Charles II - volume 204: June 9-12, 1667

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1667. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1866.

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Citation:

'Charles II - volume 204: June 9-12, 1667', Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1667, (London, 1866), pp. 163-176. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/domestic/chas2/1667/pp163-176 [accessed 19 June 2024].

. "Charles II - volume 204: June 9-12, 1667", in Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1667, (London, 1866) 163-176. British History Online, accessed June 19, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/domestic/chas2/1667/pp163-176.

. "Charles II - volume 204: June 9-12, 1667", Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1667, (London, 1866). 163-176. British History Online. Web. 19 June 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/domestic/chas2/1667/pp163-176.

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June 9-12, 1667

June 9.
Latimers.
1. Thos. Hobbes to Williamson. Thanks him and Lord Arlington for their mediation, to which he partly ascribes his favourable treatment by Mr. Bridgman.
June 9.
10 p.m. Sunday.
2. Fras. Lord Hawley to Lord Arlington. On receipt of the enclosed, has ordered the troops to draw together, but knows not yet whither to go, because most of the [Dutch] fleet is still on that coast. Hears that a general is sent down, whom he will obey. The deputy lieutenants [of Kent] and governors of forts were to have met to-morrow, to consult how to dispose of those quarters; but hearing that Lord Middleton is come, will leave those considerations to him.
June 9.
Hull.
3. Col. Ant. Gilby to Williamson. Hears nothing of the Dutch fleet, except from the prints. The Little Victory, which was to convoy light colliers northward, has gone into the Humber, to repair damage done by the storm; all the rest of the fleet are dispersed, but most of them are got into Bridlington Bay.
June 9.
Hull.
4. Chas. Whittington to Williamson. Damage done to the Little Victory. There are four men-of-war in the Humber.
June 9.
Plymouth.
5. D. G[rosse] to Williamson. The Nonsuch has discovered 20 sail of great ships, judged to be part of the French fleet, near Mount's Bay. She met Rear-Admiral Kempthorne and three other frigates, which on this news returned to Plymouth, but nothing has since been heard of the fleet. The Sorlings has brought in 20 small vessels from Tenby.
June 9.
Sunderland.
6. Ben. Francis to Williamson. On Wednesday, a terrible storm broke out, lasting from 2 a.m. to 6 p.m., during which the Little Victory lost her masts; out of a fleet of 80 sail, one half were run ashore, and many lost between Sunderland and Whitby. There are no tidings of a Scotch privateer that was with them.
June 9.
Portsmouth.
7. Chas. Honeywood to Williamson. Sir Rob. Holmes has sailed, with seven or eight frigates and a few fire-ships, and anchored at night on the back of the Isle of Wight; by morning he expected his scouts to discover the enemy's ships, which lay in La Hogue Bay, intending to order his course accordingly.
June 9.
Portsmouth.
8. Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Sir Rob. Holmes has gone to sea with his squadron. The Paradox, sent out to spy, reports that under the cape near St. Malo, are 40 merchant ships outward bound, and 16 men-of-war. The Cambridge and three other ships are to be paid off, and their seamen turned to such ships as want men.
June 9.
Deal.
9. Ri. Watts to Williamson. A Flanders packet has landed 70 prisoners from Rotterdam, who speak much of their hard usage; some of them have not seen the sun during the whole year they were in prison. At noon single guns were heard, and at 3 or 4 whole broadsides discharged, judged to be at Ostend or Nieuport. The wind is E.S.E., but very little.
June 9.
Berwick.
10. M. Scott to Williamson. No ship has passed since the squadron of Sir Jeremy Smith, who dined on Friday last with the Lord Comr. of Scotland, at Holyrood House. All is in peace at Edinburgh.
June 9.
Plymouth.
11. John Fowler, Judge Advocate, to the Navy Comrs. Amidst his late disasters, returns thanks for their promising to do right in the matter of the petition of the poor widow and her children, as soon as the Falcon comes within reach; she will daily pray for every one of them. [Adm. Paper.]
June 10.
The Cygnet, Woolwich.
12. Capt. Ant. Smith to the Navy Comrs. Received an order at the Hope to come to Woolwich, where he is waiting their pleasure. [Adm. Paper.]
June 10.
Woolwich.
13. W. Bodham to Thos. Hayter. The widow Lacy's husband was put in for the twice-laid stuff by verbal order, and so held it till Mr. Hewes, who had a warrant for the stuff from the Navy Office, became master of the rope works. When he was put out, the widow had a verbal order from Sir Wm. Coventry and Mr. Pepys, and by that has held it hitherto. She now desires to forego it, her son having fled for debt. The appointment belongs to the Navy Board; the twice-laid stuff man at Portsmouth was promised a warrant from Sir Wm. Penn. The work is wrought at 3s. 6d. per cwt., which is little enough for any man that does it as it should be; seeing the verbal order of two different governments was sufficient, it wholly belongs to the Board, who by their general directions may do things of far greater moment. [Adm. Paper, 2 pages.]
June 10. 14. Certificate by Thos. Drover, carpenter of Rochester, that on the 19th April last, he cut 19 boards into 6 foot lengths, out of two pairs of old masts, for John Wilde to make some doors at his house at Rochester. [Adm. Paper.]
[June 10.] 15. Certificate by Jonathan Crawley, labourer of Rochester, that two years since, he fetched 11 boards sawn from old masts from Wm. Forster's yard at Rochester, and nine from John Robson's, for John Wilde, before he was teamer at Chatham Dockyard, and laid them in one of the rooms of his house. [Adm. Paper.]
June 10.
Weymouth.
16. George Pley, jun., to the Navy Comrs. Can prove that he has more offered for his goods, since of the last furnished into Portsmouth, he sold part of the very worst to others for more than he sold them the best; for the last Noyals which he sold them for 20l. the bale, he refused 30l. from an eminent man of Bristol, and a good paymaster, and disposed of another bale of seconds to one of London for 25l. Judges that he has no obligation to Mr. Browne, who carried four passes from His Majesty and his Royal Highness, by virtue of which he may lade what goods he lists; supposes he has not, for the sake of advantage, spared all his passes for Irish voyages, although he understands that he has disposed of one or more to that purpose; desires to have nothing to do with him. Is sorry to be obliged to say so much, as his principle is to look to his own imperfections, without touching other men's, but Browne's creating excuses has made him interfere. [Adm. Paper.]
June 10.
Leith Road.
17. Sir Jer. Smith to the Navy Comrs. Particulars of ships. Asks for supplies. Cordage is very bad and dear in those parts, being 52s. per cwt., whereas in Hull he could have it for 30s. Knows not what he shall do unless some money is sent for defraying necessary charges. Expected to have found that place we before nished [with provisions], having given three weeks' notice before coming. Has spoken to Mr. Gauden's agent, who is very dull, negligent, and careless, and gives little or no attendance, being employed as factor in merchants' affairs. Spoke to Capt. Lee, late commander of the Paul fire-ship, who has bought a vessel at Leith, and intends shortly for London. On March 31, the Milford and Nightingale, with the Sweepstakes and Elias, met 60 sail of Hollanders near the coast of Norway, light ships, with one manof-war and a ketch of eight guns for their convoy. The Milford took five, the Nightingale three, and they suppose the Sweepstakes and Elias took each of them three. They had very much wind; so could not do much spoil, nor get up with the man-of-war and ketch, who made from them with all the sail they could, and about 3 or 4 followed; the rest were dispersed; it is thought that some privateers cruizing in those parts have gleaned up many of the dispersed fleet. The Milford and Nightingale were forced to leave the Sweepstakes and Elias all their fishes to fish their masts, and as there are no masts nor sails left, there will be no venturing them out to sea unless supplied. Supposes Mr. Phineas Pett has given an account of the masts, and how serviceable they are there for the frigates, and his assistance would be very useful, if they will order it. The Sweepstakes and Elias have not arrived, nor any of their prizes, except one of the Nightingale's, which is rather a wreck than a prize. Sends copy of a demand for stores given to Sir Wm. Batten. [Adm. Paper, 2 pages. Much damaged.]
June 10. 18. Sir Wm. Coventry to the Navy Comrs. Sends a letter from Sir W. Jennings, and desires they will supply him with the stores required, as he has been abroad in bad weather, and may want them. Asks them to fill up enclosed commissions and send them to him, together with the order about commanding for Sir F. Holles. [Adm. Paper.] Encloses,
18. i. Sir Wm. Jennings, of the Sapphire, to Sir W. Coventry. Shall not be out of call of the ship. Has been three months off the ground, but as he is not to clean, has had the ship tallowed and careened. Has but three weeks' beer, the purser being forced to leave 15 tuns behind for want of room. Has left 20 of his men at Portsmouth; they were sent with the ships to Southampton, and he could not wait their return. Desires, if ordered to sea, that he may take men where he can find them, being loath to go without his complement. Asks him to provide a West India voyage for his master, who is totally ignorant in those parts. Has no crime to lay to his charge but insufficiency. Hope, June 9, 1667.
June 10.
9 a.m.
19. Sir Wm. Coventry to the Navy Comrs. His Royal Highness does not expect their attendance this morning, but wishes their time employed in getting and fitting fireships. Desires they will order all other work aside, and one of them be present to see this followed out. Has sent to the Tower to have ingredients ready, which will be delivered if sent for. They are to employ gunners for the fireships, if they find fit men, and not to stay for warrants or orders, as the time will not permit the observing of those forms. [Adm. Paper.]
June 10. 20. Sir Wm. Coventry to the Navy Comrs. Recommends Capt. Wm. Maiden as fit for the command of the fire-ship. [Adm. Paper.] Annexing,
20. i. Note from Sir Wm. Penn, recommending Thos. Ward and Nich. Donzie, as commanders of fire-ships.
June 10.
10 P.M.
21. Sir Wm. Coventry to the Navy Comrs. Sends some blank press warrants. Hopes volunteers may be found, but for rigging and labouring, pressing may be necessary. Prays them to get as many more fire-ships as they can, besides the six mentioned; they are the greatest help; as the case now stands, they must spare neither cost nor diligence to get them dispatched. Will send blank commissions for their commanders. Hopes they will not neglect paying the ships at Portsmouth, and discharging unnecessary carpenters Has given Sir Frescheville Holles blank press warrants, and promised the commissions and orders for the commanders of fire-ships obeying him by to-morrow. [Adm. Paper.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
22. Statement by Lord Arlington of the King's pleasure for Sir Roger Norwich to be restored to his deputy-lieutenancy of Northamptonshire, and for the Lord Lieutenants to renew his deputation accordingly.
June 10. Entry of the above. [Ent. Book 20, p. 146.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
23. Commission to John Lord Berkeley, of Stratton, to be Lieutenant-General of all the militia forces in Suffolk, Cambridgeshire, and the Isle of Ely.
July 10. Entry of the above. [Ent. Book 20, p. 146.]
June 10. The King to the Earl of Oxford [Lord Lieutenant] or the first deputy lieutenant of Essex. The Dutch fleet having appeared in the mouth of the river, such of the militia as is not employed towards Harwich is to be sent to Lee, to attend the motions of the enemy's fleet; the Earl of Oxford, if away, is to be informed of this letter; sends it by Major Edw. Wood, a person of experience and courage, who is to assist in its execution. [Ent. Book 20, p. 147.]
[June 10.] 24. Draft of the above.
June 10. The King to the Earl of Essex, Lord Lieutenant of Hertfordshire. Half the county militia, both horse and foot, is immediately to be marched to Barnet, and the rest warned to keep themselves in readiness on the shortest summons, for defence of those parts. With note of a like letter to Lord Mordaunt, Lord Lieutenant of Surrey, to bring the militia to Southwark and Lambeth. [Ent. Book 20, p. 148.]
[June 10.] 25. Draft of the preceding letter.
June 10. 26. Note by Viscount Mordaunt, that at 6½ p.m., he received the King's orders concerning the Surrey militia from John Dawson.
June 10.
Whitehall.
27. Order in Council that Lord Arlington forthwith prepare letters to the Lord Lieutenant of Wiltshire to cause three companies of foot and one of horse to march for defence of the Isle of Wight; and the same to the Lord Lieutenant of Berkshire. Also a letter to the Lord Lieutenant of Dorsetshire to send two com panies to Portland, and two to Weymouth; also that 600 foot be sent from Hampshire to Portsmouth, and one troop of horse to Portsea Island.
June 10. The King to the Duke of Richmond, Lord Lieutenant of Dorsetshire. The enemy's fleet having appeared on the coasts for several days past, with intention, as is supposed, to make a descent, all orders necessary for prevention thereof about the Thames have been given, but care is needed for the safety of the remoter parts; two of the Dorsetshire militia companies are therefore to march to Portland, and one to Weymouth, to remain till further orders. [Ent. Book 20, p. 148.]
June 10. Order for three companies of foot and a troop of horse to be sent from Wiltshire to the Isle of Wight. Minute. [Ent. Book 20, p. 158.]
June 10. 28. The King to Lord Lovelace, Lord Lieutenant of Berkshire. To the same effect, ordering three companies of foot and one of horse, such as were not drawn out last year, to march for defence of the Isle of Wight. [Draft.]
June 10. Minutes of the above. [Ent. Book 20, pp. 149, 158.]
June 10. The King to the Deputy Lieutenants of Hampshire. To the same effect, ordering 500 militia foot to march into Portsmouth, and a troop of horse to Portsea Island. Minutes. [Ent. Book 20, pp. 149–158.]
June 10. Warrants to J. Wickham to convey Chevalier De Certain to Windsor Castle, and to Lord Mordaunt to receive him. Minutes. [Ent. Book 23, p. 478.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
Pass for the ship on which Madame Courtin may sail from France to Holland, to return to France. [Ent. Book 25, p. 15b.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Simon Smith, on surrender of Rob. Scawen, of the office of Receiver General for cos. Hants, Wilts, and Gloucester. [Ent. Book 25 p. 16.]
June 10. 29. Information of George Knevett of Enfield, collar maker, before Sir Hen. Wroth, justice of peace for Middlesex. A month ago, saw a cart pass through Enfield with small barrels like gunpowder, covered with pitched cloth, and was told it belonged to Mr. Walker, brewer, of Battlebridge, Southwark, and was going to a house which he had taken in Theobalds Park; saw the cart pass through 10 or 12 times, and once it had a blunderbuss and two drums. Saw several horses tied in Mr. Walker's yard on the Lord's Day, the owners of which he conceives were there at an unlawful meeting. There was something of household stuff in the cart.
June 10. 30. Examination of Christopher Berkett [Birkhead], goldsmith, before Lord Arlington. Has been 25 weeks prisoner in the King's Bench, at the suit of Hen. Harris for 300l. Never said to any one that he had foretold the burning of the city, nor any fires in London, nor any disturbance by invasion, insurrection, &c. Has conversed with several persons in prison, but does not know Mr. Bedlow [Bedwell].
June 10.
King's Bench.
31. Joseph Strangways to Lord Frescheville. Is sorry that Major Birkhead should have been examined without his directions how it should be done. Bedwell is a prisoner in the house; had better be hanged than go into the Bench, if the least suspected about this business. Will prove what he has said; wishes to be examined by Lord Arlington, and will then make a discovery of the truth.
June 10.
Falmouth.
32. Thos. Holden to James Hickes. The Gift has left the harbour, convoying a small vessel laden with salt for Ireland.
June 10.
Yarmouth.
33. Rich. Bower to Williamson. The fishermen and their convoy go to sea daily, without hindrance; writes every post to prevent jealousy or false reports, an enemy being on the coast.
June 10.
Pendennis.
34. Fras. Bellott to Williamson. There have been 60 French sail seen off the Land's End, about Scilly, and 30 off Pendennis; several stout vessels, supposed to be King's frigates, are plying in the offing.
June 10.
Bristol.
35. Sir Thos. Langton, mayor of Bristol, to Williamson. Gives the names of the three Frenchmen who came from Barbadoes, with their papers; they are inconsiderable persons.
June 10.
Little Barford.
36. Capt. W. Gannocke to Williamson. Thanks for being spared a tedious attendance, and allowed to return to his friends in the country. Obeys his commands in relating what may interest the King relating to the constitution of the country, but will gain further information from the Lord Chancellor, Lord Lieutenant. Thinks there is "too little interruption of that old serpent the presbyter, and his amphibious spawn," in Banbury and the villages about. Being the business of many, it becomes that of none. Hears little of the militia, and thinks neither King nor people were ever better for them.
June 10. 37. "Advices," being notes from letters calendared above and from the following:—
Portsmouth, June 9: Sir Rob. Holmes has put to sea with seven or eight frigates, and anchored behind the Isle of Wight, expecting the return of his scouts. The Paradox, sent to discover what ships were at St. Malo's, got amongst them, but got clear again; she reports them 40 merchantmen, with 10 men-of-war. Four vessels are to be paid off, and the seamen sent on board other ships. [1½ pages.]
June 10.
Swansea.
38. John Man to Williamson. Has no news, vessels not daring to come from about land without convoy, because French and Dutch capers are so frequent on those coasts.
June 10.
Truro.
39. Hugh Acland to Williamson. A fleet of 30 sail, supposed to be French, is hovering between Lizard Point and Scilly. Has forwarded an express from Plymouth to the governor of Scilly.
[June 10.]
Monday, 10 p.m.
40. H. Slingsby, master worker of the Mint, to Williamson. Showed the draft of the order for the mint to Lord Ashley, who made no objection to it, and thought it was fit to pass. Came to give him and Lord Arlington notice of it, but had not the good fortune to meet either, and cannot return to the Mint nor proceed there to delivery without the warrant. [See June 12, 1667.]
June 10.
York Castle.
41. Wm. Leving to Williamson. Is committed prisoner on suspicion of a pitiful sum, 4s. 6d. Though malice may render him odious, hopes his fidelity to the King will move Lord Arlington to order his liberty. Encloses,
41. i. Wm. Leving to Lord Arlington. Has gained the acquaintance of a gentleman whose birth, estate, and education make him an agent for the management of affairs of the greatest importance. He understands the present state of the nation, is true to the King, sober and judicious, and will, on terms of encouragement, relinquish his own concerns for the public good chiefly for conscience' sake; he can wind himself into the most desperate intrigues of the dissatisfied, and will do great service, not by accusing any, nor having his hand in blood, which he detests, but by bringing the heads of the factions into the King's service, or by anticipating their endeavours. He wishes not to be known to any but the King and his lordship. Asks whether to proceed with him.
York Castle, June 10, 1667.
June 10.
9 A.M. Gravesend.
42. Sir John Griffith to Lord Middleton. The enemy is on the lower end of the slope, and some say that the tide being turned, they are under sail upward. Will take the best care he can to secure the forts.
June 10.
Dover.
43. Jo. Carlisle to Williamson. The Dutch fleet has got into the Swale or nearer the mouth of Chatham river. A party of 100 are said to have landed in Thanet, but to have been forced to retreat with the loss of some men, by the Scotch soldiers there. The troop quartered at Dover is ordered to march away, but it is not known whither. The trained bands in Canterbury and Sittingbourne are in arms, and marching towards Chatham. The beacons are on fire. The deputy lieutenants of the county met yesterday, so that the county is in good condition to entertain the enemy, if they attempt to land. Capt. Peter Kenton of Dover has brought in three boats prizes—two laden with butter, cheese, and deals from Middleburg; the other was the vice-admiral of Holland's packet boat, and had letters on board, which have been brought to Sir Thos. Teddeman, and are sent away to Court.
June 10.
Wingham.
44. Rowland Selby to Williamson. Is ordered to march to Rochester, and will then give an account how things stand. Sixty sail of the Dutch have been seen about the Buoy of the Nore, and as many off the Gunfleet. Lord Middleton ordered the deputy lieutenants to march forthwith, with such forces as they could get to rendezvous at Rainham, near Rochester, the rest following. His Lordship was to meet Sir Thos. Peyton at Sittingbourne this morning. All the trained bands are marching or preparing. Expects to be tossed up and down till the Dutch go off the coast. Endorsed with a note from John Cook, June 12, that he found this thrust under his office door.
June 10.
Chelmsford.
45. Sir Jo. Bramston to Willm. Herris, Lincoln's Inn. The alarm is hot enough. Sir H. and the greatest part of his regiment has marched to Lee, and the enemy have burned houses and barns in Canvey Island, and are fallen back to the Buoy in the Nore. Thinks they will attempt Wakering, Foulness, &c. Sir James Altham says my lord's regiment will be at Chelmsford this evening. The town cannot supply them with powder if they come without, as it is presumed they will.
June 11 ? 46. John Glover to [Williamson ?]. Three hoys of the town, that were going to London, bring word that 40 sail of Dutch ships are battering at Sheerness.
June 11.
Rochester.
47. Geo. Williamson to Williamson. Yesterday, at 7 p.m., the Dutch, after some small dispute, took possession of Sheerness, which is supposed to be burned, as much smoke comes this way. The Lord General was at Chatham by 5 o'clock to-day, and has put things in the best posture he could; they lie with their main fleet opposite Queensbury, which it is said they have taken; many of the people have left the Isle of Sheppey; five of their fleet are within a league of the fire-ships at Chatham; it is expected they will attempt something to-morrow noon, when the tide will give them an advantage.
June 11.
Harwich.
48. Fras. Newby to James Hickes. The Dutch fleet has gone off from before the harbour, and only eight are left in sight. Harwich is full of nobility and gentry attending the Duke of Monmouth, and the Duke of York is expected to-morrow.
June 11.
Harwich.
49. T. R[oss] to Williamson. Sends a letter from the Duke [of Monmouth] to the King, giving an account of himself. The place is in very good posture, and as desirous of an attack from the Dutch as the latter are unwilling to hazard it. Their whole fleet, except six, has gone towards the river, and Sir Hen. Appleton writes that they have plundered, Canvey Island. Many small boats attend them for the purpose. Thinks they mean little else than to steal sheep, which they attempted at St. Osyth, but retired when the people appeared. The militia are very ready and cheerful for service.
June 11.
2 A.M. Aldborough.
50. Rich. Browne to Williamson. On Sunday the Dutch fleet fired many guns, and 30 sail came from the south-east, supposed to be recruits from Holland or the French fleet. The Dutch fleet still maintain their station, and have galliots cruising about. Has had much ado to persuade the deputy lieutenants that the Dutch were on the coasts; the vigilant care of Richard Cooke, deputy lieutenant, despatched away Sir Rob. Brooke's company, who have come, but there is no other company of horse or foot.
June 11.
Dover.
51. Jo. Carlisle to Williamson, The report of the Dutch landing in the Isle of Thanet is false; it is said they have fired Lee in Essex; the guns were heard yesterday till 10 p.m. Capt. Canning, of the Penelope, with three guns, fought a Dutch caper of eight guns for two hours and a half, but was obliged to let her go. Hopes the late packet taken by Capt. Kenton has discovered the intents of the Dutch and French.
June 11.
Whitehall.
Lord Arlington to the Duke of Monmouth. The King wishes him immediately to draw together a troop of 80 horse, by virtue of the commission granted him last year, and to certify their place of rendezvous, when they will be mustered accordingly. With list of 15 other noblemen and gentlemen to whom similar letters were sent, and of 13 others to whom they were sent on June 13 and 15. [Ent Book 20, p. 150.]
June 11. Orders for Col. Sydney's regiment to be drawn to Portsmouth; three companies of foot to be raised in the Island of Portsmouth, and three companies formed out of the workmen of the yard at Portsmouth. Minutes. [Ent. Book 20, p. 158.]
June 11. Warrant to [John] Taylor, Navy Comr. at Harwich, to impress merchant ships and other vessels, paying for their hire, to dislodge the Dutch from the coast of Kent, and prevent their attacking other ports of the kingdom. With note of like warrants to [Ant.] Deane at Harwich and Sir Thos. Teddeman at Dover. [Ent. Book 23, p. 478.]
[June 11.] 52. Draft of the above, endorsed "Impressing fire-ships."
June 11. Grant to Thomas, son of Sir Thos. Clifford, of the reversion of a Tellership of the Exchequer. Minute. [Ent. Book 23, p. 525.]
June 11.
Carrigholt.
53. Col. D. O'Brien to Williamson. Trusts him in reference to his business, Lord O'Brien assuring him of Williamson's favour. His estate is of no advantage unless he can get it discharged of the quit rent. The going thither will be as bad to him as the quit rent. [2 pages.]
June 11.
Minehead.
54. John Maurice to Williamson. The Jacob of Amsterdam, of 400 tons, was driven ashore by the storm and the negligence of the crew; she is not fallen asunder, but much of her timber is spoiled. Sir John Knight and some Bristol men were her owners.
June 11.
Portsmouth.
55. Chas. Honeywood to Williamson. Sir Rob. Holmes and his squadron returned, and are at Spithead. The Dragon and Roebuck, being the scouts, brought him word of the French being gone from La Roche Bay.
June 11.
Portsmouth.
56. Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Sir Rob. Holmes, with nine sail, whereof three are fire-ships, intended to encounter a party of 40 sail, with 16 men-of-war for convoy, near St. Malo, but was prevented by the wind.
June 11.
Plymouth.
57. Sir Tho. Allin to Williamson. The French fleet of 22 sail lies between the Land's End and the Lizard; the merchantmen will be much prejudiced unless they are beaten off the coast.
June 11.
Plymouth.
58. John Clarke to James Hickes. Thirty French men-of-war are plying up and down between the Scilly Isles and the Lizard Point. Rear-Admiral Kempthorne is there with five or six frigates and some fire-ships. The fort building is carrying on with all possible vigour; one bastion is finished, and guns will soon be planted on it.
June 11. 59. John Clarke to Williamson. To the same effect.
June 11.
Newcastle.
60. Rich. Forster to Williamson. Some 14 sail that were in the late storm have come in; the loss is not known. A Dutch privateer was lost. Sir Jeremy Smith's squadron is cruising off the coast of Scotland.
June 11.
Leith Road.
61. Sir Jer. Smith to Williamson. On May 31, four frigates met 60 Hollanders and Danes bound to the East, with one man-ofwar and a ketch for convoy, but the wind prevented their doing much spoil; the man-of war and the ketch got into Norway; 14 were taken or sunk, the rest dispersed, and many have fallen into the hands of Scotch privateers. Two of the frigates have arrived, and some ships are seen, which are hoped to be the other two and the prizes. Will hasten them out as fast as they come in, and not let them be idle. An Ostender affirms that he saw the Dutch fleet of 80 men-of-war riding near Ostend. The Oxford has taken a privateer of eight guns.
June 11.
Edinburgh.
62. Rob. Mein to Williamson. Wm. Douglas, a sweet stately youth, not 21 years, a brave scholar and spirit, was beheaded at the Market Cross, and died very penitently. Sir Jeremy Smith's cruisers have sent up 10 prizes to Leith. The governor of Hull writes word that he has heard from Holland that the Dutch intend to attack Leith, with 60 men-of-war and 20 fire-ships, and all the forces are drawing together.
June 11. 63. Receipt by Thos. Barlow of two packets from Lord Arlington and Sir Wm. Coventry, for the Duke of Albemarle and Sir Wm. Jennings, delivered by John Wilson.
June 11.
Ordnance Office.
64. Edw. Sherburne and Rich. Marsh to the Navy Comrs. Have delivered the ingredients for the fireworks to Mr. Leeke, gunner of the Princess, and appointed two gunners to assist him in fitting them. Wish the gunners of fire-ships to come to them for their other stores; nothing shall be wanting in them to expedite the service. [Adm. Paper.]
June 11.
Plymouth.
65. S. Langford to Sam. Pepys. Posted his account for May on Sunday June 2, and it should have been with him on the Wednesday following. Some persons are surveying Sir George Carteret's estate in houses and yards, where the Victualling Office is now held, that His Majesty, paying Sir George the due value, might take them into the new citadel, as a wall is to to be raised to enclose all the houses. They were valued by some at 100l. per annum, and by others at 80l., which latter sum is nearest the truth. Some of the walls of the citadel are now up to 40 feet, and they are raising a sentry house of freestone. Several of the great ships put to sea for the north of Ireland, but a ketch being sent before, discovered another French fleet; they have therefore returned, and taken in seven days' more provision. A fleet of 20 sail bound for Wales arrived from the east. [Adm. Paper.]
June 11.
Kinsale.
66. Capt. Wm. Crispin to the Navy Comrs. Will render a good account of the stores lately sent, and assist the clerk of the cheque. Thos. Chudleigh, the master shipwright, cannot continue the supply to ships putting in there, unless his former disbursements are satisfied, but will continue until he hears from them again. [Adm. Paper.]
June 11.
Kinsale.
67. Wm. Penn to the Navy Comrs. Has received the stores sent by the Milkmaid prize, and shall observe their orders as to issuing them to the ships, by advice of Capt. Crispin. [Adm. Paper.]
June 11.
Deptford.
68. Sir Wm. Penn to the Navy Comrs. Fitting up of ships. Wants two agents from the Ordnance Office, to see to the combustibles. Asks orders as to the number of men to be borne on fireships, &c, Has got help from Woolwich, and the business of fitting them goes on cheerfully. [Adm. Paper.]
June 11.
Victualling Office.
69. Certificate by Thos. Lewis, that Constance, widow of Francis Walsall, purser of the Martin frigate, has cleared her husband's account for victualling, between 24 April 1664, and 2 February 1665. [Adm. Paper.]
June 12.
4 P.M., Golden Hart.
70. Capt. Charles Juxon to the Navy Comrs. Is making all possible dispatch, and asks for 100 tons of ballast. Recommends Richards Francis as gunner, and John Garrad as boatswain, in his ship. [Adm. Paper.]
June 12.
Bristol.
71. John Humphreys and Thos. Hide, masters of two small vessels, to the Navy Comrs. Ask for an order to Capt. Rooth of the St. David, to convoy their vessels laden with pitch to Portsmouth, the Dartmouth frigate ordered for them being now ordered for the coast of Ireland. [Adm Paper.]
June 12.
7 A.M.
72. Sir Wm. Coventry to the Navy Comrs. Capt. Hannam, of the Mary, is willing to give assistance for setting out of fire-ships and to command them. His judgment may well be taken. [Adm. Paper.]
June 12. 73. Sir Wm. Coventry to the Navy Comrs. Recommends Capt. Robt. Newland to the command of a fire-ship. Will send some more blank commissions. If commanders are wanted, the boatswains and gunners of the ships in the harbour might be commanded to it. [Adm. Paper.]
June 12.
Whitehall.
74. Thirteen blank commissions for captains of horse.
June 12. Grant to Anne, wife of Fras. Wyndham, of a pension of 400l. a year. [Docquet.]
June 12.
Whitehall.
Statement by Lord Arlington, of the King's approval of eight gentlemen named, as deputy-lieutenants for Bedfordshire, to whom the Earl of Aylesbury is to issue deputations accordingly. [Ent. Book 20, p. 150.]
June 12. Commission for Sir Geo. Saville to be captain of a troop of horse Minute. [Ent. Book 20, p. 169.]
June 12. Commissions for three lieutenants to the three companies at Berwick. Minute. [Ent. Book 20, p. 169.]
June 12. Warrants to Sir John Lenthall to deliver — Bedwell and Berkleat [Birkhead], and to the Lieutenant of the Tower to receive them, for dangerous words. Minute. [Ent. Book 23, p. 479.]
June 12. Warrant to Col. Legg to pay 20,000l. out of the Ordnance, to Sir Stephen Fox, for His Majesty's pressing affairs in this conjuncture, the money to be refunded. Minute. [Ent. Book 23, p. 481.]
June 12. Warrant to Henry Slingsby, master and worker of the Mint, to observe the rules and orders in an indenture of 20 July, 1660, with the late Sir Ralph Freeman, for the coinage of money, until a new way by mill and press be settled by indenture; also to observe the regulations of the late Act for encouraging coinage. [Ent. Book 23, pp. 483–4.]
June 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Edward Beale, of Bramham, co. York, of pardon for forging an obligation from Rich. Greaves, to pay him 10l. [Ent. Book 25, pp. 16 b, 17.]
June 12.
Whitehall.
The King to the master and fellows of St. Mary Magdalen's College, Cambridge. Recommends Charles Preston, scholar of the college, for election to a fellowship of John Spendleff's [Spendlove's] foundation, now void, which should be supplied by a capable person presented by the governors of Alford school, co. Lincoln, but none such has appeared for 12 months past. [Ent. Book 27, p. 122.]
June 12.
St. Vallery ?
75. Faulomet, surgeon, to his nephew, Capt. Jacque Bideler, at Falmouth or London, in prison on account of his ships taken by the English. Has been to Rouen and Dieppe, and taken much pains to know where he is; has power to deliver him if he be kept prisoner. The count is displeased with his bad conduct and his doing nothing. [French.]
June 12.
Bristol.
76. Sir Thos. Langton, mayor of Bristol, to Williamson. A vessel from Bilbao saw 25 French men-of-war, 5 or 6 of 70 guns each, plying about Scilly and Land's End.
June 12.
Yarmouth.
77. Rich. Bower to Williamson. Not an enemy is seen, but guns have been heard for several days, some say from Nieuport in Flanders; a Yarmouth ship has brought 40 prisoners from Amsterdam; a galliot hoy has come in, pretending to be from Ostend; thinks she belongs to Flushing; 100 sail lying by the piers in the haven's mouth came up to the town, for fear of firing.
June 12.
Hull.
78. Chas. Whittington to Williamson. Notices of ships; great shooting has been heard at sea, but the cause is not known.
June 12.
Lynn.
79. Edw. Bodham to Williamson. The bay is clear of the enemy; Sir Jer. Smith has ordered a dogger to cruise in it.
June 12.
Pembroke.
80. Fras. Malory to Williamson. Several Dutch and French privateers much annoy the coast and hinder trade; the vessels which trade for Bristol with corn dare not venture to sea, for want of one or two frigates.
June 12.
Falmouth.
81. Thos. Holden to Williamson. Some 30 or 40 ships seen off Land's End are supposed to be the French fleet, cruising between there and Scilly; their intent in lying about is not known; the country people thereabout are in much fear that they will land, plunder, and go off again, the place being in no posture of defence.
June 12.
Deal.
82. Ri. Watts to Williamson. Yesterday letters to Governor Titus from the Isle of Sheppey and those parts speak of the Dutch landing in that island; reports since say it is in the enemy's possession, which has given the whole country an alarm. The foot adjoining the ports are marched away from Deal, so that if any attempt were made, the enemy would soon obtain their desires. Col. Titus' company, under Capt. Poole, watch 30 a night. The day's work yesterday was to put the handful of men in the best posture possible. Hopes the King will send some trained mercenaries to assist them, and call back the neighbouring trained bands. Will have to request a pardon if he reports the opinions of the country as he is ordered to do, for mouths are very loose.
June 12.
Rochester.
83. Geo. Williamson to Williamson. Has seen a sad sight that day, and fears it will not be otherwise to-morrow.