BHO

Charles II: January 1669

Pages 143-177

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1668-9. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1894.

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January

Jan. 1. Hen. Rumbold to Lord Arlington. I understand my place of Consul at Malaga is disposed of to Hum. Colston, without reserving me even so much as St. Lucar, with which I should have been content, as being something satisfactory to my reputation. I wonder that anyone durst speak against me as a Papist to your lordship, and that Colston, who is so by profession, and has married a Spanish woman in Malaga, should be nominated in my place. I shall not do to Colston as Sir Fras. Bedingfield did to me, inflame the merchants, and cause them to petition the King and Council for their right to elect, as all those of eminency that trade for Spain declared against Colston, upon hearing that he pretended to it, and charged him with what he could not answer, much less clear himself, as I did most fully of what they alleged against me.
I beseech your lordship to consider my case; besides the merchants' approbation, I paid down the money for my second commission, and it has been without the enjoyment of the place. This besides the great sums the Consul's place formerly cost me, and for which I have received no satisfaction of Mr. Westcombe. I have also lost my former employment as partner with Mr. Upton, which being so considerable, I ought in conscience to have a consideration. I wrote to the King as to the necessity of having a minister sent to the Spanish Court, and took some pains to get the Duke of Medina Celi to make a report to the King of Spain, that the person might be admitted into his Court. My loyalty is the only cause of my ruin, as your lordship would conclude by an inspection of my orders and vouchers, both from my brother and those that then acted for his Majesty; few men have performed such great services for their King, at their own charge. I served faithfully in my place in the Prize Office, and laid out 118l., as appears by the account annexed to my petition, given in long since, but payment of which has been deferred by Lord Ashley, so as not to make it an example; as for salary, I have not received any, nor know what will be allowed. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 1.]
Jan. 1.
Minehead.
John Maurice to Williamson. A small bark, laden with pitch and tar for Bristol, was driven ashore in the middle of the night; the goods were all landed, and the vessel was not damaged. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Jan. 1.
Hull.
Charles Whittington to Williamson. Two Swedes have arrived from Stockholm with pitch, tar, and iron, also a Londoner from Holland with tar. The Perregrin of Hull, laden with lead, barley, and cloth for Rotterdam, was cast away near Brewers Haven, and only 3 men escaped in the boat. [Ibid. No. 3.]
Jan. 1.
Harp frigate, Kinsale.
Capt. Rob. Hooper, to the Navy Commissioners. Is waiting at Kinsale for further orders. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 4.]
Jan. 2.
Roe ketch.
Capt. Thos. Foulis to the Navy Commissioners. Received the stores sent from Deptford, after waiting more than a week. [Ibid. No. 5.]
Jan. 2.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to Pepys. Has almost finished trimming the Hope galliot hoy, and shall launch her next week, and then finish the yacht. Will omit laying decks at this season of the year, the deals brought in being green. [Ibid. No. 6.]
Jan. 2. Sir John Mennes to Pepys. The Commissioners of Accounts at Brooke House requiring the pay books of 21 ships named, desires he will cause their delivery. [Ibid. No. 7.]
Jan. 3.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Hickes. The Ruth has arrived from the Leeward Islands, and the William and Elizabeth from Barbadoes, having been 7 weeks in her passage; she reports that Lord Willoughby was ready to sail to the Caribbee Islands, and so home for England, having constituted several Commissioners to manage the government in his absence. The island is in a thriving condition, and much of Bridge Town is rebuilt. [Ibid. No. 8.]
Jan. 3. Same to Williamson. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 9.]
Jan. 3.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The 54 Dutch ships that lay under Dungeness outward bound have sailed; I suppose that those that went out of the Downs with them have scarce weathered Portsmouth. Great wrecks have been seen near the North Foreland, and the Thanet men have brought much goods on shore. [Ibid. No. 10.]
Jan. 3.
Post Office.
I. Dorislaus to Williamson. I have been twice to Whitehall to receive your commands, but failed in seeing you. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
M. Wren to Pepys. I send you an order for Capt. Foulis of the Roe ketch, as I know not where to find him. [Ibid. No. 12.]
Jan. 3.
Chatham.
John Moore and Edw. Moorcock to the Navy Commissioners. We have procured credit for money for one month's pay for our men; we pray you to imprest some money speedily, or we shall not have these able men in our employ; and if we lose our credit, we shall hardly procure men in the spring. The anchors taken up will more than pay for this winter's charge. [Ibid. No. 13.]
Jan. 3.
Chatham.
Same to Col. Thos. Middleton. We shall have the old provisions broken down from the Helverstone taken on shore, and put into the stores, as this will prevent loss and embezzlement. [Ibid. No. 14.]
Jan. 4.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. A vessel with piece goods from London was cast away on the Barnard Sand; a coach and several goods, as also a woman and some other of the company, were driven on shore at Corthy. Another vessel was forced ashore a mile to the northward of Yarmouth, where she still lays far up on the land.
Nine ships have arrived from Rotterdam, one of which reports that one Bromwell of Iron Gate, near Tower Wharf, master of a ketch that was freighted from Rotterdam to London with merchant goods, also took aboard 570 odd pieces of gold, upon the account of Mr. Tucker of Rotterdam; when at sea, the master conspired with his company to share the gold and sink the ketch, which they did, within 10 leagues of the North Foreland, and were taken on board a vessel bound for Rotterdam, with some of the ketch's goods. One of the company, being a Frenchman, designed to go for St. Valery in an English vessel, and went on board; the master, finding him to falter in his discourse, secured him, and acquainted Mr. Tucker, whom he knew; Tucker, on his arrival, began to search the Frenchman, who pulled a bag with 130 pieces out of his pocket and threw it on the fire. At length he confessed the fact, and said the rest of the company were gone to the Brill, to take passage in the packetboat; these they forthwith pursued and captured, and recovered all the gold except 2 pieces. I want the Gazettes as formerly. [1¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 15.]
Jan. 4.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. Several ships have put in through the tempestuous weather, one of which has broken her foremast and sprung her mainmast. Several came in yesterday, but the tempest is too strong for particulars; a Falmouth vessel has been cast on the rocks, and is too much bulged to go to sea again. [Ibid. No. 16.]
Jan. 4.
Coventry.
Ralph Hope to Williamson. A robbery was committed near Curdworth Bridge; 3 persons met one Lascelles and his wife from London, who had stayed at Sir Clement Fisher's at Packington, and robbed them of 34 guineas, which the woman had quilted in her sleeve. After they had robbed these two, they met with others, one being from Coventry, whom they set upon and wounded; but the townsman got clear off, though not without a wound through the shoulder; they took from the others what they had, and also their horses, and have not since been heard of. One of the thieves is believed to be Ashenhurst, mentioned in the proclamation. It is strongly presumed, there being many circumstances to back it, that the first robbery was but a cheat and confederacy to recover the money of the country, and that Lascelles, as he pretends his name to be, is no better than he should be, and Sir Clement himself has that suspicion of him that he has sent after him. Some of those who committed the robbery at Coleshill 6 weeks ago are in Oxford Gaol.
The school boys during Christmas acted a play called "The Indian Emperor" for 2 nights, before a very great concourse of persons, a convenient stage being built in the school for the purpose, though there was a cabal that much opposed it. There is a pear tree in full blossom in the orchard of Mrs. Smith at Brandon, alias Brawne, 3 miles from Coventry, which creates some wonder. I suppose you have heard of the woman at Hatton in Derbyshire, who has not taken any manner of sustenance since St. Thomas's Day was a twelvemonth; she lies in bed talking much, although worn to a mere skeleton; all her refreshment is having her lips anointed now and then with a little oil, &c. [2¾ pages. Ibid. No. 17.]
Jan. 4. Reference to the Treasury Commissioners of the petition of Sir Wm. Coney, for the estate of John Fien, forfeited for manslaughter. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 18, p. 353.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Petition of George Nicholls to the King, for a recommendation to the fellows of Pembroke College, for one of the 3 fellowships founded by Charles I. for the natives of Jersey and Guernsey, there being one void by the death of Mr. Morinel. With reference thereon to the Bishop of Hereford, and his report that the petitioner is both capable and fit to receive his Majesty's favour as desired. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, Nos. 18, 19. See p. 153, infra.]
Jan. 4. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 18, p. 353.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Petition of Charles, Lord Gerard, to the King, that Sir Stephen Fox may be ordered to return to him two-thirds of the money deposited in his hands on a dispute between them, in which, on reference to his Majesty, it was decided that the petitioner should pay one-third and Sir Stephen two-thirds. With reference thereon to the Lord Keeper, and Secs. Trevor and Arlington. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 20.]
Jan. 4.
Court at Whitehall.
Order in Council—recapitulating a former order of 30 Dec. 1668, for the farmers of Customs to give their reasons for not entering 10 prize ships named as free ships, according to the Act for prize ships, but detaining them, whether inward or outward bound, in the port of London; the reply of the farmers, dated 2 Jan. 1669, that the reason why the said ships were not admitted for entry as free ships, being taken as prizes, is that oath was not entered before 1 Aug., according to the statute for making prize ships free, and that there are others in like condition which cannot be admitted without order—that the farmers are to be asked whether, in case of freeing the said ships, they will demand any defalcations; and their reply of 8 Jan. that they shall not claim defalcation. [Copy. 2¾ pages. Ibid. No. 21.]
Jan. 4. Original of the above report, and the order, &c., thereon. [1¾ pages. Ibid. No. 22.]
Jan. 4. Warrant from Lord Arlington to the Lieutenant of the Tower, for Dr. Edw. Stillingfleet to have access to Wm. Penn, confined in the Tower, to confer with him, in order to the convincing him, if it may be, of blasphemous and heretical opinions. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 96.]
Jan. 5. Grant to Jacob Smith, born at Dantzic, of denization, with proviso that he pay strangers' customs, &c. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 1.]
Jan. 5.
Portsmouth.
Capt. Ant. Deane to [Williamson]. I have had much trouble to copy the drawing, which, I believe, is the best we have, as it was all sounded. I hope Lord Arlington will excuse its not being done like painting. It is the only style I use, and I know his Majesty likes this way. I question not but if the French be as high as is reported, the discovery of the places my friend has viewed will be the means of doing them some mischief. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 23.] Enclosing,
Pen and ink drawing of the river and forts at Brest, with the number and size of the guns placed in them, &c. [Large sheet. Ibid. No. 23I.]
Jan. 5.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Arrival of a ship from New England; she sprang a leak in the Channel, and injured her mainmast. [Ibid. No. 24.]
Jan. 5.
Bristol.
James Baskerville to Williamson. The fleet outward bound have sailed. A French vessel reports that the King of France has seized all the ecclesiastical rents there, and is building ships in most of the fit ports in his dominions; this, with the news of 22 of his men-ofwar lately gone out on some unknown design, much startles the people here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 25.]
Jan. 5.
Portsmouth.
St. J. Steventon to the Navy Commissioners. I went to Southampton, and find the charge of the hemp according to particulars enclosed; the master who brought it has left orders that it is not to be delivered without payment of freight and other charges. There is no close-decked vessel here; shall I hire one at 40s. to fetch it, and pay the freight? [Ibid. No. 26.]
Jan. 5.
Portsmouth.
Capt. John Tinker to Pepys. I am daily troubled by the poor men that carried ballast to and from the ships in Col. Middleton's time, and as a small sum will satisfy the debt, it is a discredit to the service that they should complain as they do; I would as soon pay them as hear them lament, they having nothing but from hand to mouth. I pray that they may be satisfied. [Ibid. No. 27.] Encloses,
Petition of John Roberts, and 12 other inhabitants of Portsmouth and Gosport, to the Navy Commissioners, for payment of the amount set against each of their names, from 17l. to 1l. 8s., for carrying ballast to and from the King's ships, the greater part having been due nearly 3 years. [Ibid. No. 27i.]
Jan. 5.
Portsmouth.
Capt. Ant. Deane to the Navy Commissioners. We lose half the time of 100 men for want of a supply of spikes to fasten the works of the hulk; unless there be order to receive them, or the ketch arrive with them, as promised, the men must stand and look at one another, as they must have done to-day, if I had not promised to pay for 2 cwt., rather than see such disorder in the yard. The men make a great moan for want of money; pray move his Royal Highness for their relief, they having neither a penny nor credit to keep them alive. [Ibid. No. 28.]
Jan. 5.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to the Navy Commissioners. Sends an account of stores. For a new year's gift, there arose so violent a storm of wind that it stranded and staved 40 vessels great and small, and amongst others the muster boat, just taken off the oar (?) to be sent for Deptford. The fury of the storm continues yet. [Ibid. No. 29.]
Jan. 5.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to Commissioner Thos. Middleton. There are only the Crown and Dover remaining here. Some deals and other goods were taken out of the barge belonging to Mr. Andrews; but having sent some watchmen, we found the men out. Particulars of the timber stolen when the barge was lying near Tower Wharf. [Ibid. Nos. 30, 31.]
Jan. 6.
Lydney.
Dan. Furzer to the Navy Commissioners. The 2 anchors sent in the Edgar were made by your order for the Navy 2 years since, approved, and a set price agreed upon. I hope you will consider my necessity, and order the money for them, or I shall be undone. [Ibid. No. 32.]
Jan. 6.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. There has been a very violent storm, in which 6 vessels were cast upon the rocks from their anchors in the harbour. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 33.]
Jan. 6.
Falmouth.
Same to Williamson. To the same effect as the above, and part of his letter to Hickes of 4 Jan. [Ibid. No. 34.]
Jan. 6.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. A galliot hoy from Amsterdam, laden with linen, raw silk, looking-glasses, and other rich commodities, ran ashore near Deal Castle, but most of her lading will be saved. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Jan. 7.
Deal.
Same to the Same. To the same effect. My letters so often miscarrying, I send this by Sandwich, the rather because Capt. Jno. Titus, lieutenant of Deal Castle, and his soldiers, at first too much resisted the Lord Warden's officers in their good service. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Jan. 7.
London.
George Bower to [Viscount Conway]. I beg payment of my bill, as my occasions for money are so various, and persons call upon me when my stock is out. With memorandum endorsed of the names of 4 persons to whom trees were sold for prices named; also of 7 others, creditors or debtors for sums mentioned, amounting in the whole to 17l. 18s. 6d. [Ibid. No. 37.]
Jan. 7. Presentation of Ralph Davenant to the rectory of Stepney, co. Middlesex, void by simony. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 2.]
Jan. 7. Petition of the Churchwardens and Overseers of St. Martin'sin-the-Fields to the King, for his accustomed bounty of 100l. to their poor, the number of those reduced to seek parish aid increasing greatly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 38.]
Jan. 7. Privy seal for 100l. to the Churchwardens and Overseers for the Poor of the Parish of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 70.]
Jan. Docquet of the above, dated 27 Jan. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 7.]
Jan. 7. Pass for Sir Thos. Bond, his servants, and 16 horses to France. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 70.]
Jan. 7.
Woolwich.
W. Hannam to the Navy Commissioners. I have hauled the Centurion and others ashore for better security, there being so much ice in the river. I am in a strait for help to secure ships; I beg power to command the ropemakers upon urgent occasions. I desire a supply of candles, being forced to borrow. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 39.]
Jan. 7. Dr. Mathew Crouch to the Navy Commissioners. I crave pardon for not giving credit to your letter touching Mrs. Tooker being housekeeper at the Hillhouse at Chatham. I was over persuaded that it was only devised by a particular clerk, out of kindness to the widow; but being sensible of my error, I desire you will appear in my behalf to his Royal Highness, that I may be released from the custody of the messenger. [Ibid. No. 40.] Encloses,
Petition of Dr. M. Crouch to the Duke of York, for release out of custody, as he acknowledges his error, and is sorry for arresting Mrs. Tooker, who was not only released, upon a right understanding that she was related to the King's service, but had her fees paid, and her debt forgiven. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 40i.]
Jan. 8. Mich. Hales to Thos. Hayter. Some time since, a stop was put on Capt. James Carteret's pay, for an anchor and cable delivered by him out of the Jersey into a merchant ship; but Lord Willoughby having certified that they were delivered for the service, Lord Brouncker desires you to draw up a signification thereof, that the stop may be taken off. [Ibid. No. 41.]
Jan. 8. Warrant to pay 100l. to Lady Harvey and Col. Thos. Panton for providing hay for the deer in New Park. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 98.]
Jan. 8.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Williamson. The Loyal Friendship from Malaga has arrived; has no other news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 42.]
Jan. 8. Same to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 43.]
Jan. 8.
Milford.
John Powell to Williamson. The Delight of Swansea, laden with wines and salt from Rochelle, ran ashore at a place called Dale, having spent her masts; the salt was all lost, but most of the wine saved. [Ibid. No. 44.]
Jan. 8. Same to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 45.]
Jan. 9.
Weymouth.
John Pocock to Hickes. The Three Falcons, a Dutch vessel, has been forced ashore near Portland; the company deserted her and saved themselves by the boat. As soon as the vessel came on shore, she was seized for the Lord High Admiral. Her cargo of iron and timber is saved, and it is hoped the vessel will be also. [Ibid. No. 46.]
Jan. 9. Petition of Wm. Fernely of Ipswich to the King, that the penalty of burning in the hand may be suspended, until his Majesty's pleasure is further known. Being assaulted by [Darcy] Blosse of Ipswich, and having received several wounds, in his own defence, he drew his sword and killed Blosse, for which he has been found guilty by the coroner's inquisition of manslaughter. [Ibid. No. 47.] Annexed,
Finding of the jury at the inquest that Fernely was guilty of felonious homicide. [2 pages. Latin. Ibid. No. 47i.]
Information of John Jowers of Bramford, Suffolk, that as he and his brother Blosse were coming from the Golden Lion, they met Fernely against the George at Ipswich, and some words having passed between Blosse and Fernely, the latter drew his sword, and ran Blosse through the breast, of which he died.—1 Jan. 1669. [Ibid. No. 47ii.]
Certificate by Bryan Smith and F. Burwell, that the above information is a true copy of the original, taken before Ro. Rednall and Wm. Feast, coroners for Ipswich, and that they heard the coroners declare, in presence of several persons, that Jowers was the only witness examined before them, and that they were not satisfied that they ought to give any certificate thereof, unless lawfully called upon to do so. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 47iii.]
Certificate by Chris. Milton, J.P. for Ipswich, that he was present at the examination of Jowers, and that the latter declared he knew of no former differences between Blosse and Fernely, but believed them to have previously been very good friends. With certificate of Rich. Philips to the same effect. [Ibid. No. 47iv.]
John Sicklemor to Rob. Wright. The only account I can give of Fernely's business is from the testimony of Blosse's brotherin-law, who deposes that his brother gave the first offence by calling to Fernely to stay and alight from his horse, and asking him where he was going; he told him to his wife, when Blosse replied that she was an old whore, and that Fernely was the son of a whore; whereupon he alighted, and they drew swords, and after several passes, Blosse was killed.— Ipswich, 9 Jan. 1669. [Ibid. No. 47v.]
Jan. 9. Copy of the preceding petition. [Ibid. No. 47a.]
Jan. 9. Account delivered in by Col. Thos. Middleton, Surveyor, of unserviceable and decayed provisions in the stores at Portsmouth, Chatham, Woolwich, and Deptford, between Dec. 1667 and Dec. 1668. [4 pages. Ibid. No. 48.]
Jan. 9.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to Pepys. Has taken cognizance, with the master of attendance, of the Katherine yacht, and gives particulars; shall launch the Ann next week. All the ships here are safe ashore, except the Dover. [Ibid. No. 49.]
Jan. 9. Thos. Goose, purser of the Sweepstakes, to the Navy Commissioners. Begs their favour that he may not lie any longer in despatching his accounts, and that he may have such allowance as the equity of the case deserves. [Ibid. No. 50.]
Jan. 9. Note by Sir Wm. Penn that Stephen Rose, boatswain of the Golden Lion, must satisfy the Board how he can clear himself of a cable, received by him at Plymouth, by direction of Sir Rob. Holmes. [Ibid. No. 51.]
Jan. 9. Capt. George Erwin to Pepys. Pray assist Wm. Ash, boatswain of the Kent, in obtaining leave from his Royal Highness to accompany me to the East Indies in the Bombay Merchant, he having petitioned the Duke for that purpose, and being willing to proceed, if he may be continued in the service. I hope to sail the 16th or 18th. [Ibid. No. 52.]
Jan. 10.
Portsmouth.
Thos. Eastwood to the Navy Commissioners. I received money for the bark and lops which countervailed the charge of felling and squaring the timber, and placed it to account. Since his Majesty came home, it has been ordered by the Lord Warden of the Forest to Mr. Horne, merchant of Southampton, who claims the bark by his patent as hoy woodward; I suppose the money for the lops is disbursed for repairing of lodges and other charges, of which he gives account in the Exchequer every year. I am not concerned in the sale of the lops, but regarders ride with Mr. Horne who, when he has marked out the timber, value the lops, and set a price upon them. The regarders are men appointed to see that there may be no spoil in the forest, and if there is, they are to present it. Noted, "To be represented to the Lords of the Treasury, when the other purveyors have made their returns." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 53.]
Jan. 10.
Alresford.
Hen. Perrin to the Navy Commissioners. I am willing to serve into the stores at Portsmouth all goods formerly served in by me, and on the same terms as the ironmonger at London supplies all the rest of the yards. I beg some allowance for carriage of my goods, living so remote from London and other places, and being 20 miles from Portsmouth. [Ibid. No. 54.]
Jan. 10. Edw. Byland to Pepys. I want orders as to docking the Assistance and Crown, the pleasure boats being ready to launch. I have fetched a boat-load of reed from Ham Creek; I suppose there may be about one thousand bolts left. The price of cutting is 10s. per 100, and the quality needs no praising. The master of the ship with Scotch masts would not haul her ashore, so I cannot answer Col. Middleton's order. I can give no other proof that the deals stolen were the King's than that 7 were taken when the men left work, that 7 were missing, and that those brought back were like the same left behind in the barge. [Ibid. No. 55.]
Jan. 10.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Hickes. A States' man-of-war, of 44 guns and 160 men, bound with 2 others to convoy 30 merchant ships to the Straits, has put in, having lost her company in a storm and some of her masts; 3 or 4 colliers have also arrived. [Ibid. No. 56.]
Jan. 10.
Charlton.
Dr. T. Lamplugh to Williamson. Thanks for helping to make my young son a Christian; your chaplain-deputy performed his part well, and perhaps exceeded his commission, for he kissed all above and below stairs. I presume he has got the start of me in giving you an account of your partner, Sir Edw. Norris, and the name of your godson, which is Edward, my wife's father's name.
[Tim.] Halton is returned from Wales, and I hope he will reside in [Queen's] college. I hear nothing amiss of Mr. Clifford, or I would report it. The Sectarians have grown so exceedingly bold and daring that they have set apart a house at Bicester for a public meeting place, and made a pulpit in it; there is a greater number there every Sunday than in the church. There is scarcely a parish about Charlton but what is infected, and unless they are speedily suppressed, they will grow so numerous that I dread the event. Remember me to my Lord of Rochester and his lady. [Ibid. No. 57.]
Jan. 11. Sir Philip Musgrave to Williamson. I beg you to solicit Lord Arlington to accept the resignation of Mr. Sandford, ensign in my company at the garrison at Carlisle, and to appoint Basil Fielding to that employment. He was lieutenant to Sir Edw. Musgrave, and on that company being reduced, he chose rather to trail a pike in my company than to leave us; so I hope you will be a friend to him. I never did nor will make sixpence advantage by recommending any officer, as it is enough to me if I can gratify a deserving person. Let my letters be directed to Ednal, Cumberland. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 58.]
Jan. 11
Pendeunis.
Fras. Bellott to Williamson. The violence of the storm has driven 6 or 7 vessels on shore here, and 2 are broken in pieces. Several vessels have come in from Bordeaux, &c., laden with wine, pitch, and tar. [Ibid. No. 59.]
Jan. 11.
Deal
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. A large conger has been found in Sandwich Bay, which weighed 80 pounds after his entrails and fat were taken out. The wreck near Deal Castle gives sufficient employment to the people. There have been several wrecks on the Goodwin, as divers pieces of ships have been found. [Ibid. No. 60.]
Jan. 11.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Rose has come in with great difficulty from Rotterdam, by reason of the ice, and reports that they murmur there very much at payment of tonnage to the French King, and like not his being so near a neighbour to Flanders, which they suppose will soon cause a breach. [Ibid. No. 61.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
M. Wren to Pepys. I desire you to write to the victualler at Portsmouth to have provisions ready for the Roe ketch, she having lost a portion by a pink running aboard her, and breaking down the hoy lying by her side with them, so that she has only 2/3 of her supply aboard. [Ibid. No. 62.]
Jan. 12.
Alresford.
Hen. Perrin to the Navy Commissioners. I desire my contract may be made according to the London ironmongers' new contract. I have sent up my wife, who is as well or rather better acquainted with the business than myself, and she will wait on you for your pleasure. I am not able to ride up myself, through a fall from my horse. [Ibid. No. 63.]
Jan. 12.
Portsmouth.
St. J. Steventon to the Navy Commissioners. I sent a messenger to Southampton, to demand the St. Malo hemp in the King's name, but was denied the delivery of it, without paying the freight and other charges. It is in the custody of Nich. Capelin, one of the Custom House officers, who seemed willing to deliver it if he might have Master Du Hobry's wife's consent, which was refused. Unless you order payment of the freight, or find other course by constraint to force the delivery of it (in the latter of which I would be a willing instrument), you will not obtain it. [Ibid. No. 64.]
Jan. 12.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to Sir John Mennes. Though my delays have been long, pray consider my small help to compass so great a business as the whole account of the yard, not only in my own time, but before, which is very intricate. Ever since the King and Duke have been here, the Board have found me employment in preserving the King's concerns here, in unrigging and sale of the hulk, &c. I cannot have the accounts subscribed here, as there are none that can legibly write, and I cannot well be at London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 65.]
Jan. 12.
The Roebuck, Downs.
Capt. George Liddell to the Navy Commissioners. I can make shift for rigging till you give order to clean the frigate. My victuals are almost expended, and I have sent to the victualler at Dover to have a month's victuals ready. [Ibid. No. 66.]
Jan. 12.
Portsmouth.
Capt. Ant. Deane to the Navy Commissioners. The storekeeper will not receive the stores paid for with the 278l. without positive orders; as you did not give a warrant for the spikes and other things asked, I have supplied Capt. Hart with two Spanish tables out of my own house, rather than have any pretence of his want; if your Honours do not send a warrant for such small things until the Roe ketch come about, we must lose a great part of our time. The captain of the Portland is resolved to get out to-day if the wind favours him. I shall finish the hulk in 8 or 9 days, and then dock the Advice and Fairfax, as the provisions in the yard are suitable to their repairs. I have the beams for the new ship, and would get her forward if I had a supply of 4-inch plank. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 67.]
Jan. 12.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Pearl frigate has arrived at Spithead, and is coming into harbour to be cleaned and fitted for sea again, as she, with the Milford, is to try the new ship Nonsuch for sailing. The Portland is ready to proceed to Galicia, to bring the Duke of Tuscany to England. [Ibid. No. 68.]
Jan. 12. Pass for Francis Roper, sent to Flanders as Envoy from the Queen. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 98.]
Jan. 12. Warrant for 12,000l. to be paid into the privy purse, without account or imprest. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. 12. Warrant to the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, to order Sir John Curzon, Bart., Receiver, to pay 500l. to Edw. Jackson, for repairs of the house at Lindhurst, co. Hants. [Ibid.]
Jan. 12. Note of the above. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 69.]
Jan. [13.]
Whitehall.
The King to Lord Ashley, Treasurer of Prizes. It appears by the report of the Prize Commissioners, that more was placed to the credit of incident charges for Plymouth in 1667, than was apportioned on the ships, so that the Prize Treasurers were brought into debt 124l., as part of 158l. said to be due to David Grosse, but disallowed by the Sub-commissioners of Prizes. You are therefore to pay 120l. to Grosse, in full allowance for his services and expenses. [Ibid. No. 70.]
Jan. 13. Entry of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 99.]
Jan. 13. The King to the [Master and Fellows of Pembroke College, Oxford]. We recommend George Nicholls, student of Jesus College, to the fellowship in your college founded by the late King for the natives of Jersey and Guernsey. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 19, p. 92.]
Jan. 13. Warrant to Sir Stephen Fox to pay to Rich. Kent, for the use of the officers disbanded from the Guards, such money for half-pay as shall become due to them, according to a list approved and signed by the King, to commence from 26 Sept. last. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 30.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
The King to the Governors of the Charterhouse. We request you to admit William, son of William Man, of London, as a scholar in the Charterhouse. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 81.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Petition of John Skelton for a free pardon. Had a dispute with Francis Edgecombe 3 years since, which he believed had been reconciled the same night; but the next morning Edgecombe took the petitioner out of bed, and forced him to answer in the field, otherwise he would immediately kill him; thereupon wounds were given on either side, and Edgecombe died shortly after of one he then received, contrary to the petitioner's hopes and intentions, by reason whereof he has been compelled to live in exile. Served the Duke of York and the late Princess Royal, and will employ his life to serve his Majesty, if the pardon is granted.
With reference thereon to the Attorney-General, and his report that the facts are as stated in the petition, but that upon the impanelling of the jury by the coroner, Mr. Edgecombe's father sent several of his servants and tenants to serve upon the inquest, and procured such a verdict as he pleased (which proceeding was unknown to the petitioner's father or his friends); they found a verdict of murder, and the petitioner not appearing, he was outlawed, but never tried by any petty jury.—Jan. 21. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 71.]
[Jan. 13.] Draft of the above petition. [Ibid. No. 72.]
Jan. 13. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 1.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Petition of David Lawrence to the King, for presentation to the vicarage of Maker, co. Devon (sic), void by resignation of Rob. Warren. With reference thereon to the Bishop of Hereford, Dean of the Chapel, and his reports in favour of the petitioner. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, Nos. 73–75; see p. 173, infra.]
Jan. 13. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 2.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall
Reference to the Council for Trade of the petition of George Herriot, for a patent for 14 years of his way of cold-pressing cloth. Ibid.]
Jan. 13. Order in Council granting the petition of Dr. John Wilkins, Bishop of Chester, for 4 years' time to pay the first fruits of his bishopric, and of Wigan parsonage thereto annexed, on his own bond for security; if he die before the time, the remainder then due to be remitted; also all first fruits not due till the passing of his congé d'élire last October to be remitted, and his bonds delivered. With proviso that his Majesty will not henceforth grant more than 2 years for payment of first fruits. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 76; see p. 190, infra.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Order in Council that the Commissioners for Foreign Affairs consider what number of ships, and of what rates, should be set out for the summer guard, consulting if needful with the Navy Commissioners. Also that they consider a letter from the said Commissioners of 29 Dec. last, to the Treasury Commissioners, about the disposal of the 200,000l. assigned on the Customs. [Ibid. No. 77.]
Jan. 13. Report of the Council of Trade on the proposals of Wm. Carter, for preventing export of wool, that they find it of destructive consequence to trade, stating the means through which it has arisen, and the defects in the execution of the existing laws; proposing a proclamation for enforcing the laws, and confiding their special execution to the President and Governors of Christ's Hospital, London, giving them all the forfeitures for transgression thereof, towards the benefit of the poor children; with reasons for choosing them in particular; 12 signatures. [3 sheets. Ibid. No. 78.]
Jan. 13. Petition of Sir Wm. Mason, and 4 other loyal and distressed officers, to the King, for power to erect a lottery in Ireland, and to exercise it in such manner as shall be thought fit. Served his late father, and by their great sufferings for adhering to his cause and interest, are driven into extreme poverty, and know of no other way of relief. [Ibid. No. 79.]
Jan. 13.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. A vessel has arrived from Nieuport, and reports that the French King sent 4,000 horse and foot to take possession of some passage that the Duke of Lorraine permitted the Spaniards to pass in to Flanders, on pretence of an agreement made with the old Duke of Lorraine and the French King, for the command of the said passage; but the Lorrainer, apprehending some danger by having so ill a neighbour, opposed the French, killed many of them, and put the rest to flight, so that the French King is going against the Duke himself, at the head of 10,000 men. I hear of no wrecks through the violent storms, except those which happened in the harbour. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Jan. 13. Same to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 81.]
Jan. 13. Thos. Robson to Pepys. I beg your assistance in procuring 2 tickets for Wm. Man, for service on board the Mary and Loyal London, I having lost those tickets given to my custody by his brother, George Man, for which Man will give security to indemnify the King. With order by the Navy Commissioners to R. Waith, to certify whether the tickets be paid or not, 19 Jan. 1669; and report by Waith that he does not find any such tickets paid by him since July 1667, his books for the preceding time being at Brooke House. 24 Feb. 1669. [Ibid. No. 82.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Jos. Williamson to Sir George Downing. Lord Arlington desires an account of the diet made to French prisoners during the late war, and whether it was not upon the King's charge. With note by Sir George Downing to Col. Reymes, asking him to answer this, as he is best acquainted with the business. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 83.]
Jan. 14. Col. B. Reymes to Sir George Downing. What was done in one district was done in all; but I suppose Mr. Fillingham can best resolve in the general. The prisoners had several allowances, both French and Dutch, and when they were at the lowest, both French and Dutch allowed them somewhat over and above the King's allowance, which at first was 5d. a day, then 4d., then 1 lb. of bread only, then 2d. a day, every proportion and alteration being made by Council, according to the reports they had of the usage of the English prisoners, and the agreement between the Crowns; the exchange was made according to their respective qualities. When a prisoner was released without an exchange, it was ordered that he should pay back the charge he had put the King to, but I do not remember that they ever did so, except one or two, which the Marshals have, or should account for. [Ibid. No. 84.]
Jan. 14. Col. B. Reymes to Williamson. I received your and Sir George Downing's letters as to the French prisoners, and have replied to the former, but will explain more fully when we all meet, and examine the books. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Jan. 14.
Sunderland.
Ben. Francis to Rob. Francis. Pray assist Mr. Ettrick in laying hold of a person required, who deserves no favour from anyone with whom I am concerned, while Ettrick — when my place was in great doubt, by the alteration of the farmers and the times, and when none of my own friends had the opportunity to help—assisted to continue me there; so in gratitude I cannot but intreat my friends' interest to serve him also. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Jan. 14. —Joli to Williamson. I intended to bring you the orders, but our Ambassador has sent for me; let me know where you and my Lord [Arlington] will be in an hour or two. [French. Ibid. No. 87.]
Jan. 14. Edw. Bawtree to Rob. Blackborn, East-India House, Leadenhall Street. Particulars of money abated and services rendered on the estate. I told you I must have the rent reduced, or I could not hold possession, and you agreed to let me have the land at 14l. a year; I promised to pay in April, when my tenants cleared, and not before, which was also agreed upon. I could have got you a good tenant, but he is now settled for next year. [Ibid. No. 88.]
Jan. 14. Thos. Knightley to Williamson. Pray get a petition sent from a prisoner in Newgate presented to the King, and if it is referred to the Chief Justice, get as favourable a reference as you can. The bearer will gratify you as soon as the business is completed, which must be speedy, otherwise she will be transported. [Ibid. No. 89.]
Jan. 14.
Whitechapel Prison.
Nath. Bunch, purser of the Sapphire, to the Navy Commissioners. Coming to your office to pass my accounts, I was arrested by a bailiff of Whitechapel Liberty, for a debt which—by reason of the long voyage, and bad payments of money where it is due— I am unable to pay. I intreat your consideration in passing my accounts, and in getting in the money due, that I may have my liberty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 90.]
Jan. 14.
[Leghorn.]
Roger Howe to his brother, Thos. Clutterbuck, London. Complaints of miscarriage of letters. Private affairs. Lord Sherwood thanks you for inquiring after Margaret, but he is anxious about a box of drugs, sent for a friend in her chest. I advise you, in your Consul's patent, to get 2 per cent. on strangers' goods added, as the Consul of Cadiz has done, and also power to appoint a deputy, in case of your own advancement. Consul Shillingworth boasts of having his place at Leghorn for life. It is said that Sir John Finch will leave italy this spring, so you are still in time to think of a residency. [1½ pp. Ibid. No. 91.]
Jan. 15.
Newhaven.
Petition of John Balldee and 7 other inhabitants of Meeching, alias Newhaven, Sussex, to the King, for an order to Sir John Pelham and other justices of the peace, to inquire to whom money is owing for supplying materials, and lodging workmen, &c., for the erection of a harbour and pier there. The loss of so many lives and vessels yearly moved Wm. Halsted to draw up a certificate to the King, which was presented by Lord Digby and the Earl of Bristol, and was well liked by his Majesty; but it lying dormant for 3 years, Halsted drew up a petition, and obtained 80 of the inhabitants' hands to it, upon which his Majesty granted letters patent for erecting a pier and other conveniences, and Halsted assisted with his own funds in carrying it into effect, although he is now, with many others who have lost their money, hated and envied. A breach happening with the said lord and the Lord Chancellor, the business was put into other hands, and neither Halsted nor several others mentioned, who advanced their money and credit as detailed, have received any return, although many applications have been made, and they are in danger of utter ruin on account thereof. Unless respect is had to the promises and engagements made to the first undertakers of the work, the Almighty can never prosper it; 8 signatures. [2 pages. Ibid. Nos. 92, 93.]
Jan. 15. Note that [Roger] l'Estrange has received from Lord Arlington 100l. as his proportion of allowance of the News-book for the first year, ending 15 Jan. 166/67, and that there rests on account 2 years up to the present date. [Ibid. No. 94.]
Jan. 15. Thos. Corney to Williamson. I have spoken to the Ordnance Commissioners, and find that the place is in their gift, and is undisposed of. As they sit on Saturday, if you can procure my Lord's order to them, it will prevent all competition, and I shall always own you as my patron. [Ibid. No. 95.]
Jan. 15.
Pembroke.
John Powell to Williamson. Has no news. [Ibid. No. 96.]
Jan. 15. Memorial from the Council of Trade, that Lord Arlington be desired to request an order to the corporation of baize-makers, Colchester, to appoint some of their number to attend the Council of Trade, with a copy of their charter, by-laws, &c., to answer complaints concerning abuses crept into the manufacture of baize. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 97.]
Jan. 16.
Portsmouth.
St. J. Steventon to Pepys. I cannot find such a vessel as the Shepherd galliot in my book for 1665, nor was there at any time such a galliot. It may be some error in the transcript of the vessel's name; if you have an account of the man's name so borne, I can clear the doubt We had a flyboat called the Herdereen [or Hardereen] which is Dutch for Shepherd, that was employed here to put guns into, and was afterwards sent and sold at London; I never heard of a hoy called the Leicester. [Ibid. No. 98.]
Jan. 16.
Portsmouth.
Same to the Navy Commissioners. The reason of the master carrying the hemp from St. Malo to Southampton was his being denied entrance into this port, his Majesty, when here, having given order to the Governor not to suffer ships from France to come without staying a quarantine; at that time another vessel rode at Spithead on the same score. I can testify to the truth of what I have formerly written, about Mr. Capelin's denying delivery of the hemp without payment of the freight. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Jan. 16.
The Roebuck, Downs.
Capt. George Liddell to the Navy Commissioners. I will send my officers' demand by the next post; shall I deliver the anchor and cable, as it is a trouble to keep them aboard? The Duke's officers would have it, but I shall not part with it without your order. The Roe ketch, with a Holland man-of-war, sailed for Portsmouth, and here is another man-of-war bound for Cowes road, by reason of the frost being so bad in Holland. [Ibid. No. 100.]
Jan. 16.
Stockwith.
John Russell to the Navy Commissioners. There have been two sales of tops, bark, and offal timber in the forest of Sherwood, in Billhay and Brickland, by Thos. Corbin, the surveyor, arising from 2,000 trees felled; but I was not concerned in them, nor received any of the money. [Ibid. No. 101.] Encloses,
Account of timber shipped on board the Adam and Eve hoyJohn Huntington, masterfor delivery at the stores at Deptford.—24 Dec. 1668. [Ibid. No. 101i.]
Jan. 16.
Drury Lane.
Earl of Anglesey to the Navy Commissioners. I have received the list of about 2,000l. of the unpaid assignments upon the monthly receipts of the Customs; had I not been interrupted in paying, they had all been complied with, for I was always so sensible of the King's service, and tender of the credit of the Board in punctual payments, that I often paid before I had received the money, as is witnessed by the payment of 300l. upon the October month, for which I have not received anything. A further reason why they are unpaid is that I have paid Mr. Bayly for the Edgar 4,000l., Sir Rob. Southwell 300l., Capt. Cox 1,000l., and Capt. Rooth 300l., with others of the same nature, which I had no particular fund for, but they required haste. If you can find any way for their satisfaction, I shall willingly join with you, as may best testify my continuing a sensible member of your number. I have appointed Mr. Fenn to attend you to adjust this affair. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 102.]
Jan. 16. Sir Wm. Coventry to the Navy Commissioners. I could not refuse to certify that, Sir Jeremy Smith having to go to the northward in 1667, and Mr. Wigginer's ketch being to go with him, Wigginer made some difficulty in regard of his arrears of freight, whereupon I pressed him to go, on the assurance that his money should be paid here in his absence, or at Hull. He deserves favour. [Ibid. No. 103.]
Jan. 16. Declaration by Lord Arlington of his Majesty's approval of Thos. Neale as deputy-lieutenant for co. Hants, in the room of Lord Sandys, deceased. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 99.]
[Jan. 16.] Pass for the Great Prince of Tuscany who, after his voyages through Spain and Portugal, intends to come into England. [Draft. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 104.]
Jan. 16. Minute of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 99.]
Jan. 16.
Leake Chantrey.
Thos. Bawtree to Rob. Blackborn. I want an answer to my former letter, as I do not know whether you agree to my propositions. I find you are willing to abate 5l. towards the improvement of the other lands, but I am not willing to do this, as I cannot make my rent of it. I will give you 65l. a year for the ground mentioned in my lease, and that held by John Gell, on condition that you will build me a stable, and repair the roof, when I will take it for 5 years. I desire you not to think that I undervalue your farm; the one adjoining is let, and they have abated 11l. in 46l. I make no benefit by the use of the rent, as I have received 20l. and paid 20l. 10s. 6d., and the charge of Rob. Cox's house is 12l. 15s. I shall send my bullocks to London by Candlemas, when my man shall call with all the money received up to that time. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 105.]
Jan. 16.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. Several persons were indicted at the sessions held at Beccles, for not going to their parish church, and true bills were found, but they were acquitted by the petty jury, on the ground that the day they went to church, the doors were shut, which uses to be once a month for their excuse, the patron being a Nonconformist. Mr. Brewster of Wrentham, and some of the justices, were so incensed that they resolved not to come on the bench any more.
Mr. Bridge appeared at Norwich sessions, when Sir John Hubbard told him that a letter had been shown to his Majesty by Lord Arlington, who directed it to be sent to Lord Townshend; about this he was called before the deputy-lieutenants, and although they could have proved what was laid to his charge, yet on his confessing to baptizing children, keeping conventicles, and residing in Yarmouth contrary to law, they were willing to forbear prosecuting him, if he would promise to leave the county of Norfolk, and not come within five miles of Yarmouth. Bridge answered that he was not willing, but if it was commanded, he must submit. Councillor Long told him that Lord Townshend was there as a justice of peace, and not as Lord Lieutenant, and that if he would not voluntarily comply, they would have to force him. He repeated his unwillingness, when his lordship rose up in a passion, and commanded him not to come within 5 miles of Yarmouth or Norfolk, and so freed him. Many of his members and followers went to Norwich to accompany him, and boasted on their return that Lord Townshend and the rest of the gentlemen, whenever they spoke to Mr. Bridge, were with their hats in their hands, and glory much of the respect and favour he found. Various opinions thereon. I trust I shall submit with cheerfulness to those things which seem good to our princes and their councils; their acts should not be scanned by private persons, who cannot apprehend their reasons. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 106.]
Jan. 17. I. Dorislaus to Williamson. Mr. Ellis having promised me a chamber in a few days, I will then bend my thoughts towards doing you service. The Holland letters have not arrived. [Ibid. No. 107.]
Jan. 17. John Powell to Hickes. No shipping in the harbour; I want to know the price of wheat, barley, and oats. [Ibid. No. 108.]
Jan. 17. Same to Williamson. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 109.]
Jan. 17.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. Two [men] were robbed last week between Dover and Deal, and a house was broken into by 3 seamen belonging to the Roebuck; one of them escaped, the other 2, after thei commander, Capt. Liddell, had surrendered the goods, were carried aboard, and after being ducked, were towed ashore, and turned adrift. The conger caught last week was 7 feet long, 9 inches deep, and weighed 69 pounds. The Dutch ship that wilfully ran aground near Deal Castle has had her merchandize embezzled. [Ibid. No. 110.]
Jan. 17.
The Roebuck, Downs.
Capt. George Liddell to the Navy Commissioners. I send the boatswain and carpenter's demand for stores, with observations thereon, and what is required to be done on board. My sailors have little to receive, but yet grumble, so I proffered to discharge them by tickets, and receive others. This has made them quiet, for they can live as badly upon land as myself. [Ibid. No. 111.]
Jan. 18. Ant. Fist to Pepys. I cannot sufficiently thank you for past help. Let me be protected from the troubles which may happen to me by other debts which I have contracted. I desire this, not out of any fraudulent design against my creditors, but to be enabled to deserve your kindness by a performance of my duty, and to give my creditors satisfaction. [Ibid. No. 112.]
Jan. 18.
Woolwich.
Wm. Acworth to the Navy Commissioners. I never hold myself possessed of hemp on behalf of his Majesty, until it is aboard the vessel that is to transport it, nor ever was so stupid as to give the merchant a bill for a pound, till I had the master's hand to all I could charge him with, and the master workman's hand to the bill for the quality. The master complained that he was pressed, and was backward in taking it in all along; otherwise the merchants need not have lost above 20l. by the drying of the 11 bundles. He might have seen the weight had he pleased, but not 1 in 20 but trusts as to that. I have done with him as with all others, and will swear to the weight. The loss must be from his deck, as it is owned by him to be in his possession, and if 5 tons had been stolen he must have answered it; if he were not satisfied, why did he give his hand? He might have sent a whole lighter-full back, as well as part. I hope my reputation is as good as his. The Portsmouth officers may give satisfaction as to whether he had water in the hold or not. [S.P. Dom. Car. II. 254, No. 113.]
Jan. 18.
Stourbridge.
Rob. Foley to the Navy Commissioners. The goods that I serve into the stores are not the usual sorts or sizes that merchants buy, and are besides marked with the broad arrow, and prohibited by you to be sold to others; they are cheaper than his late Majesty bought by contract. You make an abatement for ready money; I refer to you to make what abatement is reasonable upon every bill paid according to his Royal Highness's warrant. I have been a great sufferer by running into debt to keep a quantity of goods in hand to supply the stores, and by staying so long for my money, and I hope that you will let me partake of the ready money; and that, as you took all Mr. Ingram's goods, though unmarked, with some abatement, it may be no ill precedent to me, especially as I paid him the money long before I received it out of the customs. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Jan. 18. Grant to Walter Underhill, sen. and jun., and Sam. Walton, for 14 years, of the sole use of their new invention for preserving and bringing salmon alive and well-conditioned to London, from Newcastle and Berwick. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 4.]
Jan. 18. Warrant to the Master of the Great Wardrobe to pay to Lewis Grabu, Master of Music, 48l. 7s. 6d. for his livery for 3 years past, and to allow him 16l. 2s. 6d. yearly for livery. [Ibid.]
Jan. 18. Thos. Knightley to Williamson. I lately sent a person with a petition from a poor prisoner in Newgate [Marg. Griffith] who knows not how soon she may be transported; being entreated by her friends to get it answered, desire you will get a positive order, when all fees will be paid. [S.P. Dom. Car. II. 254, No. 115.]
Jan. 18.
Letter Office.
A. Ellis to Williamson. I have received the despatch for Lord Robartes, and required the principal officer to deliver it and return an account. I beg you will meet Messrs. Cook and Wilkes at my hermitage to eat a goose. [Ibid. No. 116.]
Jan. 19.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Several Dutch merchant ships, homeward bound, have been forced into St. Helen's road by contrary winds. The Roe ketch has arrived to attend the Portland, which has sailed for the Groyne. Sir Lawrence Van Heemskirk is come to see to the fitting out of the Nonsuch. [Ibid. No. 117.]
Jan. 19.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The gold taken from the ship that ran ashore near Deal was sent by the Governor of Dover Castle with a good guard to Whitehall. [Ibid. No. 118.]
Jan. 19. Report by John Evelyn, and 2 other commissioners for prisoners of war and sick and wounded soldiers, to Lord Arlington, as to the allowances made to French prisoners during the war, from 2d. to 4d. a day. [Damaged. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 119.]
Jan. 19. The King to the Commissioners of Sewers for Hatfield Chace. We hear that the participants in the level of the Chace, to whom in June last we entrusted the preservation of navigation, and of the inheritance of the inhabitants, contrary to the contract made with the late King, have neglected the works, whereby some are become ruinous and decayed; and that on pretext of our previous orders, the said participants suspend the orders of the commissioners for repair of the same, discharge the tenants from payment of moneys assessed upon them, and refuse to deliver up the records. To avoid further misconstruction, we require you our commissioners to proceed in the due execution of your commission, and provide for the preservation of the said level, and the parts of the counties adjoining thereto, anything in our previous letter notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom. Entry Book 25, p. 81.]
Jan. 19. Warrant for Isaac Perrot, an alien, to be made a free denizon. Minute. [Ibid. p. 82.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of the Brewers' Company, for confirmation of their charter, with alterations and additions. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 3.]
Jan. 19.
Ordnance Office.
Edw. Sherburne and Jonas Moore to the Navy Commissioners Let us have an account of stores made chargeable on our office from any of the King's yards and stores, to whom they were delivered, and where and what indent or receipt was given for them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 120.]
Abstract of the value of provisions, &c., issued out of the stores at Deptford, Woolwich, Chatham, and Portsmouth, on the ordnance account, for building and repairs, from1Sept. 1664. Total, 2,594l. 5s. 1d. —1 May 1669. [Ibid. No. 120i.]
Jan. 20.
Brooke House.
Certificate by J. Davies and Edm. Poortmans, that they find 2 bills of imprest of 50,000l. each, charged in Sir George Carteret's account for 1665 on Sir Denis Gauden; they were dated 28 Nov. 1665, but are entered in the ledger by mistake under 15 June 1665. [Ibid. No. 121.]
Jan. 20.
TheEmsworth, Holehaven.
Capt. Walter Perry to the Navy Commissioners. Are we to continue here? If so, I request a supply of provisions, having but 11 days' supply on board. Only one vessel has come from Rouen within, Holdhaven, which is stopped on the quarantine. [Ibid. No. 122.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Sir George Downing to Williamson. I have moved the Lords of the Treasury about the Darley tithes, wherein Mr. Thomas, Mr. Carey, &c., are concerned, and have directions to pass a warrant for a lease, which shall be done with speed. [Ibid. No. 123.]
Jan. 20.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Williamson. The Berner of Havre de Grace and several other ships have arrived; the former reports that she was driven so far back to sea that they were in great distress for victuals and water, one man dying and several more being sick; so that they intended running her ashore, had not the land proved a harbour. They saw a great ship at sea, which had spent all her masts, supposed to have been a King's ship from Sir Thos. Allin; she has since come into Mount's Bay. A Newcastle man, with Spanish wines, was cast away near the Lizard, and all her goods, with the master and one man, lost. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 124.]
Jan. 20. Same to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 125.]
Jan. 20. Commission for Basil Fielding to be ensign to Sir Phil. Musgrave's company in Carlisle. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 20, p. 195.]
Jan. 20. Warrant to Sir Edw. Griffin to pay 10l. to Gideon Royer, for embellishing with arms, badges, &c., a letter sent to the Emperor of Russia, by Sir Peter Wyche, Envoy Extraordinary. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 47.]
Jan. 20. Pass for — Hemmet, — Abdra, and —Hammond, Moors, natives of Barbary, to go into their own country. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 99.]
Jan. 20. Licence to Sir George Vyner to live out of Norfolk, where he is sheriff, he having no house in the county. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. 20. Licence for Sir Cuthbert Heron [Bart.] to be absent from Northumberland whilst sheriff, to attend some personal business. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 126.]
Jan. 20. Minute of the above. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 99.]
Jan. 20. Warrant to pay to Baptist May, Keeper of the Privy Purse, 12,000l. for the said purse, without account. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 5.]
Jan. 20. Warrant to pay all sums of money, ordered by several privy seals to Hugh May, late Paymaster of the Works, but remaining unpaid, to Phil. Packer, now Paymaster of the Works. [Ibid.]
Jan. 21.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Williamson. The King's pleasure boat Mary has arrived at Holyhead from Dublin, with Sir Winston Churchill, Sir Edw. Dering, Sir Allan Broderick, and Col. Cooke, Commissioners of the Court of Claims, also Rich. Cooke of his Majesty's Bedchamber, brother to Col. Cooke. They brought with them 6 packets which had been detained by the easterly winds. The John of London has sailed for Leghorn. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 127.]
Jan. 21.
Custom House.
Sir J. Wolstenholme to Williamson. I much commiserate the case of Rich. Pell and others using the trade of Iceland (?) which has been long depending, and waits the report of the Secretaries of State; let it be made with expedition, as the persons have been great sufferers, and are lying at charge in expectation of a final order. [Ibid. No. 128.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Petition of Marg. Griffith, prisoner in Newgate, to the King, that being ordered to be transported for a felony, she may be sent to Virginia, where she has a brother, and be allowed to serve with him, being too weak to undergo the hard servitude required by a stranger from a servant in foreign plantations. With reference thereon to the Lord Chief Justice, or the Recorder of London, who sat on the trial; and their report, dated 26 Jan., in favour of the petitioner, if she gives good security to go to Virginia. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 129.]
Jan. 21. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 4.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Petition of John Ludlow to the King, for a pardon. Stands convicted for stealing to the value of 14s., though he never did it. Is 20 years of age, and served as a soldier in the wars in Portugal against the Spaniards, where he received a wound in the head, and is forced to wear a skull plate of silver; his father was a great sufferer in his late Majesty's service. With reference thereon to the Lord Chief Justice or Mr. Recorder, and the report of the latter, John Howell. The suggestions of the petitioner are true as to the small value of the goods stolen, and as to his age and wearing a plate, but I cannot learn whether he was a soldier, or his father a sufferer.—26 Jan. 1669. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 130.]
Jan. 21. Entry of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 4.]
Jan. 21.
Portsmouth.
St. J. Steventon to the Navy Commissioners. As to the complaint of the Dutch captain, Sir Lawrence Van Heemskirk, against me, for not giving conduct money to all he sends with his note. I reply that he, not knowing the end of conduct money, which is to encourage seamen, gives his note to all that ask for conduct money from London, which I refuse to pay when I see they are servants, and know they have not come from London.
I hope I have discharged my duty by well husbanding the King's money, and not paying where it is not due, which is the cause of his complaint. Pray acquaint his Royal Highness, that I may not be under censure by an untrue information. I sent all the bills for provisions to the Comptroller, and the persons concerned in them have been several times to receive them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 131.]
Jan. 21.
Portsmouth.
Capt. John Hubbard to the Navy Commissioners. Some men are come from London in the Pearl to the Milford under my command. I desire an order to the clerk of the cheque for entering them from the time they first came to the Pearl, according to Capt. Berry's certificate, that they may have satisfaction without the making of so many tickets for so little time. [Ibid. No. 132.]
Jan. 21.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to the Navy Commissioners. It is not with me as with other yards, where they have clerks belonging to all officers which assist in any exigency; but I have been forced to have all my accounts of receipts and issues written in London, there being none to do it here; I have not long known of my obligation to write out the accounts for my predecessor, which has put me to much trouble. I left 2 or 3 books with my scribe when I came from London, and hope at my return in 2 or 3 weeks, to give Sir John Mennes full satisfaction. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 133.]
Jan. 22.
Plymouth.
Roger Baker, purser of the Dartmouth, to the Navy Commissioners. At the last victualling at Portsmouth, being bound for Tangiers and the Canaries, I received all but the beer, and the frigate sailing to the Downs, I was forced to take up goods on credit in lieu of it, so I bought 2 pipes of wine. I was commanded by the captain on Christmas Day to issue a pint of sack to every man, and one pipe being out, to bring the other. On 19 Jan. he sent for me to his cabin, to know whether I would own the words I had sent up to him the day before, accounting for its disposal, when he gave me 200 blows with his cane, and took me by the hair of my head, intending to dash my brains out, had not God prevented by his providence; but he so mangled my face that I fear I shall lose an eye, and while I was under the doctor's hands, he commanded the boatswain to clap me into the bilboes, atop of the forecastle, where I continued 10 hours, being nailed down with a staple to the davit.
When I was not able to subsist any longer, it being very frosty and tempestuous weather, the master commanded the weather sail to be taken from me, saying that if I would confess that I had wronged the captain, he would release me; on telling him I could not make myself guilty, he replied that I should lie there and rot; but the captain not being aboard, rather than I should perish there that night, he confirmed me to my cabin, with a sentinel, until the commander came on board. On his coming on board, he sent for the boatswain, and beat him about the head and face with his fist, the rest of the officers not daring to approach, as he threatened to have a council of war, and if it lay in his power, to have them hanged.
I desire that justice may be done, in the first place, to his Majesty, the commander having been guilty of 9 instances of frauds detailed, and that satisfaction may be given for such great affronts.
I have several other articles to send you, but my bones being almost broken, and having the use of only one eye, I was forced to desire a friend to write this letter. I would have sent it earlier, but it was so late before I came out of the bilboes, and I am still under restraint. [4 pages. Ibid. No. 134.] Annexing,
Certificate by Wm. Day, and 5 other officers of the Dartmouth, that Roger Baker having been in the bilboes most part of the day, and the weather being cold, and he being in a weak condition, they have resolved for his present preservation— life being sweet, and Capt. [Rich.] Trevanion being ashore— to confine him to his cabin with a sentry, as accustomed, during the commander's pleasure.—19 Jan. 1669. [Ibid. No. 134i.]
Jan. 22.
Lenox yacht, Holehaven.
Capt. John Holmes to the Navy Commissioners. His provisions will be expended in a week; shall expect further orders. [Ibid. No. 135.]
Jan. 22.
Dover.
Jo. Carlisle to Rob. Francis. I beg your interest in behalf of my friend John Thomas, who is unjustly accused of horsing strangers, and is in the messenger's custody. As he is my deputy, the sooner he returns the better. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 136.]
Jan. 22.
Yarmouth.
Rich. Bower to Williamson. Upwards of 17 vessels have set sail for Lynn and Boston, and others have come in. [Ibid. No. 137.]
Jan. 22.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. Two ships bound for Barbadoes, and one for Cadiz, are detained by contrary winds. [Ibid. No. 138.]
Jan. 22.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Hickes. Pray write to various postmasters to hasten the mail, which comes in so late that the merchants get displeased. [Ibid. No. 139.]
[Jan.] 22.
Whitehall.
Proclamation of the prices at which wines are to be sold for the ensuing year, as fixed by the Lord Keeper and others. [Ibid. No. 140.]
Jan. 22. Entry of the above. [Printed. Proc. Coll., p. 265.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
Petition of George, Earl of Bristol, to the King. Though my services to his late and your present Majesty have been equalled by few, I left my recompense to the charge of the chief ministers, whom I thought my friends, but was disappointed until you were straitened by bounty to others. At length I proposed several suits for myself, none of which were refused by your Majesty, but none proved of benefit, except 10,000l. granted out of Mr. Heveningham's estate for my daughter's portion. I request that—as my estates have not been restored, and I can no longer maintain my family with decency—the proposals presented by me may be referred to some of the chief ministers.
With reference thereon to the Lord Keeper, Lord Privy Seal, and two Principal Secretaries of State, and their report that the 10,000l. which was granted him from the forfeitures on prohibited goods imported was for service, but was withdrawn on the King's displeasure towards him, and the money transferred to the Privy Purse; that he expects compensation for 16 or 17 years' loss of a pension of 2,000l. a year granted to his late father from the Court of Wards, and for the loss of Lord Brooke's wardship; they advise the renewal of his grant of 10,000l. from prohibited goods, and establishment of his pension of 2,000l., so that after his eminent services, he may be comfortable the remainder of his life. With marginal notes [by Lord Arlington]. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, Nos. 141, 142.] Annexing,
Statement of the pretensions of the Earl of Bristol:—1st, to a debt of 10,000l. for moneys due to him, for which he had a privy seal drawn on the Customs, but owing to disputes with the Customers, he never received the money; 2nd, for satisfaction for a balance of 2,000l. for the remaining term of a pension granted to his late father from the Court of Wards, for which he requests a lease of lands; 3rd, for reparation for the wardship of Lord Brooke, the only profitable thing assigned him, but which he lost by the abolition of the Court of Wards. [3½ pages. Ibid. No. 142i.]
Jan. 22. Suggestions to remedy the dearness of timber, by throwing open the trade to all, allowing its import in any vessels, charging the English only such duties as they paid before the Act of Navigation, and permitting them to import what they choose in any ships, but confining foreigners to woods of their own growth; showing the advantages thereof in bringing back the trade to the English, and giving life to house-building and ship-building. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 143.]
Jan. 23. Statements to prove that the effect of the Act of Navigation has been to throw the timber trade into the hands of the Danes; that the high price of timber takes money from the English, many of them sufferers from the late grievous fire, and gives it to Danes; advising that the trade be thrown open, and showing the importance of cheap timber, especially for rebuilding the city. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 144.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Gilbert Talbot, master of the Jewel House, to grant a discharge to Wm. Dike, serjeant of the scullery, for 1,270/12 oz. of plate lost or wasted in the King's service, from the Restoration to 21 Jan. 1667–8, the plate having been employed in hazardous services as the coronation, feasts of St. George, &c., and the waste not being so great as on like occasions formerly. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, p. 82.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Order for a warrant to Dudley Rows, receiver of the revenues of Windsor Castle, to pay 100l. to John Lawrence, and for the same to be allowed in his accounts. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 44.]
Jan. 23.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. Above 100 bales of canvas and Holland duck, and several other goods, value 200l., have been washed onto the beach, supposed to have come from the Goodwin Sands, or the wreck near Deal Castle. The boisterous weather continues. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 145.]
Jan. 23.
Chester.
Ma. Anderton to Williamson. The Resolution and 2 others have been lost on the coast of Ireland, but nearly all their men were saved. Your postmasters of North Wales are much to blame, as they never send our Beaumaris or Conway letters, until the Irish mail comes over. [Ibid. No. 146.]
Jan. 23.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to James Hickes. The Mary from St. Malo reports that there is no sign of a breach there with the Dutch or English, the trade being carried on amicably with the vessels of both. [Ibid. No. 147.]
Jan. 23.
Bristol.
John Roche and Chris. Baynes to Laurence Du Puy, Mall House, St. James'. We met Mr. Beanes on our arrival here, but when we waited upon the Mayor, he put us off. There are others here with pricking lotteries; we do not know their names, nor by what authority they act, only we fear it will be an obstruction to your interest if permitted. We have had our bill paid on sight, and will send a just account of our charges, &c. [Ibid. No. 148.]
Jan. 23./Feb. 2.
Montpelier.
W. Allestree to [Williamson]. The great ship St. Louis Royal is almost finished at Toulon, and seems to grace that port as well as the Louvre does Paris. She is 147 feet in length by 13 in breadth, and has 3 whole decks, all so high that the most proper man may stand upright under them, and yet not reach the top by a span. She carries 110 brass guns, of 24, 18, and 12 lbs, and is to have 1,000 men. Her cabins are so glorious and shining that they seem rather made for diversion than fighting, and so beautified with pictures, as if she were that way charmed against the force of bullets. Her stern is adorned with such gilt and carved work, and the King set there in so great pomp and majesty, with slaves in chains at his feet, that he seems to triumph over captive Barbary before he has put to sea. The faults which persons of judgment find are that she is much too high for her length, that her guns are too small, and that she will never sail well.
I intend to leave these parts in 3 months, spend some time on the river Loire, and from thence to Paris and London. I have very little news; as I have obeyed your counsels and commands in coming into France, I hope I am not banished from your thoughts. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 149.]
Jan. 23. Sir John Mennes to Pepys. I had some discourse with Lord Brouncker and Sir Wm. Warren, about the freight and hire of the Golden Sun, which went to Portsmouth or Plymouth in 1666; I want further information on several points given before our next meeting on Tuesday, when I hope the case will have a final determination, by seeing his Majesty have right done him, as well as the merchant. [Ibid. No. 150.] Encloses,
S. Pepys to Sir Wm. Warren. I have been with Sir Wm. Coventry about your ship, and we will give you satisfaction for her service, but she must be in a condition to sail in two days. I have written to Mr. White to assist in getting men, and enclose a letter from Sir Wm. Coventry to the Governor of the Castle to assist him,—27 July 1666. [Copy. Ibid. No. 150i.]
Jan. 23.
Portsmouth.
Capt. Ant. Deane to the Navy Commissioners. We docked the Fairfax and Advice, which are very defective, having been in many engagements, where their timbers were cut almost in pieces. If we are to go in hand with them, we shall require 500 thick spruce deals; meantime we shall employ the men with what we have in the yard. I desire that the ships committed to my care may be put into repair to proceed to service when required, but meantime 6 of the ships here are not to be reckoned. If I have a supply of things wanted, I hope to give content in their despatch before the summer passes. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 151.]
Jan. 23. Col. B. Reymes to Pepys. Had the Board met, Lord Brouncker promised to move you in my small business. Pray speak to him and Sir John Mennes about it, that I may find the effects of your favour in so just a debt, contracted for so good an end as the promoting the manufacture of English sail cloth. [Ibid. No. 152.]
Jan. 24.
Garland, Downs.
Capt. Rich. Rooth to the Navy Commissioners. I received the credit for 100l. at Tangiers, for supplying myself with a month's provisions at Cadiz, which I was constrained to take up by my long stay before Sally. I hope to arrive in London suddenly, for the season has prevented longer stay on the coast of Barbary. I have left the Francis to attend the garrison of Tangiers, and sailed from Cadiz with the Success, 31 Dec. The Garland requires repair, having sprung a leak, which stopped again of itself; if his Royal Highness shall order her in, I beseech that it may be up to Deptford. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 153.]
Jan. 24.
Dover.
Jo. Carlisle to Williamson. I repeat my request on behalf of my deputy, John Thomas, falsely charged with horsing strangers, and desire his despatch, as I am ill. I hear that the French King is drawing his forces out of Flanders to Lorraine, and that he has sent to the General of Flanders to deliver up Nieuport, and its appendages, otherwise he will have them; it is believed the Duke de Lorraine's forces will serve the King of France. A French shallop has come in which had nearly been cast away; the master was drowned. [Ibid. No. 154.]
Jan. 24. Sir M. d'Ognati to [Williamson]. I sympathize so with the Abbé of Tulay, that I shall not be better till he has recovered his health. I am to be bled this afternoon. Please send me the order for despatch of the wines, that I may show the [Spanish] Ambassador that I have credit with you. [French. Ibid. No. 155.]
Jan. 25. Warrant for 30 tuns of wine, half French and half Spanish, free of custom, for the Condé de Molina, the Spanish Ambassador. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 102.]
Jan. 25.
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes. The Rebecca and Harp have arrived from France for Ireland; 15 sail of merchantmen left the harbour. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 156.]
Jan. 25.
Lyme.
Ant. Thorold to Hickes. The Windsor and Sarah have arrived from Morlaix, and report that the French are making great preparations for war, both by sea and land, having 40,000 men ready for march, and listing more daily; also that beside ships already built, they have several others of great force upon the stocks. There are few Dutch ships in any of the French ports, and a breach is expected early in the spring. [Ibid. No. 157.]
Jan. 25.
Bristol.
James Baskerville to Williamson. The Mary and the John and Henry have arrived from the Straits. The former, on weighing her anchor, had her capstan give way, so that what with the bars and cable, most of the ship's company were borne down. One man was killed, the master's leg and thigh were broken, and several others were grievously wounded. [Ibid. No. 158.]
Jan. 25.
Milford.
John Powell to Williamson. A ship from Bordeaux, laden with wines, has put in here by contrary winds; also one from Spain laden with the same. [Ibid. No. 159.]
Jan. 25. Same to Hickes. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 160.]
Jan. 25.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Hickes. The Dartmouth and the ships for the East have sailed with a fair wind; some ships bound for Bordeaux, the Straits, and Barbadoes have arrived. [Ibid. No. 161.]
Jan. 25.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to [Williamson]. The John of London, with a quantity of Canary wine, ran aground on the Goodwin, when her company left her, except two children, after which she fired, and is now burning. It is said that there are two chests of gold dust, and much other gold, as also elephants' teeth, and other rich commodities on board. Great boats are going off to her assistance. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 162.]
Jan. 25.
Treasury Chambers.
Sir George Downing to the Navy Commissioners. The Lords Commissioners desire you to be here on Wednesday by 9 a.m., about perfecting the victuallers' contract. [Ibid. No. 163.]
Jan. 26.
Woolwich.
Giles Bond, Master of the Hope galliot, to the Navy Commissioners. I desire you to order me some provisions, as my vessel will be launched to-day, and ready by the end of the week. [Ibid. No. 164.]
Jan. 26. Warrant for permitting Robert Andrews, sheriff of Northamptonshire, to live out of the county, being so advised for his health, he taking care that the service be not prejudiced thereby. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 102.]
Jan. 26. Pass for 2 horses to Holland. [Ibid.]
Jan. 26. Warrant to the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, to grant to Edw. Vernon the offices of keeper and ranger of Marchington Ward in Needwood Forest, co. Stafford, during his life, and the lives of George Vernon and Rich. Adderly, on his surrender of a similar grant made by the late King to his father, Sir Edw. Vernon; fee 6l. 13s. 4d. and allowances for hay, &c., for the deer. [Ibid.]
[Jan. 26.] Warrant to Capt. Dowghty to preserve the game in the manor of Richmond. Minute. [Ibid. f. 103.]
Jan. 26.
Plymouth.
John Clarke to Hickes. The Mary and Jane from Jamaica has arrived; the Dartmouth frigate is still in this port, and other ships are waiting wind. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 165.]
Jan. 26. Same to Williamson. To the same effect. [Ibid. No. 166.]
Jan. 26. Sir John Marlay to [Williamson]. I hope my age and lameness will excuse my non-attendance. Pray entreat Lord Arlington to solicit his Majesty to refer my petition to the Treasury Commissioners. [Ibid. No. 167.]
Jan. 26.
Co[ventry].
Ralph Hope to Rob. Francis. I have missed my [news] letters for 3 posts; let me know the reason why I do not deserve your courtesy, and I will amend anything that disentitles me. [Ibid. No. 168.]
Jan. 27. Ralph Bostock to Rob. Francis. Hearing that there are several vacancies as land waiters in the Custom House, if you have any interest with the Farmers, I beg that you will use it on my behalf, and I will freely give 20l. [Ibid. No. 169.]
Jan 27.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. M. de Foy, the French Ambassador's servant, still lies in the prison here ready to perish, having nothing but straw to keep him from the extremity of the weather, and only the charity of the people to feed on. If you can, let the Ambassador know of it, as it will tend much to his dishonour if Foy should perish, for want of a supply to satisfy a debt contracted upon account of his voyage over to England to serve him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 170.]
Jan. 27.
Woolwich.
Wm. Acworth to the Navy Commissioners. There were 21 casks of several sorts of ironwork in the storehouse, received from Portsmouth, in one of which were 100 dozen of Dutch rings, and 30 dozen of hinges; but it was broken open by the labourers, and the goods taken away. I desire that the wages of two of them, named Knight and Kent, may be stopped until the delinquents are discovered, the value of the rings and hinges taken away amounting to 13l. 10s. [Ibid. No. 171.]
Jan. 27.
Portsmouth.
Capt. Ant. Deane to the Navy Commissioners. The works on the new ship, and also on the Fairfax, Advice, &c., depend upon a supply of plank; your answer that as soon as money can be had, care shall be taken for a supply, will be too late, except it be presently done, as were money here, there are not 10 loads of plank in this country, except Mr. Coles', whose goods are not so good as you would expect, nor will he let you have them unless he has payment of former moneys due, as well as ready money; so we must either be supplied from London, discharge the men, or be contented that they shall stand still. If no plank already cut can be had, plank cut green out of timber purchased this spring will not be fit to work until the end of summer; the using of such wood is the real cause of so many ships being bad. Money must be had, and an assurance made by contract with whomever I can find, to supply timber and convert it to plank. If you cannot make good 1,000l. or 2,000l. for this, a great deal more must be speedily provided to pay off the men. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 172.]
Jan. 28.
Portsmouth.
Capt. John Tinker to the Navy Commissioners. We will give all possible despatch to the fitting of the Nonsuch and Pearl for the Straits; we want shovels. The Milford will sail to-day. [Ibid. No. 173.]
Jan. 28.
Woolwich.
Edw. Byland to Pepys. We have launched the Katherine and Anne yachts, and the Hope hoy, and docked the Jersey and Wevenhoe ketch; but the dock being small, we put the hoy out again, and laid ways for launching her. I want orders to go in hand with the Jersey, which I will fit with such provisions as the yard affords, or as you please to send; we want a new mainmast from Deptford for her. We intend heaving up the mooring lighter, which was damaged by the frost. The reed in Ham Creek is worth 20l., and the charge of cutting and bringing it over will amount to 6l. 10s. [Ibid. No. 174.]
Jan. 28. The King to the Governors of the Charterhouse. We request you to admit William, son of Eliz. Thompson, a scholar on the Charterhouse, on the first vacancy after placing those already recommended. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 25, f. 84.]
Jan. 28. John Snell to Williamson. The Lord Keeper has caused the great seal to be affixed to the instrument sent, but doubts whether Legato or Ambassadori ought not to be inserted for Oratori; the words are "apud magnum Ducem Hetrurice oratori." You are to look at the copy of that commission, and see by what name the party resides there. Endorsed "The commission to Sir John Finch." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 254, No. 175.]
Jan. 28. Gilbert Thomas to Williamson. I have made inquiries after Howard Coney, and send a description of his person. [Ibid. No. 176.]
Jan. 28. Capt. Henry Spencer to Rob. Leigh, Dublin. I received the Lord Deputy's warrant, and your letter to Sir George Rawdon, for apprehending Coney for a robbery at Whitehall. As Sir George has gone to Dublin, and Coney has removed from his habitation, I return the letter, but will keep the warrant, and use my best endeavours to find him. Had the letter come 24 hours earlier, the man might have been got, as I saw him the day before [Ibid. No. 177.]
Jan. 29. Col. Walter Slingsby to Williamson. You may perceive, from those who were with you yesterday, how apt some men are to stand in their own light. Since a few widows are to be admitted, and as the bearer, Mrs. De Luc, deserves beyond expression, I earnestly hope his lordship will signify his design to have her admitted, and then leave it to me to manage. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 255, No. 1.]
Jan. ? Petition of Rob. Underwood, father of Dorothy Kirk, nurse of the late Duke of Cambridge, to the King, for a letter to the Governors of Sutton's Hospital, to admit him on the next vacancy. Had an estate of 150l. a year before the late troubles, but lost much by aiding the loyal party, and buried his wife and most of his family and tenants in the late contagion. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Jan. ? Petition of the same to the Duke of York, to the same effect. [Ibid. No. 3.]
Jan. ? Petition of the same to Lord Arlington, a Governor of Sutton's Hospital, for a letter to Sir Ralph Sydenham, master, to admit him on the present vacancy; no letter is before his, and he has spent all he has in looking after the place; lost many hundred pounds by his loyalty during the usurpation. [Ibid. No. 4.]
Jan. ? Statement by Rob. Underwood, that he thinks the Charterhouse Governors would have admitted him, but he could not readily answer their questions, and Lord Arlington told him that he was not qualified, being neither soldier, servant, nor sufferer for the King; whereas he really lost 600l., spent for the loyal party. [Ibid. No. 5.]
Jan. 29. The King to the Governors of the Charterhouse. We recommend Rob. Underwood, reduced by loyalty from a competent estate to great decay, for the next pensioner's place void after those already recommended. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 17, p. 279.]
[Jan. 29.]
[Whitehall.]
Petition of Ralph Salkeld to the King, for pardon and release of his fortune, forfeited because in Aug. 1664, after the prohibition for any who had served against the King in the late usurpation to wear arms, he reproved Rich. Ogle of Eglingham, Northumberland, for appearing with his sword, and a quarrel arising, gave him a slight wound, through neglect of which he died. Has lost his right arm since, in war against the Dutch. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 255, No. 6.]
Jan. 29. Reference of the above petition to the Attorney-General. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 33, p. 6.]
Jan. 29. Presentation of David Lawrence to the vicarage of Maker, co. Devon, void by resignation of Rob. Warren. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 19, p. 93.]
Jan. 29. Pass for six horses to France, for the Duke of Crequy. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, p. 70.]
Jan. 29. Grant to Thomas Segar of the office of Bluemantle Pursuivantat-Arms, void by death of Rich. Hornybrooke; fee 20l. yearly. Minute. [Ibid. f. 103.]
Docquet of the above, dated 18 Feb. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 13.]
Jan. 29. Warrant to the Sheriffs of London to allow Marg. Griffith, convicted of felony at the Old Bailey sessions and sentenced to transportation, to go and live with her brother, who is in Virginia, on giving security so to do; granted on her petition in compassion to her weakness. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 99.]
Jan. Draft of the above, dated 27 Jan. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 255, No. 7.]
Jan. 29.
Bristol.
Dan. Furzer to the Navy Commissioners. Thanks for your care of my condition, which was never at a lower ebb for want of money, by which means my credit is much impaired, and life made uncomfortable. I have been forced to leave Lydney, and come to Bristol, to engage my person as I formerly did my credit.
I intended for London, and there to settle, but have no hopes of coming from these parts before men be satisfied. I owe Sir John Wintour, Mr. Clayton, and others, 400l. for iron for the wares sent and used up in the ships, and the shopkeepers here, of whom I had commodities for the St. David, Dartmouth, Richmond, and Harp, are so pressing for their money, that I cannot walk the streets in peace; country and city are now too hot for me. Pray consider my sufferings and patience, and put an end to them. I would have been with you, but have not money to leave my family for their subsistence, or to defray my expenses up. The little stock I had is all out, and much more in credit on the King's account, and I have not wherewith to do merchants' work, or set myself and servants to work. It will be my utter ruin if I cannot get some stock. [1½ pages. Ibid. No. 8.]
Jan. 29.
The Milford, Spithead.
Capt. Thos. Locke to Pepys. I have entered myself aboard the Milford, hoping you will obtain me some place, for I understand there are several ships going to sea. If I cannot have a command, let me have a cook's place. [Ibid. No. 9.]
Jan. 30.
Dover.
Thos. White to Pepys. I beseech you to move the Board for arrears of money due to me and others; we are in extraordinary want, which makes the poor men impatient, and they exclaim against me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 255, No. 10.]
Jan. 30. List by Wm. Burroughes of the pursers and their ships who have not passed their accounts, or brought in their books in order thereto. [9 pages. Ibid. No. 11.]
Jan. 30 List by the same of 25 pursers who are in debt on their accounts, and do not appear to pay the balance. [Ibid. No. 12.]
Jan. 30.
Roebuck, Downs.
Capt. George Liddell to the Navy Commissioners. I sent up by the Garland the anchor, cable, and rope, and shall send their dimensions by the next post. Capts. Strickland and Rooth, with their frigates, sailed yesterday, and Capt. Trevanion, with the Dartmouth, came in last night. [Ibid. No. 13.]
Jan. 30.
Stockwith.
John Russell to the Navy Commissioners. A great land flood on the 26th floated the timber in the marshes and on the wharf, some of which went adrift. I will attend you when it is drawn together. I have sent two of the hoys to Woolwich and Deptford, and enclose their bills of lading. I desire you to order the masters to be more careful in stowing their timber. [Ibid. No. 14.]
Jan. 30.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. I have been filled with employment by the Guinea ship, which struck on the Goodwin Sands, and after the men had left her, fired, and drove 4 or 5 miles northward. The seamen ventured out in boats, and fetched away most of the elephants' teeth, and some dyeing wood, which was the principal cargo. The wreck where the soldiers had the command comes to so poor account that the merchants have resolved to leave off inquiry here, and make their address to Whitehall, for satisfaction for what the soldiers have purloined. The whole discourse is of a war with France, but those of better judgment pray for peace. [Ibid. No. 15.]
Jan. 30.
Weymouth.
John Pocock to Hickes. I hear by a vessel from Bayonne that 8 frigates of 40 and 50 guns each have been launched, that 4 more are ready, and that they are building in all parts of France. [Ibid. No. 16.]
Jan. 30.
Pembroke.
John Powell to Williamson. The fair winds on Wednesday last brought out all the vessels in Milford, except the Agnes of Leith with wines from Bordeaux. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Jan. 31.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Rob. Francis. Pray speak to Mr. Williamson to influence Lord Arlington on my behalf, that I may regain my former employment as surveyor. The Guinea wreck will not be much out of the company's way, as they are recovering most part of the goods, and the commander, officers, and seamen lose their wages. [Ibid. No. 18.]
Jan. 31.
Deal.
Rich. Watts to Williamson. When I was dismissed from my surveyorship, the Farmers of the Customs bade me complain against Marsh that put me out, if I could find aught against him. I send a copy of the articles which I have against him, and will send another copy to Mr. Snow, who will present them in private to the 2 aldermen. I have assurance from Mr. Snow, my Lord of Canterbury's treasurer, that Alderman Backwell and Sir Rob. Vyner take great notice of the trick that was played me, by thrusting me out without any complaint, and have assured him they will suddenly take notice of our ports, and remember me. My whole business now is to make Sir John Wolstenholme and Sir John Shaw my friends. Pray speak to them on my behalf, as it was by your favour I first got the employment. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 255, No. 19.] Annexing,
Eight articles of complaints by Rich. Watts, against Barth. Marsh, surveyor at Deal, for buying exciseable articles of several persons named on board ships, and evading payment of the duties.— 29 Jan. 1669. [1¼ pages. Ibid. No. 19i.]
Jan. 31.
Rushton.
G. Blount to [Williamson]. Both myself and wife have felt the good effects of your writing to Col. O'Brien and Lady Thomond, and are glad to hear the Colonel owns the debt to you; as he desires to know to whom he is to pay it, my wife desires it may be paid to you, when the bonds, judgments, &c., and a discharge from Rouse and Meurrill, to whom the bond was made by my cousin, shall be delivered up to you. Mr. Buxton will have nothing to do with them, but upon payment of the debt to you, we will free him by giving up his engagements. I have sent for the account, and when received, will forward it. With a note by M. Blount, thanking him for his interference. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 20.]
Jan. 31.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Milford is ordered to the Groyne, to attend the young Duke of Tuscany; the Portland, formerly intended for that service, has come in to refit, having lost her masts. The Pearl has received orders to carry a packet to Sir Thos. Allin. The Dartmouth, that was appointed convoy for the Canaries, rides in St. Helens; she came from Cadiz, and touched at Tangiers, where all things are in good condition. [Ibid. No. 21.]
Jan. 31.
Portsmouth.
Capt. Ant. Deane to the Navy Commissioners. I give you particulars as to how far you may depend on the instrument mentioned by Lord Brouncker, and what he will be expected to perform and be responsible for, being borne as a shipwright. I hope you have taken some course for speedily supplying plank, deals, and other goods, of which I have so great a want. [12/3 pages. Ibid. No. 22.]
[Jan.] Account by B. St. Michel, muster master, of 40 ships mustered by him in the Downs, between Aug and Dec. 1668; crews from 288 to 39: total men, 4,078; runaways, 1,556; also of weekly payments made by him in relation thereto, between July 1668 and the January following. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 23.]
[Jan.] Memorandum that Alice. Duchess Dudley, who died at her house near St. Giles' Church, Holborn, 22 Jan. 1668–9, in her lifetime gave for the augmentation of 6 vicarages named in co. Warwick, 20l. yearly apiece for ever; also to the same churches, and several others, divers large pieces of plate, to be used at the celebration of the Sacrament. That she gave to the church of St. Giles the greatest bell in the steeple, and divers great pieces of massive plate; paved the chancel with marble, built the fair blue gate at the entrance to the churchyard, and purchased a fair house of 30l. a year value, for the perpetual incumbent. She also gave the hangings for the choir, which cost 80l. 10s.; 2 service books, embroidered in gold, 5l.; a velvet altar cloth with gold fringe, 60l.; a cambric cloth to lay over it, with a deep bone lace, 4l. 10s.; another fine damask cloth, 3l.; 2 cushions for the altar, richly embroidered with gold, 10l.; a Turkey carpet to lay before the altar, 6l.; a long screen to sever the chancel from the church, richly carved and gilt, 200l.; a fair organ, 100l.; the organ loft, richly wrought and gilt, and a tablet of the 10 commandments, the Creed, and Lord's Prayer, richly adorned, 80l.; the rails before the altar, curiously carved and gilt, 40l. She also gave 100l. towards the repair of the steeple at St. Sepulchre's without Newgate, which was much defaced by the woeful fire.
By her will she bequeathed 100l. a year for ever for the redemption of Christian captives out of the hands of the Turks; 100l. for ever to the poor of the parish of Stoneley and 7 other parishes named; 400l. for the purchase of lands in augmentation for the maintenance of the poor in the almshouse near St. Giles' Church; and 200l. for placing out poor apprentices; 50l. to be distributed to poor people on the day of her funeral; 5l. to each place where her body should rest in its passage from London to Stoneley, in Warwickshire, where she has a noble monument, erected divers years since, of black and white marble, which cost above 300l.; also 6d. apiece to every indigent person meeting her corpse on the road from London to Stoneley. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 255, No. 24. See pp. 208, 209, infra.]
[Jan.] Petition of Zachary Browne to the Duke of York, for such consideration as he shall think fit, being wholly deprived of the use of his left hand by an engagement with the French at Martinique, while commander of the Assistance. [Ibid. No. 25.] Enclosing,
Certificate by J. Pearse, Surgeon-General, to the truth of the above petition.—17 Jan. 1669. [Ibid. No. 25i.]
Jan. ? Petition of Mary, wife of Robert Everard, prisoner in the Gatehouse, Westminster, to Lord Arlington, that her husband may be removed to King's Bench Prison, or otherwise relieved; for want of means, he is in the lower ward, where he has been a month, and it is so noisome that his life is in danger. [Ibid. No. 26.]
Jan.
Saturday.
Thos. Corney to Williamson. For God's sake see what may be done in my business, as I am reduced to that low ebb that I am ashamed to stir abroad, having had all my clothes stolen out of my lodging; and yet I have a friend who will advance anything for the getting of this place for a livelihood for me. The situation is in the disposal of the Ordnance Commissioners, and may be had with one word from his lordship. [Ibid. No. 27.]
Jan. ? Thos. Fletcher to [Pepys]. Pray obtain me a bill of imprest, without which I cannot despatch the carved works of so many frigates as are now setting forth at Chatham. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 255, No. 28.]
Jan. Lord St. John to Lord Arlington. Pray offer Thos. Neale to his Majesty, as a deputy-lieutenant under my command, in the room of Lord Sandys, deceased. [Ibid. No. 29. This should have preceded the Declaration on Neale's behalf, p. 159 supra.]
Jan. ? Warrant for a grant to John, son of Sir John Skelton, of pardon, with restitution of goods, for killing Fras. Edgecombe. [Draft. Ibid. No. 29A.]
Jan. Grant to Wm. Legge, page of honour, of a pension of 120l. a year. [Docquet, Vol. 24, No. 8.]
Jan. Lists sent by Mor. Lodge, of Deal, to Williamson, of ships in the Downs during the month, as follows:—
Vol. 255. No. Date. King's. Merchant. Wind.
30 Jan. 1 2 12 N.N.W.
31 " 2 2 13 N.E.
32 " 3 2 9 N.W.
33 " 4 2 6 S.E.
34 " 5 2 6 E.
35 " 6 2 7 E.
36 " 7 1 6 E.
37 " 8 1 6 N.W.
38 " 9 1 1 E.
39 " 10 1 1 E.
40 " 11 1 1 E.
41 " 12 1 1 E.
42 " 13 1 1 N.E.
43 " 14 2 W.
44 " 15 2 E.
45 " 16 1 W.
46 " 17 1 E.
47 " 18 1 1 S.W.
48 " 20 1 5 N.N.W.
49 " 21 1 3 S.
50 " 22 1 5 S.
51 " 23 1 6 S.W.
52 " 24 1 5 S.W.
53 " 25 3 3 E.S.E.
54 " 26 3 6 N.
55 " 27 3 2 N.E.
56 " 28 3 4 S.E.
57 " 29 1 5 W.
58 " 30 2 11 N.W.
59 " 31 1 18 W.N.W.