Charles II: December 1667

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1667-8. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1893.

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'Charles II: December 1667', in Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1667-8, (London, 1893) pp. 57-114. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/domestic/chas2/1667-8/pp57-114 [accessed 20 April 2024]

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December 1667

Dec. 1.
Pembroke.
John Powell to James Hickes. The Margaret of Stockholm is still in harbour; two vessels have arrived at Tenby from Bordeaux, laden with wine. [S.P Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 1.]
Dec. 1. John Powell to Williamson. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Dec. 1.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. The outward bound fleet is yet in port, expecting a fair wind. [Ibid. No. 3.]
Dec. 1.
Berwick.
Mark Scott to Williamson. Four light Margate men that set sail from London a month ago have arrived. [Ibid. No. 4.]
Dec. 1. Sarah Simpson to Williamson. Pray move Sir John Bennet that I may be continued in my employment; some persons have informed him that I complained of something concerning the [post] office, which has caused him to write word that he will no longer employ me in carrying the mail. [Ibid. No. 5.]
Dec. 2.
Chatham, 9 p.m.
R. Waith to the Earl of Anglesey. I desire orders as to paying off the Defiance, Lord Brouncker's orders differing from yours. The money here will employ me till the end of the week; I will then send for a further supply. [Ibid. No. 6.]
Dec. 2.
The Richmond, Kingroad.
Capt. Amos Beare to the Navy Commissioners. The Great Charles of Bristol came on board our ship and broke our spritsail yard and head, &c. I desire you will appoint some person to refit the ship, as it cannot be done here; I hope you will find the fault was not ours. [Ibid. No. 7.]
Dec. 2.
Milkmaid, Kilmar.
Thos. Stollard to the Navy Commissioners. I have been supplied by the victualler of Kinsale, according to your order. I hear not when I can begin to load, but will use my uttermost dispatch, there being no comforts in this dismal part of the country. With note of the rates at which Jos. Taylor can deliver 300 or 400 tons of timber now, and can have 2,000 or 3,000 tons ready by Michaelmas. [Ibid. No. 8.]
Dec. 2. News from Edinburgh of a dispute between the citizens and the soldiers. Three companies are ordered to quarter there, but the citizens keep them out, demanding their privilege granted by Act of Parliament, of keeping guard themselves. They continue their meetings, think the Act of Oblivion dubiously penned, and will not depend on it. [Ibid. No. 9.]
Dec. 2.
Weymouth.
John Pocock to Hickes. A Hamburgher has arrived from Bilbao, having lost all her masts and yards in a storm. [Ibid. No. 10.]
Dec. 2.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. There have been sad storms here for 3 or 4 days, and two vessels, one with oats and oil, and another with wheat, in coming for the haven, struck upon the piers, and were lost, but their men saved; a collier has been cast away near Winterton.
A letter has come to Dr. Brimsby of Yarmouth, wherein the following persons were nominated as having received money from the merchants for landing their wines: Lord Arlington, Mr. Ashburnham, and Mr. Hartly, solicitor, 500l. each; Mr. Williamson 80l., and the Serjeant of the House of Commons 50l. We hear that 30 of the Lords have fallen off to the Commons, and that the Duke of Albermarle is their leader; also that the bishops are the only persons who hinder the Earl of Clarendon's commitment. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 11.]
Dec. 2.
Bristol.
John [Fitzherbert] to Williamson. The arrival of the Barbadoes fleet has quickened the trade of the town, it being of great value, and very richly laden. The Great Charles, which was supposed to have foundered, has arrived in Kingroad, but the pilot imprudently brought her into Broad Pill, and being heavily laden, and the wind blowing hard, she sunk on one side, so that she has been under water every tide since, to the infinite damage of all her lading, except the cotton and wool. The merchants give all the rest up for lost, and it is doubted whether the ship will be recovered. [Ibid. No. 12.]
Dec. 2.
Treasury Chambers, Whitehall.
Sir George Downing to Williamson. The Treasury Commissioners desire you will move Lord Arlington for a copy of his last advices from the Governor of Bombay, in relation to its state and condition, they having promised to send it to the East India Company for their better information. I hear from my correspondent in Zealand that our prisoners there are set at liberty, except a few officers not comprised in my agreement with the Dutch ambassador, and that the said ambassador has hired a ship for their transportation to the Thames, which he has victualled, and allowed them five stivers a day for their maintenance till the wind serves. [Ibid. No. 13.]
Dec. 3.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Williamson. Two ships from Falmouth bound for France, and a Frenchman from Bordeaux with French wines for Bristol, have put into this port by stress of weather. [Ibid. No. 14.]
Dec. 3. John Clarke to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 15.]
Dec. 3.
Newcastle.
Rich. Forster to Williamson. I hear that 60 light colliers have come into the port. [Ibid. No. 16.]
Dec. 3. Dispensation for Sir Thomas Rous, High Sheriff of Warwickshire, to reside in Worcestershire, or where his occasions require. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 44.]
Dec. 3. Licences for the Hopewell, and the Anne of Bristol, to be made free of this kingdom. [Ibid. p. 48.]
[Dec. 3.] Petition and address of Lord Chancellor Clarendon to the House of Lords. His accusations are the greatness of his estate, and his influence with the King in managing affairs, whereby all the late misfortunes are imputed to him. Has nothing but what he owes to his Majesty's bounty, having received only the mere perquisites of his place, and not 5l. in bribes for favours. Was only one amongst others in advising the King; has had little influence since Sir Edw. Nicholas was removed, and always opposed the war with the Dutch. Is so far from having lately had the management of affairs that he rarely saw his Majesty alone. Has never meddled with the revenue, except to plan with the late Treasurer how to avoid the great excess of issue over income. [7½ pages, printed in Lords' Journal, Vol. XII. p. 154. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 17.]
[Dec. 3.] Copy of the above. [7½ pages. Ibid. No. 18.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
[Sec. Morice] to the Duke of York, Lord Admiral and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports. The King, by request of the House of Commons, commands you to send orders to all seaports for diligent care to be taken that the Earl of Clarendon, who has lately withdrawn, do not escape the kingdom. With note of a like letter to the farmers of customs. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 8.]
Dec. 3. The King to Lord General, the Duke of Albermarle. Viscount Fauconberg, Lord Belasyse, and Sir Thos Ingram, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, having requested for Col. John Lambert, prisoner in Jersy, the liberty of the island, and leave to take a house there for himself and family, the request is to be granted, and his Grace is to take effectual orders therein, on Lambert passing his word or giving security to remain a true prisoner in the island. [Ibid. f. 9.]
Dec. 3.
Portsmouth.
Affidavit by Jno. Dogett, merchant of London, before Sir Wm. Peake, Lord Mayor, that he, with Hugh Upton, Thos. Warren, and Samuel Travet are the owners of the ship St. Peter, having bought her in the time of the war for a valuable consideration, and that no alien or foreigner has any interest in her. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 19.]
Dec. 3.
Portsmouth.
Chas. Honywood to Williamson. The Fountain, formerly a Turkish man-of-war, has arrived at Spithead from Guinea. She left all in those parts very well, and lost but two men in the whole voyage. An agent formerly there has returned, and brought with him a great many small blacks. Capt. Darcy, commander of the Mary Rose, will sail shortly for Leghorn, his only want being men. [Ibid. No. 20.]
Dec. 3.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. To the same effect. The natives of Guinea hate the Holland inhabitants, and by a wile got the Governor of Cormantin, the gold finder, and a doctor of physic, and delivered them to the English; they are brought hither in the Fountain. [Ibid. No. 21.]
Dec. 3.
Harwich.
L. Osborne to Williamson. Thanks for your letter. I am still detained here on account of the tempest; the packet-boat has been obliged to put in for Yarmouth, and M. Quack has written to request the packet for the States General to be sent thither; but some Hollanders of quality, who have the packet, will not give it up, but have written to order the boat up to Harwich, saying they would protest against the master if he failed. They have so managed that the boat cannot start from Yarmouth, but must come here; I would else have gone thither to take it. [2 pages, French. Ibid. No. 22.]
Dec. 3.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to Williamson. Having had notice that the Dutch packet-boat was detained at Yarmouth, many passengers joined together to hire a vessel to take them to her; I will speak to Mr. Osborne to go along with them. A large flyboat with ammunition from Scotland for the Tower, and carrying the Scottish ancient, pendant, and jack, has come to anchor, fearing the weather; many ships are in sight, standing northerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 23.]
Dec. 3.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to James Hickes. The ships are still in port, expecting a fair wind. The commissioner sat on behalf of the proprietors, for examining persons that had saved any of the goods of the Sangue di Cristo, cast away at the Lizard. [Ibid. No. 24.]
Dec. 3.
Falmouth.
Thos Holden to Williamson. To the same effect. Has the commission given to the Prince [Rupert] for examining persons that bought goods out of the King's prizes since the last war been called in? [Ibid. No. 25.]
Dec. 3.
Leith, Scotland.
Edward Bond to the Navy Commissioners. I cannot get our money according to warrant, but as soon as I am clear, I shall stay no longer than to do the business I am upon; I am quite tired with this country, and had rather serve 7 years in England under your command than one month here. I have cast Capt. Strachan's cousin, whom he put in as master of the hoy, by the law, but he pleads that he expended the stores which he sold to supply the hoy with necessaries, because he could receive neither pay, victuals, nor stores from you. I know not when I shall recover the damages that I have case him in; I cannot come home without a cable. [Ibid. No. 26.]
Dec. 3. Joseph Webb to the Navy Commissioners. Sends an abstract of 8 bills due for oakum delivered into the stores since 15 March 1666, amounting to 261l. Beseeches them to consider his sad condition, and give order for the payment of 226l. balance due to him for the same. [Ibid. No. 27.]
Dec. 3.
Navy Office.
Warrant by the Navy Commissioners to the Clerk of the Cheque at Chatham, to enter Nathaniel Taylor, as pumpmaker and turner at Chatham, in the room of his father Robert Taylor, deceased. [Copy. Ibid. No. 28.]
Dec. 3.
Ordnance Office.
Fra. Nicholls and Edw. Sherburne to the Navy Commissioners. Desires that the iron work, saved out of the wrecks at Chatham, may be delivered to their agent, Mr. Gregory, to be employed for the service, being nothing the worse for the damage received. [Ibid. No. 29.]
Dec. 4.
Chatham.
W. Castell and 4 others to the Navy Commissioners. Have surveyed the wreck of the Royal Oak, and apprehend it most advantageous that the ship be built again, either at Chatham or in the river. [Ibid. No. 30.]
Dec. 4.
Treasury Office.
Sir Thos. Harvey to the Navy Commissioners. Desires that a person may be employed in writing books wanted for the clerks, as the business is extremely retarded. [Ibid. No. 31.]
Dec. 4.
Navy Office.
Wm. Barbour to Sam. Pepys. As the business at the Treasury Office is to be done at 8 constant hours daily, I dare not undertake it, because if I should be absent on any occasion, though but for an hour, I might expect to be discharged or lose your favour. I could have well discharged my duty at the Ticket Office for which service I offered myself, by redeeming an hour or two by night, if lost in the day, but this cannot be at the Treasury Office where, the action lying on three hands, the absence of one causes the cessation of the other two. Pray acquaint the Board thereof, and remember my bill for the time past. [S.P. Dom., Car. II 224, No. 32.]
Dec. 4.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The Barbadoes and Jamaica ships have sailed, but Sir Wm. Jennings with 3 of the King's, and 12 other ships, is here, outward bound. The violent winds since the 13th of last month have done much damage to the merchant ships coming up the Channel, some being forced out again, and others throwing part of their lading overboard. [Ibid. No. 33.]
Dec. 4.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. Forty laden colliers have sailed for the Thames, 3 ships for the Straits with red herrings and lead, and 3 for Rotterdam with piece goods and herrings. A ship has come in from Dantzic and Gottenburg with masts, deals, pitch, and tar, for the Navy, upon the French King's account, and a vessel from Flanders; also the Rotterdam packet with the postmaster of Rotterdam and several other passengers, who took horse for London. The packet-boat has since sailed for Harwich, to take in passengers who, for want of horses, could not come to it here. [Ibid. No. 34.]
Dec. 4.
Weymouth.
C. S[awtell] to Edm. Sawtell. A Hamburgher has put in here from Bilbao, through foul weather, having lost all her masts, and being otherwise much impaired; she is repairing her defects, and buying what she wants in the town. The Jacob has sailed for Malaga, and a small vessel for London. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Dec. 4.
London.
James Hickes to Williamson. I have not been abroad since I last waited on you, except attending 2 or 3 times by Sir John Bennet's desire on the committee at Westminster, and to no more purpose than to get a cold, which has created such an indisposition, that I now labour with more difficulty in my business than at any time since the great visitation. Mr. Ellis hints of a passage in your letter to him, that had you received more kindness from the office, it would not have suffered by it. I hope I am not concerned in anything of that nature, well knowing in the secret corners of my heart, as in all outward demonstrations of duty, that I have not acted or done anything to deserve a frown or hard thought from you. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Dec. 4. Wm. Davison to Williamson. I hope that ere this the Bishop, the Lord Keeper and Lord Arlington have spoken together, so that when the Lord Keeper comes to Council, we may know how our business stands, and receive such directions from you as may put us in the way of acting, so that we may get a bill drawn to put into the House. If the one I sent you does not satisfy, I hope the Lord Keeper will like it, though the Bishop do not, and it would not be amiss if you showed it to him. The Colonel and I have written the letter promised; he will meet him at the hall this morning, and I will be in the evening at the Council door to receive your commands. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 37.]
Dec. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Master of Sutton's Hospital to admit Lieut.-Col. James Barsey, who served his Majesty and the late King in the wars, as a pensioner, he being infirm by reason of his wounds. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 43.]
Dec. 4. Licence for the Marquis de Monbrun to transport 21 horses and 4 dogs into France. Minute. [Ibid. f. 43.]
Dec. 4. Warrant to the Commissioners of Prizes to order the Commissioners for Plymouth to deliver to Sir Edward Seymour, Bart, Sir Chichester Wray, Bart., and Sir Edw. Wise, K.B., the ship Concord of Rotterdam, a prize lying at Plymouth, and granted to them by the King. [Ibid. f. 43b.]
Dec. 4. Dispensation for Sir Robert Sewter, High Sheriff of cos. Cambridge and Huntingdon, to reside in Suffolk or elsewhere. Minute. [Ibid. f. 44.]
Dec. 4. Licences for making the Frederic of London, taken from the Turk, and the St. Peter, taken from the Dutch, and both bought by Englishmen, free ships. Minutes. [Ibid. ff. 44, 60.]
Dec. 5. Warrant for an order to the Lord Chief Justice of Common Pleas for removal of the Plea Rolls, from Richard II. to Edward VI., from the Court of Common Pleas to the Exchequer, there to be kept, and fitted with proper calendars, as they are likely to perish for want of convenient room, where they now lie. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 23, p. 586.]
Dec. 5.
Westminster.
The King to Sir Orlando Bridgeman, Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. You are to deliver up all the records, proceedings, rolls, &c., of that court, from the last of Richard II. to the first of Edward VI., into the custody of the treasurer and chamberlains of the Exchequer. [Latin. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 38.]
Dec. 5. Declaration by the woodmongers of London of their surrender of their patent, granted 29 Aug. 1665, to his Majesty. [Latin copy, pages. Ibid. No. 38A.]
Dec. 5.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Fountain from Guinea still rides at Spithead, expecting orders for the Downs, as also the Mary Rose to press seamen, for such ill husbands are those that were paid off from here, that few of them will go to sea until all [their money] is spent. [Ibid. No. 39.]
Dec. 5.
Pembroke.
John Powell to Hickes. The Golden Fox, with sugars and cottons from Barbadoes, and two ships with wines from Bordeaux have come into Tenby, as also two others for London. The Swede is still in harbour. [Ibid. No. 40.]
Dec. 5. John Powell to Williamson. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 41.]
Dec. 5.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to Williamson. Some laden colliers endeavoring for the Thames, two of them ran aground, but were got off; the Mary of Newcastle was bilged on the West Rocks, and her men quitted her; they returned the next day, but with very little hopes of saving her. Mr. Osborne has taken leave and gone on board the packet-boat, as also Sir [Sam.?] Sandes for Holland. Will launch the Resolution, a third rate, to-morrow. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 42.]
Dec. 5.
Leghorn.
Thomas Clutterbuck to the Navy Commissioners. Sends copy of his letter of Nov. 28th, and beseeches relief, and instructions for his better government in future. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 43.]
Dec. 5.
Whitehall.
Sir George Downing to the Navy Commissioners. The Treasury Commissioners have given directions to Sir Robert Long to receive and register such certificates on the 11 months' tax for wares as were signed by you, before receipt of directions not to sign any more. Their lordships being informed that the Earl of Anglesey has paid wages at Chatham before, as well as since January, they desire some of you to attend them to-morrow about it. [Ibid. No. 44.]
Dec. 5.
Woolwich.
Christopher Pett to the Navy Commissioners. Thanks for the care taken to supply provisions for the new ship building; if the timber is found fit, and we can speedily have it, the works will go on to your satisfaction. Capt. Clarke had little reason to trouble you, as the brass shiners and boat are ready for him when his men shall call for them. [Ibid. No. 45.]
Dec. 6.
Dover.
Thos. White to the Navy Commissioners. I send my account, and what is in store shall follow when the vessel calls for it. His Majesty shall have all, and there is not much wanting, considering the sickly times, when men were afraid of each other. None of the ships have miscarried in this harbour, when many others have broken their backs and sunk. Though a great quantity of canvas was stolen and hidden 10 months, yet I caused the receivers to bring it in again to the stores, so that not a nail was lost. I beseech that my care may be rewarded by paying me my due, for I have deserved my wages. [Ibid. No. 46.]
Dec. 6.
Deptford.
Jno. Cox and Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. Appraisement of the Casimir dogger, with the materials, as they were delivered into the stores, at prices named, amounting in the whole to 158l. 19s. d. [Ibid. No. 47.]
Dec. 6.
Woolwich.
Christopher Pett to the Navy Commissioners. I understand that a barge of timber is unlading at Deptford, although my necessity for it is such that before another can come, I shall be quite out of stuff for the men to work with. Mr. Shish only needs it to make ways for launching the ship; it is a great pity and prejudicial to the King, that timber of 36 and 40 feet long, and worth 3l. a load, should be put to so mean a use, where old timber of 24 feet would serve. I desire, if the barge is not unloaded, that it may be ordered here, or that the timber may be re-shipped and sent down. I am troubled that, although I was the person that first acquainted you that there was provision for building the second-rate ships in Whittlewood Forest, and was long soliciting an order for it, I should thus beat the bush and another catch the bird. [Ibid. No. 48.]
Dec. 6.
Drury Lane.
Earl of Anglesey to Robert Waith, paymaster. The Treasury Commissioners are now for paying the ships at Chatham, as was done at Portsmouth, in money since January, and with tickets before, to be paid here; you may guess the reason; I have therefore sent less money and printed tickets. Pray acquaint Lord Brouncker herewith, and as every ship is paid off, give notice what it comes to. [S.P. Dom. Car. II. 224, No. 49.]
Dec. 6.
Custom House, London.
Farmers of the customs to the Navy Commissioners. Recommend Capt. Glover, commander of the Enquiry smack, now their servant, for consideration for services. When the Sorlings was run on shore near Margate, and stranded, Glover repaired to her and saved 120 men, being the captain and company, and has been at some charge, as well as pains in the case. [Ibid. No. 50.]
Dec. 6.
Hull.
Charles Whittington to Williamson. A Hull vessel, laden with lead and cloth, has sailed for Hamburg, as also the Panther and Fan-fan, with two prizes taken by them, for London. Two ships have come in which had very sorry weather at sea. There are many wrecks on the coast. [Ibid. No. 51.]
Dec. 6.
Durham.
Dr. Thos. Smith to Williamson. I have been told the bishop is more inclined to yield than formerly to the desires of the country for sending up knights and burgesses to Parliament, on condition, however, that they will hearken to his recommendation in the choice of the persons. I am extremely glad he has you in his eye for one, and hope he will manage the affair so that it shall not miscarry; but to make sure work, I advise you to gain Colonel Tempest as your friend, for under the rose he is the factotum here, both in town and country; if you secure him, your work is done. Though my own interest is very small, it will be employed to the utmost to serve you. [Ibid. No. 52.]
Dec. 6.
Newcastle.
Rich. Foster to James Hickes. One new wine ship has come in, and the wines prove very good and beyond expectation, there being so much rainy weather in the gathering of the vintage. Your friend Bower is in the town, and begs remembrances. [Ibid. No. 53.]
Dec. 6.
Lynn.
Edw. Bodham to Williamson. A few colliers have come in, but not a quarter enough to supply this place and the country, which depends for coals from hence; people are giving 30s. per chaldron, whereas in other years 18s. used to be thought a high price. An order has come from the farmers of customs to the officers here, to make search for, and stay the Earl of Clarendon, if he should take shipping here or on the coast hereabouts. [Ibid. No. 54.]
Dec. 6. Commission for Robert Humes to be ensign to Sir Fras. Mackworth's company in Berwick. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 20, p. 184.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant appointing the Officers of the Great Wardrobe to be the master or deputy comptroller, surveyor, and clerk, and specifying the duties connected with each office, and other regulations for due execution of the offices of the Wardrobe. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 23, pp. 587-602.]
Dec. 6. Warrant for a grant to John Ogle and Thomas Jenney, of St. Andrew's parish, Holborn, of pardon for manslaughter of Thos. Danby, with restitution of lands and goods. [S P. Dom., Entry Book 28, p. 10.]
Dec. 6. Warrant to pay to Dr. William Child, in place of Hen. Ferabosco, deceased, 32l. 5s. for liveries for 1662 and 1663, and to allow him a yearly livery henceforth. [Docquet, Vol. 23, No. 164.]
[Dec. 6.] Petition of the Bristol merchants and shipowners trading to Newfoundland to the King and Council, for speedy protection against the French and Dutch, who threaten to swallow their trade, which in customs alone, by import of oils, wines, &c., from Spain and Portugal, in exchange for fish, brings in 40,000l. a year to his Majesty. [28 signatures. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 55.]
[Dec. 6.] Similar petition of 13 merchants and shipowners of London, trading to Newfoundland, requesting the appointment of a governor who, with 60 old iron guns, some small arms, 50 seamen and 150 landsmen, could make five or six harbours defensible, and thus greatly benefit the fishery. [Ibid. No. 56.]
Dec. [6.] Copy of the above, as sent from Wm. Horne, mayor, and 11 others, of Southampton. [12 signatures. Ibid. No. 57.]
Dec. 6. Statement of the advantges to be derived from sending a governor to Newfoundland to protect the trade, which is of the greatest benefit to the Western ports, and is the great nursery of seamen; but it is damaged by pirates and enemies, especially the French, who have sent out a governor and erected a fort. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 58.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
Order in Council referring the above petitions and narrative to the Earl of Anglesey, Lord Ashley, and three others, to examine and report thereon. [Ibid. No. 59.]
[Dec. 7.] Statement of the case of Wm. Palmes; that being seized of Ashwell Manor, co. Rutland, and of lands in cos. Nottingham, Derby, and York, on marriage with Mary, his wife, he settled all his lands, except those in Yorkshire, in trust for himself, her, and their children; but having now to sell some lands to pay debts, he desires to make an exchange, so as not to sell those in Yorkshire, which are his most ancient paternal inheritance. [Ibid. No. 60.]
Dec. 7.
West Cowes.
John Lysle to Williamson. Arrival and departure of ships. [Ibid. No. 61.]
Dec. 7.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to James Hickes. Asks him to deliver a paper enclosed to Williamson. Has no news to communicate. [Ibid. No. 62.]
Dec. 7.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to Williamson. The Resolution, a beautiful third-rate ship, was launched and swims a fine sight in the water; notwithstanding the day was windy and rainy, there were very many of the country people present. The collier that was injured upon the West rocks has been destroyed upon the Corke close to them; she had several goods belonging to the late governor of Tynemouth Castle on board. Can see nothing but her masts. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 63.]
Dec. 7.
The Richmond, Kingroad.
Capt. Amos Beare to the Navy Commissioners. Shall give dispatch and receive as many provisions as the ship will contain; hopes they know that the wrong the ship has received was not on his part. [Ibid. No. 64.]
Dec. 7. Capt. J. Perriman to the Navy Commissioners. Particulars of works done on ships named in the river, and of his proceedings on their Honours' business for two days. Desires they will speak to the Earl of Anglesey to pay the captains of the fire-ships, that he may clear his bill of Imprest, and be freed from the captains, who daily torment him for their bills. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 65.]
Dec. 7.
Ordnance Office.
Certificate by Edw. Sherburne and Jonas Moore to the Earl of Anglesey, that William Jones, gunner of the Isabella ketch, has delivered the remains of his gunner's stores, and an account of the expenditure. [Ibid. No. 66.]
Dec. 7.
The Diamond, Whitebooth Road, Humber.
Capt. John King to the Navy Commissioners. Broke ground with the Stadthaus of Haarlem prize from Hull Road, but put back with much difficulty on account of the weather. The Trinity Masters of Hull have furnished a pilot who is nearly blind; had he not been on board himself, they had sustained damage. Desires an order to the Trinity Masters to supply an able person to bring the prize about, as there is not any that will take the charge, she being so unruly in working. [Ibid. No. 67.]
Dec. [8 ?]
Sunday Morning.
M. Wren to Samuel Pepys. I desire you will expedite the Francis, as the wines will receive damage by lying at Rouen; the Swallow, if she had men, is not so fit a vessel for the purpose as the Francis. His Royal Highness has ordered the Leopard and two others to the buoy of the Nore, and desires to know whether the Board think fit to have them brought up. [Ibid. No. 68.]
Dec. [8 ?]
Sunday Night.
M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. I fear that the retarding of my letters by the messenger may have put you to inconvenience. I send the Duke's directions upon an Order of Council which is not distinctly drawn up. The Committee of Parliament will be with the Duke to-morrow about the business of Sheerness; do not attend the Duke to-morrow morning, as there is likely to be some business in the House of Commons at which I would not be absent, but you may come in the afternoon. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Dec. 8 ? Notice that the Company of Woodmongers surrendered their charter of incorporation on Thursday 5th [Dec. ?], before Sir Walter Littleton, Master in Chancery, as desired by Council, on account of the great abuses in the sale of fuel. [Ibid. No. 70.]
Dec. 8.
Dover.
John Carlile to Williamson. The master of the packet-boat brings news that the Earl of Clarendon is at the President's house at Calais, and was carried there from London by long seas in a boat belonging to the farmers of the Customs. Johnson, the pilot that cast away the Sorlings, and another who was confined for piracy, have broken out of Dover Castle. A great Dutch fleet has sailed through the Narrows homeward bound. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 71.]
Dec. 8.
Portsmouth.
Chas. Honywood to Williamson. The Fountain frigate from Guinea intends to sail up the river, and 5 merchantmen outward bound have put into the Road. [Ibid. No. 72.]
Dec. 8.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Fountain is ordered for the Thames, the Revenge is out of the dry dock, and the Mary Rose remains at Spithead waiting sailing orders. [Ibid. No. 73.]
Dec. 8.
Hull.
Chas. Whittington to Williamson. Two vessels have arrived from Holland, one from Newcastle and another from Hamburg, all of whom speak of the sad storms and great shipwreck on the coast. A Swede was driven from her anchors and ran ashore, but has been got off again in pretty good condition. [Ibid. No. 74.]
Dec. 8.
Letter Office.
A. Ellis to Williamson. The dispatch of the mails would be much accelerated if foreign letters were sent by themselves, as much time is spent in the Inland Office in separating them from the inland ones. [Ibid. No. 74a.]
Dec. 8.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson.] The flyboat Rotterdam has been run aground in Sandown Bay through the drunkenness of the skipper, and has since been broken up; but her men, sails, masts, and cables were saved. Sixty sail of Flemings have come into the Downs outward bound. [Ibid. No. 75.]
Dec. 8.
Berwick.
M. Scott to Williamson. Hears that Sir James Stewart, sometime Provost of Edinburgh, and Sir John Cheisly, both of whom have long been prisoners in Edinburgh Castle, have been sent from thence with a guard of horse to the Tolbooth of Dundee, upon a double account; first, because they would not subscribe the bond for securing the peace, all other declarations being waived; secondly, because they had so many visits from disaffected persons of their own stamp.
A great wind at Edinburgh blew down their Tron and half of the cock that stood in their great steeple. The Lubeckers and some other Hanse Towns, with the King of Sweden, are threatening to give letters of reprisal against Scotland, which is much feared by the merchants, and not without reason. Two ships, bound for France, were blown back into the Holy Island, when betwixt Tynemouth Haven and Berwick. [Ibid. No. 76.]
Dec. 9.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. Two vessels have arrived from Rotterdam with merchants' goods; two have set sail, one for that place and the other for Middleburg, their chief lading red herrings, and three are riding in the Roads, bound for London and the Straits.
The Earl of Clarendon is the whole talk of town and country, and his escape is laid upon the Lords; some make them all guilty, while others except the Dukes of Albermarle and Buckingham and the Earl of Bristol; their discourse runs so high as to justify the supreme power of the nation to be in the House of Commons, and that a peer ought to have no more privilege than any private person; I see nothing wanting but a leader to cause them to rise in open rebellion. They go as confident to their conventicles, with their books publicly under their arms, as others do to church, and the magistrates have been too remiss in their duty.
I was told by one who informed one of the justices of a meeting, that the justice said he must make oath that they did not use the book of Common Prayer, otherwise it was none of his business, and he should not take notice of it. I think the bellwethers of these flocks, being those that hold forth at the meetings, repair at this time from all parts of the country, and until they are suppressed, and liberty of speech regulated, I never expect to see a settled peace; their meeting houses are no other than tinder boxes, to strike fire upon all occasions, to set the nation in a flame, blown up by the tongues of the vulgar, which run every way amongst the multitude.
I pray that God will reconcile both Houses, and that it may be a' fair warning to all in public trust that honour their King, to do those things that are just and honest, and to know that they are not for themselves, but for the good and honour of the King and kingdom; when they are private persons, they gain but an ill name to themselves, but in public trust they bring scandal to the Government, and make all others suspected without cause; one truth with the common people will gain credit for 100 lies. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 77.]
Dec. 9.
Weymouth.
John Pocock to James Hickes. I observe that let me send what I will, it is never put into print, but a parcel of simple stuff, written by some other hand, about ships bound from place to place. I can give the best account of ships bound out, but have forborne such things because they are frivolous; eight ships have arrived from Holland bound for Bordeaux. [Ibid. No. 78.]
Dec. 9.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to James Hickes. A small vessel has been cast away at St. Ives, laden with hides and provisions bound for France; the men were all saved, and gave one half of the goods for saving the other half. A vessel has come in from Yarmouth bound for France. [Ibid. No. 79.]
Dec. 9.
Pembroke.
John Powell to Williamson. The Golden Fox still remains in Tenby, with the two vessels laden with wine from Bordeaux. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Dec. 9.
Pembroke.
John Powell to Hickes. To the same effect; also that the Swede formerly mentioned is still in harbour. [Ibid. No. 81.]
Dec. 9.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. A Dutch merchantman, laden with wine, has put into Bristol to stop her leaks. A Majorca vessel, the Santa Maria, is lying in Penarth Road outward bound, with several sorts of goods; the captain, having a private commission, is much feared by the French merchantmen in Bristol. [Ibid. No. 82.]
Dec. 9.
Minehead.
John Maurice to Williamson. The Lion of Youghall has arrived from Lisbon with sugars, and is bound for Bristol. The master brings news of a great revolution in the kingdom, the King being driven off his power, his brother set up in his room, and the Queen going into a monastery, which was all effected in one night, without any effusion of blood. An Anabaptist whom I advised to forbear their public meetings and rebellious speeches defied me to suppress them, presuming upon the favour of the neighbouring justices. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 83.]
Dec. 9.
Treasury
Chambers, Whitehall.
Sir George Downing to Williamson. The Treasury Commissioners desire that if the Governors of the East India Company require to be more particularly informed as to any matters relating to Bombay, you would move Lord Arlington to accommodate them out of his last papers and advices. [Ibid. No. 84.]
Dec. 9.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. A vessel has sailed for Dieppe with 50 seamen, who have gone over on a promise of being employed in French vessels; 10 or 12, jealous that they should be turned into the French King's service, have stayed behind. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Dec. [9.] Message from the King to the houses of Parliament, for their adjournment for Christmas on 18 December, requesting them meanwhile to review the Militia Acts and those for public defence; as all our neighbours are strongly arming, it is fit to be provided against accidents. [More full than given in Lords' Journals XII., 161, and Commons' Journals IX., 34. Ibid, No. 86.]
Dec. [9.] Three drafts of the said message, giving 26 January or beginning of February as the day of the re-assembling of Parliament. [Ibid. Nos. 87-89.]
Dec. 9.
Jersey.
R. Manley to his cousin, Rob. Francis. I am perplexed not to have heard from you since I came here. We are very quiet, nor do we hear much of our neighbours stirring, save that at St. Malo they talk much of a war with Holland. Let the enclosed be delivered to my Colonel, and enquire how I stand at Court, for I have ill-willers here who try to alienate our Governor, Sir Thos. Morgan, from me. Write anything of consequence for me to John Blewet, merchant, St. Malo; but else by Southampton to Dr. Carteret. [Ibid. No. 89A.]
Dec. 9.
West Cowes.
John Lysle to Williamson. The ships reported to have sailed hence have returned with a contrary wind, as also 4 more from the Downs with ballast, bound for France, and a Swede from Madeira with wine for Holland; she reports that 9 or 10 English ships were laden and gone from thence to Barbadoes and other parts of the West Indies. [Ibid. No. 90.]
Dec. 9.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. A French man-of-war of 40 guns coming into the Downs was espied by an Ostend privateer of 2 guns, which concluding him to be a merchantman, made sail after him, and when near Walmer Castle, came up by his side. The Ostender showing his men, the Frenchman poured in a whole broadside, thereby killing many men, when the Ostender ran for it; he confesses he has 17 wounded and slain, whereof 8 are laid on his deck dead, but it is said he had 16 or 17 killed besides those wounded. The French man-of-war is in the Downs, but the other is gone to Ostend. His loss is lamented here, they loving him and hating the other. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 91.]
Dec. 9.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson.] A Deal ketch arrived from Lisbon says that the Queen and Duke have possessed themselves of the King's person, and confined him to three rooms in the palace, and have killed his chief secretary and some others of quality; that the Queen complains of the King's insufficiency for marriage, and that the Queen and Duke of Portugal have resolved to join themselves together in marriage. [Ibid. No. 92.]
Dec. 9. Exchequer order for payment of 2,000l. to Charles Henri de Bellegarde, Marquis de Montbrun, out of the rent of the farmers of customs, for interest due to him; from the King. With transfer by him of his interest thereon to John Bernard, and transfer by Bernard to Laurence Dibusty, 15 Oct. 1668. [Ibid. No. 93.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
Petition of Mabella, wife of John Cole, of Odiham, co. Hants, to the King, for a lease in reversion for her husband, of the house and grounds called Coxleases, in Lyndhurst, New Forest, co. Hants, now settled on him by former patents, in recompense for her services to the late King in his closest restraint in the Isle of Wight. With reference thereon to the Treasury Commissioners. [Ibid. No. 94.]
Dec. 9. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 18, p. 275.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
Petition of Henry, Marquis of Worcester, to the King, to disallow an assignment made by John Hall, receiver of part of the revenues of the duchy of Lancaster, of a judgment for 6,000l. due to him by Edward, late Marquis of Worcester, in part of moneys owing by him to his Majesty on his receipts, by colour of which assignment the lands of the marquis are extended in his Majesty's name, though worth 1,200l. a year, whereas the whole revenue in charge of that receiver is only worth 400l. With reference thereon to Sir Thos. Ingram, Chancellor of the Duchy. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 95.]
Dec. 9. Copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 18, p. 275.]
Dec. 9 ? Similar petition to the same effect. With notes annexed of one of two forms in which the reference should be drawn up, and a reference thereon to the attorney or solicitor-general. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 96-98.]
Dec. ? Petition of Toby Chauncey to the King, for dispensation of absence from the county of Northampton, for which he is chosen high sheriff for the present year, as his business will require him to repair to London and elsewhere. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Dec. 9. Licence for Tobias Chauncey, high sheriff of Northamptonshire, to live out of the county as his occasions require. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 17, p. 270.]
Dec. 9. Licence for transport of 15 horses into France custom free, with 12 servants to attend them; granted by request of the Comte de Lude and Earl of St. Alban's. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, p. 44.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Duke of York to order the Navy Treasurer to pay 500l. to Sir John Chicheley for services at sea, out of the moneys arising from the sale of ships, after payment of 4,000l. already ordered. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 20.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
The King to the Duke of York. We ordered the ship Fannican, lately sunk for the security of the river, to be delivered as a free gift to Capt. Hen. Millet, for his former sufferings and late reverses; but finding her of greater value than was supposed, a moiety of her profits only is to be given to Capt. Millet, and the other moiety to Capt. J. Fortescue. [Ibid. f. 20.]
Dec. 9. Certificate by Charles Moore that Christopher Corney has appeared before Dr. Leoline Jenkins, Judge of the Admiralty Court, and taken the oath according to the form sent in by the Navy Commissioners, to be true to his Majesty’s service. Endorsed, “Certificate of Mr. Corney’s being sworn to the work at the Treasury Office.” [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 100.]
Dec. 9.
Dover.
Thos. White to the Navy Commissoners. Capt. Strode, the governor’s brother, received orders from him to have an appraisement made of the Crown Mary; I chose 2 appraisers to join theirs, and they valued it at 175l. 12s., deducting 71l. 4s. for damages. Seeing which way they would steer, I demanded whether the merchants, when a ship had performed her voyage and freight was paid, used to make good what the ship cost at her setting to sea, showing what charge his Majesty was at to fit this ship out; they told me that no freight was yet paid, and that was left to your Honours; and because I told them they were not called to judge the value of the ship, but what damage she had received in the service, they desired me to depart the room till they had done. The charge for the waiter in looking after it from 21 Oct. to 9 Dec. is risen by the Governor’s not taking the ship before. [Ibid. No. 101.] Enclosing,
Inventory and appraisement by Richard Jacob and three others of the Crown Mary, amounting to 175l. 12s. [1 1/4 pages. Ibid, No. 101i.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. Is commanded by his Royal Highness to recommend the case of Mr. Gravier, and to desire them to give him all possible dispatch. [Ibid, No. 102.]
Dec. 9.
Chatham.
Edw. Gregory to the Navy Commissioners. Commissioner Pett mentioned the circumstances which induce him to believe that Sir William Rider’s tar was received into the King’s stores. No business ever created more trouble or occasioned so much discontent, and if you look into the matter impartially, though you will find it more my misfortune than my fault. Messrs. Holt and Barrow being removed, the whole blame, with inconveniences and reflections, lights upon my single shoulders, and is therefore borne the heavier. [Ibid. No. 103.] Enclosing,
Two affidavits by Edward Whitton and Wm. Allen, before Lord Brouncker, that Thos. Watson, of the Friends’ Adventure of Scarborough, on 27 Dec. 1665, entered 24 lasts of tar and 12 of pitch at the Custom House at Rochester, which they saw delivered into the stores at Chatham on 6, 7, and 8 Jan. 1666. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 103i.]
Dec. 9.
Woolwich.
Christopher Pett to the Navy Commissioners. Has ordered Mr. Sawel of Poplar to wait on them in order to furnishing broom, heath, &c. Will have to expend 40,000l. or 50,000l. in finishing the new ship; complains of Mr. Shish’s taking 100l. worth of timber to launch his ship. Must put off all the men if timber is not brought in. [Ibid. No. 104.]
Dec. [9 ?] Advertisement of 4 ships to be sold in the dockyard at Portsmouth on Friday the 13th inst. By the candle; the buyers to have liberty to pay two-thirds by Navy Bills, and the other in ready money. [Ibid. No. 105.]
Dec. 9.
Westminster.
John Fowler to the Navy Commissioners. His Royal Highness wishes the late commanders of the lost ships, Coventry, Elizabeth, and Sorlings, to be tried by a court martial in the river. Is commanded to use all diligence for perfecting the preparatories relating to each. Has received copies of the examinations of officers named, but desires the originals, attested by Lord Brouncker and Sir John Mennes; the others are of no use as evidence. [Ibid. No. 106.]
Dec. 10.
Westminster.
John Fowler to the Navy Commissioners. Is informed by Capt. John Lightfoot, commander of the Elizabeth frigate, that sundry original papers and certificates relating to him and that ship’s loss are in the Navy Office. Desires they may be sent together with the other papers about the Coventry or Sorlings, as no preparatories in order to a speedy trial can be made without them. [Ibid. No. 107.]
Dec 10. Robert Mayors to [the Navy Commissioners]. Has been to Brentford, and finds there is about 100 loads of Mr. Tunstall’s timber tendered to Mr. Pett for the new ship; but most of it is too small for the purpose, and one portion cannot be obtained without the other. [Ibid. No. 107a .]
Dec. 10.
Chatham.
Wm. Rand and 4 other officers of the chest to Sam. Pepys. Ask restoration of their iron chest and its contents; being about to renew the trust of one of their farms, they require the lease that is in it; its detention has been a great obstruction to their business. [Ibid. No. 108.] Annexing,
The Navy Commissioners to Mr. Bodham. We desire you to deliver back to Mr. Minors the chest of papers belonging to the Governors as he received it; we do not think it likely that for some time we can meet constantly enough on that commission to benefit the chest. 24 Dec. 1667. [Copy. Ibid. No. 108i.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Sir Eliab Harvey of licence to build outhouses for a dairy, corn-loft, and pigeon-house, to make fish ponds, and to enclose land to make bricks, &c., near his mansion house, called Rolles, in the parish of Chigwell, Waltham Forest; and also to enclose Loughton Lane, leading from his Essex mansion house to Epping, on his making another road as convenient instead. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, ff. 44b-46.]
Dec. 10. Message from the King for adjournment of the two Houses of Parliament from Dec. 17 to the beginning of February. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 23, p. 603.]
Dec. 10. Pass for John Vaughan and his servant to Ostend. [Ibid. p. 603.]
Dec 10.
Newcastle.
Rich. Forster to Williamson. Fourteen or fifteen light ships and flyboats have come in; we expected a great fleet, coals being so dear in London, but suppose the uncertain weather hinders them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 109.]
Dec. 10. Certificate by John, Lord Belasyse that during his residence at Tangiers, several English seamen who were set ashore there informed him that 2 or 3 English merchant ships of great value, wherein they had been mariners, were taken by the French King’s ships off Tunis, brought into Toulon, and made prize; and that it was done before the war between England and France was declared, and before the embargo or taking of any of the French ships by the English. [Ibid. No. 110.]
Dec. 10. T. Barker to [Williamson ?] I sent your letter to [Phil.] Fell, of All Souls, who returned for answer that Mr. Scudamore shall not fail of a cause for absence, and that his friends at All Souls would be glad to hear where he is. Scudamore had licence from the college to travel, and still may have; therefore 1 pray you to get the letter desired for his arrears. [Ibid. No. 111.]
Dec. 10.
Ordnance Office.
Estimate by Fras. Nicholls and 3 others of the charge of making three brass demi-cannon of 11 feet long, with a travelling carriage and other necessaries mentioned to complete the same; total 1.278l. 6s. 4d. [Copy. Ibid. No. 112.]
Dec. 10.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Williamson. Only one Dutch vessel bound to Rochelle has passed into this port since his last. [Ibid. No. 113.]
Dec. 10.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to Williamson. The Dutch packet has come in, and will go out with the next tide. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Dec. 10.
Durham.
Thos. Smith to Williamson. I am glad you have made an interest in Col. Tempest; if he stands firm, taking it for granted the Bishop will, your business will be done; but the Colonel is a subtle man, and you will do well therefore to get as fast hold of him as you can; such a declaratory letter from the magistrates there as you mention would do very well; I cannot understand that any application has yet been made to them about it, and until my Lord or Colonel Tempest owns the business, I doubt it might do hurt rather than good. I have imparted it only to one friend whom I can trust;, and who can do you more service than forty such as myself, but I have taken all fitting occasions to be speaking of you to the townspeople, and have given such a character of you as you deserve. I am returning to Cockermouth; I shall be glad to hear how you proceed; I will do all I can to forward your interests. [ pages. Ibid. No. 115.]
Dec. 10.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The paying off of ships laid up, the making survey of stores upon the death of Sir Wm. Batten, prior to the succeeding surveyor’s taking charge, and the setting forth to sea the ships ordered, have been perfected; the Fountain is gone from Spithead for the Downs. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 116.]
Dec. 11.
West Cowes.
John Lysle to Williamson. About 20 ships have arrived from Amsterdam, Hamburg, &c., outward bound. The Batchelor’s Adventure, of Yarmouth, with herrings for Bordeaux, was met by an Ostend privateer of 4 guns, which plundered the master and men of their best clothes, broke open their chests, and took all their money and strong liquors, &c., to the value of 20l.; several Dutchmen complain of the like affronts off Dover. Two Ostend men-of-war have come from cruising, one of which has sent 2 rich prizes to Ostend, and another with fish to Biscay. [Ibid. No. 117.]
Dec. 11.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. Two vessels have come in, one from Hamburg, and the other from Rotterdam, and 20 light colliers have set sail for Sunderland and Newcastle; also 2 ships for the Straits, their loading being chiefly herrings and lead. [Ibid. No. 118.]
Dec. 11.
Portsmouth.
Charles Honywood to Williamson. The Fountain is still at Spithead; Sir Wm. Jennings has come into the Road with the Sapphire, and has sailed with the Mermaid for the Straits. There is to be a sale here of the prize ships, formerly delivered to the Navy Commissioners. [Ibid. No. 119.]
Dec. 11.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. Fifty sail of Dutch merchantmen have gone out, and 17 or 18 English and other ships are in the Downs. [Ibid. No. 120.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
Pass from Sec. Morice for John Bulteel to go beyond sea and return to England. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, p. 46.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
Sir George Downing to the Navy Commissioners. Desires they will quicken the paying off the growing charge in all places, the Earl of Anglesey having received 30,000l. yesterday for seamen’s wages. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 121.]
Dec. 12.
Woolwich.
Wm. Bodham to Sir Wm. Penn. Has thought of Sir John Shaw’s hemp business, with grief that his Majesty should be so much abused, by spurious allegations and pretences of a merchant, as to sign away 1,000l. at a clap, contrary to the judgment of the Navy Commissioners, who must be allowed to understand far more in such cases than Whitehall. Gives 7 reasons to show that the orders received from the King and his Royal Highness were unduly obtained. With note [by Chris. Pett] in answer to Bodham’s statement. [2½ pages damaged. Ibid. No. 122.]
Dec. 12.
Chatham Dock.
Wm. Rand and John Brooke to the Navy Commissioners. Send a certificate of a survey of provisions in the Henrietta. Boutwell being examined as to a yard and a half of coarse cloth taken from Burrowes, says that he took it in jest, and threw it to a maid living in the dock to make a waistcoat of; and that had he demanded the money for it, he would have paid it. [Ibid. No. 123.]
Dec. 12. M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. Asks if there be any ketch, or other small vessel, fit to be sent to Rouen to bring over some wine for the King’s use. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 124.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. Asks the number of men employed in the summer guard, in order to the declaration for victuals next year. It is resolved that the new ship at Portsmouth, and the repairs of old ones shall be entered on, and the Slothany let alone for the present, for which they shall have an order, that they may signify it to Col. Middleton before he comes from Portsmouth. [Ibid. No. 125.]
Dec. 12.
Pall Mall.
Sir Wm. Coventry to the Navy Commissioners. I desire that the bills for freight of John Wigginer and two other commanders of ketches for attending Sir Jeremy Smith to the northward, may be paid speedily, as they chiefly undertook the voyage upon the encouragement I gave them that I would intercede for their being paid their arrears. [Ibid. No. 126.]
Dec. 12. John Huntington to the Navy Commissioners. Asks if the Adam and Eve hoy shall remain at Woolwich weighing ships, or go up to load timber on the Trent, which is deeper by 4 or 5 feet in winter than in summer; wants victuals. [Ibid. No. 127.]
Dec. 12.
Treasurer’s Office.
Rob. Maddocks to Thos. Hayter. The Guernsey is to be paid to-morrow, and you must give the company notice to appear in the office in Broad Street. Sir John Mennes must have notice to pay, as Sir Thos. Harvey will not be there. [Ibid. No. 128.]
Dec. 12.
London.
A. Ellis to [Williamson]. I find the packets from Lisbon are the same that came here with some ship letters from Deal; I would have dispatched them had a messenger been at my disposal; understanding that Mr. Stanny’s man is alone to carry his Majesty’s packets between the Court and this place, I hope I shall be excused in not knowing what more to do but wait his coming, as also in the dispatch of the French and Flanders letters, which also stayed 4 hours for his coming. [Ibid. No. 129.]
Dec. 12.
Treasury Chambers.
Sir Geo. Downing to Williamson. I am desired by the Treasury Commissioners to return the docquet for Sir Edward Carteret; it is a business wherein they are very unwilling to do anything, not knowing either the value of the thing thereby granted, or to what value Sir Edward and his partner desire to be gratified, without both of which they will pass nothing away belonging to the King. [Ibid. No. 130.]
Dec. 12.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Sir Wm. Jennings has come with the Sapphire into Spithead, where he is to be paid, and then proceed, in company with the Mary Rose, to the Straits, with Sir Thos. Allin. [Ibid. No. 131.]
Dec. 12.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to Williamson. The Black Cock, with deals, &c., from Norway, and several others, have put in here for shelter, [Ibid. No. 132.]
Dec. 12.
Pembroke.
John Powell to Hickes. The Golden Fox remains at Tenby. [Ibid No. 133.]
Dec. 12. John Powell to Williamson. To the same effect as the preceding. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 134.]
Dec. 12.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to James Hickes. A terrible clap of thunder blew the western door of Manaccan parish church, being fast locked, and of great bigness and strength, into the chancel, all shattered to pieces, and the lock into the minister’s seat; it almost blew a great stone of 4 feet long and proportionable thickness out of the eastern window, and made a hole underneath it that a man might creep through; it rent the walls from top to bottom, cast down the four pen-rails of the tower, and threw down one of the bells; cracked the tower as far as the leads, and a stone, as much as a man could carry, was cast upon an adjoining house, and fell through the roof upon a chest, and thence upon a bolster where two children were abed, but did no more hurt. The wind blew but an ordinary gale, as several thatched houses and mows of corn joining the churchyard had not the least rent or damage. The Hamburg merchant and several others have gone out for Portugal and the Straits. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 135.]
Dec. 12.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. To the same effect as his 2 last letters to Hickes. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 136.]
Dec. 12.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Williamson. The London merchant ships continue here through contrary winds and storms, and a Dutch vessel from Amsterdam bound for Bordeaux has come in. A sad accident happened to the church of Manaccan, on the other side of Helford Harbour, the night the storms were so raging and the thunder so terrible; it carried the roof clean off into the churchyard, clove the corners of the walls asunder, blew down part of the tower, and the leads of the church were so blown up against the tower that they wrapped about it like a wet cloth. With other particulars to the same effect as above. I had the relation from several who have been spectators, and I hear the people are scared from going nigh, expecting it to fall continually. [Ibid. No. 137.]
Dec. 12. Warrant for a grant to George, son of Sir George Downing, of the office of one of the four Tellers of the Exechequer in reversion, after the placing of Sir Thos. Clifford and — Vernon, who had previous reversions. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 23, p. 604.]
Dec. 12. Draft of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 137A.]
Dec. [12]. The King to the Attorney General. We are informed that Henry Marquess of Worcester, is seized, to himself and the heirs of his ancestor, William Lord Herbert, of Chalton Manor, Hants, and Crookham, co. Berks, yearly value 485l. 2s. 5d.; and also of the reversion in fee in the Crown of Wollaston, and other places in South Wales, and the Marches, value 405l. 0s. 10d. At his request we are willing to grant him the reversion which is in the Crown of the said lands, and in consideration thereof, he is to settle Raglan Manor, co. Monmouth, yearly value 600l., on himself, for life, and then on the Earl of Essex and Sir Hen. Capel, and their heirs, preserving the contingent remainder to his wife and sons and heirs. Also the manor of Methenny, alias Llandenny, co. Monmouth, value 580l., in like manner. You are therefore to prepare the deeds accordingly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 138.]
Dec. 12. Entry of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 23, p. 605.]
Dec. [12.] The King to the Attorney General. Order for the said grant, he taking care for payment of the rent of 88l. 3s. 10d. heretofore payable thereon. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 139.]
Dec. 12. Entry of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 23, p. 606.]
Dec. ? Petition of Mallimer Pritchard to the King, for a place in Sutton’s Hospital; served the late King as cook 34 years, and is now 72, and past labour. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 140.]
Dec. 13. Letter recommending admission to the Charterhouse of Mallimer Pritchard, 35 years cook in the royal kitchen. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 17, p. 271.]
Dec. 13. Warrant to [Sir Wm. Wylde,] Recorder of London, and the sheriffs of London and Middlesex, to suspend the execution of sentence of burning in the hand against John Ferrers, found guilty of the manslaughter of Simon Mountfort. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 10.]
Dec. 13. The King to the Dean and Chapter of Westminster. The 12 canons are bound to perpetual residence, but there are only 11 lodgings for them, so that sometimes a senior and useful prebendary is without lodging. You are to adopt the practice of Windsor and other churches, permitting the seniors to have the choice of lodging on any removal, so that none but a junior could be wanting a house. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 19, p. 67.]
[Dec. 13.] Draft of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 140a.]
Dec. 13. Grant to Dr. Robt. Boreman of a prebend at St. Peter’s, Westminster. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 19, p. 69.]
Dec. 13. The King to the Dean and Chapter of Durham. We commend Dr. Isaac Basire, prebendary there, for full allowance of profits, &c, although he cannot keep the required residence, being engaged in a tedious Exchequer suit to recover the rights of the rectory of Stanhope, and other occasions requiring his attendance in London. [Ibid. p. 68.]
Dec. 13. The King to [the Bishop of Durham]. We recommend for the first void prebend in that cathedral M. Durel, well known to you for constant loyalty, which forced him to live many years in banishment, and for zeal to the Church. [Ibid. p. 69.]
[Dec. 13.] Draft of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 140b.]
Dec. 13. Answer of Sir John Monson, Bart., to the bill of complaint of Sir John Bennett and Elizabeth, countess dowager of Mulgrave, his wife, in reference to the claim of the countess to 1,000l. jointure and a moiety of the product of certain alum works left her by her late husband, to be paid by the defendant. [20 sheets. Ibid. No. 141.]
Dec. 13. Commission to Charles Lord St. John of Basing, to be Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire. [Docquet, Vol. 23, No. 165.]
Dec. 13. Warrant to the treasurer of the Chamber to pay to Thos. Fitz, musician in ordinary, 110/. A year, for life. [Dec. 23 & 28. Ibid Nos. 165, 169.]
Dec. 13. Licence to Sir Thomas Cooke, High Sheriff of Worcestershire, to reside in London or Westminster. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 46.]
Dec. 13.
Hull.
Charles Whittington to Williamson. Several vessels have arrived from Rotterdam, and other places named. A great fly boat, coming from London, was put ashore at Flamborough, but escaped; the same day a vessel of Newcastle came aground at the back of their South Pier, but was got off again. A Flushingher was cast aground near Bridlington, and broke all in pieces, and of 8 men, only 2 escaped. Seven bales of madder, some flax and hemp, and several other goods have since come ashore. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 142.]
Dec. 13.
Clehonger, Herefordshire.
H. Aubrey, Jun., to Williamson. Asks that Sir James Bridges, High Sheriff of Herefordshire, who has his settlement in the neighbouring county of Salop, may be dispensed to continue at his usual dwelling, observing the times of his especial service at the assizes. [Ibid. No. 143.]
Dec. 13.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to [Williamson]. Two ships that sailed for the Straits have put back by contrary winds, and two others have come in. Three vessels ran aground within a mile of Calais, where they are forced to get their loading of herrings ashore, and hang them in the fish-house there, the ships being mostly under water at high tide; but they are since reported to be got off, and to have put into Calais Haven. [Ibid. No. 144.]
Dec. 13.
Plymouth.
Sir John Skelton to Williamson. The Mary Rose of Guernsey has been plundered by the captain of an Ostender, of 660 pieces of eight and 13 pistoles. Having taken the master and mate’s examinations, I find it very probable to be one Stanthwait, an Englishman, who pretends to have a Spanish commission; I have had several complaints from merchants plundered by him. A ship lies here from Martinico, and several ships that put back by foul weather. I have sent 80 letters to the post-house, which came by a Jamaica man. [Ibid. No. 145.]
Dec. 13.
Newcastle.
Rich. Forster to Williamson. Thirty light ships, mostly colliers, have come in, and there are above 160 sail in port. Hears of the loss of 2 belonging to Newcastle. The masters of the ships fear they will have to wait until after Christmas, on account of the stormy weather. [Ibid. No. 146.]
Dec. 13.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Williamson. Several ships bound to Calais, Ireland, Virginia, &c, put to sea, but were forced back by contrary winds; 26 sail bound for Holland, &c, have put in, for a fair wind to proceed on their voyage. [Ibid. No. 147.]
Dec. 13. John Clarke to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 148.]
Dec. 13.
Portsmouth.
Account by St. John Steventon of the sale by inch of candle of 4 vessels named, amounting to 806l., for which the parties who bought are to pay one-third in ready money, and the other in Navy Bills in 14 days after. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 149.]
Dec. 13. Similar account, with a slight addition. [Ibid. No. 150.]
Dec. 13.
Treasury. Chambers.
Laur. Abbott to Sam. Pepys. Asks him to do all that is fitting to procure an allowance to Capt. Juxon’s men for services rendered in the Golden Hart. Mr. Wren promises to do his best therein. [Ibid. No. 151.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Order in Council—on petition of the bailiffs, jurates, and inhabitants of Guernsey, of 29 December last, for enjoyment of their ancient charters and privileges, when it was ordered that they should attend the Attorney-General with their charter, and that he should present the heads, with his opinion about the renewing of their privileges, which he has done as follows:—
They are to continue exempt from all customs, tolls, taxes, &c., from which they were before freed. In time of war, enemies as well as friends may freely trade thither.
They may determine their own causes, except in such cases as, by the laws and customs of the islands, are to be examined by the King.
They shall not be sued out of the islands for anything happening there, except in cases reserved to the King.
They shall have their liberties confirmed, under their former rents and services.
They shall not pay customs on goods transported to England.
The rector of St. Peter’s shall have, as before, 60 qrs. Of corn yearly from the King’s revenues there.
For repair of the pier, and other public uses, they may receive such petty customs money as they had temp. Eliz.
Also on paying 20s. a year, they may have the weighing and measuring of things, and the profits thereof, as they had them temp. Eliz.
All their liberties to be confirmed, with a saving of their allegiance to the Crown of England, and to the King, in right of the Duchy of Normandy, and saving appeals to the King as formerly.
Confirmation of lands given to churches, hospitals, and schools.
Confirmation during pleasure of licences to export beer, victuals, and coal, from certain ports of England, provided a list of the things desired be brought from the Captain of the Castle, or the bailiffs and jurates.
These premises being considered, it was ordered that the Attorney-General prepare a warrant for signature, in confirmation of the privileges granted 3 Car. II. [Ibid. No. 151A.]
Dec. 13.
Ratcliff Cross.
Capt. Thos. Blackman to Thos. Hayter. Asks for 20 tickets more, those already sent being expended, and some men sick on shore, and others carried on board other ships. [Ibid. No. 152.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. His Royal Highness thinks the Swallow ketch will be a very fit vessel to send to Rouen with the Kitchen for the wine. Desires them to let the commander know, and to furnish him with all speed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224 No. 153.]
Dec. 13. Same to the same. Desires they will order the Dartmouth to Woolwich, that what she wants may be done with all speed; being designed for the winter guard, it is high time she was in the Downs. The order for the Slothany being made a hulk bears date the 9th instant. [Ibid. No. 154.]
Dec. 14.
Bristol.
Daniel Furzer to the Navy Commissioners. Hopes to have the Richmond repaired by Tuesday. Particulars of the damage done by the Great Charles coming aboard her, and how the accident occurred, as also the names of the owners, all of Bristol; the person to blame was the pilot, Peter Dee. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 155.]
Dec. 14.
Trinity House, Hull.
Richard Ripley and Richard Robinson, wardens, to the Navy Commissioners. We perceive some complaint has been made of want of sufficient pilots for ships from Hull to London, for which there is no just reason. Capt. Thorpe, the pilot we appointed, may be aged, but not blind, as he had so much sight and judgment as not to carry down the ship in the night, when the wind failed and the tide was against them. We have power to nominate pilots but not to compel them to go. [Ibid. No. 156.]
Dec. 14.
London.
William, Lord Widdrington to Sam. Pepys. I am informed by Matthew Woodhouse, master of a hoy, that some of the under officers of the Navy have seized a vessel of mine. I am confident it is without your knowledge, and therefore shall make no complaint but to you, and beg a speedy order for her release. [Ibid. No. 157.]
Dec. 14. M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. Did not get the order of the King and Council for Harwich time enough to send his Royal Highness’s orders thereupon; the substance thereof is that the yard at Harwich is to be paid off, and Mr. Deane only continued in the service there. [Ibid. No. 158.]
Dec. 14. Robert Coytmor, purser of the Antelope, to the Navy Commissioners. Has been in petty warrant since 1 November, and been forced to issue the company sea victuals, through the victualler not supplying them. Asks orders to make good the deficiency, or shall not have sufficient for the voyage. [Ibid. No. 159.]
Dec. 14.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. It was indifferent to me if the barge of timber had been sent to Woolwich, but I know that there was not one piece in it that would make a beam, and am sure it is converted to the best advantage; if not, I am willing to suffer out of my salary. The greater part was taken ashore and drawn to the saw pits, so I could not answer your desires. Reasons why Deptford dock requires thicker launching planks than Chatham. [Ibid. No. 160.]
Dec. 14. Rob. Maddocks to Mr. Hayter. Has put up the Victory prize and the Orange to be paid on Monday, and desires him to give the men notice of it. [Ibid. No. 161.]
Dec. 14. Reasons why the House of Lords dissents from the vote of the House of Commons for a proclamation summoning the Earl of Clareudon to be brought to his trial, and has passed a bill of banishment against him instead. [Printed in Lords' Journals, Vol. XII. p. 171. S. P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 162.]
Dec. 14.
Newcastle.
Rich. Forster to Hickes. Some ships have passed by the bar, but I cannot say what they are. Your friend, John Bower, and other masters of ships, have been with me, and drunk your health. [Ibid. No. 163.]
Dec. 14.
Weymouth.
C. S[awtell] to Edm. Sawtell. Arrival of vessels; one from Jersey or Guernsey has brought in horses and disbanded soldiers. [Ibid. No. 164.]
Dec. 14.
Weymouth.
John Pocock to Hickes. A barque from Normandy says that 2 troops of horse of 80 and 60 have been raised there within 2 months, and that the drums are daily beating for volunteers to serve in the intended army in Flanders next spring; that the general discourse is of a war with Holland, and that the new imposition which the French have put upon English manufactures in those parts puts a great stop to trade. An Ostend privateer of one gun, and a double shallop from Dieppe, together with 6 others from St. Malo, &c., have also come in. [Ibid. No. 165.]
Dec. 14.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. A vessel of Weymouth from Guernsey, put in by contrary winds, reports that all things are well there, but that no boat can put out from France; the Mary of Lyme, which left Morlaix a week ago, was separated from the company of some Topsham men and others, and there is fear of her safety. Hopes for good news of some Lyme men who left Bordeaux long since. [Ibid. No. 166.]
Dec. 14.
Burlington.
John Hill to James Hickes. Several ships mentioned have been forced aground by the easterly winds, and the Anne of Flushing put ashore to the northward of Burlington Piers; only two of her men and some of the goods were saved, the master and 5 more being drowned. The ship is broken to pieces. [Ibid. No. 167.]
Dec. 14.
West Cowes.
John Lysle to Williamson. All the ships that were here have been despatched save a Hollander, laden with deals, masts, and materials for shipping, which stays for further advice, fearing surprise by the Ostend privateers who swarm these parts. An Ostend privateer arrived with a small French vessel in ballast, and having left her prize here, is under sail with the frigate to cruise after more; the Charles II., another Ostend privateer, of 12 guns and 98 men, sailed for the Bay of Biscay; another is fitting herself, and will sail shortly, commanded by Hamilton, a Scotchman. Biscay men-of-war have set upon the Grande Partie's fleet, taken all, save 4 or 5, and carried them into the Groyne. An English pink has come in from Portugal, laden for London. [Ibid. No. 168.]
Dec. 15.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Williamson. Five vessels have come in from the East, and 40 outward bound wait for a wind. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 224, No. 169.]
Dec. 15.
Pembroke.
John Powell to Hickes. A Bristol ship has arrived, laden with goods for Virginia; another Bristol vessel has sailed for Lisbon. [Ibid. No. 170.]
Dec. 15. John Powell to Williamson. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 171.]
Dec. 15.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Sir Wm. Jennings in the Sapphire is at Spithead, and has had supplies. Sir Edw. Spragg has been to look after the Revenge, which he is to command in the Narrow seas this winter; he finds her forward, but wanting men, and is gone to London to provide them. There has been a sale of the King's Dutch ships, and they have sold well. [Ibid. No. 172.]
Dec. 15.
Berwick.
Mark Scott to Williamson. A Newcastle tobacco merchant, returning from Scotland, with 10l. English money and some dollars, was stopped near Berwick by an officer of the Custom House of Scotland, who told him that no one was to carry money out of the kingdom, without an order from the Lords of Council or the Custom House at Leith. There have been great coast storms all the week, and great falls of snow and rain. [Ibid. No. 173.]
Dec. 15. Pass for 10 Irish soldiers, who lately served in Sir Edward Scott's company in the King's regiment of guards, to go to France. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 23, p. 607.] Annexing,
i. Certificate by Sir Edward Scott that the above-named soldiers served in his company in Col. John Russell's regiment, and conducted themselves as dutiful and loyal subjects. Dec. 13., 1667. [Ibid. p. 607.]
Dec. 16.
Woolwich.
William Hannam to the Navy Commissioners. Supplied Capt. Langston of the Princess with cables, giving him 2 new ones in place of 2 spoiled by neglect, and he is as well fitted as any ship; is sorry he should trouble them in the business. Complains of the neglect of officers in giving their attendance on board, especially those of the Hampshire; desires he may appoint a boatswain to look after her, there being not one officer aboard; the pursers take no care to clear the ships, whereby they might come at ballast to lighten them, and make them fit to lie ashore. [S.P. Dom., Car. II 225, No. 1.]
Dec. 16. W. Castell to the Navy Commissioners. Went to the Port of Rye in Sept. 1666, and spent 15 days about the King's affairs; meantime was disappointed of 571l. for fitting fire-ships, and has ever since been out of that money. Fitted several frigates, amounting to 3,257l.,and received 700l. imprest, and a bill for 228l. more. Desires to be allowed it as ready money for the ships he has bought by the candle. What makes his necessity the greater is that he is still out about 1,500l. for building the Defiance. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Dec. 16.
Dover.
Thos. White to the Navy Commissioners. The appraisers said Capt. Jacob would not let them make any other appraisement than value the naval provisions fallen in since the Crown Mary entered the service. I showed them what had been expended on her; they judge the damage at 15l., but the bill was 7ll. 14s.; I spoke to Capt. Jacob, who will send you an answer. The remains of stores are ready when you send a vessel for them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 3.]
Dec. 16.
Woolwich.
Chris. Pett to the Navy Commissioners. Without a speedy supply of broom and heath, cannot carry on the works. [Thos.] Sawell, of Poplar, is willing to serve upon such rates as he sells to others for ready money, and was at the Navy Office to know their pleasure, but not called in; has ordered him to wait on them again, and hopes they will agree with him, as he has bought up all that commodity in the whole country, and it will be much dearer in a few months; wants a supply of elm and oak timber. [Ibid. No. 4.]
Dec. 16.
Barbadoes.
William Poole to the Navy Commissioners. The Prosperous has found the way to her old station, but without her masts. Three commanders, appointed to survey her, having reported that she would not be worth the charge bestowed on her refitting, I sold her for 200l., and had the bills of exchange made payable to myself, and at my arrival designed to tender an account. I have not been acquainted to sell any of the King's goods, but this was of such great necessity that I hope I have not done amiss. I have delivered the bills of exchange to Sir John Harman, with one hogshead and 4 barrels of indigo, to secure their payment. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 5.]
Dec. 16. Grant to Dr. Robert Boreman of the Prebend in St. Peter's Church, Westminster, void by the death of Dr. Thos. Gorges. [Docquet, Vol. 23, No. 166.]
Dec..
Amsterdam.
Sir John Webster to the King. Thanks for the passport to come to England to make my address to you. My not coming was occasioned by my relations intending to cheat me of my freehold estate, whereby I have been necessitated to follow process in law in the Court of Holland, where I found justice with expedition. From thence my adversary appealed to the High Court, which appointed Lords de Bie and Hadden commissaries to examine and report to the assembly; there I obtained sentence to my full content, so I render thanks to both courts, and crave that the like expedition may be granted to the inhabitants of those lands in the Courts of England. Lord Jan Meerman, Burgomaster of Leyden, sent ambassador to your Majesty, is a man of worth, who owes great respect to the royal family.
I served your Majesty in affairs relating to England and Ireland from 1648 to 1661, with such zeal that envy itself cannot oppose; yet Sir Wm. Davidson produced a warrant from you to recall a pretended commission to me of 20 Sept. 1662, which was done without your Majesty's knowledge. O'Neale and Davidson—having been instrumental for the loss of the Turkish company's goods to a great value, through their folly and greediness, and having been reproved by me for it—procured the aforesaid act in my disrespect; Laurence Loe well remembers how well I had secured the goods, as he was employed by the Turkish company in the business. If the warrant to Davidson was obtained by your Majesty's knowledge, I submit patiently thereto; else I crave the renewal of my former commission to remove the reproach; I have received no retaliation for my services or disbursements, and for my providing the fleet in Goree when in danger of the Earl of Warwick, and for other accounts.
William, Duke of Hamilton, left 24,000 guelders in my hands; I understood that he was slain at Worcester, and no one coming to demand the money, I gave public notice in England and Scotland that I had money of his for his wife and children; William Davidson and Andrew Coale came with a paper from Lokyer and Swinton, to which I gave credit, declaring that Lady Anna Hamilton was the right heir; whereupon I let Andrew Coale have money to redeem a chest belonging to the late duke, in Zealand, in which were found papers whereby it appeared that the children of James, Duke of Hamilton, were to inherit the dukedom, but duke William's lady and children the personal estate. Davidson and Coale then procured letters from Cromwell to the magistrates of Amsterdam to have the money delivered to them, and by that means the duke's children were cheated of it. As William, Duke of Hamilton, was a loyal subject, you should have knowledge of the truth, so that his lady and children may seek redress while I am living to witness. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 6.] Annexing,
Charles, Prince of Wales, to John Webster. Having been informed by Sir Wm. Boswell, his Majesty's Resident with the States General, and others, of your great zeal for the service, I tender my acknowledgment and kind acceptation thereof, and intreat you to continue the same good affection.Helvoetsluys, 26 July 1648. [Copy.]
Prince Charles to the same. The pressing necessities of my affairs has forced me to send my secretary to intreat assistance; pray believe that I shall have no greater care than to see you satisfied, &c. [Copy.]
The King to the same. Having had great and frequent evidences of your many services for the last 20 years, we appoint you factor, commissary, and agent for all affairs relating to England and Ireland in matters of trade and merchandise, at Amsterdam, with power to make application to the chief magistrates there for advice and assistance when required, and they are desired to receive and allow such your requests, as may reasonably be expected from them.Whitehall, 10 Sept. 1661. [Copy. Ibid. No. 6.]
Dec. 16.
London.
Declaration by Sir Wm. Peake, Lord Mayor, and the Aldermen of London, that John Sybrants, mariner of London, has sworn before them that he and other subjects of the King are the sole and lawful owners of the Cooke of London, 260 tons burden. [Ibid. No. 7.]
Dec. 16.
Weymouth.
C. S[awtell] to Edm. Sawtell. A Weymouth vessel from Bruges reports the fears there lest the French should attempt them by coming over the rivers on the ice; and that there is no trading, because the goods, whether carried by horse or by land, are seized by the French. The vessel has brought back most of its drapery, as unable to sell it. Vessels have arrived for and from Bordeaux. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 8.]
Dec. 16.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. Meetings are so frequent that instead of gaining on them to bring them to church, they draw others from church to their erroneous ways; they meet in such numbers as to cause fears; 200 or 300 met at the house of Thos. Raven, a common councillor, and present chamberlain; had the Act been put in execution, their numbers would have been lessened, but the government of the town is much altered the last 2 years. An Ostender has come in, chased by a French caper. [Ibid, No. 9.]
Dec. 16.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to James Hickes. The southward fleet is detained by a south wind. An Ostend man-of-war shot 2 guns at the Brothers' Friendship, of Yarmouth, bound for France, took from her some herrings and cordage value 20l., and beat the master, and then made him pay 10s. for the 2 shots, and sign a testimony that he had been kindly used. An Ostender has brought in 2 prizes. There are 80 Dutch merchantmen with convoys, bound for St. Eudons, in Portugal. Another Ostender is offering money beforehand to get seamen. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 10.]
Dec. 16.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Williamson. Arrival of ships; an Ostend privateer has robbed a Yarmouth vessel. Another in Pendennis has taken 2 prizes. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Dec. 16.
Deal.
Ri. Watts to [Williamson]. The outward bound merchant fleet has sailed; there is a strong report that a hurricane in Virginia has spoiled all the tobacco and many houses. [Ibid. No. 12.]
Dec. 17.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Notices of ships in harbour; the Revenge is fitting for the winter guard, and the Mermaid for the Straits. The paymaster has paid all the ships, and gone for London. [Ibid. No. 13.]
Dec. 17.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The packet has come in with passengers, and sailed for Holland, but not a word of news. [Ibid. No. 14.]
Dec. 17. Peter Flower to Williamson. Has Lord Arlington received the fees which Sir Allan Apsley pretends to be due from the new levies of his regiment? viz., 6l. from every captain, lieutenants 4l., ensigns 40s. [Ibid. No. 15.]
Dec. 17.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to James Hickes. A Falmouth ship, bound for Tangiers, is cast away in Mount's Bay. The outward bound fleet has sailed with a fair wind. [Ibid. No. 16.]
Dec. 17. John Clarke to Williamson. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Dec. 17.
Hull.
Chas. Whittington to Williamson. A vessel for Rotterdam has put into the Humber, being damaged by the storm; the Employment has been obliged to return from Hamburg, with her rich lading of cloth and lead, the Elbe being frozen. [Ibid. No. 18.]
Dec. 17.
Dover.
John Carlile to Williamson. The articles sent are generally false, and grounded upon malice; the mayor has a pique against me for telling the truth; I got a parcel of printed papers at the beginning of the Dutch war; to secure that none should pass in or out of the kingdom without examination; I will do nothing but what is just, and hope my friends will appear for me. The Marquis de Monbrun has gone for Dieppe in the Henrietta, and the Earl of Clarendon to Calais; I will try to get a correspondent there. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 19.]
Dec. 17. "Extract," being notes that a vessel from Guadaloupe brings news that the English have taken Cayenne from the French 26 Sept., and are gone to Surinam; also that a vessel from Cowes brings news that some privateers of Biscay met the French fleet off the Grande Partie, and took all but 4 or 5. [Ibid. No. 20.]
Dec. 17. Col. John Russell to Williamson. Wants a commission for Mr. Home to be ensign in Sir Fras. Macworth's company. [Ibid. No. 21.]
Dec. 17.
London.
Affidavit by Sir Wm. Peake, Lord Mayor, and the Aldermen of London, that George Smith, of Newcastle, has deposed that he and others of the King's subjects are the sole owners of the Mary of Newcastle, burden 100 tons, which they bought during the late war, and manned with foreigners. [Ibid. No. 22.]
Dec. 17.
The Lion, Barbadoes Road.
Sir John Harman to the Navy Commissioners. Has received the provisions sent by the America and 2 others, which have eased him of much care and trouble, and would have done more had he had the least intimation that any was to be expected. Shall hasten home when the rest have arrived and been distributed. [Ibid. No. 23.]
Dec. 17. Sir Denis Gauden to the Navy Commissioners. I suppose on examination it will be found that the pursers who complain for want of petty warrant victuals are necessitated to expend the sea store. They had what they desired except butter, cheese, and fish, but I allowed them the full allowance of flesh days, which is my loss and not theirs. The butter and cheese were not fit to be issued, having exceeded the time of warranty; the providing more, in lieu thereof, is a double charge to me, these being still in store, except so much as I have sold to very great loss. I ordered the agent at Leith to dispose of what he could, which he did, but more will be found upon the place than is yet brought off. Let things be strictly examined, and no more expected from me than I am obliged or able to perform, unless I am answered in what you were formerly acquainted with. [Ibid. No. 24.]
Dec. 17. Rich. Green and three other pursers of Sir Thos. Allin's fleet to the Navy Commissioners. Desire satisfaction for the want of butter and cheese; being in harbour victualling, and the victualler not sending any on board, are necessitated to issue flesh in lieu thereof. The purser of the Monmouth also desires payment of two bills for necessary money. [Ibid. No. 25.]
Dec. 17.
Deptford.
Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. Asks for a supply of timber and oakum to finish the works on the ship, before she goes into the water. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 26.]
Dec. 17.
The Richmond, Kingroad.
Daniel Furzer to the Navy Commissioners. Has received 1,060 tons of timber from the forest of Dean, felled by Sir John Wintour; 200 tons is lying there squared and ready for carriage, and 100 tons is yet standing of timber fit for the Navy, accounting 40 feet to the ton. Has ended the works of the Richmond, which will be ready this week. [Ibid. No. 27.]
Dec. 17.
Ordnance Office.
Jonas Moore, Rich. March, and Edw. Sherburne, to the Navy Commissioners. Are ready to deliver the broken guns required for mooring of the yachts at Greenwich, when they shall appoint. [Ibid. No. 28.]
Dec. 17. Rice Freeman, purser of the Hampshire, to the Navy Commissioners. I came into the river on 20 October, and applied to the victualler for lighters to take ashore the provisions, as the ship was appointed to be laid up, but my daily applications and your letter to Sir Denis Gauden have not yet done it. I fear their continuance on board will cause such embezzlement that I shall be unable to pass my account. [Ibid. No. 29.]
Dec. 17.
Portsmouth.
John Shales to the Navy Commissioners. Has attended the payment of the ships in port with the rest of the clerks, and sent the books from time to time to the clerk, Shall be always ready to attend the like or any other business, being out of employ by the lapse of the survey of the victualling. [Ibid. No. 30.]
Dec. 17.
Portsmouth.
John Shales to Sam. Pepys. Sends by Lord Anglesey an abstract of the money paid to ships in that port, with particulars thereon; it will not exceed 39.000l.; believes that the sum transmitted was above 40,000l., and that a considerable part of it has been misemployed; has suggested this to Col. Middleton. Lord Anglesey should take his agent's account as soon as possible, for no cash is left, and several considerable sums have been remitted to London. Is coming to London, unless wished to remain here. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 31.]
Dec. 18.
Dover.
Thos. White to the Navy Commissioners. Capt. Jacob summoned the appraisers together, and they made a certificate of the damages. Thinks they have done what is in reason; desires payment of the money due to that town. [Ibid. No. 32.] Encloses,
i. Certificate by Capt. Richard Jacob and three others that the damages the Crown Mary has received in his Majesty's service will amount to 17l. 15s.; that she was sent to cruise by order of Sir Thos. Teddeman; and that she was out at sea a month. Dover, Dec. 18, 1667. [Ibid. No. 32i.]
Dec. 18. William Newland, purser, to Sam. Pepys. The only obstacle in paying his accounts depending with Sir Wm. Penn is an allowance for leakage of brandy and oil; the first by defective casks, and the other by an impossibility to prevent waste of-such a liquor in so hot a country. Desires that he may have what is equitable, and that the wages of his captain may be paid him, towards reparation of 300l. worth of his own goods, which the captain has detained from him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 33.]
Dec. 18. M. Wren to Sam. Pepys. Asks where the Swallow ketch is which is to fetch the wine from Rouen; doubts whether she is paid off, and whether there was not some mistake in propounding her for that service. Desires him to set it right soon, "for the interest concerned in the matter of a good wine is a powerful and a pressing interest." Sir William Jennings meets with no order for his payment, though he needs very little, and may be ordered to go away before the rest of the squadron. [Ibid. No. 34.]
Dec. 18.
Bristol.
John Fitzherbert to [Williamson]. The Blossom from New England brings word that there was no news of the Governor of New York's arrival. A fine Bristol ship returning from Marseilles was boarded by 4 Algerian men-of-war, but dismissed with all civility, all on board being English; next day 2 French men-of-war met them, and enquired after the Spanish galleons they were waiting to surprise, but hearing no news thereof, dismissed them. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Dec. 18.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. Arrival and departure of vessels for Lisbon; one of them left behind him his long boat, purser, and 8 men sent ashore for beer; the Dutch fleet and some English bound for France have sailed. The Ostender has sent both his prizes to Falmouth. A fleet of Dutch merchantmen bound for France has come in from Plymouth. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Dec. 18.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. To the same effect as the preceding, and his letter to Hickes of the 16th instant. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 37.]
Dec. 18.
Bristol.
James Baskerville to Williamson. All is quiet; 15 or 16 ships have sailed for Virginia and the West Indies. [Ibid. No. 38.]
Dec. 18.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. There were 400 or 500 at the conventicle named in his last; they flock together in other parts of the town, discouraging those who come to public worship, and who fear they may be secured at church. The conventiclers give out that Parliament winks at these things, and that proposals to that effect have been tendered to them. They expect Mr. Bridges, a grandee of the Independent faction, shortly, and several outed ministers are supplying his place. Mr. Ottee, once a bodice-maker, in the late times minister of Beccles, was one.
Thinks those who comply not with Church government should not be trusted with civil power. The aldermen and common council are of 2 parties, Episcopal, and Presbyterian, who call themselves moderate Episcopals; till within 2 years, the latter were kept back from the office of bailiff, and then these meetings were put by, and none admitted as alderman or common councilman without receiving the sacrament; but now no care can be taken to suppress meetings when so many of their wives flock to them. A Yarmouth vessel has been lost on the sands near Harwich. Some hogsheads of Bordeaux wine have come ashore on the coast. [Ibid, No. 39.]
Dec. 18. Petition of Anne, widow of Sir Rich. Fanshaw, to the King, for a further lease, free of all rent, for 40 years after the death of the Queen mother, of the rents of assize, fines, profits, and perquisites of court, belonging to her manors of Tring and Hitchin, at the high rent of 161l. 18s. 4d.; has lost 1,000l. paid short on her husband's accounts as ambassador to Spain and Portugal, and the interest for 3 years. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 39A.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
Reference of the above petition to the Treasury Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 18, p. 276.]
Dec. 19. H. W. to Sir Philip Musgrave. Capt. Gower and his wife have invited me over; I wish I could go to see if anything considerable be in agitation in those parts of the country. I still go to the meeting's at Raby Castle; Cocks is very respectful and the others very familiar to me. The Duke of Buckingham is much cried up among them, as a discoverer of the late designs of Papists, and it is expected he will have many of them called in question; he is said to be much in esteem, and to have entertained Major Wildman, who had been prisoner since the Restoration, and called him and another the wisest statesmen in England.
It is rumoured that when De Ruyter came in with Sir George Askew, the Chancellor removed, De Ruyter having given out that he intercepted a letter of Chancellor Hyde's when the packet-boat was taken, inviting the French forces to come to Chatham, which they would have done had not the Dutch seized the opportunity. I hear that Justice Sanderson has hopes of the 20l.; I wish I had the small part of it intended for me, I would not then delay going amongst such as I know. [S.P. Dom., Car. II 225, No. 40.]
Dec. 19. Articles of impeachment against Peter Pett, late Navy Commissioner:–
1. He neglected and refused to moor the Royal Charles, on orders from Lord Admiral the Duke of York, and thereby it became a prey to the enemy.
2. He neglected the orders of the Duke of Albemarle, appointed commander of all armies and land forces, on 11 June last, to bring up the said ship to a place of safety.
3. He refused to give orders to Capt. [John] Brooke, master attendant at Chatham, to prepare anchors and tackling for the said ship.
4. He neglected the Lord-General's orders to sink the Sancta Maria, in the Channel within the chain, whereby divers of the King's ships were destroyed by the enemy.
5. Being ordered by the Duke of York to make ready 30 boats for defence of the river, he employed some of them to carry away his own goods, allowed others to be similarly diverted, and seized a boat of Sir Edw. Spragg's, whereby many of the King's ships were lost.
6. The Navy Commissioners ordered him on 4 June to command all captains on land to their ships, and to be vigilant and careful in his charge; but when the Lord-General arrived, he found that of 300 persons under his command and in the King's pay, only 10 were ready on the invasion of the enemy.
7. The Lord-General having appointed soldiers to raise batteries to defend the Navy, he refused them tools, though there were plenty in the stores when his lordship had them broken open.
8. Being ordered on 11 June to send oaken planks for platforms and batteries to oppose the enemy, though there were oaken planks in the yard, he sent only deal ones, which broke through on discharge of the guns. [ pages. Printed in Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., pages 42, 43. SP. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 41.]
Dec. 19. Memoranda [by Williamson] of proceedings [at the Committee of the House of Commons] relative to Pett's charges, examinations thereon of the several witnesses, &c. [5 pages. Ibid. No. 42, 43.]
Dec. 19. List of 5 public Acts of Parliament passed 19 December 1669. [Ibid. No. 44.]
Dec. 19. Table of public and private Acts passed on 19 December 1667. [2 pages. Printed. Ibid. No. 45.]
Dec. 19. Act for taking the accompts of the several sums of money therein mentioned. [17 pages. Printed. Ibid. No. 46.]
Dec. 19. Act for banishing and disenabling the Earl of Clarendon. [3 pages. Printed. Ibid. No. 47.]
Dec. 19. Act to make prize ships free for trade. [5 pages. Printed. Ibid, No. 48.]
Dec. 19. Act for assigning orders in the Exchequer without revocation [3 pages. Printed. Ibid, No. 49.]
Dec. 19. Act for settling freedom and intercourse of trade between England Scotland. [3 pages. Printed. Ibid. No. 50.]
[All printed in Statutes of the Realm, Vol. V., pages 624-630.]
Dec. 19. Notes from the Act of Parliament of the names of the Commissioners appointed to sit at Brooke House for taking the accounts of public moneys; they are to continue 3 years, and have 1,000l. a year for diet and 2,000l. for rent. [See Statutes of the Realm, Vol. V., p. 624. Ibid, No. 50a.]
Dec. 19. Memoranda of proceedings in the House of Commons, from 14 Oct. to 18 Dec. 1667. [Similar to those printed in the Commons' Journals under the respective dates, but not duplicates; 35 papers. Ibid. No. 51-85.]
Dec. 19.
Whitehall.
Message from the King to the Houses of Parliament, adjourning them to 6 Feb. 1668. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Dec. 19.
Westminster.
Commission to the Lord Keeper, Lord Robartes, Keeper of the Privy Seal, the Dukes of Buckingham and Albemarle, and Earls of Lindsay and Manchester, to notify the Royal assent, and to the Lord Keeper to affix the Great Seal to certain Acts passed in Parliament, as the King cannot be present as usual in person. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 86a.]
Dec. 19. Warrant for a pardon to Henry Guy for omitting to enter a certificate of having taken the Oath of Allegiance before he became an Officer of Excise, as ordered by the late Excise Act, under penalty of 50l. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 23, p. 608.]
Dec. 19. Draft of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 86b.]
Dec. 19. License granted to Nicholas Le Grice, high sheriff of co. Bucks, to reside in London, Westminster, or elsewhere. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, p. 46.]
Dec. 19.
Pembroke.
John Powell to Williamson. The Bristol ship bound for Virginia remains waiting a wind. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 87.]
Dec. 19. John Powell to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 88.]
Dec. 19.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. The Sancta Maria of Majorca, of 23 guns and 80 men, outward bound, being detained near Cardiff, her provisions grew short, and the company came on shore, and took 22 head of cattle, without the owner's leave; they have put a great obstruction of the French and British trade formerly driven here. [Ibid. No. 89.]
Dec. 19.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Fountain has sailed for the Downs; part of the Straits fleet going under command of Sir Thomas Allin waits sailing orders at Spithead. [Ibid. No. 90.]
Dec. 19.
Portsmouth.
Charles Honywood to Williamson. Commissioner Middleton left on Monday, having discharged the ships in port. Three vessels ride at Spithead, bound for the Straits. The Fountain sailed but was constrained to anchor again. [Ibid. No. 91.]
Dec. 19.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The yard is paying off and disbanding; is sorry its great usefulness was not manifested before its condemnation. With note to Mr. Francis, requesting delivery of the enclosed to Mr. Williamson. [Ibid. No. 92.] Enclosing,
Silas Taylor, to Williamson. Will soon be out of employment; begs some in Virginia or wherever he can get a livelihood: has laboured so constantly that he has not had leisure to do himself good: begs remembrance of his petition to the Prize Commissioners. [Ibid. No. 92i.]
Dec. 19.
Whitehall.
M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. Desires their opinion on the petition of Adams and Dunkin concerning two hoys of Chatham, referred to them by his Royal Highness, that the men may have an answer and be freed from further attendance. Asks what they have done concerning Capt. [Chas.] Juxon's men having allowance for their service in the same proportion as their captain had. [Ibid. No. 93.]
Dec. 19.
Portsmouth.
John Tinker to Sam. Pepys. I hope Col. Middleton has arrived in London; will diligently obey any commands. The Slothany shall be made a hulk, and the Fairfax got ready by next spring [tide]. I desire orders as to guns to be taken out of ships that come into the dock, the wharf being out of repair. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 94.]
Dec. 19.
Portsmouth Ropeyard.
Gregory Peachy to Col. Middleton. The day of your going hence 3 cwt. of tar yarn was conveyed away; we have used all means for refinding it, 'together with those desperate instruments," but in vain. I desire orders as to placing a watch at the rope house. [Ibid. No. 95.]
Dec. 19.
Ordnance Office.
Edw. Sherburne to the Navy commissioners. Having 5,000 whole culverin round shot at Leith, in the custody of James Hooper, agent for the Prize Commissioners, I desire that the galliot hoy commanded by [Edw. ?] Bond, and now coming from thence for London, may bring the same to the Tower. [Ibid. No. 96.]
Dec. 19.
Harwich.
Commissioner John Taylor to the Navy Commissioners. All the ships are fully paid off; we doubt not but money will be taken up here to perfect all things. The 3 last quarters' pay is not yet satisfied. The debt consists of men's wages, town rents, &c., without which there will be clamours and some will suffer wrong; it is only for want of 100l. when Mr. Wilson was here that you are troubled about it; I pray full direction therein. [Ibid. No. 97.]
Dec. 20.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. [Wm.] Chambers' price for his reed is 28s. per 1,000, which is 2s. less than he had last year. It is scarce, and he cannot serve in above 60,000. Desires orders. [Wm.] Attaway will wait upon them as to his elm timber. [Ibid. No. 98.]
Dec. 20.
Woolwich.
Christopher Pett to the Navy Commissioners. Supposes the timber was, as stated by Mr. Shish, not fit to make beams or wale pieces, but it was not for that use he wanted it; has had to saw up great pieces to keep the men employed, which was some hindrance and more charge to the King. Has surveyed and made an estimate for the rebuilding of the Royal James, and shall do the same for the Loyal London, as soon as docked. Desires that [John] Hardwin may have an order for supplying 3 new poop lanterns for the Duke's yacht, the Ann, which is ordered to be caulked and graved. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Dec. 20. Sir Thos. Allin to Col. Middleton. Desires an order for the captain of the Deptford ketch to have a boat from Deptford yard, he having made a very great complaint for one. [Ibid. No. 100.]
Dec. 20. Charles, Lord St.John to Lord Arlington. Being ordered to serve as lieutenant of Hampshire, offers for the King's approval Lord Sandys, Sir Rob. Howard, Sir John Norton, Sir John Trott, and 4 others as deputy-lieutenants; does not name Lord Delawarr, being uncertain whether he will accept of it. [Ibid. No. 101.]
Dec. 20.
Plymouth Fort.
Sir John Skelton to Williamson. Arrival of vessels from Cadiz. The bad weather has forced many of the ships from Bordeaux into St. Martin's Road; 5 have been lost, 3 of London and 2 of Yarmouth, but 70 men were taken up; 6 Londoners, bound for the Straits, have arrived. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 102.]
Dec. 20.
Newcastle.
Rich. Forster to Williamson. The great collier fleet is still in harbour; there are 200 sail and more expected. [Ibid. No. 103.]
Dec. 20.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Williamson. Most of the ships that sailed are put back by contrary winds. A New Englander confirms the news of the hurricane in Virginia. Arrival of ships from Bordeaux, most of them Dutch and French. [Ibid. No. 104.]
Dec. 20. John Clarke to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 105.]
[Dec. 20.] Request by Thos. Heather, vicar of Portsmouth, for letters for his son Thomas, scholar in Winchester College, to be elected to New College, Oxford. The warden and fellows of Winchester College should grant this, as they have not allowed any augmentation to the vicarage of Portsmouth, which is not worth 40l. a year. [Draft. Ibid. No. 105A.]
Dec. 20. The King to [the electors, &c., of Winchester College]. We recommends Thomas Heather, a child of that foundation, for removal to Oxford next election, his father having been very useful as minister of Portsmouth church, of which that college is patron. [Ibid. No. 105B.]
[Dec. 20.] Entry of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 17, p. 271.]
Dec. 20. Licence for Sir John Fitzwilliams, Bart., High Sheriff of Kent, to live out of the county. Minute. [Ibid. p. 271.]
Dec. 20. Licence for Sir Bernard de Gomme, Engineer General, to go into Zealand for 2 months. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 23, p. 608.]
Dec. 20. Passport for Pat. Simpson to pass and repass into any part of the Ottoman Empire, on his merchandise affairs. [Ibid. p. 608.]
Dec. 20. Warrant to Lord Ashley to pay to Hugh May for the works at Greenwich, not only 2,800l., balance of 10,000l. before ordered, but the overplus remaining in his hands from the sale of prize goods value 2,980l., bought by John Lanyon of Plymouth, which sum was ordered to be paid from the last 10 months' tax. [Ibid. p. 609.]
Dec. 20. Order for a warrant for discharge of the East India Company for 154,969l. 13s. 5d., the sum raised by sale of goods taken in two Dutch East India prizes consigned to them, and for which their accounts have been examined by the Duke of Albemarle and 10 others. [Ibid. p. 610.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
Grant to Alexander Halsall of the office of Commissioner in the Office of Alienation for composition of fines, in place of Richard Halsall, deceased. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, p. 46.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
The King to the Duke of York. Capt. John Cox, master of attendance at Deptford, having done good service, and sustained great losses by the demolishing of several of his houses built on the town ditch, we wish to bestow on him 1,000l. You are therefore to order the Navy treasurer to pay him 250l. from moneys arising from the sale of ships, and 250l. a year from the Navy Treasury yearly till 750l. is paid. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 21.]
Dec. 21.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Little occurs here but the arrival of packet-boats out of Holland. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 106.]
Dec. 21.
Bridlington.
John Bower to James Hickes. The tempestuous weather has caused much shipwreck on the coasts; has lost part in 4 good ships, wherein all the men perished. [Ibid. No. 107.]
Dec. 21.
Newcastle.
Rich. Forster to Hickes. Arrival of 20 ships, 2 or 3 being from Holland, the rest colliers. [Ibid, No. 108.]
Dec. 21.
Weymouth.
John Pocock to Hickes. A Vessel from France reports great preparations there for the Netherlands; the French intend to try for Ostend when the frost comes, and to have 100 men-of-war out in the spring; they say that after the Netherlands, England and Holland are but a breakfast for them. [Ibid. No. 109.]
Dec. 21.
Lyme.
Anth. Thorold to Hickes. The Kingfisher of St. Malo met an Ostender, who fired at her, commanded the master on board, and tortured his men by twisting small cords with knots about their heads, to make them confess whether they had any Frenchmen's goods on board. Several English have been plundered lately by the Ostenders. The French king is preparing great things against Flanders for next spring. The Ostenders dare not go along the shore, and some have been fetched from their harbours. [Ibid. No. 110.]
Dec. 21.
Coventry.
R. H[ope] to Williamson. Robberies have been frequent lately. Account of a fraud practised on Matthews, a rich mercer of Daventry and head collector of the county tax, by a forged letter of advice for payment of 400l., whereon he paid the money.
Last week a company of pickpockets was seized in the market, and 2 burly fellows, with 3 good horses and 10l. in gold and silver, were sent to prison, but next day broke gaol by difficult and strange passages, and escaped. James Gibson, a pretended watchmaker, has been seized for robbing a house in Nottingham; he had on him 6 or 7 watches and 6l. in money. The carriers have also been robbed. There are neither Quakers nor any others in prison for religion. The steeple aspires apace; hopes it will soon exceed its pristine height. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 111.]
Dec. 21.
Portsmouth.
St. John Steventon to Thos. Middleton, Navy Surveyor. Sends a warrant appointing the master of the Milford to the Swallow ketch; supposes it is a mistake for the Eaglet, and if so, desires him to alter and return it. [Ibid. No. 112.]
Dec. 21.
Greenwich.
Capt. Robert Robinson to the Navy Commissioners. When on the coast of Ireland, bought conveniences for building stores, &c., to the quantity of 100 tons, and charged not one farthing to the King. Supposes they will grant an order for his recovering them. [Ibid, No. 113.]
Dec. 21.
The Richmond, Kingroad.
Capt. Amos Beare to the Navy Commissioners. Has received on, board the stores named. Has mis-spent no time, nor shall do. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Dec. 21.
Whitebooth Road.
Capt. George Liddell, of the Roebuck, to the Navy Commissioners. Capt. King and myself have used all possible diligence in bringing the Stadthaus of Haarlem prize about; that the captain may stand clear of the aspersion of affronting the Brethren of the Trinity House, Hull, we assure you that they were averse to finding a pilot, naming persons some of whom were in Holland and some in London; others were unwilling to undertake it, lest they should not be paid. The brethren said they could only give the names of men, and the captain must catch them as he could, and used other discourteous expressions. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 115.]
Dec. 21.
The Diamond, Whitebooth Road.
Capt. John King, of the Diamond, to the Navy Commissioners. I apprehend you have received a strange kind of information from the Trinity House here, touching my desire that the Stadthaus of Haarlem prize might be furnished with a pilot able to bring her about, which they have not performed. Capt. Thorpe never came on board her to pilot her, but agreed to pilot Capt. Tucker's ship into the Downs; the ancient man who was appointed to us was chosen by Alderman Ripley. I was very urgent to break ground with her, having an opportunity to get her down, but was disappointed by wind and weather. The provisions are near expended; we have been on half allowance of beer several days, and until further orders I know not how to be supplied, there being no victualler here. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 116.]
Dec. 21.
The Diamond, Hull.
Same to the same. The Stadthaus of Haarlem prize has been ready for sailing these 3 weeks: has not above 10 days' provisions, so that if the winds hang longer out of the way, shall not have any left. Desires that an order may be taken for some. [Ibid. No. 117.]
Dec. 21.
The Diamond, Hull.
Capt. John King to Mathew Wren. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 118.]
Dec. 21.
London.
Rice Freeman, purser of the Hampshire, to the Navy Commissioners. Desires an order to the master attendant at Woolwich to assist him in getting the empty casks, &c., out of his ship, the victualler having neglected to send lighters for them. [Ibid. No. 119.]
Dec. 21.
Victualling Office.
Certificate by Thos. Lewis that Robert Woodward, purser of the Royal Oak, is not charged with any sea victuals, nor chargeable with any provisions otherwise than what he received as purser of the Swiftsure. With note that the bond was delivered up 21 Dec. 1667. [Ibid. No. 120.]
Dec. 21.
Chatham.
Robert Sliter, clerk of the rope-yard, to Lord Brouncker, Navy Office, Seething Lane. The ropemakers are to spin, from 1 Feb. to 31 Oct., 77 pounds of yarn per day each man, and from 31 Oct. to 1 Feb. 70 pounds per day, which yarn ought to be of such size that a rope of 3 inches should have at least 14 threads in each strand; but they, being not tied to any length or number of threads, and desiring to make haste to finish their day's work, spin their yarn much bigger, though they have been several times pricked and suspended for it. Desires an order that instead of the above weight, they spin 16 threads the length of the rope-house in summer and 15 in winter, and the King will have no wrong in the quantity, but much right in the quality. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 121.]
Dec. 22.
Portsmouth.
John Tinker to Sam. Pepys. Had orders from Col. Middleton for fitting the Hawk ketch, coming from London with tar, but the men deserting, Mr. Jones, the master, returned his warrant. Suggests that men be taken out of the Emser sloop for the purpose. Desires orders as to the removal of guns and repair of ships. [Ibid. No. 122.]
Dec. 22.
Portsmouth Dockyard.
Edward Byland to Col. Middleton. I have made such haste that the works of the Milford are nearly completed; had you been here to have seen it, you would have consented that I should have had "a piece of plate instead of a juniper sermon." Those of the workmen that are ingenious drove on furiously out of respect, the rest out of fear did the same, with such alacrity as if they had newly received their pay. I never did the like piece of work in so short a time. [Ibid. No. 123.]
Dec. 22.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Williamson. The ships which sailed eastward are put back, and those bound westward have put to sea. An Ostend man-of-war has brought in a French prize. [Ibid. No. 124.]
Dec. 22.
Berwick.
Mark Scott to Williamson. Only having received the Gazette once in 3 weeks, let me know whether our correspondence is to end; I will then tell Mr. Collingwood, who initiated it, that I have performed his request and yours. [Ibid. No. 125.]
Dec. 22.
Pembroke.
John Powell to Williamson. The Golden Fox from Barbadoes, laden with sugar, cotton, and indigo, has arrived; also 2 vessels laden with wine, brandy, and prunes, and a Bristol vessel laden with wine and fruit from Malaga. [Ibid. No. 126.]
Dec. 22.
Pembroke.
John Powell to James Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 127.]
Dec. 22.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Two vessels of Malaga have brought in the captain of a vessel cast away near Scilly; 2 other ships with their crews have been lost near Scilly. [Ibid. No. 128.]
Dec. 22.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. All is quiet, the ships paid off, and the seamen gone. Part of Sir Thos. Allin's squadron rides at Spithead. [Ibid. No. 129.]
Dec. 23.
Lyme.
Anth. Thorold to James Hickes. Three vessels have left for St. Malo, and one for Morlaix with drapery. The Dutch are arming 60,000 men to secure their frontiers against the French. Some Ostenders have brought in vessels bound westwards. The person robbed by an Ostend privateer has still the marks of what passed; hopes the timely resenting of it may prevent such practices in the future. [Ibid. No. 130.]
Dec. 23.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. A fleet of 16 Dutch merchantmen has left for France. A Spanish vessel was cast away on Scilly island, wherein was a great Spanish Don, bound for Flanders; he complained much of the cruelty of the islanders, who left him on a rock a day or two, though they could have fetched him off safely, valuing saving the goods more than his life. A Plymouth vessel, bound for the Straits, was cast away in Mount's Bay. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 131.]
Dec. 23.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. The magistrates do not put the least check on the conventicles, and the numbers flocking thither increase daily; they are so full that people can scarcely get in; none dare speak to the bailiffs; the town being generally factious, any complainer would lose his trade. Is requested by one of the ministers to write up about the meetings. There is no guard upon the forts and guns newly fixed, and they could easily be taken; those who are averse to the meetings are such as lived quietly under the late powers, and walked warily, wishing to save their estates, but their loyalty is as the chance of a die. Fears being thought too busy, never having been ordered to meddle in these concerns. [Ibid. No. 132.]
Dec. 23.
Weymouth.
C. S[awtell] to Edm. Sawtell. Arrival and departure of vessels. One of those so much feared for has arrived from Rochelle. Has been very ill. [Ibid. No. 133.]
Dec. 23.
Weymouth.
John Pocock to Hickes. A vessel from Limerick met with much wreck for 6 leagues together; she supposes some Dutch vessels have perished. A vessel from Madeira reports that the Dutch vapour so that an Englishman dares not show his head, and that in the Straits is a fleet of 60 merchantmen with 12 Dutch men-of-war. [Ibid. No. 134.]
Dec. 23.
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Williamson. Arrival and departure of vessels. [Ibid. No. 135.]
Dec. 23.
Dover.
John Carlile to Williamson. A Dover vessel has arrived which carried soldiers to Dieppe for Lord Douglas; the master says that the Earl of Clarendon was at Dieppe on Friday. A Dover vessel of 100 tons, from Malaga, has been lost about Scilly, and all drowned. The mayor of Dover has confessed that he wrote the 5 articles against me, but he begins to be ashamed of them. [Ibid. No. 136.]
Dec. 23.
Tower.
Sir J. Robinson to Williamson. The captains scared away by my inquisition are Doudle and Peirce, and may probably be sailing from Gravesend. Capt. Clinch is now at Rye about shipping, and Lieut. Farren is active in procuring seamen. A servant sent after Capt. Towst could not find him, nor any such sign as the Green Man. [Ibid. No. 137.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to –––– Du Moulin of the office of assistant master of the ceremonies to Sir Chas. Cotterel, to give attendance on ambassadors and messengers of foreign princes, in cases only where Sir Charles cannot give his attendance, with the fee of 6s. 8d. a day, any former restraint in the patent granted by the late King to Sir John Finnet of the office of master of ceremonies notwithstanding, [ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 138.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
Order in the committee for the affairs of Newfoundland, that they call before them Sir John Frederick and others named, and also all who have petitioned or are concerned in the government of Newfoundland. [Ibid. No. 139.]
Dec. 23. Warrant to pay to Sir John Robinson, Lieutenant of the Tower, 3,712l. 16s monthly, for the Tower garrison, from 28 Sept. last. [Docquet, Vol. 23, No. 167.]
Dec. 23. Warrant to pay to Rich. Arundel, Baron of Trerice, 99l. 12s. 8d monthly, for the garrison of Pendennis. [Ibid.]
Dec. 23. Licence to Sir James Bridges, Bart., high sheriff of Herefordshire, to live out of the county. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 17, p. 272.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
Statement by Lord Arlington of the King's approval of Lord Sandys and 7 others as deputy-lieutenants of Hampshire, to whom Lord St. John, Lord Lieutenant, is to issue deputations accordingly. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 20, p. 184.]
Dec. 23. Account by Judge Advocate Fowler of courts-martial concerning ships, held on board the Catherine 4, 11, 18, and 23 Oct. 1667, as to the loss of the Elizabeth, Coventry, Sorlings, and St. Patrick With note that a bill for six days at 13s. 4d. was passed Jan. 1668. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 139a.]
Dec. 23. Certificate by W. Burroughes that James White, purser of the Great Gift, has passed his victualling account. [Ibid. No. 140.]
Dec. 23.
Woolwich.
Christopher Pett to the Navy Commissioners. Recommends Christopher Andrews for money to enable him to pay his men for bringing timber from Whittlewood forest; 400l. is due to him. The timber is the best ever brought in; in 300 loads, has not found one piece defective, and believes there might be sufficient in the forest to serve the Navy these 7 years, being free from defects. Begs some of it for himself and Mr. Shish, for rebuilding the Royal James and Loyal London. [Ibid. No. 141.]
Dec. 23.
Woolwich.
Same to the same. Docked the Dartmouth on Saturday last, and is in hand with the repairs. Two of the lanthorns of the Ann yacht were swept overboard, and the other is old and decayed. Desires leave for his assistant, Roger Eastwood, to go to Portsmouth to fetch his family. [Ibid. No. 142.]
Dec. 23.
Bristol.
Daniel Furzer to the Navy Commissioners. Has communicated with Mr. Badcock, and shall prosecute the business as to the timber in the forest. The small reward and help allowed to pilots causes great trouble in bringing in ships, especially when such unexpected accidents intervene; dares affirm that the pilot's intentions both to the ship and the lost merchantman were good, and he has carefully served in bringing in and carrying out 4 other ships; desires not to meddle with their determination, but wishes them to be fully acquainted with the business. [Ibid. No. 143.]
Dec 23.
Chatham Dock.
Wm.Rand and John Brooke to the Navy Commissioners. We cannot weigh the Helverson without two vessels more, and the Marmaduke will require the same. We will fall to work on the Norway Merchant flyboat next week, to clear the river on that side. It is very cold and hard work you put upon us; we doubt not you will take it into consideration. Lord Brouncker promised to move the Board for some brandy for the poor men employed. The casks sent for the work are much decayed, and the cooper requires a warrant for those he has repaired. [S.P. Dom., Gar. II. 225, No. 144.]
Dec. 23.
Bristol.
Certificate by John Badcock that the gun deck of a third-rate frigate, building by Francis Baylie, is laid according to contract; with note that a bill for 1,000l., being his third payment, was passed 4 Jan. 1668. [Ibid. No. 145.]
Dec. 24.
Portsmouth.
John Tinker to Sam. Pepys. Repair of ships. [pages. Ibid. No. 146.]
Dec. 24. Sir Wm. Coventry to the Navy Commissioners. I know not whether Lord Anglesey has received all the money from the East India Company, and also 10,000l. which I was told the farmers of the excise had brought in upon the seamen's wages; if those sums be all received, I advise you not to engage yourselves to more payments to ships, until the Treasury Commissioners sit and you have some further assurance of money; the worst thing that could befall the service would be to appoint a day for payment, and not have money. I desire you to consult the treasurer, and avoid the mischief of disappointing the seamen.
I am sorry the stock is so low as 2,042l.; that is too little to pay any of the great ships' tickets. I have been told that many men have been discharged from the yards, on their own desire, and that Harwich yard is discharged; yet the yards are now computed at 1,200l., which some time since was little above 1,100l. per week; this cannot be, unless you have lately engaged new men, which I hope you have not. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 147.]
Dec. 24. Ezekiel Sanders to the Navy Commissioners. Desires an answer to a letter from Capt. Wm. Hannam, master attendant at Woolwich, recommending him as boatswain for the Hampshire. [Ibid. No. 148.]
Dec. 24.
Leith.
Edward Bond to the Navy Commissioners. Has received a warrant bestowing the Galliot with all her furniture, &c., upon one of Lord Lauderdale's men; has discharged himself and company out of pay and victuals since the last of November, keeping 15 months' pay of the men in their hands, leaving them at their own charge, and giving no allowance for charges home. Desires their Honours will make his condition known to his Majesty, and send him a favourable answer. Would otherwise have willingly obeyed their order as to taking in the shot. [Ibid. No. 149.]
Dec. 24.
Tuesday.
M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. Being Christmas Eve, his Royal Highness attends the King to chapel. It is resolved that the Sapphire and Mermaid shall set sail for the Straits, so direction should be given as to the men's pay. Asks what they think most convenient as to the Leopard, and the other ships with her. [Ibid. No. 150.]
Dec. 24.
Winchester Street.
James Houblon to Williamson. Hopes the letters of which he has copies were sent to the Spanish Ambassador and Earl of Sandwich. Wants a copy of the Order of Council, having forgotten to take one. Will send the office fees. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 151.]
Dec. 24.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Williamson. Four London ships bound for the Straits, and a French man-of war have put in since his last. [Ibid No. 152.]
Dec. 24. John Clarke to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 153.]
Dec. 24.
Hull.
Charles Whittington to Williamson. Arrival and departure of vessels. [Ibid. No. 154.]
Dec. 24.
Minehead.
John Maurice to Williamson. The Truelove of Minehead, which left Rochelle with 60 other vessels, reports great preparations in France for war; the French speak openly of their King as a Protestant. No news is heard of the Friendship of Minehead, which went for Lisbon 10 weeks since. [Ibid. No. 155.]
Dec. 24.
Portsmouth.
Charles Honywood to Williamson. A fleet of merchantmen from Bordeaux, bound for London, was driven into Cowes by contrary winds, but is now sailing eastward. Notices of other vessels. [Ibid. No. 156.]
Dec. 24.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Several ships are passing. The Dutch packet brought in many passengers, who are hastening to London in a new coach set up in Harwich the very day they landed. Begs him to remember [Capt. John ?] Lloyd about the prize petition. [Ibid. No. 157.]
Dec. 24. Account of Robt. Francis for clothes, &c., total 3Î. 15s. 8d. [Ibid. No. 158.]
Dec. 24.
Mr. Browne's Parliament Club, Old Palace Yard.
Sir Humphrey Winch to Williamson. I have twice tried, with my tackling about me, to see you at Whitehall, but found the doors shut both of your office and lodgings. I beg dispatch in passing my signet and privy seal, before I leave town. [Ibid. No. 159.]
Dec. 24.
Plymouth Fort
Sir John Skelton to Williamson. An Ostend privateer which has come in took a Guernsey vessel from St. Malo, laden with linen, &c., consigned to English merchants, and abused the men, binding their heads with cords; she also took a Frenchman, laden with bank fish. The deputy vice-admiral has seized the caper and her prize, till further orders from the Court of Admiralty, thinking she has no firm commission to act by. Arrival of other vessels. [Ibid. No. 160.]
Dec. 24.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Constant Warwick, and Eagle have been fitted here for the winter guard. [Ibid. No. 161.]
Dec. 25.
Letter Office.
James Hickes to Williamson. Six mails were this day expected from Ireland; the two first were sent by Chester, but the others driven back by wind into Carrickfergus; some of the letters are much damaged by wet. [Ibid. No. 162.]
Dec. 25.
West Cowes.
John Lysle to Williamson. The easterly wind has driven in 26 ships homeward bound, laden with wines, prunes, &c., from France. They have now sailed, except the Swan of Hamburg, which is leaky. An Ostender has brought in two French prizes. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 163.]
Dec. 25.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to James Hickes. A Newcastle vessel bound for Bordeaux, laden with coal, was driven into St. Jean de Luz, where, by an order from the King, she was seized, being the 14th taken by virtue of that order. [Ibid. No. 164.]
Dec. 25. Thos. Holden to Williamson. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 165.]
Dec. 26.
Portsmouth.
St. John Steventon to the Navy Commissioners. Has received no order from Lord Anglesey for money to pay the Sapphire, but when it comes shall dispatch it. Sir Wm. Jennings says the books are ready, but resolves to sail without being paid, if Lord Anglesey's order comes not speedily. [Ibid. No. 166.]
Dec. 26.
Portsmouth.
John Tinker to Sam. Pepys. Repair of ships named. I hear nothing of the breaking open of the rope-house. Let men be sent down to fit the Milford and other vessels, if haste is required, as we have as much work as we can turn our hands to. Mr. Steventon has received no order concerning the money for the Sapphire. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 167.]
Dec. 26.
Deptford.
Jno. Cox and J. Uthwat to Sam. Pepys. Send a list of ordnance and other stores required by the commander of the Fortune of Dunkirk to complete his inventory; will supply all but those belonging to the ordnance. [Ibid. No. 168.]
Dec. 26. Grant to the Marquis of Worcester, and the heirs of Henry, sometime Earl of Worcester, his ancestor, of the manors of Chalton, co. Hants, and others; Crookham, co. Berks, and other lands in South Wales and the marches; also of the reversion in fee in the Crown, he covenanting to pay the whole rent of 88l. 3s. 10d. out of the residue of the lands charged therewith. [Docquet, Vol. 23, No. 168.]
Dec. 26.
Milford.
John Powell to Williamson. The only ship in harbour is one of 400 tons from Bristol, bound for Virginia. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 169.]
Dec. 26. John Powell to James Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 170.]
Dec. 26.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Wishes him a merry Christmas. [Ibid. No. 171.]
Dec. 26.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Sir Phil. Honeywood, the governor, is married to the sister of Mr. Neale, the high sheriff of the county last year. The Eagle, fitted for the winter guard, has gone to Spithead. [Ibid. No. 172.]
Dec. 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Edw. Griffin, treasurer of the chamber, to pay to George Tomlin, embellisher, flourisher, and writer, 20l. for embellishing letters to Sultan Mahomet and Vizier Azem. [Ibid. No. 173.] Annexing,
Bill of [George Tomlin], the King's writer, &c., for embellishing letters to Sultan Mahomet and Vizier Azem, both sent away 22 Dec. 1667, 20l. [Ibid, No. 173i.]
Dec. 27.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to James Hickes. Arrival of vessels; the Ostend man-of-war which brought in the French prize is arrested by an Admiralty warrant, by some merchants of Exeter, having taken a ship of Jersey, laden at St. Malo and bound to Exeter, and sent it to Ostend. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 174.]
Dec. 27. John Clarke to Williamson. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 175.]
Dec. 27.
Newcastle.
Rich. Forster to Williamson. All the fleet of laden colliers has sailed. A great Ipswich ship was put ashore, but has been lightened of her coals and is now safe in harbour. [Ibid. No. 176.]
Dec. 27.
Letter Office.
James Hickes to Williamson. There is a general complaint of the Gazettes wanting domestic intelligence; some in the office, who sent 14 or 16 dozen weekly, now only send half the number; 20 dozen less than formerly are sent from the office, they having nothing in them of the proceedings of Parliament, which Mr. Muddiman writes at large. Muddiman gives far larger accounts to his correspondents than you do, which makes them much desired [Ibid. No. 177.]
Dec. 28. Capt. James Sharland to the Navy Commissioners. I am desired by my officers and company to send their tickets, and not to enter any discharges on them, but to allow the tickets to be made for some longer time than the half time up to January last mentioned in your order. Some of the men with myself have served on board the Harp. [pages. Ibid. No. 178.] Encloses,
List of 25 men belonging to the Mary yacht, with the amount due to each of them. [Ibid. No. 178i.]
Similar list of 34 men belonging to the Harp frigate, total due 723l. 13s. 11d. [Ibid. No. 178ii.]
Similar list of 32 men belonging to the Harp and Mary on old tickets. [Ibid. No. 178iii.]
Dec. 28. M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners. Desires they will supply the Francis. Some of the ships have victualled at Dover, but in regard to his Royal Highness's orders for reducing the victualling ports, is not certain if any victuals are remaining there. [Ibid. No. 179.] Encloses,
William Burstow to M. Wren. Has arrived safe in the Downs, and the David and Jonathan has arrived at Havre de Grace. Will be out of provisions 2 January; requires a cable, mizen-sail, &c.The Francis, Downs, 24 Dec. 1667. [Ibid. No. 179i.]
Dec. 28.
The Eagle, Portsmouth.
Capt. John Crabb to the Navy Commissioners. Is ready to sail for Spithead, and only requires an order for powder and shot. [Ibid. No. 180.]
Dec. 28. Capt. J. Perriman to the Navy Commissioners. Sends account of proceedings at Deptford and Blackwall, as to the wrecks on 27 and 28 December. Stephen Brooks, who is to weigh the ship at Woolwich, cannot get the men to work without money, and what he had is expended. Some Irishmen about London are endeavouring to seduce English seamen to go over to serve the French King, promising every man that will go 3l. in hand and 40s. permonth. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 181.]
Dec. 28.
The Richmond,
Kingroad.
Capt. Amos Beare to the Navy Commissioners. Has but 14 days' provisions, and desires an order to the victualler there for 14 days' more; but if the wind favours sailing, shall not stay to receive it. [Ibid. No. 182.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Turkey Company. Has recalled the Earl of Winchelsea, who has continued ambassador at Constantinople some years longer than the usual time, and has appointed in his place Sir Dan. Harvey, Bart., who is well qualified for the station, and anxious to improve trade in those parts. Hopes that they will receive him cheerfully, and that he will acquit himself well. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 17, p. 274.]
Dec. 28. Warrant for a grant of the King's consent to the union of the parish churches of St. John Baptist and All Saints; as also of the parish churches of St. Benedict and St. Mary, in the town of Huntingdon, which are in his Majesty's patronage, according to the Act for uniting churches in cities and towns, the said union being proposed by the Bishop of Lincoln. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, p. 47.]
Dec. 28. The King to the Masters and Fellows of Emanuel College, Cambridge. Dispenses with the statute of county, whereby Hen. Lee, B.A., is prevented being elected fellow of that college, and finding him otherwise well qualified for preferment, empowers them to elect him, if he prove worthy on examination. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 128.]
Dec. 28.
Lyme.
Anth. Thorold to James Hickes. The Samuel of Lyme has arrived from Bordeaux, being separated from a fleet of merchantmen with which she sailed, and which put into Tenby. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 183.]
Dec. 28.
Newcastle.
Rich. Forster to Hickes. Hopes the laden fleet is safe in London; the wind being fair, the light fleet is expected. [Ibid. No. 184.]
Dec. 28.
Tower.
Sir John Duncombe and Thos. Chicheley to Lord Arlington. Request a warrant for a grant of the office of master gunner of England to Capt. Valentine Pine, who executed it for some time in place of Col. [Jas.] Wemys, engaged in other services in Scotland, the said Colonel being now dead. [Ibid: No. 185.]
Dec. 28. John Smith to Williamson. I beg you to write a few lines in my behalf to Squire Evelyn, for satisfaction for curing the sick and wounded from the King's ships, landed at Margate, in the Isle of Thanet, for 15 months. I want an order to the farmers of customs for a surveyor or waiter's place at Margate. [Ibid. No. 186.]
Dec. 28.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Sir Wm. Temple has arrived; I provided him and his sister with all the necessaries Harwich could afford; he was lately resident at Brussels, and had leave to come away: he hired a vessel to bring him from Holland, and is gone for London. A great fleet of 60 colliers, laden for London, is seen about Ousley Bay. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 187.]
Dec. 28.
Weymouth.
C. S[awtell] to Edm. Sawtell. A Weymouth vessel has been lost at St. Martins; all the men saved, but much of the goods shuffled from them by the French. [Ibid. No. 188.]
Dec. 29.
Hull.
Charles Whittington to Williamson. Arrival and departure of vessels. [Ibid. No. 189.]
Dec. 29.
Berwick,
M. Scott to Williamson. Has nothing worth noticing to tell. [Ibid. No. 190.]
Dec. 29.
Milford.
John Powell to Hickes. Has no news. [Ibid. No. 191.]
Dec. 29. John Powell to Williamson. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 192.]
Dec. 29.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Notices of vessels. The ships are making ready for the winter guard as fact as they can. [Ibid. No. 193.]
Dec. 29.
Portsmouth.
John Tinker to Sam. Pepys. Has ordered a watch to walk the rope-house, and charged them that if it is broken in, or anything lost, they must make it good. Believes the thieves belong to the rope-house. Mr. mayor has issued a search warrant, and [Gregory] Peachy says be shall know the yarn again if he can see it. Desires orders as to the disposing of the Swallow. [Rob.] Waith has sent down orders for money to pay the Sapphire. [ pages. Ibid. No. 194.]
Dec. 29.
Spithead.
Sir Wm. Jennens [or Jennings] to the Navy Commissioners. Supposes he shall be paid now, there being a great noise about a little money. Did not keep his men, because he can be supplied if he wanted with good men every day. [Ibid. No. 195.]
Dec. 30.
Portsmouth.
St. John Steventon to the Navy Commissioners. Sends an account of the tonnage, &c., of ships; also the books of the Sapphire, having paid her to the last of Dec. 1666. [Ibid. No. 196.]
Dec. 30. Account by Rich. Kingdon of the prize officers' charge on the Zealand; total 22l. 17s. 6d. [Ibid. No. 197.]
Dec. 30.
Harwich.
Certificate by Ant. Deane that Garrad Chrismas has half done the carved works of the Resolution, and may have his bill for the second payment; with note that a bill for 30l. was passed Jan. 3. [Ibid. No. 198.]
Dec. ? Petition of Wm. Herbert, high sheriff of Monmouthshire, to the King, for licence to leave the county, having urgent occasions to go to Bristol and elsewhere. [Ibid. No. 199.]
Dec. 30. Licence to Wm. Herbert, high sheriff of Monmouthshire, to live out of his county. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 17, p. 275.]
Dec. 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Rich. Corry to seize all dogs, guns, nets, &c, used to destroy the King's game within 8 miles of his house at Bourne, co. Lincoln, and to certify to Council the names of offenders therein. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, p. 48.]
Dee. 30.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to James Hickes. Has no news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 200.]
Dec. 30.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. Arrival and departure of vessels. Had a commission from the Prize Commissioners to seize all embezzled goods taken from prizes, and deliver them to the storekeeper of prizes; 2 years ago, seized a cable embezzled from a prize, and gave it to George Clifford, who shipped it to London, where it was sold with other goods. Is now sued for it by Jas. Miles, who bought it from the embezzlers; was threatened to be brought into trouble for all the goods he seized, and if this person be encouraged, the rest will follow. Thinks his commission will not on trial be sufficient to stop judgment. A west country collier was lost off Winterton. [Ibid. No. 201.]
Dec. 30.
Lynn.
Edw. Bodham to Williamson. Arrival of colliers; the price of coals has fallen from 32s. to 24s. a chaldron; notices of ships; the place is very healthful, people's minds are well satisfied, and the militia in good settlement. [Ibid. No. 202.]
Dec. 30.
Lichfield.
Shar. Talbot to Hickes. I received your letter on Christmas day at Sir Harry Littleton's; he complains of having no letters or short ones from Williamson, while Sir Ralph Clare, of Kidderminster, has constantly a whole sheet of news. [Ibid. No. 203.]
Dec. 31.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Hears that the Holland States have renounced the Stadtholdership, and sent deputies to persuade their 13 or 15 towns to join them in the renunciation, and if they will not, to remove the Heeren from their magistracy. The Dutch are troubled not to know how England is resolved in the contest between France and Spain, and fear we have a design to break with them shortly, which causes them to build ships, &c.; some talk of having some towns in the Spanish Netherlands, but the soberer say the King of France could take them away when he pleased. Thought it was an ambassador that came on Friday, but finds he was only a servant of the Holland ambassador. [Ibid. No. 204.]
Dec. 31.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Williamson. The Marygold of Dartmouth, which arrived from Lisbon in 21 days, confirms the news of the great revolutions in that kingdom. [Ibid. No. 205.]
Dec. 31. John Clarke to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 206.]
Dec. 31.
Portsmouth.
Chas. Honywood to Williamson. The Mary Rose has sailed for the Downs. Sir Wm. Jennings and others are ordered for the Straits. A prize has come in from Ireland, taken by the Speedwell, a privateer with a Spanish commission, near the coast of France, to which her men got ashore. [Ibid. No. 207.]
Dec. 31. Deposition by Rich. Bryant, merchant of London, before Sir Wm. Peake, Lord Mayor, that he is sole proprietor of the Queen Hester, now in the Thames, and that no foreigner has any interest therein. [Ibid. No. 208.]
Dec. 31.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Sir Wm. Jennings, with the Sapphire and Mermaid, has sailed for Malaga, to convoy outward-bound ships, and bring merchant ships homeward. [Ibid, No. 209.]
Dec. 31. Grant to Sir George Savile of the titles and dignity of Baron Savile of Eland and Viscount Halifax, co. York. [Docquet, Vol. 23, No. 170.]
Dec. 31. Grant to Richard and William Winch, brothers of Sir Humphrey Winch, of the dignity of a baronet, in case the said Sir Humphrey die without issue male. [Ibid.]
Dec. 31. Discharge to Rich. Winch of 1,095l., usually paid in respect of that dignity. [Ibid.]
Dec. 31. Grant to Henry Guy of pardon of the penalty of 50l. a month, incurred by him for acting as farmer of excise without taking the oaths required by Act of Parliament. [Ibid.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pardon to John Ferrers, of Clifford's Inn, convicted of manslaughter of Simon Mountfort, with restitution of goods [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, p. 10.]
Dec. 31.
Leghorn.
Certificate by Charles Chellingworth, consul, and 27 other English residents at Leghorn, that Newport Littleton is a young man of good comportment, a loyal and faithful subject, and never heard to speak against King nor Parliament. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 210.]
Dec. 31.
Downs.
Capt. Jeremiah Crawley, of the Francis, to the Navy Commissioners. Lost 2 anchors and a cable; Mr. Coomer, of Deal, who has supplied him with an anchor, thinks both anchors might be found by the buoys. With note that the surveyor is ordered to look after them. [Ibid. No. 211.]
Dec. 31.
Dover.
Thos. White to the Navy Commissioners. The captain of the Francis came in with an order to come to Dover to victual; sent a pilot on board, promising him ready money when he had performed his work, without which none would undertake it. Desires orders for supplying stores named, and payment of the money due to the port, as men will do nothing without it. [Ibid. No. 212.]
Dec. 31. M. Wren to Sam. Pepys. Puts him in mind of the meeting intended on Thursday. Has given notice to many of those expected, and desires him to do the same to Capt. Cox, Mr. Shish, Mr. Pett of Woolwich, and Capt. Pack. [Ibid. No. 213.]
Dec. 31.
Portsmouth.
John Tinker to Sam. Pepys. [Edw.] Silvester could have finished the chain by July, had he had a certain sum of money as contracted for, when the chain was half made. [Ibid. No. 214.]
Dec. 31.
Portsmouth.
John Tippetts to the Navy Commissioners. Repair of ships named. Will return his opinion as to [Edw.] Byland's terms for translation of the Slothany after seeing them; desires consideration of the charge of 11l. which he was put to in attending at London with his accounts. [Ibid. No. 215.]
Dec. 31. Sir George Downing to the Navy Commissioners. The Lords of the Treasury desire to know what seamen's wages remain due and unpaid from January last to this January, and what is due to them upon tickets before last January. [Ibid. No. 216.]
Dec. 31.
Deptford.
Account by Jno. Cox and Peter Rowley of a survey of the provisions returned into the victualling office from the Monmouth, some being unserviceable. [Ibid. No. 217.]
Dec. 31.
Westminster.
John Fowler to [Wm.] Hewers, Navy Office. Pray deliver my letter to the Navy commissioners, and attend the result. I hope you have the bill ready drawn up. Capt. [Rob.?] Shephard, of the Falcon, has signed the boatswain's books, and conceives they have passed the Board, so that the late Wm. Cockerell's salary may soon come to your hands for the widow and children. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No, 218.] Encloses,
John Fowler to the Navy Commissioners. I spoke to Secretary Wren to move his Royal Highness touching my quarter's salary. Your Honours are to attend his Royal Highness about other concerns on Thursday. I intreat you to put in a word for me, time pressing for departure.––Westminster, 31 Dec. 1667. [Ibid. No. 218i.]
Dec. 31.
London.
Joshua Child to the Navy Commissioners. I understand that before passing of bills on account of my own and Mr. Shorter's first contract, I should give the account of the progress made upon the second contract, on which I had 550l. imprest. Details of freighting ships to New England to fetch home masts; two of the ships were forced back into the river when the Dutch were in the Downs, and lay so long that they were too late in the year to proceed, whereby I lost 700l. [ pages. Ibid. No. 219.]
Dec. 31. Capt. John Coudre to Thos. Hayter. Shall make all dispatch to sail to Chatham as ordered. Wants stores, provisions, and men. [Ibid. No. 220.]
Dec. 31.
Harwich.
Commissioner John Taylor to the Navy Commissioners. Hopes Mr. Hill has satisfied them as to paying off all growing charges. Sends a copy of the contract made with the bricklayer and carpenter about the store-house, and desires they will impress 50l. to the former and 19l. to the latter. Forbears engaging men on the new ship until she is appointed for sea, and the days get longer. Had a warrant from the Duke of Albemarle, when his Royal Highness was at Oxford with his Majesty, to send for the Rumerokerke galliot from Southwold, and repair her, which warrant was afterwards delivered to Sir John Griffith at Gravesend. [Ibid. No. 221.]
Dec. 31.
Emsworth sloop, Portsmouth.
Capt. Walter Perry to Thos. Middleton. Asks orders; arrived here on the 18th, and applied to Capt. [John] Tinker for further orders, but he has not yet received any. [Ibid. No. 222.]
Dec. ? Petition of Capt. Greg. Alford to the King, for an order for payment to him 6,367l. from discoveries of embezzled goods at Brook House; he and his father have lost at least 22,000l. by their loyalty. [Ibid. No. 223.] Annexing,
Particulars of the losses of Capt. Greg. Alford, by disbursements in his Majesty's service; total 6,367l. 3s. [Ibid. No. 223i.]
Request by Alford for payment of 6,367l. from discoveries of embezzled goods to be made by the Commissioners at Brook House for taking accounts of such goods, it being no more than his disbursements on his Majesty's special service. [Ibid. No. 223ii.]
Dec. ? Petition of Capt. Edmund Bourke to Lord Arlington, for a grant having preserved the life on his brother, Capt Bennet, against the mutineers at Fetters in Kent, during the late Dutch war. [Damaged. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 224.]
Petition of Capt. James Bradshaw to the King, for a recommendation for the reversion, after Lieut.-Col. Thomas Cox, of the place of muster master in London; left a profitable trade as a mercer of London to follow the King, and attended as captain of the Militia of London throughout the Dutch war and the plague; lost 1,000l. in the fire of London, and receive no recompenses for service. [Ibid. No. 225.] Annexing,
Statement that Capt. Bradshaw has a letter from the King to admit him muster master on the death of Cox; that Cox is now dead, but they refuse Bradshaw without a partner; and that he desires another letter to the Lieutenancy of London requesting his admission to the office without a partner. [Ibid. No. 225i.]
Dec. ? Petition of Capt. [Michael] Brett to the King, for subsistence till he can obtain employment; lost an estate in Ireland of 600l. a year; served at Dunkirk in the horse guards, and in the new raised forces, as captain under the Earl of Chesterfield. [Ibid. No. 226.]
Dec. ? Petition of Katherine, Countess of Chesterfield, to the King, for a new lease for 9 years of the duty of 5s. a ton imposed on French ships, granted to her late husband, Dan O'Neale, and Sir George Carteret, the latter of whom declines to concern himself further therein. [Draft by Williamson. Ibid. No. 226a.]
Dec. ? Petition of Sir Jordan Crosland, Sir Thos. Higgins, Col. Rich. Kirkby, and –– Prideaux, to the King. Have served faithfully as Commissioners of Prizes, but were left out when the number was reduced; beg a share, above their ordinary salary, in the bounty which his Majesty granted to those who remained in. [Ibid. No. 227.]
Dec. ? Draft of the above [by Williamson.] [Ibid. No. 228.]
Dec. ? Petition of Septimus Field to the King, for leave to dispose of his place to the best use he can, as other Roman Catholics who deserted their employment have done. Served his Majesty as a commissioned officer during his exile, and afterwards in the horse guard; waited on the Duke of York last summer at sea, and was recommended by him as adjutant in Lord Peterborough's regiment; expected to go to Holland, but finds no order therefor. [Ibid. No. 229.]
Dec.? Petition of Major Fitzharris to the King, for reference of his claim for payment of 50l. by the Earl of Thomond, assigned to him by the late Marquis of Worcester, in part of a debt of 400l. due from the Marquis to him; also for payment of the remainder of the debt from the dowager Marchioness, or the present Marquis. Lost his estate for his loyalty, and has served abroad without recompense. [Ibid. No. 230.]
Dec. ? Petition of Capt. Thos. Gleadstone to the King, for present subsistence till he can be again employed; served abroad during the rebellion, then at Dunkirk, and during the Dutch war at Jersey, till the company was disbanded. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 231.]
Dec. ? Petition of Bernard Grenvile to the King, for recommendation to the Treasury Commissioners to admit him, in place of the late Sir John Colliton, to be joint farmer with Sir James Smith of the excise of Devonshire. [Ibid. No. 232.]
Dec. ? Petition of Sir Cuthbert Heron, sheriff of Northumberland, to the King, for liberty to be absent 6 weeks in London, on weighty occasions at law which require his attendance this next term. [Ibid. No. 233.]
Dec. ? Petition of John Kersey, late postmaster of Great Yarmouth, to Lord Arlington, for restoration to his place; when an abatement was proposed on the postmasters' salaries, was induced by Hen. Pharoah, postmaster of Beccles, to stand out for his old salary, hearing that it was done in all other stages; and now Pharoah has treacherously taken both his own stage and that of Yarmouth. [Ibid. No. 234.]
Dec. ? Petition of John James to the King, for permission to prove before the Treasury Commissioners his innocence of anything deserving displeasure; was made a Commissioner of Excise for service done his Majesty and the brewers, when they farmed the excise, and raised the rent 18,000l.; attended during the whole time of the plague, and is now put out for no other reason than his Majesty's pleasure that it should be so. [Ibid. No. 235.]
Dec. ? Petition of the Lord Mayor, &c., of London to the King, for pardon of 23,614l. 15s. 11d., arrears of the first 6 quarterly payments of the royal aid, and the 2 first of the additional supply, which by occasion of the dreadful plague and fire, are in arrear in the parts of the city that were burnt down. The Treasury Commissioners required the same to be levied by re-assessment, but there would be much difficulty to raise it on the parts yet uninhabited; they therefore offer to submit to the imposition of hearth money for the remainder of the 7 years during which his Majesty had remitted it to them on 13 Sept. 1666, and to pay the arrears due from the standing part of the city, on release from the aforesaid sum, and from 120,623l. 1s., which would have grown due for the last 6 quarterly payments of the aid and supply, in the burnt-down parts of the city. [Ibid. No. 236.]
Dec. ? Petition of John, Lord Lucas, to the King. Lent the late Countess Dowager of Derby 3,000l. on security of land, but as it proved insufficient, she assigned to him, 13 Jan. 1663, her life pension of 1,000l. a year, granted 8 Jan. 1661, of which a year became due, and then she died. Begs payment of the 1,000l. due. [Ibid. No. 237.]
Dec. ? Petition of Sir John Monson to the King, for another reference of his petition for reparation of suffering for his loyalty, the death of the Lord Treasurer and removal of the Lord Chancellor making the last of no avail. With names of the Lord Keeper and two others as referees annexed. [Ibid. No. 238.]
Dec. ? Petition of Sir John Monson to the King, for reference of his former petition, and the report made thereon by the then Lord Chancellor and others, to some of the Council, as in spite of many gracious promises, he has obtained no reparation for his losses and sufferings through his loyalty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 239.]
Dec. ? Petition of Patrick Moore to the King, for the gift of the Wood Merchant fire-ship, she being very old and unfit for service. Continued faithful to his Majesty all through the war against the Dutch, under Sir Edward Spragg, and is very poor. [Ibid. No. 240.] Annexed
Certificated by Sir Edw. Spragg that Patrick Moore volunteered into the service at Sheerness, and served under him on board the Diamond, where he rendered essential service in attacking the enemy, cutting off the fire ship's boats, &c.––Diamond, 2 Aug. 1667. [Ibid. No. 240i.]
Dec. ? Petition of Henry Nicoll to the King, for a grant of the Golden Hand flyboat, with all her furniture and apparel, at the same price as he paid for the Wildboar, and for orders to the Duke of York and the Navy Commissioners to give him possession thereof forthwith, they taking the same security as was ordered for the Wildboar. Presented a petition on 20 October, stating the unrequited services he rendered at the Restoration; also that he designed to bring a good quantity of timber out of Ireland towards the rebuilding of London; and for the better effecting his design, asked for the Wildboar prize ship, at a reasonable price, and convenient time for payment, which was granted; but after being at great charge in rigging and setting her forth to sea, she foundered on her voyage, and 15 men perished in her, whereby he was deprived of the means of bringing over the timber, or of paying his debts. [Ibid. No. 241.]
Dec. ? Petition of the officers and gentlemen who served in the guards, both horse and foot, in England and beyond the seas, to the King, for employment; left their services in France to serve him in Flanders, under command of the Duke of York; have served him in the guards in England and elsewhere, and are now dismissed for religion, and left without subsistence, though told, when turned out, that they should have especial favour. [Ibid. No. 242.]
Dec. ? Petition of the officers and soldiers whose names are annexed to the King, for a livelihood, till they can be employed in some foreign country; have served faithfully, but are recalled from Portugal as incapable of bearing arms, because they are Roman Catholics. [Ibid. No. 243.] Annexing,
List of 13 Roman Catholic officers and 36 soldiers who served in Portugal, and continued in service till sent for by the King. [Ibid. No. 243i.]
Dec. ? Petition of 6 distressed soldiers who served under Sir Tobias Bridges at sea, Barbadoes, &c., to the King, for payment of 314l. 4s. 10d., their arrears of wages. [Ibid. No. 244.]
Dec. ? Petition of Wm. Sandys, the King's servant, to the King. Your late father, 14 June 1636, granted Thos. Smith and others a lease for 31 years of the taking up of sand and gravel in the Thames, for ballasting ships, on rent of 1,000 marks. I have had a great concern therein, but by reason of the late troubles, the benefit since 1641 has been wholly taken away, and I have lost 5,000l. money disbursed.
Through my experience I can improve the navigation of the river, now much prejudiced by shelves, and furnish ballast, which is of great importance. I beg therefore a lease of the gravel for 31 years at the former rent, with powers for ballasting ships. [2 copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 244A, B.]
Dec. ? Petition of John Speereing, sub-postmaster of Southampton, to Lord Arlington, for relief. Sir John Bennet having ordered the mail to Winchester to go 3 times weekly, has sent it, but has failed in his attempts to obtain satisfaction for that service. [Ibid. No. 245.]
Dec. ? Petition of Edward Suckley to the King for relief; lost 4,000l. and had two sons slain in the late King's cause, to whom 160l. was due for arrears; was imprisoned 48 weeks, sentenced to death, and only released on exchange for Thos. Massy; spent 80l. in the dangerous service of releasing prisoners at Warwick, Lichfield, and Windsor, by the King's order, and marched under the Duke of York till the surrender of Oxford. Sir Ralph Freeman, then master of requests, was ordered by his Majesty to find a place for him, but being unable to fee Sir Ralph, was soon forgotten. Has kept a petty school, but his infirmities and his own and his wife's old age of 160 years now prevent it. [Ibid. No. 246.]
Dec. ? Petition of Abraham Summers, and 3 other maimed soldiers, to the King, for pay, subsistence, and a pension; went with Sir Tobias Bridges to Barbadoes in March 1666, were wounded at Martinico, have been at St. Bartholomew's Hospital since their return, but are now turned out, and have received no pay for their service. [Ibid. No. 247.]
Dec. ? Petition of Thomas Tuder, constable of East Greenwich, to the King, for the next vacant place of land waiter in the port of London, and for admission as land waiter extraordinary meanwhile, having served the late farmers of customs as a searcher for prevention of frauds; was promised recompense for his injuries in a fall, whilst quenching a great fire in the store yard, Deptford, 16 June 1667. [Ibid. No. 248.]
Dec. ? Petition of Benj. Waller, of Great Yarmouth, to the King and Council. Licence being granted, 22 March 1665, to import commodities from Germany, Flanders, and France, with promise of 6 months' notice in case of its revocation, ordered 675 cwts. of nutmegs, which reached Yarmouth 14 Jan. 1667, and paid the duties; yet Peter Salmon informs against him, and endeavours to recover penalties from him therefor. [Ibid. No. 249.] Annexing,
Statement of the case between Waller and Peter Salmon, in reference to the above transaction. [Ibid. No. 249i.]
Dec. ? Petition of Katherine Welsh, widow, to Lord Arlington, for a pass to return to her family in Ireland; went to Barbadoes with her husband, under Sir Tobias Bridges, but he dying of a wound there, she returned to England, and is too sickly to help herself. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No, 250.]
Dec. ? Petition of Sir Thos. Wolstenholme and 4 others to the King, for another hearing, to make good their accounts for their late farm of customs ended Michaelmas 1667; the Treasury Commissioners have taken exceptions on points which petitioners have undeniable evidences to justify, and have issued process against them for a debt of 1,950,000l. [Ibid. No. 251.]
Dec. ? Warrant to pay to Lewis Grabu, master of the select band of violins in place of John Bannister, 600l. for himself and the band, with arrears to commence from Lady Day 1667. With note that the whole establishment is to be made over again. [Minute. Ibid. No. 252.]
Dec. ? Additional clause in a grant to Thos. Chicheley of 1 November,––of two-thirds of the freight of goods brought home from the American plantations, on ships of war lately employed there under Sir John Harman, till it reaches 4,000l.,––that as the said profits are inconsiderable, not yet reaching 102l., he shall have the whole of them. [Ibid. No. 253.]
Dec. Notes [by Williamson] from the signet books, of warrants, grants, &c., passed during the month, the uncalendared portions of which are as follows:––
Grant to Margaret Whinyard and Grace Whinyard, for life, after John Whinyard, the husband, of the office of housekeeper of Westminster Palace.
Grant to the Earl of St. Alban's of certain territories in America
Lease to Rob. Napier and John Laurence, for 7 years, of the pre-emption and coinage of tin, rent 5,000l. a year to be paid half-yearly, and the lease void if the rent be unpaid 28 days after the term.
Note that the expense of all the garrisons, which amounts to 4,870l. 16s. 8d. monthly, is to be paid by Sir Stephen Fox, on a general privy seal.
Grant to the muster masters of 150l. additional to their former allowances, payable by Sir Stephen Fox.
Note that all the rent of the excise is to be first paid into the Exchequer, and an entry or register kept of it.
Grant to James Lancashire, for life, on surrender of ––Stevens, of the receivership of Lancashire, Cumberland, Westmoreland, and the Isle of Man. [Dom., Corres., Nov. 1667, Vol. 223, No. 186.]
[Dec.] The King to the Treasury Commissioners. The condition of the treasury needing considerable retrenchments, we have approved the report of the establishment enclosed, drawn up by certain Lords of the Council to whom it was entrusted, in order that from 1 January, the payments for the household, buildings, and privy purse may not be allowed to exceed the sums therein laid down. [Draft. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 254.]
Dec. ? The King to the farmers and officers of customs in London. The inferior officers of customs, on the late prohibition of transportation of horses and horsemen into France, have stayed those who had passes for Barbadoes and the foreign plantations; we wish such horses to be permitted freely to pass away. [Draft. Ibid. No. 255.]
Dec. John Ray to [Williamson]. I have been for some time employed by Mr. Muddiman in writing; and having parted from him, wish to serve you in things of the same nature. [Ibid. No. 256.]
Dec. Capt. J. Fletcher to Thos. Hayter. Asks for ten tickets, having several people coming for them. [Ibid. No. 257.]
Dec. ? Sir Rob. Vyner to Lord Arlington. I request you to recommend my petition to the King and Treasury Commissioners, my Credit, which is dearer than life, being at stake. The payments to me have been postponed, and my credit shortened, but I can extend it if I can be helped over this stile. None has ever so served his Majesty, and my zeal has made me not cautious enough. My request would not much injure the King; the Navy debts will fall first on the wine Act, and my request is on the subsidies or customs. [Ibid. No. 258.]
Petition of Sir Robt. Vyner to the King, to recommend him to the Treasury Commissioners for direct payment, on the new subsidies, of 30,000l., part of the great Navy debt, in which he is unhappily concerned, being engaged in a vast debt for his Majesty's service. [Ibid. No. 258i.]
Petition of Sir Robt. Vyner, and other farmers of the pre-emption and coinage duty, to the King. Became farmers 1 Sept. 1664, on rent of 6,500l., but in June 1666, were dismissed on their petition, advancing the money for the next Midsummer coinage, on condition of remission of their quarter's rent. Since that time the revenues have been paid to the receiver of the Duchy of Cornwall. They have frequently advanced their rent, on promise of interest and allowances, and borne the expenses of a law suit against his Majesty's right of pre-emption; they are some hundreds of pounds in advance, and beg payment thereof discharge of their farm. [Ibid. No. 259.]
Dec. Certificate by John Withers, commander, and two other officers of the Hind ketch, that their vessel was forced ashore on the south-west rocks of Scilly 11 Dec., and was lost. [Ibid. No. 260.]
Dec. ? Caveat that no grant of the Tellership of the Exchequer be signed for Mr. Squibb till a report be made by the Lord Keeper and Treasury Commissioners about a teller's place now in dispute. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 225, No. 261.]
Dec. ? Request of Charles, Earl of Norwich, to the King. States the grant in 26 Sept. 1661 of a pension of 2,000l. a year for 7 years to his late father, on surrender of his place as captain of the guards; the death of the Earl 6 Jan. 1663; the grant of 3,600l. of the pension to Rob. Leigh [see 1667 26 Jan.], and that notwithstanding the Earl's caveat and the King's warrant of 29 March 1667 for payment of the pension to him, he finds that a privy seal for 4,580l. to other creditors has passed; represents that it will be a great prejudice to him in preventing his redeeming any part of his father's estate from debt, and that he gave up a warrant for the 3,600l. from this pension to be considered as payment for the mulberry garden; but the late Lord Treasurer decided that the payment of the pension ought to go according to law; therefore prays for recall of the privy seal to the creditors, for the pension to proceed according to the warrant of 29 March last, and for other compensation for the mulberry garden which was to be passed to his late father. [Ibid. No. 262.]
Dec. ? Statement that the King of France, to discredit the rumours of his having sent for the Earl of Clarendon to his Court, thereby to excite troubles in England, has sent M. la Font, one of his gentlemen, to order the said earl to depart his kingdom. With note for Rich. Hancock to carry 4 horses to Holland for M. Ovekyrke. [Ibid. No. 263.]
Dec. ? Statement by F. Slingsby that Sir Arth. Slingsby placed Lady Greene's child with M. Medina, Lieut.-Governor of Oudenarde, at 30l. a year; that Sir Ant. Des Marces was sent with 200l. to deliver the child to others by the King's order, but that the Comte de Blangervale, Governor of Oudenarde, took charge of him, expecting probably a present if the King owned the child; that he is well provided for, and Sir Anthony has sent money for his clothes. [ pages. Ibid. No. 264.]
Dec. ? Account of the condition of Wm. Callow, Owen Christian, and Alice Cord, quakers, addressed to the King. They have been banished from the Isle of Man 2 years for nonconformity. Anne and Mary Callow and Jane Christian still remain prisoners, being taken by 2 priests, and all their estates seized, though never brought to trial; they have appealed in vain to the Earl of Derby, and therefore beg an order for their return and release. [Ibid. No. 265.]
Dec. ? Certificate by Gilbert wimberley that, being sent for to Lady Villier's daughter, he found her in labour, the Countess of Newport and Lady Aylesbury being with her, and that she declared the son of Sir Thos. Jermyn to be the father of her child. [Ibid. No. 266.]
Dec. ? Post Office account between Mr. Vandepere, of Nieuport, and Lord Arlington, for hire of boats to carry the foreign mails, salary, &c. [2 papers, Ibid. No. 266A.]