proposition [for alliance] he knows, but the design of the Duke of Lorraine he does not; of the other two he will speak to you, but charge him with secrecy, for the Queen does still desire the business of the marriage may not be divulged, and the other is destroyed if yet it should take wind. Pray if Davenant have need of your favour in anything use him very kindly for my sake, and let him know [who] conjured you to do so. You see by this I retain an opinion of some credit with you, though your letters be cold and less kind than they were wont, I am still in the same degree I have been most entirely yours. P.S.—I hear Thos. Elliott is yet at Havre-de-Grace, which I am glad of; you will have had by my former, wherein I sent you my letter to him and his answer, time to have resolved what to do, in the case my letter should not be come, it is not unfit to tell you again he received the King's command to stay, and the best advice I could give him to obey that command, but did notwithstanding resolve to continue his journey, and may now be gone for ought I know. This letter I have sent by [means of] the Portugal Ambassador, and I believe it will come to your hands soonest that way, but there is something added concerning Sir Wm. Davenant. Second P.S.—The Queen hath commanded me to let you know that she desires you would let Sir John Monson know she hath recommended to your care his interests, and that you would advance them in all reasonable things ; she cannot recollect what he did in particular sue for; she desires you to advertise her what it is, and that you preserve yourself unengaged till you hear again from her, and in the mean space you let him know her care. [Partly in cipher, but deciphered. It is numbered 54, and was one of the papers taken at Sherburn, and read in Parliament 3 Nov. 1645. See Commons' Journals iv., pp. 329 and 332. 4 pp.]
April 25.
May 5.
32. Another copy of the same, wholly in cipher, but deciphered, and in places erased. It is numbered 15, and is much less full than the preceding, which was sent by Sir Wm. Davenant, and is numbered 54. It is, however, the copy endorsed "Read 3 Nov. 1645." The clause concerning Davenant is omitted, as is also the message from the Queen forming the second postscript; but the following clause is added at the end. Prince Edward [Count Palatin of the Rhine] was last week married privately to Princess Anne [Gonzaga], the daughter of [Charles] Duke of Nevers, which so offends the Court of France that he is banished out of the kingdom, but we hope to reconcile the business shortly, and there is no doubt of it. [3¼ pp.]
April 25.
Penrith.
33. The Committees of Cumberland and Westmoreland to the Committee and Commissioners of both kingdoms, and to his Excellency the Lord General Leven, commanding the Scottish forces at Newcastle. We have received your letters of the 21st present by Lieut.-Col. Halsey and Mr. Rowe, in which we find such expressions of your care and favour towards these two poor exhausted counties, and in particular to ourselves, that we are constrained to return you all humble thanks, and shall express the same in our actions so far as lies in our power. We have taken into consideration your Lordships' motion, and resolve to undertake the siege of Carlisle, in regard the country is far more willing to undergo that service than to pay the Scots' forces. We are confident to be able to perform it, having agreed to bring to the leaguer 3,000 foot and about 600 horse, whereof 1,000 foot and 200 horse to be furnished by Westmoreland and the rest by Cumberland. They shall be drawn thither by Wednesday sennight, but we desire that some of the Scottish horse may be continued there before Carlisle until the whole country forces be laid down there. The rather because the enemy appears to have a considerable strength of horse having lately sallied out with 260 as we are informed, which being so well appointed as they are, may upon all occasions be able to master the Cumberland horse, until nearer approaches be made by the foot. We have two more requests to offer. That when the Scots' horse shall be withdrawn they may be ordered not to march through Westmoreland, lest it occasion new commotions there and endanger the deserting of the siege by the Westmoreland men, and so expose all to ruin; the other is that either the Lord General Leven or Fairfax may be earnestly dealt with to send some horse to lie near Skipton and Bolton to keep in the enemy there, they having strong parties of horse, and may otherwise infest and disturb Westmoreland and so hinder this service. Upon his Excellency's and your Honours' declaration, and these resolutions, the tumult of the country people in Westmoreland is appeased, and we hope their diligence in this service will partly qualify their former distemperature and much conduce to the ease and safety of both these counties. 12 signatures. [Seal with arms and crest broken. 1½ pp.]
April 25. 34. Warrant of Sir Thos. Fairfax to Sir John Wallaston and the rest of the Treasurers-at-War or their deputies. Whereas part of the train [of artillery] now listed under my command were mustered at Reading on the 5th present, and the other part at Windsor and Colebrook [Colnbrook] at several different times, by reason whereof at their last muster on the 21st there were 14 days' pay due to the former and only 6 to the latter part. In regard it is most convenient for your accounts and best for the service that the time of their muster and pay for the whole train should be alike, these are to desire you to pay to Matthew Martin, paymaster to the train, 747l. 14s. 11¾d., which is in full for 14 days' pay for the one part and 6 for the other part of the train [which will equalize them]. Underwritten,
34. i. Receipt by Matthew Martin for 747l. 14s. 11d. paid by the Treasurers, in full discharge of this warrant. [1 p.]
April 25. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, Manchester, and Lauderdale, Lords Saye, Wharton, and Warristone, Sir Ph. Stapleton, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir G. Gerard, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Barclay and Crew. Ordered,
1. That thanks be returned to the Committee of Surrey for their readiness. That the warrant sent in by them be sent to Sir Thos. Fairfax, who is to take order for preventing the like both in that county and in others.
2. To write to Sir Thos. Fairfax to give order that Major-Genl. Browne may put, as he desires, the remaining 60 men of the Earl of Essex' regiment at Abingdon under his own regiment, to which this Committee is inclined.
3. To report to both Houses Sir Thos. Fairfax's letter of 24th April concerning 300 of Waller's horse.
4. To write to Sir John Gell and Cols. Rossiter and Hatcher to assist the Governor of Nottingham for its security.
5. The two letters to Sir Thos. Fairfax now read to be sent.
6. That letters be written to the Admiralty at Ostend for release of a Hamburg ship laden with goods of the Merchants Adventurers which was taken by a frigate on the coast of England and carried in thither. The Spanish Ambassador to be spoken to about this and other ships captured, and to desire restitution.
7. To acquaint Sir Thos. Fairfax with the condition of Tannton, and advise that he should send a sufficient party for its relief, about 5,000 foot and 2,000 horse. Also that he certify this Committee to-morrow of the strength of his forces, and from time to time how his recruits go on and in what condition his army is. Messrs. Nicholls and Erle will inform him of the condition of the west, and some members of this Committee will come to him on Monday about this business.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 208*, 209*. Copy. 1½ pp.]
April 25.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Thos. Fairfax. We desire you to furnish the garrison of Abingdon with 20 barrels of gunpowder, a proportionable quantity of match, and a double proportion of musket bullet from the stores at Reading, which will be replaced from hence for the use of your army. Let it be ready to go with the money from hence that the same convoy may serve for both. There are still remaining at Abingdon 60 of the 200 foot sent thither by the Lord General for strengthening that garrison. These are desired by Major Genl. Browne to recruit his regiment, and we conceive them to be very fit for that purpose, they being already there. We thought good to let you know this lest they should receive other commands from you. Sent by Cadwell. [Interregnum 20 E., pp. 152, 153. Copy. 1¼ pp.]
April 25.
Derby House.
The same to the same. By the enclosed you will receive information of the oppression to which Surrey is subjected by the quartering of horse upon the country, and by the exorbitant warrants that are given out [for provisions], of which many complaints are made to this Committee. The inhabitants will be thereby disabled from paying their assessments which are for the maintenance of your army, and it will besides receive very great prejudice. Let no more such warrants be given out, nor any such quartering of troops be laid upon those counties whence your contributions are to come, that the people may have all encouragements for the ready payment of their assessments. Sent by Cadwell. [Ibid., p. 154. Copy. 1 p.]
April 25.
Derby House.
The same to the same. In regard of the straits that Taunton now is in, and of the great consequence it is that it should be preserved, as well as the many well affected people in it, who if the town should be lost would be exposed to certain butchery, we desire to give it present and effectual relief. Have your forces in readiness that a sufficient party may with all expedition march for that service. By information received from the west as to the strength of the enemy and the number of our forces that can be had for that service, we conclude that 5,000 foot and 2,000 horse are the fewest that can be sent hence with any likelihood to effect that work. You will receive further information from some of the Western Committee, who will be with you to-morrow, and on Monday we will send some of this Committee to you, who shall be instructed and have power to see that party despatched away. We hope there will [then] be sufficient force remaining for defence of the Associations and the midland parts. Certify us by to-morrow afternoon what numbers you have, both of horse and of foot, and occasionally how your recruits go on and the state of your army. P.S.—The persons sent from the Committee of the West are Mr. Nicoll and Mr. Erle. Sent by Binding. [Ibid., pp. 155, 156. Copy. 12/3 pp.]
April 25.
Derby House.
The same to Lieut.-Genl. Cromwell. By the enclosed you will see the success that the forces of Worcestershire and some of Warwick have had against the enemy, and you will easily judge of how great advantage it may be to the public if it be well followed. We desire you, therefore, to give all the assistance you can to those forces for the prosecution of such advantages as may be thereby offered. Sent by Cadwell. [Ibid., pp. 156, 157. Copyp.]
April 25.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee at Leicester. We are informed by such as are competent to judge that your town is not in so secure a posture [of defence] as a place of that consequence ought to be, and would be in apparent danger should it be resolutely attempted. We recommend to your especial vigilance both the works and guards. Your fortifying of that part called Newark may perhaps both discourage the inhabitants and invite attack, the enemy concluding the rest untenable, unless they see a like care taken of it. We would not discourage your strengthening of a part, but urge the defence of the whole, yours being a town of very great concernment to the kingdom. We would only add that if the town should unhappily be surprised, it is not the strength of a part that will secure you. Sent by John Craven. [Ibid., pp. 157, 158. Copy=1 p.]
April 25.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee at Coventry. Since your forces were sent towards Col. Massie a great success has been gained over the enemy, which if effectually followed up, while their forces are thus scattered and they are not reinforced in those parts of Worcestershire, may prove of great consequence. You cannot better employ all the force you have than by an effectual application of it that way. Your nearness to the place gives you a special advantage, yet we have given order to other forces to advance that way. Give them the most effectual assistance you can in prosecuting the late victory. Sent as above. [Ibid., pp. 158, 159. Copy=1¼ pp.]
April 25.
Derby House.
The same to Col. Bridges. We have received yours containing a relation of your good success against the enemy of Worcestershire. We return you, and all the rest who were instrumental in it, our hearty thanks. We doubt not but you will improve this victory by employing your forces against the enemy whilst they are dejected by this unexpected blow. We have already ordered considerable forces of horse to march towards Col. Massie, and some of these were in time to share in your victory, and others are now ready to go thither. Col. Massie will speedily be in a posture to look towards those parts, in the meantime we desire you to afford them all the encouragement you can. We trust you will afford to the Committee of Worcestershire resident with you the best accommodation that the town of Warwick can afford both for themselves and their prisoners, until their own county may be in a better posture to furnish them with conveniences at home. Sent by Mr. Craven. [Ibid., pp. 159, 160. Copy. 1⅓ pp.]
April 25.
Derby House.
The same to Col. Rossiter. You must have heard before this of the surprise of the fort at Nottingham-bridge, and you know of what consequence it is as to the passage into the north. Lest that town also should be endangered by the conjoined forces of the enemy's garrisons afford present assistance to Nottingham till we can appoint more force for the regaining of that fort. Sent by Mr. Hanbury. Underwritten,
The like to Col. Hatcher and Sir John Gell. [Ibid., pp. 161, 162. Copy=2/3 p.]
April 26.
Chester.
35. John Lord Byron to George Lord Digby, principal Secretary of State [to the King]. I received together with your letter a double comfort, both the assurance of your recovery from a dangerous sickness and of my continuing to hold that place in your good opinion, wherewith I have ever considered myself so much honoured; to these I may add another, the hope I have shortly to enjoy your Lordship's much longed for conversation, where you may ease my oppressed thoughts of a burden which has grown too unwieldy for them any longer to bear. For the present I shall only inform you of the condition of this place with which I desire you to acquaint his Majesty, and the necessity there is for a speedy and powerful relief. I know it is usual for men to exaggerate the importance of those places where their commands lie, but this place, without any such self-partiality, I would urge stands unrivalled in relation to his Majesty's affairs, both in this kingdom and Ireland, as drawing with it all Wales, Lancashire, with the north of England, and what supplies the King can expect either out of Ireland or Scotland. The two Princes [Rupert and Maurice] having united their forces and relieved Beeston Castle, were earnestly entreated by me to clear this country, before they departed, of those petty garrisons which infested Chester, but other considerations at that time hindered the effecting of it, and therefore with a promise that the army should continue within a [moderate] distance, till Chester were furnished both with victuals and ammunition, I was contented to return and undertake the government of that garrison, but the business of Hereford intervening Prince Rupert was suddenly called away before either ammunition or victual could be brought into Chester, and together with his Highness marched away the remainder of the old Irish regiments with some other horse and foot to the number of at least 1,200, so that I was left in the town with only a garrison of citizens and my own and Colonel Mostin's regiments, which both together made not above 600 men, whereof one half, being Mostin's men, I was forced soon after to send out of town, finding them by reason of their officers, who were ignorant Welsh gentlemen, and unwilling to undergo any strict duty, far more prejudicial to us than useful. The rebels finding the Prince retreated with his army, and the country emptied of all soldiers, but such as were necessary for keeping the garrisons, returned with all their forces to block up Chester on all sides, which ever since they have continued, and withal laid siege to Hawarden Castle. The Welsh, though they have men for number and arms sufficient to beat the rebels out of Wales, yet either will not or dare not stir, notwithstanding the many orders I have sent them. The truth is that so long as that cursed Commission of Array, or at least such Commissioners as are put into it, have any power there, the King must expect no good out of North Wales, and I am confident were it not for the castles, which are well provided both with men, victual, and ammunition, that country would have long since taken part with [Sir Wm.] Brereton and [Sir Thos.] Middleton. Thus you see I am left in a condition neither to offend others nor defend myself, if pressed by a considerable army of the enemy, which I am advertised now is advancing towards me, the Scots being invited by the Ordinance of Parliament, which gives them Chester if they can win it, to join with the Lancashire and Cheshire forces; besides this, if speedy relief come not, the want of gunpowder will be sufficient to blow me up there, there being not full 18 barrels in store, neither any public magazine of victual nor money for public service. I have the more fully related my condition to your Lordship to the end that if any misfortune should befall me before relief come, it may appear how little accessory I have been to it; and for those poor means I have left to maintain this place, you may be assured I shall improve them to the utmost, and how unfortunate soever I may be, [you] shall have an account of my charge befitting an honest man, and one whom I hope you shall not blush to own. [The first and last paragraphs of the letter are in cipher, but deciphered. 1 p.]
April 26. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earl of Northumberland, Lords Saye, Wharton, and Warristone, Sir G. Gerard, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Crew, Browne, Kennedy, and Barclay. Ordered,
1. To write to Sir Thos. Fairfax, enclosing the Committee of Surrey's letter of the 26th inst., and recommending to him to make speedy reduction of the forces lying in that county, and which make it unable to pay contribution.
2. Directions for the disposal of the 1,300l. for the two regiments of Majors Buller and Salkeld ordered for Gloucester.
3. Directions for Majors Buller and Salkeld, who are to march with their regiments to Col. Massie, and receive his orders.
4. That Lady Dorothy Couch and her gentlewoman have liberty to go in the ship provided for the officers of Ulster to Ireland.
5. To write to the Committee of Kent, desiring that their regiment now upon its march shall not stay in Surrey, but proceed at once to Sir Thos. Fairfax, and in case there shall be any need of martial proceedings, it will be best that it should be done in his army. The like letter to Sir Michael Livesay to march forthwith, and intimation to be given to Sir Thos. Fairfax.
6. That Mr. Peters be warned to attend on Monday.
7. To write to the Committee of Kent about their horse which mutiny. Letters to Livesay and Fairfax.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 209*, 210. Copy = 1½ pp.]
April 26.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Thos. Fairfax. The regiment of Sir Michael Livesay is now marched as far as Sevenoaks, and we have sent them orders to join your army. The Committee of Kent will send along [with them] some to inform you who have been the chief incendiaries of that mutiny, against whom you may proceed and punish them as you shall find cause. Sent by John Arnold. [Interregnum 20 E., p. 162. Copy. ⅓ p.]
April 26.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Kent. Since your [mutinous] regiment is now upon their march, we desire that they should not stay in Surrey to burden that county, which was so ready to assist in reducing them to obedience, but march up to Sir Thos. Fairfax's army, where there may be martial proceedings taken against such as have deserved punishment. Send some of your number along with them, to give information who were the chief incendiaries of that mutiny. We thank you for the care and pains you have already taken in this service. Sent by a messenger who came from thence. [Ibid., pp. 162, 163. Copy = 1¼ pp.]
April 26.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Michael Livesay. We understand from the Committee of Kent that your regiment was yesternight to quarter at Sevenoaks. We desire that by no means they should stay in Surrey, to be a burden to that county, but forthwith march up to Sir Thos. Fairfax's army. Sent by the Kentish messenger. [Ibid., p. 163. Copy. ½ p.]
April 26.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thos. Fairfax. By the enclosed you will see the reiterated complaints of Surrey for the coming in of Waller's regiment; their oppressions have been very great, and we have divers times written to you about it. We earnestly recommend this to your especial care, that the regiment may be reduced, and so have money to pay their quarters. Let them be immediately removed to other quarters, lest the people be utterly disabled to pay their assessments, which will be to the very great prejudice of your army. [Ibid., p. 164. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 27. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earl of Lauderdale, Lords Saye, Wharton, and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir G. Gerard, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Crew, Barclay, and Kennedy. Ordered,
1. To give answer to the gent. of the west that this Committee will take into present debate their affairs, and send to-morrow early some of their members to Sir Thos. Fairfax, with a resolution to send such a strength as, it is hoped, shall be sufficient.
2. That Lords Saye and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, senr., and Wm. Crew be directed to go to-morrow to Sir Thos. Fairfax's army.
3. That it be left to the Committee which goes to Fairfax's army, after advice had with them, to send a competent force not exceeding 6,000 into the west.
4. As also a competent strength of horse and dragoons not exceeding 2,500.
5. To signify to Sir Thos. that to-morrow some of this Committee will be with him, and that he prepare forces, both foot and horse, for the west. That this Committee be warned for to-morrow [to meet].
6. To report to both Houses that this Committee, being resolved to send horse and foot to the west, are at a loss to resolve who should command the forces which are to go, and who those to be left behind, so they have thought fit to report that matter to the Houses to know their pleasure therein.
7. That all the members of this Committee in town be warned to attend tomorrow morning.
8. That the letter from his Excellency the Earl of Leven be reported to both Houses.
9. That the proposition of Lieut.-Genl. Cromwell be taken into consideration by the Committee that goes to Sir Thos. Fairfax.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 211, 212. Copy. 1⅓ pp.]
April 27.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Thos. Fairfax. Mr. Nicoll has given us an account of the strength of your army, and we desire you to expedite the preparing of those forces which are to go into the west for relief of Taunton, of the sad condition of which town this letter from Lyme [Regis] will inform you. Tomorrow morning some of our number will go from hence early to advise with you concerning this expedition. [Interregnum, 20 E, pp. 164, 165. Copy=2/3 p.]
April 28.
Campden.
36. Sir Henry Bard [Governor of Campden House, co. Gloucester] to his Highness [Prince Rupert]. The letter enclosed was sent to me from Oxford to be conveyed with all speed possible, pray God it comes time enough, it concerns a most unfortunate man, Col. [Thos.] Windebank. Sir, pity him and reprieve him; it [the surrender of Bletchington House] was God's judgment on him, and no cowardice of his own. At the battle of Alresford he gave a large testimony of his courage; and if with modesty I may bring in the witness, I saw it; and thence began our acquaintance. O happy man! had he ended then. Sir, let him but live to repair his honour; of which I know he is more sensible than [are] the damned of the pains of hell. And sure it will be a perfect means of his salvation. God and your Highness consult about it. [Endorsed: Concerning Windebank's delivery of Bletchington House. Without seal or direction. 1 p.]
April 28./May 8.
[The Hague]
37. Dr. [Stephen] Goff to Henry Lord Jermyn. Since the receipt of yours I am confirmed in what I wrote last from Graffier Muis concerning the resolutions of the Prince of Orange, that though there have been overtures made from [the Marquis of] Brandenburg, yet if the Prince of Wales may be obtained for [Orange's] daughter they will not be hearkened unto. It is not probable any treaty has been begun upon these [overtures] how[soever] that reserve may have slackened the adventures for this of the Prince of Wales; for as soon as I had given in the extract of my letters, which was most greedily called for, the conclusion was that to gain time Mr. de Zulicum should draw the project of a treaty in articles on both sides, according to the particulars wherein I shall be instructed within 7 days, as your letters to him and to me promise. It is expected that before the Prince of Orange's going from hence, which is like to be within few days, an assurance may be given him that the treaty will proceed well, and the effecting of their designs depend only upon the effects of the public, without which the King and they will have small comfort of the business. There is now or never something to be done upon this State by means of the excellent and clear relations which their [the Dutch] Ambassadors do make both in private and public in the King's behalf. I have hitherto found as good success of this as can be wished, besides that which is already written of the marriage. I have to let you know that there will be a Committee of the States [General] presently settled for the English affairs, that according to what shall be related to them by their Ambassadors resolutions may be taken what to do. These Ambassadors are so extremely set on bringing the States [of Holland] to the King [of England's] assistance that no English subjects could express greater concernment ils se creveront, says the Prince of Orange, if they be not able to bring somewhat to pass for the Duke [of Lorraine's] passage. The Prince of Orange says that for the safety and convoy [of the Duke's expedition] that which was promised before shall be performed, for the transport ships must be sent from hence as was given in the instructions to D'Estrade before, and shall be now repeated and enlarged, in answer to his letter of this week concerning that business. The States must not by any means be acquainted with the business, and therefore the course must be, under pretence of some service for France, to hire the ships of merchants here which the Prince of Orange will give quick order for when it shall be requisite. The [Prince] says he will write that which shall encourage them in it, and [that he] often wished that his zeal and affection might form a leading example to others, and that it should not be wanting [in this instance]. It is much feared the hiring of Holland ships in France may give such an alarm to the Parliament [at Westminster] that all French ports will be presently beset, besides if there be numbers sufficient the way were by force to constrain them at the instant, and not to send beforehand about it. Upon information that the rebels [in England] intend a defensive war only, the Prince of Orange said he was very glad of it, for then if the King could preserve himself until he could by sea do something upon them and their London trade, they would be instantly ruined, and from thence added [some words here obliterated] And this was the sum of that discourse. This day I visited Burrell, who makes many protestations of persuing their Majesties' affairs here in such a manner that he considers not what he suffers by it. I have given him a paper specifying the things desired of this State, such as they [the Dutch] may do without declaring war against the rebels of England, and in justice they are bound to do, being allied to the King already, such as with the concurrence of France they are now sought to perform in a new league with his Majesty, wherein nothing is demanded of them but what within these 4 years by their Ambassadors in England they have offered to his Majesty. [M. Burrell] approves of every particular, and I am assured will labour more effectually than any creature their Majesties have of their own. Within a very short time will appear the utmost we can hope from this place, for if either the Committee [of the States General] should be refused, and the Prince of Orange as I hear has some doubt of it, or, if being settled, nothing should be resolved by it, which may invite France to send their Ambassadors and join with them [the Dutch], it is evident that new counsels must be sought, and that the King is not to linger away his crown here, only, whatever the event be, some means must be used [to obtain money], which is nowhere to be had [except here]; but if the event of this Committee for England be presently to grant us liberty of their ports to sell prizes, to hire ships, to buy arms and ammunition here and to carry them out of Dunkirk, to grant letters of reprisal to those Hollanders who may require them against the [English] Parliament, and after these things by inviting France to [join] them make a league offensive and defensive as we desire, I suppose it will be seasonable for Lord Jermyn to appear in this place and conclude the marriage, the conditions whereof will be very honourable whatever little [marriage] portion they give or how great conditions soever they obtain for the young Prince, for certainly by it the crown will be restored, and therefore I hope the whole business will be referred to their disposal except only the conclusion and signing, which must not be until the effects of the public treaty be obtained. All this will yet appear more reasonable if the Duke [of Lorraine] proceed in his voyage, but though that vanish, as I fear it will, yet there is more substance in this triple alliance if it may be gotten than in any other counsel in the world. I could now wish the Order of the Garter with the herald and robes and letters were come. The young Prince is very worthy of all honour and kindness from their Majesties, and grows a very proper and lovely person, as does Mademoiselle, more now than at first, perhaps difficulty adds beauty, but truly she has a perfect good shape, white skin, excellently well-fashioned hands, neck, and breast, the face is not ill [indeed], all but very good for many proportions there. To-morrow the young Prince and all the horse take the field. [Probably taken near Sherburn, in Yorkshire, though not numbered. Written in cipher, but deciphered. 4 pp.]
April 28. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day, Present, Earl of Manchester, Lord Wharton, Sir G. Gerard, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierrepont and Wallop. Ordered,
1. That the troop which brought up the prisoners do quarter this night at Southam, and join the regiment to-morrow.
2. To write to the Committee at the army, according to the votes passed yesterday, for forces to be sent for relief of Taunton, and that the remainder do lie about Woodstock and Bletchington, co. Oxon., if they shall think fit.
3. To write to the Committee of Kent, to acquaint them with the pressure on Surrey by reason of Sir Michael Livesay's regiment lying there, and to desire them to provide money, that these troops may be hastened up to the army [of Sir Thos. Fairfax].
4. To write to the several hundreds of Lancashire to send their full proportions of men and victuals to the siege of Latham [House]. Also to signify the same to Col. Egerton, that he may certify who fails therein.
5. That Messrs. Scowen and Hodges shall speak with the Committee of the West about the supply of provisions for the forces which are to march westward. Also about providing ships or carriages for transporting the same.
6. To write to Sir Thos. Fairfax, desiring him to remove his forces which lie in Middlesex, and to give order for discharge of their quarters; to send the list presented to the Committee, and to examine the particular about the cashiered officers.
7. That the gent. of Middlesex be empowered to refuse lodging to such officers and soldiers as have not warrant from their superior officers, and have liberty to publish this to their county.
8. That the sub-committee for Windsor may meet and consider of the propositions now offered by Col. Whichcott.
9. Warrant to Erle to send four petards fixed to the army of Sir Thos. Fairfax, to be delivered to John Phipps.
10. That the petitions of Sir Chas Coote and the Mayor of Londonderry be referred to the sub-committee for Ireland.
11. That the Committee with the army [of Sir Thos. Fairfax] be desired to acquaint Lieut.-Genl. Cromwell what they resolve concerning the remainder of the forces that go not to the west.
12. To report to the Commons that they would be pleased to give order for the speedy ingathering of the money assessed upon the several counties for maintenance of the Scottish army.
13. That the letter from the Committee of Kent be reported to the House of Commons.
14. As also the paper given in by the gent. of the Isle of Ely.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 212–214. Copy. 2½ pp.]
April 28.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to the Committee of both kingdoms with Sir Thos. Fairfax's [army]. By the enclosed order you see the resolution of both Houses about the march of Sir Thos. Fairfax and Major-Genl. Skippon toward the west, and for the numbers that are to march with them. We leave this to your judgment, provided it exceed not 6,000 foot and 2,500 horse and dragoons, which we desire you with all expedition to despatch away. For the remainder of your forces we recommend it to your consideration whether it will not be fittest to send them to Bletchington and Woodstock, or those parts where they will lie in the fittest posture to oppose the march of the Princes [Rupert and Maurice] towards the [Eastern] Association and our own quarters. This will also be an encouragement for the recruits to come up when our forces shall be so near to Oxford, and so [our position] strengthened on that side. We have this day received a letter from Sir Thos. Fairfax, desiring 7,000 foot and 3,000 horse, yet, in respect the forces with you are the main strength left for the preservation of the [Eastern] Association against any attempts of the enemy in the absence of those forces, we conceive it not fit to exceed the number resolved on, but if you conceive a smaller number may effect that design, we desire you to send no more than may be sufficient for that service, leaving the rest for the protection of the Association and of those parts. What you shall resolve on concerning the forces to be left for securing these parts signify to Lieut.-Genl. Cromwell. Sent by Mr. Crips. [Interregnum 20 E., pp. 165, 166. Copy. 12/3 pp.]
April 28.
Derby House.
The same to Major Salkeild. We have appointed the troop that was Captain Pym's, and all the troop of Major Hurry, except the Scots, to recruit your troop. Having received these you are to march forthwith according to former orders. Given to himself, being then in town. [Ibid., p. 171. Copy. ½ p.]
April 28.
Derby House.
The same to the officer in chief command of Mr. Pym's troop. We have appointed all the troopers under your command for the recruiting of Major Salkeild's troop, which you are required to deliver over to him for this service. Given to Mr. Salkeild. [Ibid., p. 172. Copy. ⅓ p.]
April 28.
Derby House.
The same to the commanding officer of Major Hurry's troop. To the same effect as the preceding, but with the addition of the following clause,—"except those of the Scottish nation." [Ibid. Minute.]
April 29.
Newcastle.
38. Paper given in to the Scotch Committee. Whereas for the satisfaction both of the soldiers and the inhabitants of the English counties it has been often demanded by us, that just and exact accounts might be made up betwixt the regiments of the Scottish army and the country people, in their respective quarters, which was thought equitable and reasonable by the Parliament of Scotland, and accordingly condescended unto and appointed by his Excellency the Earl of Leven, and yet nevertheless sundry regiments have gone away without making any accompt at all, and some have left their quarters unpaid, notwithstanding they received their entertainment from the country according to the agreement of the Committees of both kingdoms, and many have not accounted for all that the people say they have furnished to them. In which regard for our own exoneration we desire that this Committee will appoint some persons of ability to join with such as shall be appointed by the Parliament or their Commissioners in every county where the Scottish forces have been quartered for taking and adjusting all accounts betwixt your army and these counties, which we hope may prevent future challenges and differences which otherwise we doubt may arise. [Certified copy, signed Wm. Rowe, Secretary to the Commissioners. 1 p.]
April 29. 39. Order of the House of Commons touching money owing to delinquents or malignants. That Sir John Jacob and the rest of the Old Customers, paying the 5,000l. owing by them to Mr. Seymour, to the Committee at Haberdashers' Hall, shall not be troubled by the said Committee, for money owing or payable by them to any delinquent or malignant, unless the House be first acquainted therewith and order given. Upon the report from the Committee at Haberdashers' Hall of the inconveniences that happen by pretences of discoveries of malignants' estates, and upon the desires of the said Committee, it is ordered that no person shall be henceforth received to make such discoveries, until there be first a recommendation from this House. [Printed in Commons' Journals iv., p. 126. Copy. 1 p.]
April 29. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Manchester, Essex, and Loudoun, Lord Wharton, Sir G. Gerard, and Messrs. Pierrepont and Wallop. Ordered,
1. That Major Buller shall command for the present the two regiments of Cols. Behr and Dalbier.
2. To write to Northampton to send 400 foot to Aylesbury, for some service about Oxford. The like to Newport [Pagnell] for 300, and to Warwick and Coventry for as many as they can spare for the same service.
3. That Lieut.-Genl. Cromwell's letter be reported to both Houses. To write to the City for hastening the levying of the money for the new [modelled] army, and for the recruits to be sent with speed.
4. To send to the Committee for the army to hasten away the pistols and money.
5. To write to Lieut.-Genl. Cromwell and Major-Genl. Browne, one to command the horse and the other the foot, till further order.
6. To write to Sir Michael Livesay to march with his regiment forthwith to Sir Thos. Fairfax. Likewise to Sir Thos. to inquire into the mutiny and punish such as he shall find to be most faulty in it.
7. Sir Walter Erle to certify this Committee whether there be in the stores any drakes.
8. That Col. Massie's letter be reported to both Houses.
9. That the petition of Col. Herbert be referred to the sub-committee for South Wales.
10. That Manchester and Gerard have leave to confer with Mr. Frogg about delivering up of any fort or garrison within the enemy's power.
11. That the petition of such officers of Essex's and Balfour's regiments as are dismissed from their several charges be reported to the House [of Commons].
12. Report made by Mr. Pierrepont from the sub-committee for Irish affairs to this Committee, which was accordingly voted by the Committee. Items of the report here specified.
[Day Book of Orders, Interregnum 8 E., pp. 215–218. Copy. 4 pp.]
April 29.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Thos. Fairfax. Complaint has been made to us of the great pressures on Middlesex by reason of the quartering of some forces there, whereby they are disabled to pay the contributions appointed for maintenance of your army. Let those that are of your army be removed, and their quarters discharged, also examine concerning the cashiered officers who pretend your warrant, and certify this Committee of the state thereof. Sent by Mr. Crips. [Interregnum 20 E., p. 167. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 29.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Michael Livesay. We wrote to you to march with your regiment to Sir Thos. Fairfax, but are informed by him that you are not yet come up, and that the work of recruiting and reducing is thereby at a stand. You are to march up thither without further delay, that this service be no longer delayed, which requires all expedition. Sent by Mr. Jennings. [Ibid. Copy. ⅓ p.]
April 29.
Derby House.
The same to the dept. lieuts. [of each] of the 6 hundreds of Lancashire. The advantage to your county by having Latham House reduced you well know. Forces have been appointed from the several hundreds of your county for this service, but as we understand they have not been so sent, or so maintained as they ought. By such a way of management you lengthen out your charge, dishearten your soldiers, encourage the enemy, and obtain not the place which still remains a thorn in your own sides, and an invitation to the enemy to relieve it and ruin you. See that the forces appointed for your hundred be so sent in and maintained that this work may be effectually accomplished. Certify us what you have done herein. We have written to Col. Egerton and to the other 5 hundreds. Sent by a messenger who came from thence. [Ibid., p. 168. Copy. 1 p.]
April 29.
Derby House.
The same to Col. Egerton. We have seen yours to Lord Wharton, and for the more effectual prosecution of the siege at Latham House, wherein the quiet of your county is so much concerned, we have written to the several hundreds to send in their appointed proportions of men and provisions. We hope they will not be wanting to that which is of such consequence to them, yet if any should fail of a full and timely supplying of their parts, let us know that further course may be taken with them. We desire you to make the best improvement you can, and to proceed with effect for the reduction of so important a place. Sent as above. [Ibid., p. 169. Copy. 1 p.]
April 29.
Derby House.
The same to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen of the City of London. We are informed that the recruits from the City for the army come but slowly in, and there is now great want of them. We desire you to hasten them away, and to take care for the collection of those assessments which are for the maintenance of [Fairfax's] army, without which they will be disabled for duty, and give discontent to the places where they may come. Sent by Bulmer. [Ibid., p. 170. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 29.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee at Northampton. The necessities of the west and present danger to Taunton require a speedy relief, which is ordered for them to be sent from the new army. Meantime we desire you to send from Northampton to Aylesbury 400 foot if you can spare them with safety to your garrison. These are to be employed with the rest of the army about Oxford against such of the enemy's forces as may move that way, and prosecute those several successes which our forces have lately had in those parts. This service we conceive to be of great consequence, and will be a means to preserve our own quarters from the incursions and depredations of the enemy. We recommend it to your especial care and expeditious despatch. Sent by Mr. Butler. [Ibid., pp. 170, 171. Copy=1 p.]
April 29. The like to Newport [Pagnell] for 300 foot. [Ibid. Minute.]
April 29. The like to Coventry and Warwick for as many as they can spare. [Ibid. Minute.]
April 29.
Derby House.
The same to Major Buller. Being informed that Major Salkeild cannot for the present attend the service to which your and his regiments are appointed, and which cannot admit of delay, we appoint you to take the temporary command of both those regiments, and to march with all expedition according to former orders. Take care that good discipline be maintained, and that the people where they come be not oppressed, wronged, or discontented by them to the disservice of the public. Given to himself. [Ibid., p. 172. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 29.
Derby House.
The same to Lieut.-Genl. Cromwell. Being informed that [General] Goring is upon his march toward Oxford, and that forces are sent up from the [our new] army to your assistance, we wish you to command the horse until further order, and have written to Major-Genl. Browne to command the foot. We desire you, by mutual correspondence and joint counsel, to conduct those forces, and to take the best advantages you can for opposing the enemy, and give frequent advertisements to us of the enemy's motions. Sent by John Priestley. [Ibid., p. 173. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 29. The like to Major-Genl. Browne, mutatis mutandis. [Ibid. Minute.]
April 29.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee [of both kingdoms] with the army [of Sir Thos. Fairfax]. We have, according to your desire, written to Major-Genl. Browne and Lieut.-Genl. Cromwell, as also to Northhampton for 400 foot, to Newport [Pagnell] for 300, and to Coventry and Warwick for as many soldiers as they can spare, with security to their garrisons. We have sent to the City to hasten the levying of their money for the army and to send up their recruits speedily, and have desired the Committee for the Army to despatch away the money and pistols. We desire to hear from you speedily concerning the motions of the enemy's forces, and whether the former intelligence you had concerning Goring's being at Marlborough doth hold true. We leave it to your consideration, being on the spot, what regiments of Waller's shall go to Gloucester and what for the west. Sent by John Priestley. [Ibid., pp. 173, 174. Copy=2/3 p.]