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Charles II: October 1671

Pages 511-551

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1671. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1895.

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October 1671

Oct. 1.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Enclosing a list of ships arrived. We have had very tempestuous storms most of the last month. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 84.]
Oct. 1.
Camberwell.
Edmond Bowyer to Williamson. Recommending the bearer, whom the Archbishop of Canterbury has lately presented to St. Mary Aldermary, and who desires that he would, at the King's being at the University, procure for him the degree of B.D., being an M.A. of eight years' standing. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Oct. 1. Sir Robert Vyner to Lord Arlington. Praying his favour for his brother-in-law, Richard Emarton, who was returned as one of the six for sheriff of Hertfordshire, but was not one of the three, as Sir John Read's getting off puts him in fear again. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Oct. 1.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. No news. [Ibid. No. 87.]
Oct. 1.
Ballenderry.
N. Boullay to Viscount Conway. Complaining that at the receipt of their last pay, ten days ago, Mr. Mildmay refused, by order of Lord Conway's lieutenant, the allowance his lordship had been pleased to grant him, and supposing that some one had been slandering him to his lordship. [French. Conway Papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II 330, No. 211.]
Oct. 2.
The Chapel at Raynham.
Robert Wright to Williamson, at Trinity College. Stating that he had desired Mr. Worts, the junior bedell, to remind him of creating Richard Clamp of Lynn M.D. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 88.]
Oct. 3.
Whitehall.
Sir Thomas Clifford to Williamson. Enclosing a note from Sir Thomas Bond, stating the sum to be paid by warrant to Sir Robert Long upon the Queen Mother's rents for the Duchess of Cleveland, was 1,700l. with fees and interest, and was to be paid to himself. [Ibid. No. 89.] Enclosed,
The said note, stating that the sum was 1,700l., to which must be added 42l. for fees, and the warrant must order interest till payment, and the warrant must be to himself for jewels sold. [Ibid. No. 89i.]
[Oct. ?] Warrant to the Commissioners and trustees of the revenue late in jointure to the Queen Mother, to give warrant to Sir Robert Long to pay out of the said revenue to Sir Thomas Bond 1,742l., in discharge of the like sum due to him for jewels bought of him for the King's service, with interest till payment at six per cent. [Draft. Ibid. No. 90.]
Oct. 3.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner J. Tippetts to the Navy Commissioners. Signifying the great want there of the plank from the Forest of Dean, as the weather prevents the Hope going there to fetch it, and proposing that a ship be hired at Bristol to bring part of it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 60.]
Oct. 3.
Newmarket.
Matthew Wren to the Navy Commissioners. Desiring to know whether the ships had been taken up for the voyage to the West Indies, the service for which they are wanted being so pressing that much longer delay will make the voyage useless; enclosing blank commissions for Captain Narbrough and Captain Perry, who are to have them; desiring that particulars of the two ships selected be sent; inquiring whether one of the fireships in the Medway might be conveniently fitted for a voyage to the West Indies; and desiring them to signify in what readiness they are for laying up and paying off any ships. [Ibid. No. 61.]
Oct. 3. Jonas Shish to the same. No bolts can be got for the ships now in dry dock, which are waiting for them, the smith saying his iron and credit are gone, and that he can do no more without money. [Ibid. No. 62.]
Oct. 3.
Dublin.
Dr. Lancelot Bolton to Viscount Conway. I waited to-day on the Lord Lieutenant, who was civil, and to-morrow I receive his orders to remove W. Hill. I shall then hasten to the North to give you a further account concerning the troop, and various members of it. I dined yesterday at Sir Arthur Forbes' and Sir Ellis', and sent him to the Castle so drunk as ever was man. He almost foxed himself at dinner, and we drank nothing, so that afterwards three full healths fixed him. To-day the Lord Lieutenant and Lord Chancellor were very pleasant on him. If you please, let him have some guineas, for he told me he would never refuse any, and thanked God he could not brag of any other humour in his life. Lady Clanbrassil lodges in Lady Berkeley's chamber, and is in great favour. [1¾ page. Conway Papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 330, No. 212.]
Oct. 3.
London.
Nicholas Darcy to Williamson. Asking to have his Majesty's letter remitting the quit rent. [Ibid. No. 213.]
Oct. 3. Testimonial by the Provost and Senior Fellows of Trinity College, Dublin, to the learning and good character of William Lloyd, and that he had taken the degree of B.A. on 23 February 1670[–1]. [On Parchment. Ibid. No. 214.]
[Oct. ?] The King to the Provost of Trinity College. Directing him to admit William Lloyd to one of the junior fellowships now vacant. [Draft. Ibid. No. 215.]
Oct. 3.
Lisburn.
Sir G. Rawdon to Viscount Conway. Mostly concerning various matters of business and family news. The night after the fair, John Ayrs, of your troop, returning to Portmore, wounded a poor man on the highway without any offence given, and the hue and cry followed him and took him. The man is not yet dead, but no hope of his recoevry. There has been a most violent storm of wind and rain, and this river is very high, which has hindered the work at Portmore. [2 pages. Conway Papers. Ibid. No. 216.]
Oct. 4.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Shipping news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 91.]
Oct. 4.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Identical with the last. [Ibid. No. 92.]
Oct. 4.
Gloucester.
Dr. Henry Fowler to Williamson. Having heard from the Dean of Gloucester of his discourse with him concerning the procuring for him of the degree of M.D., requesting him to use his best interest to obtain the royal mandate for the same, and expressing his thanks for his favours and civilities. [1¼ page. Ibid. No. 93.]
Oct. 5.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner J. Tippetts to the Navy Commissioners. The Phænix sailed this morning, so she can take her men out of the Reserve to-day, and the latter come in to-morrow. The Constant Warwick came to Spithead on Monday. She wants a stream anchor and cable, in exchange for those left at Tangier by order, and also a capstan and a boat. In reply to their question, giving the method of measuring masts. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 63.]
Oct. 5.
The Francis fireship, in the Downs.
Captain Thomas Willshaw to the same. The Dreadnought, the Rupert, and the two fireships sailed from the Buoy of the Nore for the Downs this morning. I desire my boatswain may be secured at Deptford, where he lives, for embezzling the stores. I have secured the cook who saw the things go out of the ship, and desire that Sir John Chicheley may have orders what to do with him. [Ibid. No. 64.]
Oct. 5. Jonas Shish to the same. Giving, as the result of his survey of the Katherine yacht, what repairs she requires, and suggesting her being hauled up on the slip where she was built. [Ibid. No. 65.]
Oct. 5.
Portsmouth (sic, endorsed Emsworth) sloop in Portsmouth Harbour.
Captain Edward Pearce to the same. Requesting that the conduct money of several of his men who came from London be paid, and stating that he had been ready to sail since the 30th, but had been prevented by the weather. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 66.]
Oct. 5. [The Navy Commissioners] to [Matthew Wren]. We had agreed on two ships for the West Indies, but when Captain Narbrough viewed them, he thought them unfit on account of their draught of water, which should not exceed fourteen or fifteen feet. We have therefore discharged them, and are trying to hire others, but find none willing, except those whose ships are defective. We therefore suggest the Sweepstakes be appointed for one. The fireships at Chatham are not, in our opinion, fit for the voyage; but the Francis, now going for the Straits, would be, if another were provided in her place. Sir Thomas Littleton daily expecting to resign, and Sir Thomas Osborne not being yet prepared to enter on his office, causes such a stop to procuring money that there is no prospect yet of any for payment of ships. It would be both a service to his Majesty and an accommodation to merchants who have plate on board, if the Constant Warwick, now arrived at Portsmouth, came to Woolwich. [With more in shorthand. Rough draft. Ibid. No. 67.]
Oct. 5. List furnished by Mr. French of the tickets to be paid on the Dreadnought, Rupert, Fountain, and Francis, amounting to 2,998l. 9s. 11d. [Ibid. No. 68.]
Oct. 6. Sir John Robinson to Sir Thomas Allin. The owners of the Constantinople are unwilling to trust to their payment, some of them having been sore bitten, and think the advance money too little. I suggest that she might be bought cheap. I must wait to-morrow on the Lord Keeper, twelve miles from London. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Oct. 7.
Newmarket.
Samuel Pepys to the Navy Commissioners. The illness of the ways and height of the waters made it Sunday morning before I could reach Norwich, whence the Court being gone to Lord Townshend's, and some indisposition since of the Duke's (which is now well over) hindering, I could not get opportunity of having the King and Duke together till Thursday, in order to my receiving their directions upon the errand I went on. This night or to-morrow I hope to have their last orders, so as to set out towards London on Monday. In the meantime be pleased to order the despatching away of the enclosed with all speed by an express to the commander of the Francis fireship. The Duke approves of your advice of the Constant Warwick's coming to Woolwich, and therefore would have orders forthwith sent for her being fitted for coming about. [Ibid. No. 70.]
Oct. 7.
The Kitchen yacht, Gothenburg.
William Wright to the same. Announcing their arrival on the 28th there, where they were waiting Major Andros' return from Stockholm. [Ibid. No. 71.]
Oct. 7. Jonas Shish to the same. The Guernsey, the Sweepstakes, and the hulk will be ready on Tuesday to launch out of the dry dock, and therefore an order is desired to the master attendant to get the Dartmouth ready for docking. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 72.]
Oct. 8.
Lambeth.
Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury, to Williamson. Desiring him to speak to Lord Arlington in his name, to obtain a King's letter for Dr. Cradock for the next fellowship at Eton. He writes by another hand, being in some indisposition in his bed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 94.]
Oct. 8. Dr. Fell to Sir Leoline Jenkyns. After parting rudely from my friends in Worcestershire, and breaking through the dissuasives of bad weather and worse ways, it was a severe disappointment not to meet you here. Soon after my return Mr. Wilkins died, and last Friday Mr. Bold, according to the King's letter, was transferred to his place, but our young gentlemen take it very much amiss that they should be told of their fault in the last election, and seem preparing to repeat it next Tuesday, when the ViceChancellor designs to have a congregation for the choice of an Architypographer, but I hope the major part will take up soberer counsels. Our business concerning the grant from the University was this week proposed to the Delegates of Printing and the heads of houses, and passed by both, whereon our draft was engrossed and intended to be sealed at the last convocation when the Divinity Bedell was chosen; but the Provost of Queen's, who consented at the former meetings, told the Vice-Chancellor that we were going about a business very detrimental to the public, it being a scandalous thing that they should let out their rooms, and it was an unreasonable bargain that we should have their privilege, room, and furniture for 200l. per annum, when the Stationers paid that for the mere privilege. The Vice-Chancellor referred him to the Principal and myself, who made the obvious answers to his objections, and told him that we conceived it was a service to the University to put ourselves on a certainty of great trouble and expense to bring the trade of printing hither for their honour and advantage, and whereas by Statute they were to allow the greatest part of the revenue they received to printing, not to expect anything from them, but to pay them 200l., and that we were not fond of the employment, and as we had before offered him and others the option of joining us, so we could very willingly desist. Thus it stands, so difficult a thing it is to be permitted to do men a kindness in this world. Mr. Principal will give you a fuller account next week in London. I heartily thank you for your schoolmaster of Abergavenny. Postscript.—We are told the Bishop of Carlisle is dead; if the Provost succeeded him all these objections would be easily answered. The person set up by the angry gentlemen has been with me, and I think is so satisfied of his true interest that he will desist. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 95.]
Oct. 8.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Phænix is at Spithead; the Reserve came into port thence on Friday to be laid up. [Ibid. No. 96.]
Oct. 8.
Essex House.
C. Cratford to Viscount Conway. On business matters. [Conway Papers. Ibid. No. 97.]
Oct. 8.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner J. Tippetts to the Navy Commissioners. The Reserve came in on Friday, and lies here as a guardship, two-thirds of her company being enjoined to be constantly on board. About twenty of her men are willing to sail in the Phænix, if they have tickets here, to be paid in the Downs. The hoy, with provisions much wanted, arrived yesterday, and will speedily sail for the Severn to bring the plank, which is already much wanted here. I hope Mr. Baylie will hasten the first vessel. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 73.]
Oct. 8.
Spithead.
Captain John Waterworth to the same. The Constant Warwick, under my command, arrived here last Monday, having been ordered by Sir Edward Spragg to go to the Thames; but having no boat to weigh an anchor, or capstan, and my foretopsail yard being broken, and my mainmast very bad, and the wind veering southerly off the Needles, I put in here, not believing that my pilot would take the ship over the flats in her present condition. I sent my lieutenant, on arrival, to Mr. Wren, but now, hearing that he is out of town, I desire your commands, whether I shall proceed according to the Admiral's order, or stay here. In the former case I must take in provisions and other things. [Ibid. No. 74.]
Oct. 8. Appointment by the surgeons of several men-of-war of Richard Reynell, clerk of the Barber-Surgeons' Company, as their agent to receive the money due to them for their necessary charges and for the carriage of their chests to several ports. [Signed by thirteen surgeons at various dates between 10 April and 8 October. Ibid. No. 75.]
Oct. 9.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to James Hickes. The Samuel, arrived on the 4th in four days from Belle Isle, found there four French men-ofwar, viz., the King, Queen, and two others, all snug, but stately, well-built ships; the King and Queen very richly painted, carved, and gilt with their arms, the crown also not excepted out of the sails of their boats. The King carries 127 guns and 1,250 men, the Queen 96 guns and 950 men, the others, one 70, the other 50 guns, having been cruising with the new ships on trial, as a guard or attendance on them. Great damage to shipping by the late storms about Croisic, Bordeaux, Nantes, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 98.]
Oct. 9.
Oxned.
Sir Robert Paston to Williamson. Stating that he is on the brink of those necessities that no man of the nation of his quality or fortune is, the King's intentions of favour in his farm being anticipated four or five years, his own revenue seized for a mortgage of 10,000l., and himself hated and oppressed on every side; and suggesting that the King should purchase his Yarmouth lands, with which he might gratify somebody else, and desiring Williamson's advice and instructions how to proceed. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 99.]
Oct. 9
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Last Friday there was such a violent storm that several vessels were driven ashore in this harbour. Shipping news. [Ibid. No. 100.]
Oct. 9.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Regretting that Lord Arlington and he had not come to Yarmouth, and describing his preparations for their reception. His Majesty was observed to feed heartily on our sea-made herrings. For a taste I have sent you a little box by post with 21 sea-made and 8 fishhouse herrings. If they are liked, let me have more of your custom. All parties and factions were unanimous as to the King's reception, striving to outvie one the other, some out of their true loyal affection, others that they might seem so to be. The former Lord Townshend was pleased to affront several times, as is supposed to put discouragements upon them, to advance his party here, having procured two of them to be knighted, James Johnson and George England. He pushed and miscalled Sir Thomas Medowes in the King's presence, which he put up [with]. It is said the reason was that some of his party informed him that Sir Thomas intended to deliver a petition about Captain Clarke's business, which his lordship has an order to examine, but for certain no such thing was intended. It was the fear of the guilty parties that possessed his lordship with that story. Our ministers here intended to have kissed his Majesty's hand, but were obstructed by his lordship. None here is in favour with his lordship but what are of the old stamp of the late times. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 101.]
Oct. 9.
Bushy.
Silas Titus to Williamson. Asking his assistance on behalf of the late Edmond Roydon's family. The King, in consideration of his fidelity and sufferings, bestowed on him the keeping of the stables at St. Albans, and on his death, leaving a most distressed family, Titus begged the post for his son, which the King granted, but there was no time to pass the grant before he left town. The town of St. Albans now intends to petition for the stables, in order to make money thereby for the maintenance of their minister. Mr. Rogers, the bearer, will give information of all the circumstances. [Ibid. No. 102.]
Oct. 9.
Newmarket.
The King to the Marquess of Worcester. Informing him of the disorder at Gloucester, and that the late Mayor had been ordered to retain the government of the city till the whole matter be determined in Council, and desiring him to keep an eye on the matter and take care to prevent further disorders. [S.P. Dom. Entry Book 31, f. 83.]
Oct. 9.
Newmarket.
The King to Dr. Henry Fowler. Signifying his will and pleasure that the government of Gloucester continue in him as Mayor till the matter of the pretended election there be heard and determined in Council on his Majesty's return, and desiring him to inform the Common Council and to make public notification thereof. [Ibid. f. 84]
Oct. 9. Drafts or copies of the last two letters. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, Nos. 103, 104.]
Oct. 9.
Hull.
Charles Whittington to Williamson. The late storms have destroyed on this coast at least 65 ships, small and great, averaging 70 tons burden. Among them are three or four Scotch, four laden with piece goods for this place, all the rest colliers. Last week sailed three richly laden for Holland, and two for Virginia, with about 60 servants. Four are arrived from Holland and two from France, the last wholly laden with prunes. A vessel is come for lampernes, which we hope this year will prove a commodity in these parts. The great exportation this year of all commodities, and the hope of its continuance, give great encouragement to all ingenious, active, stirring persons. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 105.]
Oct. 9.
Windsor.
Dr. G. Hascard to Williamson. As Mr. Mountague is made Fellow of Eton, and Dr. Thriscross is despaired of living above two or three days, and his friends have therefore been urgent with him to procure the King's letters to the college, proposing it to him and leaving it to his prudence. [Ibid. No. 106.]
Oct. 9.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. In obedience to your order of 30 September, I enclose estimates of the charge of the works to be performed, and demands for the provisions wanting, besides what are in store. As to your desire that bills be made out and sent up for all work done up to the aforesaid day, neither the carver's nor the painter's work is yet finished on the Prince Royal, and therefore I beg your further directions, and if bills are to be made out for what is already done, I ask that some other person be joined with me in the survey, there being no precedent for rating the carver's work, though there is for the painter's. As to your order that no provisions be received without a regular demand expressing the particular use for which each is demanded, this causes a great difficulty about the daily issues of iron work from the forge, on account of the great number of workmen and the many works in hand, and I therefore desire your further pleasure. The ships now in dock must be launched the next spring tides, whether there is sheathing board or not for the Dunkirk and Antelope, as demanded in my last of 30 September. I do not yet know what ships are to be docked next, though I and my assistant gave our opinion to Commissioner Cox on 7 September that the Lyon and Henrietta were fittest for the double, and the hulk for the single dock. Being since informed that the Rainbow is chosen as a guardship for this harbour, which has some pieces of lead nailed under water over holes cut, when she was sunk on the coming up of the Dutch, I informed Commissioner Cox of the necessity of her coming into dock for one tide, before the hulk, to have the lead pulled off and the holes stopped with plank, and that we could launch the Victory this spring, there being very little to do to her. But he instead gave his warrant for hauling her ashore on the other side of the water, where never any ship lay. She was twice laid last week, with workmen both times to attend her, putting the King to an unnecessary charge, and the second time laid where the water fell from her so much, and the bank was so steep, that she almost fell over at low water, and the work is not yet done. Being informed that the Commissioner intends to have her brought ashore on the ways, not knowing what harm she may have taken when she fell over, my opinion is that it will not be safe for her to be brought anywhere on the ground but in the dock, where she may be well secured with shores, being a very old ship, and I judge that it will be very necessary for her security that the gates were shut on her for a neap's time, that she might be firmly caulked, her galleries, which are very rotten, taken off, and those holes planked up, with some other small repairs, which I submit for your consideration. I have not yet received my warrant from the Commissioner for doing any work on these guardships, nor for discharging the house carpenters, who, I acquainted you in my last, might be spared. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 76.] Enclosed,
Oct. 9. Account of the charge of the works yet to be performed on the ships in harbour, and on those that want only graving and some small finishing work, of the ordinary repairs on ships afloat for the winter, of repairs of harbour boats, lighters, &c., and of house carpenters' works, &c., amounting to 61,550l. [Two copies, the second dated 13 October, and differing from the first only by including a charge of 300l. for repairing the hulk. Ibid. Nos. 76i, 76ii.]
Oct. 9.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the same. Mr. Owen, clerk of the ropeyard, informed me there is only one barrel of tar in store, and for want of tallow he cannot proceed in laying strands. Two sorts of tallow are to be had here for ready money at 38l. and 30l. per ton. I shall get samples of both. No bricks are in store. Leaden scuppers are much wanted. I ordered the Rainbow to be brought alongside the hulk to get in her guns, but as she had some holes cut in her when the Dutch were here, she needs a tide or two in dock when the Victory is launched. I ordered her to be laid ashore to save the charge of docking, but the holes were cut so low that they could not come by them to stop them all. I dare not advise laying her ashore on the ways being a very ancient ship. Some small matters want to be done to the three guardships for the accommodation of the captains and the lodging of the men. All the pressed carpenters, 23 in number, may be discharged, the 21 remaining in the service being all that can be employed this winter. [1¼ page. Ibid. No. 77.]
Oct. 9.
Chatham Ropeyard.
John Owen to the same. Informing them of the want of tar. [Ibid. No. 78.]
Oct. 9.
Bristol.
Francis Baylie to the same. Informing them that he has taken up a ketch of Berkhelmeston (Brighton), which will be ready to take in the plank in six days, and that he can procure another for the rest of the plank, and so save sending one for it. [Ibid. No. 79.]
Oct. 9. Sir John Chicheley to Lord Brounker. Desiring to have the yawl of Mr. Peeps' (Pepys') brother[-in-law, B. St. Michel], in exchange for his own. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Oct. 10.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. (To the same purport as his last to Hickes, with some additional shipping news.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 107.]
Oct. 10.
Whitehall.
Dr. Thomas Tullie to Williamson. Having received a summons from his brother chaplains to attend in Newmarket that day week, requesting him to secure him from that voyage, as his fortnight will be out after next Sunday. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 108.]
Oct 10.
Newmarket.
The King to the Provost and Fellows of Eton. Directing them to admit Dr. Zachary Cradock, one of his chaplains, to the first vacant fellowship in the college. [Sign Manual. Seal. Ibid. No. 109, and S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 79.]
Draft thereof, slightly differing. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 110.]
Oct. 10. Warrant to pay to Lord St. John and others, Farmers of the Customs, 177,400l. by payments of 10,000l. a month out of the Customs revenue, with interest at 6 per cent., being part of 207,400l. advanced by them to the King, 30,000l. whereof is otherwise secured to Sir John Bennet, with a cancel of the privy seal of 30 September last, securing 226,000l. to the parties aforesaid. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 133.]
Oct. 10. Congé d'élire to the Dean and Chapter of Bristol, empowering them to elect a bishop to that see, the same being void by the death of Dr. Ironside. [Ibid. No. 134.]
Oct. 10.
Newmarket.
James, Duke of York, to the Navy Commissioners. Sir John Baptist Duteil being now ready to depart to Genoa and Leghorn in order to equip the two galleys the King has had built there, desiring them to give him credit on Sir Thomas Clutterbuck at Leghorn, and some merchants at Genoa, for the sums they may think necessary for carrying on that service, and also to give orders to Sir Thomas and the merchants respectively to supervise such equipment and furnishing, and to supply Duteil from time to time with the moneys they shall find requisite, and to take care that moneys be provided on the assignations for the galleys for answering any bills drawn upon them. [Two copies and a French translation. A third copy is addressed to Williamson as Secretary of the Privy Council, and is therefore later than January 1671–2. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, Nos. 81, 82, 83, 84.]
Oct. 10. John Hall, carpenter of the Monmouth yacht, to the same. The captain being unable to attend from illness, has sent him to learn their pleasure about her. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Oct. 10. Sir Jeremy Smyth to the same. Giving the results of the survey of the casks from Deptford returned from the Straits, which the Board had directed. Noted that the Board decided to leave to Sir Jeremy to examine which are the King's and which the victualler's, to sell the former for the best price he can get, and to leave the latter to the victualler, and let him, if he can, give reason for satisfaction from the King for the damage. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Oct. 10.
Harwich.
Capt. Silas Taylor to the same. The houses adjoining the launch are in danger every great wind, most of them leaning to the east on account of the force of the westerly winds. [Ibid. No. 87.] Enclosed,
Thomas Langley and Robert Last, carpenter, to the same. Certificate that the spawls about the great launch are rotten just at the ground, and will endanger the buildings on both sides by their fall, and that a small pitch-kettle house on the wharf should be pulled down. [Ibid. No. 87i.]
Oct. 10.
Cork.
Peter Bronsdon to the same. The 29th I received yours, on my return from the Killmar river. I had been at Dingle Bay viewing Sir Francis Brewster's woods, which lie so far from the seaside, that I think they cannot draw any timber from the best, which are called Glanfliske, and lie in a glen between two great mountains, the ground very rocky, and the end of the glen beset with bogs, so that no timber is brought thence but what can be carried on horses' backs like pipe-staves. From Glancarrah, the other wood which lies by Lough Carr, some small timber may be brought to the seaside. I cannot give any judgment as to the quantity, the woods being so thick, and much old timber lying on the ground, which is very rocky, and no drawing the timber till a way is made, which from the furthest part to the Lough is about two miles, then boated over the Lough, which is about three miles, and then drawn over a bog, about a mile of very bad way, and then boated by the river about four miles to where the ship can ride. For this I treated with the steward, who can give no answer without hearing from Sir Francis Brewster. I expect his answer every day. Thence I went again to the Killmar river, and I like these woods best for transportation of any I see in Ireland. The steward has not yet received any answer from Sir William Petty. I shall give you a further account on my return. In six days I hope to sail for Minehead. I hope the St. Jacob is safely arrived, though we hear she is lost. I have received the 50l. order. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 88.]
Oct. 10.
Woolwich Ropeyard.
W. B[odham] to Thomas Hayter. Signifying that their hemp was long since exhausted, and that there was a demand from Deptford for a great quantity of cordage. [Ibid. No. 89.]
Oct 11 List of persons convicted at the sessions for London and Middlesex, with their sentences. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 111.]
Oct. 11. [Ralph] Snowe to Williamson. I have communicated yours of the 9th to his Grace [the Archbishop of Canterbury], who is very ready to gratify you and your friend the Doctor, but is unable to do so in this, for Dr. Clerke has not yet accepted the bishopric, and if he does, will beseech his Majesty that he may hold in commendam the living you mention. [Ibid. No. 112.]
Oct. 11.
Windsor Castle.
Dr. Thomas Vyner to Williamson. Forwarding two letters from the Bishop of Gloucester and the Chapter Clerk there, and desiring the former to be returned. The bearer is the Mayor before Mr. Fowler. [Ibid. No. 113.] Enclosed,
Oct. 4.
Gloucester.
William Nicholson, Bishop of Gloucester, to Dr. Vyner. We are here all mad, Bedlam mad. Last Monday, the day to choose the Mayor and officers for the city, the Mayor sent to the Aldermen and Common Council to appear for the election at one, being resolved to carry himself with that mildness and calmness as not to exasperate the froward party, and summoned them to accompany him to the cathedral at morning service at ten. Thither he came with his company, but while we were at prayer, an Assembly of the rest was called, as was agreed the night before. Alderman Arnold at the head steered the business as Demetrius at Ephesus, and prevailed so far with the rest of the Council that Mr. Bubb, or Bubble rather, was elected Mayor, and two sheriffs agreed on before chosen with the other officers, for which the bells of St. Michael's were rung, great joy omni populo, and so suddenly done that we heard the harmony when we came out of the cathedral. Had they been rung backwards I suppose it had been more proper. To mix a little mirth with this tragical scene, Dorney was sent for to be consulted of the legality of the election. In this like himself a grave lawyer he answered, he knew no law to justify their actions. However, jolly they would be, wine and cakes were sent for, one of which was sent him; but he refused, and jocularly replied, he'd none of their cake, for he feared their cake was dough. Whether he rejected the good sack or claret I cannot say, because it is præter consuetudinem. After we had dined at the old sheriffs, the old Mayor at one appears on the stage at the Council House with his party as appointed, quickly acquaints them of the reason of his summons at that hour and meeting according to their charter and custom to elect officers. Up starts presently a tribune and tells him that he might spare his pains, for they had already elected for themselves, and demanded of him the sword and maces in a threatening and angry manner. The Mayor showed his wisdom and patience, gave not a high word, but told them that his Majesty had committed that sword to him, and that he could not be so perfidious as to deliver it to any whom he conceived not to be his Majesty's Lieutenant, and with that rose up and laboured to depart, but a hubbub there was, the door of the Council Chamber was clapped to against him, harsh words passed, and some blows, Mr. Wagstaffe's heels attempted to be struck up, with much more rudeness. But the Mayor at last forced the door and opened it, and carried the sword and maces to his own house, where they yet are, though there be threats to fetch them thence by violence. Remember my service to Mr. Williamson, and acquaint him that his counsel was followed, for they have now entangled themselves sufficiently. It remains in his Majesty's power to let them out of the net or else to take them in it. One thing only I forgot, Dux femina facti. I will unfold this mystery when we meet. [S.P. Dom., Car. II 293, No. 113i.]
Oct. 4.
Gloucester.
William Lambe, Chapter Clerk, to Dr. Thomas Vyner. Giving another account of the election, with the addition that after the Mayor's departure, the morning electors sat still in the Boothall and proceeded to swear in the Mayor and sheriffs, which are Mr. Bubb, Mr. Veysey, and Mr. Phelps, and afterwards brought their elected Mayor home. Next day they summoned a Council, and met this morning. The first thing they did they broke open the treasury, and made an order demanding the sword and maces, and bound Mr. Jourdan to good behaviour. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 113ii.]
Oct. 11. Mary Baron to Williamson. Requesting him to forward the enclosed, which she sends by the desire of Lady Carr and her aunt. I should be glad to hear what the London ladies' opinions are of us poor country women. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 114.]
Oct. 11.
Deal.
Joseph Smith, Judge Advocate, to the Navy Commissioners. Yesterday at a court martial on board the Dreadnought, Robert Johnes, boatswain of the Francis, was found guilty of embezzling a hawser and other stores, and sentenced to be sent to [Chatham ?], and to be rowed from the dockyard to one of the ships there, with the usual ceremony of a drum beating at the head of the boat, his crime written in capital letters and fixed on his head, breast, and back, to stand an hour on the gunwale of the ship with a rope from the yardarm about his neck, and then to have fifteen strokes on his naked back, and to have the like punishment at Woolwich and Deptford, to be dismissed his ship, and rendered incapable of ever bearing any office in any of his Majesty's ships. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 90.]
Oct. 11. Jonas Shish to the same. Giving particulars of Mr. William Wood's beech timber, which will be useful for the new sluice at Deptford Yard, and suggesting that the sluice should have three channels for the water to run out. [Ibid. No. 91.]
Oct. 12.
Pall Mall.
Sir Peter Wyche to Williamson. How I wished myself in the cracking chair the evening the King returned from Cambridge. How shriekingly would all the Oxford men have quitted the field, and how might I have run myself out of breath without any competitor. When the sun but shines we are as glad of it for your sake as Gondibert was, who in England bemoaned its absence, and by a gentleman going to Spain presented the glorious planet with his very humble service. Jack's other father, Pelham, is come to town, but as children learn their native language by hearing the common discourse, so ours often remembering you will not suffer his presence to prevail against your absence. My cousin Harby has been very ill. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 115.]
Oct. 12. Dr. J. Fell to Sir Leoline Jenkins. To-morrow the Principal will give you a full account of what passes here. The passion of our angry men, when they saw themselves concluded to choose that one man who was unquestionably fit here or look abroad, set up and chose Wase, a Cambridge man, who I hear is crazed in his head and void of all management. [Ibid. No. 116.]
Oct. 12. John Kendall of Thetford to Lord Arlington. Petition stating that he leased certain marsh lands in North Wootton and Rising, Norfolk, from Lord Henry Howard, at 700l. a year rent, and a fine of 1,500l., for 21 years, of which eight or nine years are unexpired, but on 12 September last, a breach of the sea overflowed those marsh lands to the value of 500l. or 600l. a year, drowning many hundreds of great marsh sheep, destroying 400 or 500 acres of edgrowth (sic) or after-grass and old grass, and injuring his hay; and begging his Lordship's mediation with Lord Howard, to acquit him of the remaining years unexpired, abate the last half-year's rent, and return part of the fine. [Ibid. No. 117.]
Oct. 12.
Euston.
Lord Arlington to Williamson. The enclosed answers the King's letter. I have added a word from myself about my brother's bill. If the King be content, its passing by immediate warrant will be best. The King will be here on Saturday. Let Mr. Sayers follow, and the chaplain for Sunday. It will be impossible to lodge the Duke with any convenience, but wait upon him to know his pleasure. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 118.]
[Before Oct. 12.] The King to the Bishop of Lichfield and the Dean and Chapter there. Recommending John Waldron for election to the first vacant prebend there. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 33.]
Oct. 12.
Newmarket.
Matthew Wren to the Navy Commissioners. Directing that with the other repairs of the Monmouth yacht, her head should be raised a little. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 92.]
Oct. 12.
Rochester.
John Petty, purser of the Royal Charles, to Sir Thomas Allin and Sir Jeremy Smith. Asking for leave for his friend Robert Orrin, purser of the Gloucester, to appoint a deputy, in order that he may attend at the passing of his own accounts, which he himself is disabled by illness from doing, and requesting a speedy and favourable despatch of the said accounts, and that allowance be made him for the great expense of cask in sea fights and other necessary occasions. [Ibid. No. 93.]
Oct. 12.
Portsmouth.
Captain Anthony Deane to Commissioner Tippetts. I enclose an estimate for the works in the yard and the ordinary caulking and repairs afloat, and also the beginning of a detailed estimate of the charge of docking, shoring, and repairing one ship, which on that method would take ten or twelve sheets of paper, as to which we desire the Board's resolution. Pray let us have some supply of plank and long treenails, of which we have none. But 30 loads of timber are at Redbridge, and near 300 still in the New Forest. I have often pressed Mr. Eastwood about it, but I doubt the season of the year is so far spent as this winter's work will receive a great loss by this neglect of carriage. He answers the hewing the frame takes away his profit, and says he has given the Board an account of it. He is aged, and cannot ride to see the business done, and I wish some younger man were thought on to get down what we can out of the woods. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 94.] Enclosed,
Estimate and present charge of repairing the Yarmouth, Nightingale, and Anne yacht, and building Prince Rupert's vessel, the new great ship, and twelve new boats, and for caulking and ordinary repairs of the fifteen ships afloat, and to repair all the harbour and workmen's boats, amoun'ing to 22,650l. [Ibid. No. 94i.]
Detailed particulars of the repairs of the Happy Return. [2 pages, with a note that to proceed on this method through the whole ship would take ten or more sheets. Ibid. No. 94ii.]
Oct. 12.
Portsmouth.
Walter Slingesby to the same. Desiring an order for his receiving stores at the storehouse door according to custom, and not at the wharf, several embezzlements being made between the wharf and the storehouse. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 95.]
Oct. 13.
Euston.
Lord Arlington to Williamson. Acknowledging his, and enclosing a warrant countersigned, and his brother's bill. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 119.]
Oct. 13.
London.
J. Sayers to Williamson. Sending a paper to put him in mind of their parson, as Mr. Chiffinch may have forgotten to do so, and stating that if he pleases to make any use of the kitchen Mr. Musher will readily serve him till he comes. [Ibid. No. 120.]
Oct. 13.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Shipping intelligence. We have no news but of war with Holland, which is generally disliked of. [Ibid. No. 121.]
Oct. 13.
Gloucester.
Henry Fowler to Williamson. I will observe the advice in your letter just received in every particular. The morning after the irregular actings of those people, I gave Judge Morton an account of it. As soon as his Majesty's express arrived I performed his command, and sent that enclosed for the Marquess to him at Badminton. [Ibid. No. 122.]
Oct. 13. Dr. Fell to Williamson. Acknowledging his kindness in his late offer about the printing, of the reception of which Mr. Principal will inform him, though, considering the risks of great undertakers, possibly the refusal of our service may prove no small expression of thankfulness for our good intentions, and enclosing a specimen of a catalogue, an imperfect payment of a debt long since owed, beginning with an account of Greek writers, the "failances" of which he asks him to pardon. [Ibid. No. 123.]
Oct. 13. Dr. Tullie to Williamson. Repeating his request to be excused going to Newmarket, and asking him to represent it to the Lord Chamberlain. [Ibid. No. 124.]
Oct. 14. Matthew Lock to Williamson. As Lord Hawley's troop, now quartered in Southwark, is ordered to march to Canterbury on the 26th, enclosing an order for Sir Francis Compton's troop, now at Huntingdon, to relieve them in Southwark, if it be the King's pleasure that there should be a troop in Southwark. [Ibid. No. 125.]
Oct. 14. Sir John Berkenhead to Williamson. I suppose Dr. Hugh's business is by this despatched. I have some books of his that must be sent by special hand, and would gladly let it go along with them. We all, who have served the King or his father, are sorry for Mr. Dyves. I know the King will show small pity to coiners, especially of guineas. This morning Lord Ashley summoned two or three Commissioners of Discovery for Defective Titles, and told them such commissions ought not to come under the Great Seal, but the Exchequer Seal. The Lord Keeper and Attorney-General affirm the contrary. The truth is, this commission has got the start of the Duke of Buckingham's, which has been long on the anvil, but not yet passed. Caveats were put in at the Great Seal, but the Lord Keeper, more valiant than ordinary, slighted them all, and the Commissioners now sit, and are like to do service. An ecclesiastical officer, well known to you, last Wednesday convented a gentleman for a clandestine marriage, who answered he was not guilty, for though he had lived two years with the lady at bed and board, he was never married at all. We hear Sir Robert Howard has won all; must he always gain by being against the King ? [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 126.]
Oct. 14.
Gloucester.
Henry Fowler to Williamson. I have punctually observed his Majesty's commands, and also performed on Monday the order from Sir Robert Southwell, giving every person concerned a ticket under my hand to appear the 30th instant, the day appointed by his Majesty for hearing the matter. But being myself a principal person concerned, and being commanded by his Majesty to exercise the office of Mayor till the matter be decided, I beg you to resolve the question whether I may come to London and leave this charge without being authorised by his Majesty. [Ibid. No. 127.]
Oct. 14.
Newmarket.
The King to [the Governors of] Sutton's Hospital. Recommending George Seignior, Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, to the office of preacher of that hospital, void by death of Dr. Thirscrosse. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35B, f. 17.]
Oct. 14. List of orders exchanged by Sir Thomas Littleton since his list of 3 August 1671, and an account of orders since received out of the Exchequer, and of what are remaining. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 96.]
Oct. 15.
St. Mary Hall, Oxford.
Christopher Wase to Williamson. When I arrived here on the sole occasion of Eton on Thursday, Dr. Allestry informed me that the same Tuesday I had been elected Architypographus, to which is annexed an Esquire Bedell in Law. In my absence, and without my knowledge, I was nominated and elected against a competitor who relied on the sole strength of Christ Church, so that he had 70 and I 139 voices. All Queen's and St. John's were unanimous for me, and some others. This is hardly digested by Christ Church, that a Cambridge man should appear in Oxford, and they would reverse the privileges of the University by getting a mandamus to reverse it. I flee to your compassion that I suffer not such violence, nor so ill a precedent be raised against the place; by Dr. Wren I have deprecated my Lord of Canterbury's grace. They managed awhile the objection of my grace for Doctor in Cambridge against it, but finding that to have been but inchoative, and that I was not presented, they waived it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 128.]
Oct. 15.
Newmarket.
Francis, Lord Hawley, to Williamson at Euston. As he could not see him before he went, desiring him to remind Mr. Treasurer and Lord Arlington of his business, that they may join in moving of it to his Majesty, and saying that he is himself better, and hopes to be well in two days. [Ibid. No. 129.]
Oct. 15.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Shipping news. [Ibid. No. 130.]
Oct. 16. Joseph Haynes to Williamson. Enclosing a state of his business, one whereof the Duchess of Monmouth has sent to Lord Arlington, and another Captain Downing has sent to Mr. Porter for the Duke of Buckingham, and begging him to move Lord Arlington on his behalf, or that he himself would present a petition for him to his Majesty, or do whatever he shall think fit, by advising with Mr. Porter or the Duke of Monmouth, towards the saving of his life. [1¼ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 131.]
Oct. 16. Sir Thomas Littleton to Williamson. Enclosing a letter for Mr. Treasurer, as directed by him. [Ibid. No. 132.]
Oct. 16.
Guildhall.
Sir Thomas Player to Williamson. Apologising for not having written before, for want of news; saying that Sir John Robinson, Sir Andrew King, and himself were invited to dinner by Captain Mead, the great Quaker, to his house at Clapham, where they had ten or twelve dishes of meat, but no butcher's meat, and most abominable Christmas pies, and were all served in silver and made half drunk, though the Quaker never drank to them; requesting to be informed whether the Dutch desire to raise any men here, and whether the King will permit it, because there are two or three considerable persons, no ill soldiers, who have a desire and reputation enough to raise men for them, but they will rather die than do it without the King's full approbation; and saying that they have heard here with trembling of great dangers his Majesty has been in, and wish him here in safety. [1¾ page. Ibid. No. 133.]
Oct. 16.
Spring Garden.
Sir Robert Southwell to Williamson. I got safely home Saturday night, and found among the letters for me here Lord Arlington's invitation to Euston, telling me my errand into Flanders as Envoy Extraordinary. Pray let your servant convey the enclosed to Lord Crofts, justifying me from a troublesome neighbour, his tenant. [Ibid. No. 134.]
Oct. 16. Thomas Blood to Williamson. I received yours of the 11th from Sir John, and acknowledge with all thankfulness your great condescension in being so mindful of our small concerns among your many weighty affairs. Our two friends present their service to you. We meet often, and are very intent on what may be serviceable to his Majesty. Mr. Ch[urch] intends immediately to begin his corresponding in Ireland, and at your return to give you a further account of that affair. Last Thursday I met the person I was to meet, but nothing considerable passed but large expressions of his great respects to me, and how ready he was to serve me, and how much he disgusted my antagonist. I was pressed to accept his endeavours to solicit some advantage for me from the King. I thanked his care, and told him I had found his Majesty's grace towards and care of me so large that I thought it inconvenient to move for more. I suppose I shall have another appointment, at which he may be more free with me in some things I have had hints of, but I forbear mentioning them till I wait on you on your return. Sir John has taken pains in freeing those prisoners, and has put it in a fair way. [1¼ page. Ibid. No. 135.]
Oct. 16.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. I read to the several officers concerned the articles mentioned in yours of the 10th, and gave to those that desired it a copy of such articles as they thought concerned them, and they promised the speedy execution thereof. I enclose the estimate I had from them for provisions wanting to fit out the ships here without any regard to what is in store, and also those wanting at present, without a speedy supply of which the service will be much hindered, and likewise an account of the whole charge of the works yet to be done to the ships. There is no estimate of the particulars of the works intended to be undertaken first, as the articles express, but only these in gross, for want of which estimate a hoy is here now with plank from Mr. Maddox, which is unreceived, not knowing on what estimate to give warrant for receipt thereof. There is another great difficulty about the iron work, as to which the master shipwright has proposed no method, but promises he will, nor have I yet received any return from the master attendants and clerk of the survey. Two of the guardships have their guns on board, but want powder. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 97.]
Oct. 17.
Euston.
William Bridgeman to Williamson. I find by yours of this morning the miscarriage of a letter sent you on Saturday at M. Colbert's desire for the Duke of Richmond. My lord desires you to show the enclosed from Major Darrell to the King, and know his pleasure about it, and the other from my lord will acquaint you with the contents of that to his Majesty, and he bids me add that he desires you to acquaint the King that Major Andros arrived at Gothenburg five days after Ambassador Coventry. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 136.]
Oct. 17.
Euston.
Lord Arlington to Williamson. Desiring him to present the enclosed to the King, and to obtain his pleasure on it, and consenting to his going to London on Thursday. [Ibid. No. 137.] Enclosed,
Oct. 17.
Euston.
Lord Arlington to the King. On the Lord Keeper's behalf, asking him to grant to his nephew, Mr. Bridgeman, the office of Protonotary of Monmouthshire and three other counties in South Wales now held by one Hughes, who is dying. [Ibid. No. 137i.]
Oct. 17.
St. John's College.
Dr. Francis Turner to Williamson. Mr. Gale of Trinity and I have so ordered matters that you shall have the desire expressed in yours of the 13th. The Master of St. Benet's only alleged it was very uncustomary, but not unstatutable, to grant such an MS. as this out of the library, and was extremely civil in affording his licence and assistance to find the book. The day after I waited on you at Newmarket, I laid out for Grotius de Jure Belli, and the four pleasant pieces, some as tart as pleasant, on the contempt of the clergy. — Describing by what means the books were sent to Williamson at Newmarket, and asking his kindness to the bearer, Mr. Seignior. [Ibid. No. 138.]
Oct. 17.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Enclosing a list of ships arrived. The Rupert, with her convoy, sailed last night for the Straits. News of the fight described more fully in Holden's of the 18th. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 139.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 139i.]
Oct. 17.
Barnstaple.
William Wakeman to James Hickes. Shipping news. [Ibid. No. 140.]
Oct. 17.
Southampton.
Thomas Butler to Williamson. Hearing that Dr. Clerke, incumbent of North Crawley, in Bedfordshire, is actually, or is certain to be, appointed to the vacant bishopric of Bristol, begging him to use his interest to procure that living for him. [Ibid. No. 141.]
Oct. 17.
Seven Stars, in St. Lawrence Lane, London.
John Wagstaffe to Williamson. Our Recorder, Mr. Justice Morton, has commanded me to consult you whether it be his Majesty's pleasure that the Mayor should appear on the day of hearing. A reply by next post is desired to the Mayor or to Morton. [Ibid. No. 142.]
Oct. 17.
Oxford.
Christopher Wase to Williamson. The complete kindness of the University has defeated my fears and suspicions. They have actually admitted me to the place of Architypographus to the University and Superior Bedell in Civil Law. [Ibid. No. 143.]
Oct. 17. Captain Edmund Chillenden to the Navy Commissioners. Desiring satisfaction against Richard Davis, mate of the Dover, who, at the instigation of Edward Gampens, master thereof, last Saturday evening waylaid him, and gave him many blows with a stick, and wounded him and despoiled him of his goods, and who, with Gampens, goes on threatening his life. Noted that the matter was accommodated at the Board between Chillenden and the parties, Davis confessing the fault and giving him 40s. for his cure. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 98.]
Oct. 18.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. A vessel from Milford speaks of much wreck on that coast. They met such violent storms about the Land's End that a vessel that sailed with her foundered near her. The Ruth arrived here from Oporto. There came out with her the Swallow of London, and a pink, and off the Northern Cape an Algiers man-of-war of about 30 guns came up with them under an English flag, but when they came within shot put up the Turk's colours. They boarded the Swallow once or twice, and she cleared them again. She had 18 guns. The Ruth being far distant, he could not put any of his men on board them, and night drawing on, they made the best of their way. They heard several broadsides, and believe that if they held out till night they might get clear. A vessel from Rochelle reports that about 22 sail were cast away on that coast, three of them English. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 144.]
Oct. 19.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Our Deal men on board the King's four ships in the Thames report their victuals very unwholesome, that most of the men are gone, and suffer rather to lose their pay than to stay, being at home so long without their money that they are run in debt more than their wages would pay. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 145.]
Oct. 19. Warrant to pay to Sir Robert Southwell, Envoy Extraordinary to the Governor of the Spanish Netherlands, 4l. per diem and 300l. for his equipage. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 135.]
Oct. 19.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. Informing them that he had ordered the Victory to be launched and the Rainbow docked in her room, and inquiring whether the Dunkirk and Antelope are to be sheathed before they are launched, their works being almost finished. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 99.]
Oct. 19.
Deptford.
Captain John Tinker and J. Uthwat to the same. Stating on what principle they had estimated the tonnage of the masts and other goods sent in the Love. [Ibid. No. 100.]
Oct. 19.
Victualling Office.
Sir D. Gauden and Co. to the same. Desiring that two bills of exchange drawn by Sir T. Clutterbuck be accepted and paid, and placed to their account. [Ibid. No. 101.]
Oct. 19.
Woolwich.
William Hannam to the same. According to my instructions as master attendant I am not concerned in keeping any accounts, which is the business of the clerk of the survey, mine being to look after the ships afloat, and see them safely transported to the docks, and when launched to their moorings again, and to see them well rigged and fitted for sea. His Majesty's affairs are much hindered by men engrossing offices for two yards, and those that live on the place are put to a great deal more trouble. If it is objected, Why can you not do it as well as formerly ? I answer since this was first a yard the Navy is twice as many, if not more. I have known so little to do here that the docks were lent to owners to build and repair ships. [Ibid. No. 102.]
Oct. 19.
Woolwich.
The same to Colonel Middleton. Desiring an order for a partition to be put up in the sail-room, and for surrendering the room to the boatswain of the yard. [Ibid. No. 103.]
Oct. 20.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Enclosing a list of ships and giving more details of the fight with the Algerine. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 146.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 146i.]
Oct. 20.
Portsmouth.
John Powell to James Hickes. As he has left Weymouth for Portsmouth, advising that Nathaniel Osborne be made correspondent in his place, and asking to be correspondent at Portsmouth in place of Mr. Salesbury, or at any rate to have the Gazettes weekly. A note at the side from James Hickes desires Williamson's advice thereon. [Ibid. No. 147.]
Oct. 20.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. Concerning the launching of the ships in dock, and which are to be docked in their room, and the difficulty about the ironwork (all mentioned in his letter of the 9th, to which he has received no answer), and desiring a speedy reply. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 104.]
Oct. 20.
Chatham.
Thomas Wilson, storekeeper, to the same. Referring them to Commissioner Cox's warrant for delivering canvas and tar to several boatswains for making tarpaulins, on account (besides the danger of the tar being embezzled) of the risk of the ships being fired by making them on board. [Ibid. No. 105.]
Oct. 21.
Pembroke.
Robert Chambers to Williamsom. Having come there as collector, desiring the news-letter as sent to the late collector, and offering in return to correspond. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 148.]
Oct. 21.
Gloucester.
Henry Fowler to Williamson. Since his Majesty's letter I have exercised the office of Mayor, but little regard is had to me, very few owning me to be Mayor, but the power of Mayor is in the person irregularly elected, who writes himself William Bubb, Mayor. I have called two Common Councils to declare his Majesty's pleasure, but there was no appearance except a few of our friends. I was compelled, therefore, to send to their houses a letter of my own and Sir Robert Southwell's, that everyone might take notice of the day appointed for hearing the matter, and be unable to plead ignorance. The town is at present quiet, but full of discontents. Pray send me a line or two by the next post whether I am to attend on the day fixed. Mr. Alderman Wagstaffe, now in London, will wait upon you. [Ibid. No. 149.]
Oct. 21.
Plymouth.
James Blackborne to James Hickes. The weather has been stormy; two Dutch vessels and an English one were cast ashore north of the Land's End, near the habitation of the Earl of Bath, who prevented the usual destruction that the country makes in such cases, and gave passes to the people for Plymouth, where some have embarked for Holland. A ship from Newfoundland, which persisted in going for Saltash, was lost. [Damaged. Ibid. No. 150.]
Oct. 21. Warrant to Jo. Topham, Serjeant-at-Arms, to repair to Gloucester and apprehend Wm. Bubb, alderman, and bring him before the King and Council, for contempt of the King's late letters concerning the government of that city. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 119.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 151.]
Oct. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry de Vic, Chancellor of the Garter, to admit Captain Thomas Beck, who is unmarried, and suffered both in limbs and fortunes for the late King, to the place of a poor knight of Windsor, void by death of Col. Hastings. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 42.]
Oct. 21.
Bristol.
Francis Baylie to the Navy Commissioners. The first barge with timber for loading the ketch is come, and I hope the rest will Monday or Tuesday. I desire orders for the master. I have given him my bond for payment of the freight two days after discharge. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 106.]
Oct. 22. Dr. Fell to Williamson. The defeat of our proposal is no surprise to me, this not being the first time I have found how impatient some here are of having good done to the public. Mr. Principal will tell you with what caution we proceeded in expectation of opposition. Our Masters are ashamed of what they have done, but will, I fear, continue in the same ill-humour, and be tempted to repeat it. The pretence of house-room, &c., is so pitiful a suggestion that plainly it was only mentioned because nothing better could be thought of; the advancement of printing was the real grievance. What troubles me most is the sordid ingratitude to my Lord of Canterbury, which after such obligations as we have received is vile and brutish beyond all example or comparison. It is advisable not to make any new offers. When anything like an overture is proposed, I shall not throw it off without advising with you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 152.]
Oct 22.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Shipping news. [Ibid. No. 153.]
Oct. 22.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Shipping news. [Ibid. No. 154.]
Oct. 22. Warrant to the Recorder of London to insert the name of Thomas Sykes, convicted of burglary at the Old Bailey sessions, into the next pardon that comes out for Newgate convicts, inserting his name in the clause for transportation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 55.]
Oct. 22. The King to Major N. Dorrell, Governor of Sheerness. Several Dutch dogger-boats, usually frequenting the river of Chatham in the oyster season, have passed up as far as Upnor Castle on pretence of getting oysters; they are not to be suffered to pass higher up the river than within gunshot of that fort, and such as shall pass higher shall be stayed till their contempt of orders has been certified. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 79.]
[Oct. ?] Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet to prepare a bill granting to Sir Martin Wescombe, Consul at Cadiz, 20s. per diem for his entertainment, and 100l. for his settlement there. [1½ page. Draft. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 155.]
Oct. 22. Privy seal for 40s. per diem to Sir Martin Wescombe, knight, British Agent and Consul at Cadiz. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 119.]
Docquet thereof, dated the 31st. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 140.]
Oct. 22. Warrant to the Commissioners of the Musters to muster and pass as lieutenant in Sir Edward Betts' troop, in the Earl of Oxford's regiment, Henry Slingsby and his two men, who has obtained leave to go to France in the regiment levied by Sir H. Jones for the French King's service, during his absence. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 29.]
Oct. 22. Warrant for arms and ammunition for the Barbados regiment [Calendared in S.P. Col., America, &c., 1669–1674, p. 268. Ibid.]
Oct. 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a licence to John Ramsden and his heirs to hold a market for cattle and merchandise every Tuesday at Huddersfield, co. York, receiving the tolls and profits thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 43.]
Oct. 22.
Portsmouth.
John Moore to the Navy Commissioners. The Phœnix and Constant Warwick sailed on Friday from Spithead for the Downs. Tar is greatly wanted for the ropemakers. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 107.]
Oct. 22.
The Fountain, in the Downs.
Captain Robert Stout to the same. Stating that several of his cables were old, that the King may not be charged with new for old, and that he had provisions only for four months and three weeks. [Ibid. No. 108.]
Oct. 22.
The Mary Rose, off Cadiz.
Captain William Davis to the same. We sailed 18 September from the Bay of Bulls, with 37 ships in our convoy, and we are now off Cadiz. Having placed the ships bound for this place in security, I shall pursue our voyage. [Ibid. No. 109.]
Oct. 23. Thomas Hall, Registrar. Notice to all persons having claims under the late Act of Parliament for settling and preserving the navigation of the river Wey to bring them in before All Saints' Day next. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 156.]
Oct. 23.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. Very bad and tempestuous weather of late. [Ibid. No. 157.]
Oct. 23.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Sending list of ships arrived, with some other shipping news. [Ibid. No. 158.]
Oct. 23. Certificate by Sir John Frederick, J.P., that Jacob Wartlae, an alien, had taken the oath of allegiance before him. [Ibid. No. 159.]
Oct. 23.
The Tower.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. My escaped prisoner returned last night infinitely ashamed of his foolish actions. Pray satisfy Lord Arlington. [Ibid. No. 160.]
Oct. 23. Order to Commissioner Cox, if the Dutch oyster boats pass up the river, to seize and make stay of them till he has certified their insolence. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 79.]
Oct. 23. Commission to John Morgan, to be ensign to Captain Thomas Jermyn. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 29.]
Oct 23.
Chatham Dockyard.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. I received yours approving of the docking of the Rainbow, Lyon, and Henrietta, and a warrant from Commissioner Cox for that purpose, and for repairing the Rainbow, but no directions about the repairs of the Lyon and Henrietta, and therefore desire your speedy directions therein. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 110]
Oct. 23.
Portsmouth. Ropeyard.
G. Peachy to the same. Giving an account of the yarn in store, which will take five months to tar and lay into cordage when the tar is received. [Ibid. No. 111.]
Oct. 23.
Yarmouth.
Henry Edgar to Samuel Peaps (Pepys). Offering to build a frigate of the dimensions of the Yarmouth at 6l. 10s. per ton, and desiring to have the scantlings of all timbers, with the length, breadth, depth, and rake. [Ibid. No. 112.]
Oct. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter granting to James, Archbishop of St. Andrews, and his successors, the sole power of naming and presenting the four commissaries of Edinburgh. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 277.]
Oct. 23.
Dublin.
Sir N. Armorer to Williamson. Commending the bearer, Sir Arthur Forbes. I had come with him, but yet my tolls are not ready for the report, being resolved now I am on this side to finish all. You tell me not that the Lord Lieutenant was angry with you, though I know it from other hands. [2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 330, No. 217.]
Oct. 23.
Dublin.
Sir Ellis Leighton to Williamson. Cooper, the spreader of seditious libels, which you desired so strict an inquiry after, is lately taken in the county. A pursuivant is sent to seize all his books. He himself is brought to town, and is in strict custody, but has not yet been examined, but will be strictly. What we get out of him shall be the subject of another letter. Pray give the enclosed to Father Patrick [McGinn], and present my humble service to Lord Aungier and Lord Arlington. You will send me word how you will have this Cooper disposed of. Maybe you will be able to prove more against him there. I take no delight in the feverish animosities of this place, that leave but an uncomfortable station for common civility or neutrality. [3½ pages. Ibid. No. 218.]
[Oct. ?] Horatio, Lord Townshend, to the King. Petition stating that he has a grant of one-half of the 8s. duty per chaldron on coals exported, and praying a grant of the other half at such rent and for such time as shall be for his Majesty's service, the petitioner being willing to give the value to enable him the better to manage his own half. At foot,
Oct. 24. Reference thereof to the Lords of the Treasury, and
Oct. 31. Reference thereof by them to the Commissioners of the Customs. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 161.]
Oct. 24.
Southampton.
Thomas Butler to Williamson. Repeating his request for the living of North Crawley in Bedfordshire. [Ibid. No. 162.]
Oct. 24.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The States have prohibited the importation of wine, paper, and chesnuts from France, under great penalties; the Hollanders on the other side are unwilling to venture their ships into France, fearing an embargo. [Ibid. No. 163.]
Oct. 24. Privy seal for payment to Sir George Downing, Ambassador to the States General, of 1,500l. for his equipage and 10l. per diem for his entertainment during that employment, and also of such sums for extraordinaries as shall be allowed by a Secretary of State. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 116.]
[Oct. ?] Caveat in favour of T. Billaye, that nothing pass concerning a pardon for Misset. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 12.]
Oct. 24. Caveat in favour of Fr. Rogers, that nothing pass of Jones's estate. [Ibid.]
Oct. 24. Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley to deliver to John Browne, the founder, all the defective brass ordnance about the Tower and Woolwich for recasting. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 30.]
Oct. 24. Edward Boatwell and Thomas Denton, the relations, attorneys, and masters of thirteen caulkers named in the margin, now in service at Port Mahon, to the Navy Commissioners. Requesting payment of their arrears, not having received a penny for eleven months, though it had been promised their wages should be paid at the end of every six months. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 113.] Annexed,
Oct. 21. Edward Boatwell to the same. Requesting their orders for the payment of the wages of his brother John, master caulker, and his son Daniel, and two others, and that the same might be granted to the relations of the rest of the caulkers. [Ibid. No. 113i.]
May 28. John Boutwell to Lord Brounker. Stating that some of their company had been very sick, and requesting payment to their friends of their wages at the end of the six months. [Ibid. No. 113ii.]
Oct. 24. The company of the Centurion to the Navy Commissioners. Petition, requesting that payment of their wages might be ordered, their ship having returned in August from a voyage of nearly three years to the Straits. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Oct. 24.
Bristol.
Francis Baylie to the same. I shall have the galliot, which is arrived here, laden and despatched with all possible speed. Her master goes to Newnham to-morrow to hasten the business. [Ibid. No. 115.]
Oct. 24.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. On the petition of the Mayor and Corporation of Dublin, proposing the erection of an hospital and school; directing letters patents to be passed granting the parcel of land at Oxmantown Green, on which the intended hospital and free school is already begun to be built, to the said mayor and corporation as a mansion house for the sustentation and relief of poor children, aged, maimed, and impotent people, inhabiting the said city, with power to the said mayor and corporation to place therein such master of the hospital and such poor people and children and such officers of the said hospital and free school, and likewise a learned and orthodox minister to be approved of by the Archbishop of Dublin, to read divine service and preach, teach, and catechise, as shall to them seem convenient, with power to remove the same from time to time, to be named " The Hospital and Free School of King Charles II., Dublin," the said mayor and corporation and their successors to be governors thereof as a body corporate, with perpetual succession and a common seal, with power to sue and be sued as such, and to hold lands not exceeding in value 6,000l. per annum, the statutes of mortmain notwithstanding, and that in the said letters are to be inserted all the clauses and privileges contained in the charter of Edward VI. to the mayor and commonalty of London for the erection of the hospitals commonly known as Christ's Hospital, St. Thomas's, and Bridewell, which shall be apt to be inserted therein. [Nearly 5 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 158.]
Oct. 24.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. Directing a pardon to Henry Jackson and John Gallagher, who had been condemned for piracy at Cork last December, and who had since made some discoveries to the Earl of Orrery, Lord President of Munster. [Ibid. p. 163.]
Oct. 25. Affidavit by William and Sampson Gough of Corbett's Wood, in the county of Salop, that Robert Greene, gentleman, of Bansum, parish of Pinkum (Pencomb), in the county of Hereford, in a discourse concerning the rebellious wars, said "that there was none but rogues that were of the King's party," and that the informants delivered a petition to Prince Rupert to that effect on 8 Sept. 1670, who ordered them to make oath of the same before a justice of the peace, and to send the affidavit to him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 164.]
Oct. 25.
Windsor.
Dr. G. Hascard to Williamson. Your Greek author in a corner will be highly pleased if Bristol be proposed to his acceptance; he is sufficiently qualified to be a Greek father, and a spiritual madam is a very pretty thing. He has a good living in Lancashire. Yesterday the Dean of Gloucester and myself dined with Mr. Bold. He is very well, and imputes it to the elixir proprietatis. I wish it succeed at the long run well with him, for putting some into his pocket by mistake, it corroded and shrank it so much he was forced to send for a botcher. Lady Rachel goes to London next Tuesday with the Dean of Gloucester, but I must stay till the week after, having to attend the Audit. [Ibid. No. 165.]
Oct. 25.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. The Falcon frigate from the Straits has arrived. She sailed from Malaga convoying about 24 sail, five from Scanderoon and Smyrna. She lost them off the Northern Cape on the 22nd in very foul weather. Near the Lizard a Newfoundland ship of Plymouth is cast away. All her crew, about 70, were drowned except eight, some of whom are so wounded that they will hardly live. Near the same place the Speedwell from Scanderoon was embayed on Sunday night, and rode it out all that night and Monday. About thirty men endeavouring in her longboat to put out another anchor, were cast away except one. The ship was driven ashore on Monday night, and more of her men drowned. [Ibid. No. 166.]
Oct. 25.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. (A duplicate of the last.) [Ibid. No. 167.]
[Oct. 25 ?] Narrative of the Swallow's fight. The Swallow, Capt. John Baddisson commander, an English-built ship of 180 tons, 26 men, came out of Oporto about 2 October, in company with a small vessel for Plymouth and a flyboat for Bristol. Two days afterwards, off the Isles of Bayon, they were chased by an Algier man-of-war of 38 guns, esteemed to be manned with about 220 men. The flyboat sailing heavily, Capt. Baddisson, fearing they might take him, first towed him about two leagues, but, the Turk approaching, cast him off, and prepared to receive him, and thus gave the two small vessels an opportunity to escape. The Turk, after having given him a broadside and a volley of small shot, came to rights on board him and grappled him, putting several men on board him, but were bravely repulsed, and forced to cut his grapples, leaving six men still on board, and his great shot so well placed in the enemy's hull that he forced him to lie quiet for half an hour. Soon after, he boards him the second time, but was presently forced to fall off again without being able to recover the men he had left on board (who had got upon the shrouds and had cut most of the rigging and sails, two of which they killed, the others they gave quarter to and brought home with them), when, the night coming on and a fresh gale, they lost him, and with great difficulty, the hull being much torn with great shot, and having only a mainsail and spritsail left, the others being burnt in the fight, they performed their voyage, and arrived the 25th instant in the Downs. The captain behaved himself with great courage and prudence in ordering and managing so few hands against so considerable an enemy. He was shot through the cheek, his boatswain and two others were killed outright, the carpenter dangerously wounded, and about fourteen more, who are since the fight pretty well recruited. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 168.]
Oct. 25.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The commander of the Mary, from Guinea, reports that the natives rose and possessed themselves of a ship and a sloop, but the English recovered them. A ship from the Barbary coast says the fort near Sallee that was building where they intended a harbour is left off as a matter of more expense than profit, and that a French squadron anchored near Sallee and bombarded it for four hours, but that the Turks or Moors did not sling above 40 shot at them. [Ibid. No. 169.]
Oct. 25.
Weymouth.
[Nathaniel Osborne] to James Hickes. Shipping news. [Ibid. No. 170.]
Oct. 25. Warrant for allowance to Sir Thos. Osborne, Bart., appointed on the 3rd instant Treasurer of the Navy, of 800l. a year for payment of his cashier and other inferior officers, in addition to the 2,000l. allowed him as salary, in lieu of the 3d. in the pound heretofore taken by the Treasurers, both amounts to be deducted by him from moneys received, and allowed on his accounts. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 114.]
Oct. 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Thos. Stringer, in fee simple, nominee of Lord Ashley, of the reversion remaining in the Crown of Cranborne Chace, cos. Dorset, Wilts, and Hants, granted by King James to William, late Earl of Salisbury, and the heirs of his body. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 45.]
Oct. 25. Reference to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury of Arundel Bull's petition desiring Thomas Stafford's estate. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 7.]
Oct. 25. Warrant to pay to the Cofferer of the Household 1,100l. for the arrears of board wages of Samuel Cooper, his Majesty's limner, for five and a half years, and also 200l. a year from last Michaelmas. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 136.]
Oct. 25. Grant to Alexander Culpeper of the place of Surveyor-General of Virginia. [Calendared in S.P. Col., America, &c., 1669–74, p. 268. Ibid. No. 137.]
Oct. 25. Grant to William Thornebury and Timothy his son of the office of collector of the customs and subsidies on wool and all sorts of leather, &c., in the port of London, for their lives, on the surrender of the said office by the said William. [Ibid.]
Oct. 25.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. Last Monday the Victory was launched, the next day the Rainbow docked and the Dunkirk and Antelope launched, and to-day the Lyon and Henrietta were docked. Without speedy supply of the provisions lately demanded by the master shipwright and storekeeper, most of the works will be at a stand, there not being sufficient to employ the men. For want of bricks the Dunkirk and Antelope are both launched without hearths or furnaces. I direct my warrants to the clerk of the cheque and storekeeper to issue the provisions from time to time demanded by the master shipwright, according to his late estimate, as the works come in hand, as there is no account given of particulars on the estimate. If you disapprove of this way of proceeding, let me know your further pleasure. Shall the Henrietta have a full repair, or only be fitted for a voyage? There is no tar in store at the ropehouse. Tallow, thrums, lead, and lead scuppers are also greatly wanted. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 116.]
Oct. 25.
The Constant Warwick, Woolwich.
Captain John Waterworth to the same. I sailed last Friday from Portsmouth, and arrived here last night. The boatswain of the yard ordered me alongside the St. David, which was done, but, a gust of wind coming, the chain broke, and, fearing we should be both ashore, he ordered me to get two hawsers and warp alongside the hulk; but in warping, the tide being very strong, my ship fell thwart the St. David's hawse, and her bowsprit carried away my mizen mast by the board, but without other damage. I desire your orders whether to unrig here or elsewhere. [Ibid. No. 117.]
Oct. 25. Jonas Shish and others to the same. Reporting on the weight of six barrels of tar of Mr. Hill and Mr. Cutler, and on the quality of the latter. [1¼ page. Ibid. No. 118.]
Oct. 25. Roger Howen to the same. Desiring to be recommended for Robert Maddocks' place, now void. [Ibid. No. 119.]
Oct. 25.
The Downs.
Captain Richard Le Neve, of the Phœnix, to Samuel Pepys. Requesting him to get the tickets of the seamen that came to him from the Reserve cast up and signed and sent down again. [Ibid. No. 120.]
Oct. 25.
Whitehall.
Order in Council, on the petition of Sir Hans Hamilton, Henry Loftus, James Wahope, Mary Trayle, and John Trayle, for a King's letter to be prepared to the Lord Lieutenant, authorising the passing of letters patent to them, according to the copies in the Auditors' Office of the certificates of the Court of Claims, the original certificates having been lost. [2½ pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 330, No. 219.]
Oct. 25.
Lisburn.
Sir G. Rawdon to Viscount Conway. Concerning his wife's dangerous illness, and beseeching him to impart the enclosed to Dr. Stubbs for his opinion. [Conway Papers. Ibid. No. 220.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
News-letter to Mr. Saunders, Scarborough. They write from the Hague that the prohibition of French wines was gone so far that it would be probably finished in eight days, especially since Gueldres and Zealand now seemed inclinable to it, so that the merchants apprehended there would soon be a general arrest of all the Dutch ships in France. Monsieur Verjus was very busy in his master's behalf, to reconcile the citizens of Cologne to the Elector, and would have them discharge the States' forces, and leave off all correspondency with them, which they seem very unwilling to do, not knowing where to find any others so much concerned for their interest. The 22nd the English, Irish, and Scotch forces in France were reviewed by the King at St. Germain's, 1,500 men with their officers. The French Ambassador at Venice is preparing to return, much dissatisfied at their not allowing forces to be raised for his master in their territories. At Brussels news has come from Vienna that the Emperor had declared to Monsr. Gremonville that he should not grant him an audience till he had performed the promises made to Count Windischgratz, his Ambassador, for the restitution of Lorraine. His Majesty returned to Whitehall on the 20th. The African pink arrived at Leghorn on the 9th, in nine days from Tunis, whence two barks went out in corso. The Algerine laid up there had been out and taken a Trapanese from Palermo to Spain with 92 men, among them two knights of Spain with their wives. The Tunisians are not yet inclined to make peace with the French. Four of our frigates were said to be before Algiers, and as boats with flags of truce passed daily between them and the town, it was conceived they might quickly conclude a peace. Last spring tides the Victory, Dunkirk, and Antelope were launched from the docks at Chatham, repaired so as to be as good as new, and the Rainbow, Lion, and Henrietta are taken in in their place. Three guardships are fixing in those parts, though the ships there seem sufficiently secured by the many forts now erected. The missing ship from Hudson's Bay was on the 20th safe at Plymouth, where the Rupert went with such merchantmen as were ready, intending to meet Sir John Chicheley in the Offals. The Constant Warwick, Phœnix, and Emsworth sailed from Portsmouth for the Downs. Letters from Cologne say that the Bishop of Münster was sent to the Elector of Cologne from the Emperor, to tell him of the number of French forces lately received into those parts, and to warn him not on any pretence whatever to entertain any more of them, and that the bishop had conferred with the Bishop of Strasburg and the deputies of Mentz, Trier, and the Elector of Saxony concerning that affair. The Elector of Bavaria, of whom the Emperor was jealous, now declares that he will give no assistance to the Elector of Cologne, being diverted by the insinuation of a marriage between the King of Spain and his daughter, in effecting which he knows the Emperor must be chiefly made use of. Dutch letters say they daily expect the final order for prohibiting French wines, Utrecht and Zealand having already agreed to it. By the exactest inquiry 'tis found that only 500 false guineas were coined of copper gilt, of which 300 were taken with the Dutchman at Mr. Dives' house, and 28, which Mr. Dives carried with him, each worth 13d. On the 25th Sir Robert Southwell received his instructions as Envoy Extraordinary to Flanders, and will go in a few days. The Earl of Sunderland may stay till the Spanish Ambassador comes here. They write from Lynn that the waters that overflowed the banks are much abated by the sluices, but that the ground is thought to be spoiled for some years. A French merchantman says that the French fleet in the Straits was returned to Brest. The Bishop of Cologne has so posted his men that the town apprehends being suddenly besieged; 2,000 horse are said to be coming to him out of Lorraine. All the ministers of the French party in Cologne give out that unless Colonel Bampfield's regiment be removed from the city, it will become the seat of war, but the States and their friends heed it little. Monsr. Charvilly goes on the French King's behalf towards Cologne to command the Elector's forces and assure him of his Majesty's further assistance. The French King is still intent on his levies, and resolves to have an army of 110,000, divided into three bodies, one of 30,000, and the others each of 40,000, which, though a vast number, will be much outdone by the others, if it be true that the Count de Montery will have 60,000, the Dutch 80,000, and the Emperor, with the German princes, as many. He is also raising 50 millions for the discharge of the war. Besides the commissions given for land officers, he has nominated 60 for sea service. Tis proclaimed by sound of trumpet at Bordeaux that the Spanish Netherlands, Swedes, and Danes shall be excused the 50 sols per tun, but not the Dutch. [3½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 171.]
Oct. 26. Sir John Nicholas to Williamson. Asking him to remind Lord Arlington of the state of his case, and mentioning arguments to persuade the doctor to desist. [Ibid. No. 172.]
Oct. 26. Notice from the Clothworkers to meet at Great Allhallows Church in Thames Street at 8 a.m. next Monday, and with the rest of the Company to attend the Lord Mayor in the barge to Westminster, and invitation to dine with them in hall. [Printed paper. Ibid. No. 173.]
Oct. 26.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. Last week, on the other side of the Swansea river, a labouring man and his wife left their three small children locked up in their cottage. When they returned it was burnt, with the children, to ashes. A ketch of Waterford, with horses and barrel-staves for Bridgwater, ran ashore within the bar of Neath, and the goods were landed, but the men forsook her, expecting her to break up every hour, but the next tide she came without help directly into the harbour, and lies safe there. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 174.]
Oct. 26.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Acknowledging with thanks the news-letter sent, and the promise that they would be sent as often as he wrote. Shipping news. On Tuesday, out of a packet-boat from Holland, arrived here Sir William Pen[n]'s eldest son, the great opinionist; he went presently and associated himself with the Quakers of this town. [Ibid. No. 175.]
Oct. 26.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Mr. Battyson, who we feared was taken by an Argeer pirate, arrived this morning in the Downs. His ship is much torn, also her rigging in pieces, and she has spent her foretopmast. He lost the Turk in the night, and resolved that if next morning they had boarded, he had blown up his deck. The very first broadside received, several of his cartridges were fired, and eight of his men wounded. The last time the Turks boarded him, six men which got the roundhouse were left on board, which immediately took the tops, cutting the rigging and doing what spoil they could. Next morning, before they could take these six Turks, they killed the boatswain, and another was wounded. In all three were killed and fifteen wounded, and the captain also himself; notwithstanding, he would not go from the deck, but much encouraged his men. Two of the six Turks were killed before they would be taken. One of Mr. Battyson's men is brought on shore here much burnt. The Turks say their ship had 40 guns and above 300 men. At noon she sailed for the Thames. [Ibid. No. 176.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of St. George's Chapel, Windsor. Bestowing upon Capt. Thos. Beck, a sufferer for the late King, and statutably qualified, the poor knight's place of Windsor, vacant by death of Col. Hastings, and requiring them to instal him into the same. Noted as the copy of a commission or patent sent by Sir Henry de Vic to be signed by his Majesty for Capt. Beck's admission. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 44.]
Oct. 26.
Portsmouth.
Captain Anthony Deane to the Navy Commissioners. Reporting favourably on Mr. Couzens' timber, complaining that owing to Mr. Eastwood's delays the timber from the New Forest will not now come till next spring, or even till May, and inquiring whether the Nonsuch is to be docked when the Yarmouth is launched, which he hopes will be the next spring, and stating that he will contract for broom. [1¼ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 121.]
Oct. 26.
Portsmouth.
The same to Thomas Heatter (Hayter). The sail needles, pitch ladles, and hatchets are a mistake, and can be had here; but the lead, which is much wanted, must come from thence. Nails of several sorts are wanted. [Ibid. No. 122.]
Oct. 26.
Deptford.
Thomas Turner and W. Fownes to the Navy Commissioners. Reporting that in the night of the 10th or 11th three firkins of thimbles or nails were stolen out of the storehouse by the three watchmen, who afterwards fled, but one has ventured to come back because some 5l. were due to him, and asking how they shall dispose of him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 123.]
Oct. 26.
Deptford.
The same to the same. Sending up samples of hollands and Suffolk cloth lately received. [Ibid. No. 124.]
Oct. 26.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett to the same. I have set men to work on the Lyon and Henrietta, which will require a full repair, as to which your directions are desired. Compass timber is required for the Lyon, and treenails for both, none being in store. If there is no delay for materials, and the workmen have encouragement, and are not so grossly abused as they frequently are by Commissioner Cox, to their great discouragement, they may be completed, in my opinion, by the latter end of March. [Ibid. No. 125.]
Oct. 26.
The Garland.
Captain Courtenay to the same. Announcing his arrival in the river, and hoping to be at Deptford next tide. [Ibid. No. 126.]
Oct. 26.
Victualling Office.
Sir Denis Gauden, Sir T. Littleton, Josiah Child, and B. Gauden to the same. Desiring a declaration of the victuals required for the ensuing year, which ought, according to contract, to have been declared the 15th instant, and one-third of the money paid within ten days. [Ibid. No. 127.]
Oct. 27.
Windsor.
Dr. Thomas Vyner to Williamson. I would most gladly comply with your invitation to the City custard, but the statutes confine me here till Tuesday. Pray be kind to Mr. Bubb, and let him be instructed how to address himself to his Majesty, lest he should ask his worship how his wife does. I am sorry I heard not of your want sooner. Dr. Fielding has a useless scarlet gown at Gloucester, but it is too late to send for it. The fur you mention may be had of a dear friend of the gentleman whose gown I commend; I mean his fox friend, the parson of St. Nicholas in Gloucester. But I doubt you would not like it, because that fox has been in the late wars, and some blood may stick to it. It was somewhat like the fox for Fielding and Price to go to the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford to get credit at Court by his letters. That beast preys far from home, and the gentlemen sure would not have gone so far afield if they thought they had deserved well of their neighbours. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 177.]
Oct. 27.
Plymouth.
[Philip Lanyon to James Hickes.] List of ships arrived. The Rupert and Fountain, that left the 17th, returned with some of their convoys. [Ibid. No. 178.]
Oct. 27. The King to the Treasury Commissioners. Directing them to cause a grant in reversion to pass to — Kirke, of a land waiter's place in London. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 80.]
Oct. 27. Order to Sir Thomas Chicheley not to admit people in future to see the stores and magazine at the Tower in the ordinary and common manner hitherto practised, as the great number of persons resorting thither at festivals may lead to ill consequences. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 30.]
Oct. 27. Similar order to Sir Gilbert Talbot concerning the Crown and other regalia. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 30.]
Draft and minute of the last two orders. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 179.]
Oct. 27. Warrant to the Earl of Carbery, Lord President of the Council of Wales and the Marches, to admit Sir Sackville Crow, Bart., to the execution of his office as secretary to the said Council, and to deliver to him the seal of the said office. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 47.]
Oct. 27. Reference to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury of the petition of the Mayor and Aldermen of St. Albans, desiring a grant of the lodgings, ruins, and grounds formerly used for the stables, to build a church for the minister, &c. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 7.]
Oct. 27. Reference to the same of Edmund Royden's petition, desiring the place of keeper of the stables at St. Albans, with the ground granted therewith. [Ibid.]
Oct. 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter translating Robert, Bishop of Dunblane, to the Archbishopric of Glasgow, vacant by the demission of Alexander, the late Archbishop, there being no Dean and Chapter there to whom a congé d'élire might be directed. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 1, p. 279.]
Oct. 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a letter to the Archbishop of St. Andrews to translate Robert, late Bishop of Dunblane, and instal him Archbishop of Glasgow. [Ibid. p. 286.]
Oct. 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a patent creating John Scott of Ancrum a baronet of Scotland. [Ibid. p. 287.]
Oct. 27.
Whitehall.
Memorial of a protection in the ordinary form to David Ross of Balnagown for three years. [Ibid.]
Oct. 27.
The Francis, The Downs.
Captain Thomas Willshaw to the Navy Commissioners. As he has been ordered to the Straits, desiring a supply of victuals, as 52 days' of his sea provisions have already been expended, and those ordered him at the Buoy of the Nore were never received. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 128.]
Oct. 27.
The Rupert, Plymouth.
Captain John Hart to the same. By Sir John Chicheley's orders I weighed from the Downs the 13th, and receiving further orders from him to take the ships here under my convoy and proceed on my voyage, I sailed the 17th with the Fountain and 21 merchantmen. But we had not got 70 leagues ere the wind took us short with such tempestuous weather that our fleet was separated, some bearing up within 24 hours, the rest beating to windward with me, in hopes of the weather abating. But at last some of the bigger bearing away, we thought it convenient to bear up with them, both for their present preservation and future safety. The Cadiz merchant received much damage, which, knowing she was a ship of very considerable value, was our first inducement for bearing up for England. Though we could have well endured the sea, yet we shipped much water by the extremity of the weather, and our ship wrought so much that our hearth and furnaces are dropping down, which I am forced to mend on my own credit, and crave that the bill may be satisfied. This morning I sent to the victualler's agent to be supplied with a month's provisions for 400 men for the Rupert, and for 46 for the Fountain, which were ordered for us at the Buoy of the Nore, could we have stayed for them. The stores, however, are very bare, and the agent says for want of money he is put to very great straits, yet on my pressing he assured me of a supply in three days. I therefore beg that order be given forthwith to the victualler to supply him with moneys to answer the same. I doubt not but we shall be ready to sail with the first fair wind. We got in late last night, leaving in the Channel the ships in our company, and to-day being thick, with little wind, only four or five are yet in. The Fountain is very leaky, chiefly from bad caulking. I have written to Falmouth to order any ships put in there to repair hither, and also any others that are bound southward. [1¼ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 129.]
Oct. 27.
Plymouth.
Captain Robert Stout to the same. The 14th we sailed from the Downs with Sir John Chicheley and five merchantmen in convoy. Off Dover he ordered me to Plymouth to call out the Rupert and the merchantmen there to meet him off the Sound. On Sunday night we lay by off the Start, it blowing hard and dirty weather, and got into Plymouth Monday morning, where we found the Rupert and 21 merchantmen. We sprang a leak lying by, and it was nigh night before we could staunch it. Sir John not appearing, we sailed the next morning with the Rupert. [Then follows an account of the voyage, to the same effect as the last.] Our pumps being bad, would not work. I have ordered a pumpmaker to see what can be done with them. [Ibid. No. 130.]
Oct. 27.
The Constant Warwick.
Captain John Waterworth to Thomas Hayter or William Hewer. Asking that twenty blank tickets be delivered to the bearer. [Ibid. No. 131.]
Oct. 28.
Whitehall.
News-letter to William Scawen. [The first part is identical with the last news-letter.] It is intended by the Lord Mayor, &c., that Monday next, the day for the Lord Mayor to be sworn and to enter on his office, should be kept with all the gallantry possible. They sent some of their officers on Tuesday to invite several gentlemen at Court, on Wednesday the Sheriffs attended the Council with an invitation, and on Thursday they waited on his Majesty and Royal Highness and obtained the promise of their presence, and they have likewise given particular invitations to all the Ambassadors and Public Ministers residing here. The Earl of Sunderland has received particular orders from the King to make all the haste he can to go to Spain, and for greater despatch he is not to go by sea, but post by land. The Earl of Winchester, 'tis thought, will be appointed again Ambassador to Constantinople. The Swallow is returned safe. The Dutch convoy went into Leghorn on the 11th, two men-of-war without any merchantmen from Smyrna, where their Consul and merchants were at great difference, so that they clapped up most of them in prison, and would have them sent home in the ships, but the captain would not receive them except with their consent. Monsr. Gremonville has very much pressed for the Emperor's answer to what he had delivered on his master's behalf, viz., what he would do in case his master attacked one of the Triple Alliance, but could get nothing more than that he would then take his own measures, and that he was not to expect any further satisfaction till his master had performed his promises for the restitution of Lorraine. The French King has granted one year more for adjusting the limits between France and Spain. [3¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 180.]
Oct. 28.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Last high winds blew several Dutch into the Downs, among them two of their men-of-war, whose confidence was so great as to come in with their pendants flying, which Captain Willshire, commander of the Francis, perceiving, sent to them to take them down, and that if they refused he would come and fire them. After some small time they took them down, and so continued whilst in the Downs. I had this report of the Dutch sauciness from Captain Willshire to-day. [Original and copy. Ibid. Nos. 181, 182.]
Oct. 28.
Dover.
John Carlile to Williamson. It is my duty to acquaint you with to-day's transactions and the rude carriages of 200 or 300 men, headed by the Mayor, who caused the horn to be blown, charging all freemen to appear at the Guildhall at two p.m., who did so in a tumultuous or rather rebellious manner, to alter the constitution of this corporation contrary to the laws and charters. The Mayor, who is no great politician, is guided by a party, some Quakers, many Anabaptists, and most of them Nonconformists and excommunicated persons. It looked like the face of rebellion as it began in '42. One of the ringleaders was one that surprised Dover Castle in that year, and several of them have been in actual arms against the King. If the Governor had not been here, very probably there would have been bloodshed, but he with his company kept them from doing any harm, though he was sufficiently abused by them. None of the magistrates joined the Mayor, but told him it would be taken as an act of rebellion. [Ibid. No. 183.]
Oct. 28.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to James Hickes. Undertaking to transmit news in place of Mr. Pocock. The Dutch ship in Portland Roads is now said to be for the East Indies, not the Straits. She has only 26 guns mounted, though some are said to be in the hold. It is said the soldiers are to serve seven and the seamen five years in the East Indies. Some who have been on board say there are not more than 150 soldiers, and those pitiful shabby fellows. The captain says four or five more from Holland are to join him where he is going, to do the French a displeasure on the first notice of war; but not all he says is to be credited. Three of the soldiers sent to Portland for water got to Week and deserted, and it is said all the others would do the same, had they opportunity. With note from Hickes to Williamson, asking him if he accepts Osborne's offer to have the written news sent him every Saturday. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 184.]
[Before Oct. 28.] Sir Richard Ford, Lord Mayor, to the King. Petition praying for such a largesse as may enable him to end the life spent in his service without contempt in the city, having spared no pains in behalf of the Crown, and lost 6,000l. by the tin farm in his endeavours to serve his Majesty, and having been disappointed in the late farm of the Customs, which is disposed of to others, though he greatly improved it. He was assisted by his Majesty in the expense of serving as sheriff, and encouraged in his present mayoralty, wherein he has not saved honourable expense, and has kept the government tranquil. [Ibid. No. 185.]
Oct. 28.
Portsmouth.
Walter Slingesby to Commissioner Tippetts. Stating that a Duch East Indiaman having been driven into Portland by a storm, and having sustained much damage in her masts and yards, had been supplied by Mr. Newland with everything but a foreyard, and that having advised with the chief officers of the yard, he had let Mr. Newland have one, taking his bond for 100l. for bringing into store before 1 February next a sound yard of the same dimensions, and asking pardon if he has done wrong. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 132.]
Oct. 28.
Gravesend.
Phineas Pett to Col. Thomas Middleton. Touching some allowance expected by the bearer, Edward Webb, for his care of one of the King's anchors. Noted, that no reward was thought due to him, he having kept it four years without offering it to the King till it was discovered by Pett. [Ibid. No. 133.]
Oct. 28.
Whitehall.
The King to John Bysse, Chief Baron, and the rest of the Barons of the Exchequer in Ireland. Wentworth, Earl of Roscommon, having, by his petition, stated that the part of his estate that is in Westmeath, was, by mistake in the late survey, returned the property of James, Earl of Roscommon, an Irish Papist, and as such was charged with payment of the year's value, and that process is now issued out for levying the same, notwithstanding that the said Wentworth is a Protestant, as were his father and grandfather, requiring them to examine these allegations, and, if true, to give the requisite order for discharging the said lands. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 205.]
Oct. 29.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. The Rupert, with most of her convoy, returned with contrary winds and foul weather. News of two shipwrecks mentioned in Holden's letter of the 25th. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 186.]
Oct. 29.
Barnstaple.
William Wakeman to James Hickes. Shipping news. [Ibid. No. 187.]
Oct. 29.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. No news. [Ibid. No. 188.]
Oct. 29.
Dover Castle.
Colonel John Strode to Williamson. Concerning the disturbance by the Mayor and freemen, and referring him for details to his letter to Mr. Wren. [Ibid. No. 189.]
Oct. 29.
Portsmouth.
Captain Thomas Eliot to the Navy Commissioners. Asking whether eight or ten of his crew, who are sick on shore, shall be discharged or not, and, in the former case, that tickets for them may be sent. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 134.]
Oct. 30.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. The Speedwell was cast away at Pengersicke, near the Lizard. The rude country people plundered her of all that was between decks to a very great value, but this being noised abroad, Sir William Godolphin, Hugh Boscawen, and John St. Aubyn came to the wreck, and by their care preserved all or most of the goods in the hold from the violence of the country people, and have taken care for the goods ever since to be landed with all speed, and the greatest part is now landed. Account of the wreck of the Prosperous, a Newfoundlander, in Mount's Bay. Two of the men who got ashore have since died of their injuries. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 190.]
Oct. 30.
Portsmouth.
John Pocock to James Hickes. A Dutch fleet of about thirty, convoyed by six men-of-war, sailed this morning from Cowes Road for the Straits. Mr. Osborne will give you constant returns from Weymouth. I hope to have Mr. Williamson's letter. With a note from Hickes to Williamson, asking that the written news be sent to Pocock. [Ibid. No. 191.]
Oct. 30. Sir Robert Carr to Williamson. I did not send you any birds, as my wife assured me you never eat any, and my niece, your particular friend, vouched it. She has reckoned how many days you forbore to answer hers, and reckons she has till Saturday next to answer yours. As to the Boston business, the Treasury granted it me, and it was entered in their books, and the Farmers covenant for what should be done further they would not oppose or demand any defalcation, for it does not prejudice the King a shilling. I was forced the other day to go and assist the Chimney men, who are also Excise men, and am sure I take many a troublesome journey to save them trouble and charge. I wish I could come to London, but my affairs will not allow it. [Ibid. No. 192.]
Oct. 30.
Thetford.
Mary Drury to Williamson. Replying to his letter acknowledging the entertainments received from her father, and on her part thanking him for the honours and civilities received from him at Newmarket. [Ibid. No. 193.]
[Oct. ?] Jeremiah Nelson, rector of Ellesdon, in Northumberland, to the King. Petition, praying on account of his age and infirmities a dispensation for non-residence, in order to take means for the recovery of his health. At the side,
Oct. 30. Reference thereof to the Bishop of Durham. On the back,
Certificate by him in favour of granting the dispensation. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 194.]
[Oct. ?] Butler Buggin, a clerk and attorney in the office of the Remembrancer of the Exchequer, to the King. Petition stating the practice in that office with regard to the delivery up to the obligors of bonds given to secure the landing of goods shipped in England or Wales at some English or Welsh port, and that by the fraud of Rawlins and Reynes, under-clerks in the said office, he had been induced to allow a certain bond of the kind, of which the condition had not been fulfilled, to be delivered out of the office, and praying a pardon for the offence he had committed through inadvertency. At the side,
Oct. 31. Reference of the petition to the Commissioners of the Treasury.
Their report, dated 28 Nov., that they have spoken with the King, who is pleased that the petitioner should have his pardon. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 195.]
Oct. 30. Affidavit by the said Butler Buggin, verifying certain of the statements in his petition. [On parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case C.]
Oct. 31. Another copy of the said reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 8.]
Oct. 30.
Chatham.
Commissioner John Cox to the Navy Commissioners. I have employed Mr. Eason to inquire what timber, tallow, bricks, lime, &c., may be had in these parts. Lead, lead scuppers, solder, copper plates and nails, tin plates, and some other things may be had here when there is money to pay for them. The notice of your coming to pay a quarter's pay was very seasonable, for the workmen of the yard last Friday were very impatient for their quarter's wages, and urge the promise you made them. I acquainted them to-day, you would be here suddenly, which has somewhat satisfied them. I shall observe your directions about the full repair to the Henrietta and the other ships to be docked. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 135.]
Oct. 30.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett to the same. We have proceeded to strip the Lyon and Henrietta of their outboard planks, keeping them as whole as we can for the planking of the ropehouse and other uses. We are obliged to take down all their standing cabins, with the ceilings of their great cabins, coaches, and roundhouse, which I have strictly charged should be done with all care, that they may serve again, as being seasoned stuff, they would be much better than new, and therefore while the ships were stripping, and those joinery works secured, I stopped the workmen carrying out of the yard anything that came off those ships, only allowing them lawful hewed chips that fell from the axe. This morning, finding his Majesty very much abused by a rude multitude of women and others coming into the yard (being chip day), several of whom I took carrying away good planks split into chips, and others of whom the porter took throwing their burdens over the quay at low water, I stopped their proceedings, and acquainted the Commissioner with the great prejudice caused thereby to his Majesty, and the great temptation it would be to the workmen to split what might otherwise be taken off whole, into chips, on purpose for them to carry away, many being their wives, austisses (hostesses ?), and acquaintance, and that, since I knew the yard, it was never customary for those chip gatherers to carry anything out of the yard but lawful chips, and that if these people were countenanced in it they would in a short time carry those two ships out of the yard in their laps. I am confirmed in my belief, unless your Honours put a speedy stop to it, the Commissioner having given them toleration, since which they are grown to such a height that many of them go on board (and some on shore) and split and break the joinery work, which might serve again, in pieces, as it is pulled off by the workmen, in a most shameful manner, and carry it away, saying that they have power for what they do from the Commissioner. Being an eye-witness to these great abuses, and knowing the great charge caused by those people being tolerated, I could do no less than lay it before your Honours. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 136.]
Oct. 30.
Wapping.
Captain William Colman to Thomas Hayter. Asking him to deliver twenty blank tickets to the bearer, his purser. [Ibid. No. 137.]
Oct. 30. Commissioner Cox to the master shipwright at Chatham. Warrant for an account of the men's names who worked extra time in shutting the gates and preparing the docks when the Rainbow, Henrietta, and Lyon were docked, and of the time they worked, and of what they may deserve for their extra time. [Ibid. No. 138.]
Oct. 31. William Harris, junior, to his father or mother at Lanert Hill. Stating that he will be at Gloucester next Wednesday, and asking that two horses and 50s. to pay the coachman be sent there, otherwise he must stay there till payment be made, as he has had much expense for maintenance in his sickness, and paying solicitors' and counsels' fees. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 196.]
Oct. 31.
Canterbury.
— Vernon to Williamson. Sir Robert [Southwell] arrived here safe, with Mr. Deering, Mr. Coxe, and Mr. Knatchbull. A mile and a half out of Sittingbourne the staybreast iron broke, and after it the standers and one of the wings of the coach. They overturned, but not of the side Sir Robert was on, and without any hurt to the rest. An empty coach with six horses for Dover happened to be before us, which Sir Robert's man overtook and brought back, and everything was shifted into it. [Ibid. No. 197.]
Oct. 31.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. The Rupert and Fountain frigates sailed this morning for the Straits. [Ibid. No. 198.]
Oct. 31.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. These parts afford nothing of news. [Ibid. No. 199.]
Oct. 31.
Whitehall.
The King to the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge. Directing them to elect forthwith Matthew Babington, B.A., Westminster Scholar of the college, as Fellow of the college, to come into the next vacant fellowship after such as are already elected are provided for, in consideration of the eminent loyalty of his father Matthew, late of Leicestershire, both to the hazard of his life and the impairing of his estate, inasmuch as by reason of the supernumerary Fellows chosen at the last election, there could not be an election of Fellows in his time. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 169.]
Oct. 31.
Whitehall.
The King to the Master and Fellows of Christ's College, Cambridge. Renewing in favour of Thomas Burnett, M.A., Fellow of the college, a licence to travel abroad for three years for his health, and dispensing in his favour with any statute or custom of the college to the contrary, his health not having recovered during his former absence for two years, granted 26 January 1664–5. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 169.]
Oct. 31.
Whitehall.
Confirmation of a lease made by John Bedle, rector of St. Bennet's Sherhog, London, with approval of Humphrey, Bishop of London, of the glebe on which the rector's house formerly stood, all parsons and vicars being empowered, by the additional Act for rebuilding the city, to let leases for 40 years, with the approbation of the patron and ordinary. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 48.]
Oct. 31.
Whitehall.
The King to George, Duke of Buckingham, Master of the Horse. And. Snape, serjeant farrier, receives a penny a day for each horse and nag, and was able to carry on the service, notwithstanding the dearness of iron and coal, because of the nags; but they being taken away since the retrenchment of the stables, he cannot serve without increase of allowance to 1¼d. each horse per day, which is granted him from 1 April 1669, for better enabling him to the service of shoeing. [Ibid. p. 49.]
Oct. 31. Grant of denization to Jacob Wartlae. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 140.]
Oct. 31. Captain John Tinker and Jonas Shish to the Navy Commissioners. Report on the condition of the mast of the Henrietta yacht. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 139.]
Oct. 31.
Portsmouth sloop, Portsmouth.
Captain Edward Pearce to the same. Asking some tickets in order to discharge three of his men, who are unfit for duty from illness. [Ibid. No. 140.]
Oct. 31.
Harwich.
Captain Silas Taylor to the same. I shall not take down any of the spauls but such as are rotten and likely to fall. The pitchhouse must be taken down. [Ibid. No. 141.]
Oct. 31.
The Rupert, Plymouth Sound.
Captain John Hart to the same. We shall have all our month's provision this morning, and the wind being fair, we are ready to sail with the ships under our convoy, about sixteen sail, some of great value. [Ibid. No. 142.]
Oct. 31.
Plymouth.
John Lanyon to the same. Stating that he had supplied the Fountain for caulking to the value of 3l. 6s. 8d., of which he prays payment. [Ibid. No. 143.]
Oct. 31.
Dublin.
Sir Ellis Leighton to Williamson. My lord having proposed the matter to the Council, all incline to defer Cooper's examination till we hear from you. They propose to send him prisoner to London, but desire to hear from you first. It is suspected that, if he be shrewdly put to it, and find that sufficient can be proved to make him guilty, he is able to discover some of a better condition and more dangerous to the Government. His books and papers are all sealed up, but we imagine there may be little there, but such ordinary books and ballads as he trades in. [2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 330, No. 221.]
Oct. The Earl of Thomond to the Duke of Richmond. Being denied the loan of your coach, I will forbear in future troubling you with unreasonable requests, but am glad to have hinted you an opportunity of spending your Sabbath on the Duke of York. Lord Townshend expected you to have gone with him in his coach. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 293, No. 200.]
Oct.
The Mary yacht, Dublin.
Captain Francis Sharland to the same. Coming from Holyhead to Dublin the 1st of this instant October, in very tempestuous weather, at the chops of Dublin Bay, by an unexpected violent gale off shore, we had to let fall our best bower anchor, or else had been blown out to sea. Soon afterwards our cable broke like wood, so the anchor is in danger of being lost unless it can be recovered by sweeping. I have a half-worn cable that may serve awhile, and the Lord Lieutenant and Council have ordered me 20l. to buy an anchor and some other necessaries. I desire that a cable with some cordage and colours be sent by the next ship from London. I beseech you to speak to Sir Denis Gauden to pay the 204l. 3s. 4d. now due three years for provisions, and most of it owing here; my creditors are petitioning to have the benefit of the law. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 300, No. 144.]
Oct. Account of how the sixth-rates are to be employed next year. [Ibid. No. 145.]
Lists sent by Morgan Lodge to Williamson, of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 293. No. Date. King's. Outward. Inward. Wind. Remarks.
201 Oct. 6 4 8 0 N.E. The rest of the fleet sailed this morning, and now the East India ships have sailed.
202 " 7 4 6 0 E.
203 " 8 4 7 0 W.
204 " 13 4 0 2 N.
205 " 14 1 4 0 N. These sailed through and did not anchor. The Dreadnought and Fountain sailed this morning.
206 " 19 1 0 1 S.
207 " 20 1 S. About thirteen foreign ships are forced in by a contrary wind.
208 " 22 4 0 3 W.N.W.
209 " 27 2 3 6 S.
210 " 28 2 4 3 S.
211 " 30 2 3 0 N.W. The packets are delivered to the master of the Susan and Mary for Cadiz.
212 " 31 2 3 1 N.E.