BHO

Charles II: January 1675

Pages 513-565

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1673-5. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1904.

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January 1675

Jan. 1. Report by Sir Francis North on the petition of Eustace Burneby, calendared ante, p. 488, in favour of the petitioner. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 1.]
[Jan. 1.] William, Lord Crofts, to Williamson. Requesting him to cause that piece of Hoccum (Hock) wine to be prised, such as he sent him the other day, and that he may have two ames of it, for his physician will allow him to drink no other, and that in the meantime he will bestow on him two bottles of the same wine. [Undated, but endorsed "1 Jan., 1674–5." Ibid. No. 2.]
Jan. 1
Durham.
Dr. Thomas Cartwright to Williamson. You have been so great a benefactor to Queen's College that it were more than a venial sin to question your kindness to any of its members. I have therefore taken the boldness now to importune you. Dr. Neile is yet the third prebendary of Durham, which the King, I hear, has promised to Mr. Musgrave, and Dean of Ripon, the reversion of which his Majesty promised me last August twelvemonth on my surrendering the Commissary's place of Durham to Mr. Ireland, and caused caveats to be entered accordingly, which Lord Arlington promised to see made good to me in due time. Now, as the news of Dr. Neile's death may come to Court before my Lord's return, you will pardon my addressing you for the same favour, which I beg the rather, because a living of his, North Allerton, will be given me by the Dean and Chapter of Durham, which lies midway between this and Ripon, and then I shall be able to draw all my concerns into the North. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 3.]
Jan. 1.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About 10 this morning arrived two packet-boats from Nieuport, one having put in yesterday morning to Margate and landed his mail there. The other landed his here, and came from Nieuport yesterday. They brought no passengers nor news. [Ibid. No. 4.]
Jan. 1.
Dartmouth.
William Hurt to Williamson. Giving particulars of five ships from Bordeaux and one each from Barbados and the Canaries arrived that morning. [Ibid. No. 5.]
Jan. 1.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 6.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 6i.]
[Jan. 1 ?] Account of what has been issued to Sir Stephen Fox for secret service from 1 Jan., 1673-4, to 1 Jan., 1674-5, amounting to 56,660l. There is also a note of a payment to Sir Philip Lloyd on 5 Jan., 1674-5 of 562l. 5s. 11d. [Ibid. No. 7.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
The King to Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master General of the Ordnance. As there are great quantities of gunpowder in the stores which will waste and decay, authorizing him therefore to sell to the best advantage such quantity of the said powder as he shall think fit, causing the moneys arising thereby to be paid into the Ordnance treasury, that new and serviceable powder may be bought when required. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 119.]
[Jan. 1.] Latin ode and chronogram dedicated to Williamson as a New Year's gift by James Philip Boningen, minister of the Divine word. Printed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case F.]
Jan. 2.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About noon yesterday one of our packet-boats came hither, but had some days before landed both mail and passengers at Yarmouth. The master reports that the English lately at the Brill are reduced, that but 6 or 7 companies stand, and that those are marched away thence, and some companies of their marine regiments are come in their room. About 10 last night another arrived. The Master affirms the same as the former concerning the reducement of the English, and says but 6 or 7 captains of the English still keep their commissions with the English. The Earls of Arlington and Ossory are still at the Hague and the yachts &c. at the Brill. They stay for a fair [wind] which has been these three days more southerly than before. One of the masters says that the Prince of Orange was there reported to have intended over for England, but, as it is said, was hindered by the States, they intending to draw some of their forces together to watch the motions of the Swede, and that Admiral Van Tromp is to come in his stead. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 8.]
Jan. 2.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About 12 last night the Calais packet-boat went to sea with the mail with a fair wind. The passengers were half a score, most Frenchmen. About 9 this morning the packet-boat from Calais landed the mail here. Only two passengers came over, one a Frenchman, the other an Englishman named Jones. Both report that they heard yesterday at Calais by letters received by merchants there from Paris that Mons. Turenne had lately had a skirmish with the Imperialists in Alsatia, and killed them 2,000 men. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 9.]
Jan. 2. Caveat that nothing pass of the forfeited estates of certain coiners and clippers now discovered in Gloucestershire, without notice to Lord Lovelace. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 5.]
Jan. 2.
Dublin.
Sir Gilbert Talbot to [Williamson]. I received yours of 22 Dec., which I perceive was intended with great kindness for the honest Tory, but the Lord Lieutenant tells him his business cannot be done. I showed his Excellency your letter, which said it was put into his power. He answered you were mistaken. I then desired him to put Sir Edward into the right way and let him know what application he must make to obtain an effectual order. He replied he doubted whether any order could be effectual, but told me not where the difficulty lay. I can conjecture but two obstructions, either the excess of Lord Kingston's grant of 60,000 acres, which begets a general stop, or else a design his Majesty may have to reserve all such lands to make a fortune for some other person. I wish the poor Tory knew what he had to trust to, for his debts contracted for the King's service lie heavy on him, and the several disappointed grants and journeys he has made to pursue them but plunge him the deeper into debt. It would be great charity therefore either to remove the obstructions, or to relieve him some other way. If the stop be in Lord Kingston, he may be forced to sink his proportion, the excess whereof now obstructs himself and all other pretenders. If it prove the second, I can see no remedy. Enlighten us, if you can.
Postscript.—Since I wrote, we have agreed with the Lord Lieutenant that Sir Edward may pass his grant, because he places deficiencies on it, which distinguishes him from Lord Kingston's grant, and brings him into the nature of Col. Dillon's, but then there will be this danger, that Col. Dillon's clause of preference will defeat him; therefore all we now beg is, that he may have a non obstante to that clause of preference. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 127.]
Jan. 3.
Rushton.
Viscount Cullen and Lord O'Brien to Williamson. On behalf of the bearer, a Fellow of Lincoln College, requesting that his Majesty's dispensation of the rule there requiring all Fellows at 24 years of age to take orders or quit may be obtained for him for a few years longer, he not being fixed whether to enter into orders or to practise physic. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 10.]
Jan. 3.
Milton.
William, Lord Fitzwilliam, to Williamson. Since I received your letter we have christened the little one, Lady Exeter, my neighbour and relation, and Lady Carr, who came purposely from Asserby, being partners with you. I procured a neighbouring gentleman to be proxy for you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 11.]
Jan. 3.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Desiring his commands about the packet he has had for three weeks for Sir T. Morgan, Governor of Jersey, as no vessel bound thither has yet come into the Downs, and suggesting Portsmouth as a more convenient place. The winds continue southerly and keep a great fleet here. Yesterday a Malaga vessel came in bound for London, and ran aground about a mile to the southward of Deal, but by the speedy care of our seamen was got off with little damage. Five days summerlike weather. [Ibid. No. 12.]
Jan. 3.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About 1 this morning the Nieuport packet-boat went to sea with the mail, having a fair wind and fine weather. [Ibid. No. 13.]
Jan. 3.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind E.S.E. The wind coming fair the ships here and at the Isle of Wight will all sail, having tarried a long time for an opportunity. [Ibid. No. 14.]
Jan. 3.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Here are come in about 20 Dutch merchantmen with one big man-of-war from Cadiz bound home. [Ibid. No. 15.]
Jan. 4.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. The master of a vessel of this town that came into harbour yesterday morning from Holland informs us that they have reduced a great many English soldiers there, and that they are so badly used that many of them die, and those that can make their escape endeavour for England, France or any other place rather than suffer hunger and cold. He tells of 400 that made their escape when he was there. Three small vessels came into this harbour last night, two laden with salt for Lynn or Boston. The other, a small bark of Yarmouth, laden with red herring, has been beating at sea this week (being intended for Holland) but could not stretch it over. We have had very good weather for 10 or 14 days, the wind being constantly W. and S.W. The 1st the moon was totally eclipsed for two hours betwixt 6 and 9. [Ibid. No. 16.]
Jan. 4.
Hull.
Richard Gleadow to Williamson. A sad accident happened at Beverley last Friday, being New Year's Day. Sir Francis Cobb, knight, one who, I suppose, might be or is very well known in the Court, about noon in his own chamber, his man waiting on him, pretended to be sick and lay down on his bed, and desired his man to get him down to dinner, but he desired to stay with him or to send up some to him to bear him company and see what he wanted, but he would have none, and desired him to be gone, which he did, on which he presently went from off the bed, and spread his coat on the chamber floor, and drew his rapier and set the hilt on his coat and the point to his breast and ran himself through his heart and his body, and fell down dead, so that his man and some others coming up after dinner found him lying with the rapier through his body. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Jan. 4.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. Just this instant a ship is come in with rye from Roan (Rouen). Lord Townsend, our Lord Lieutenant, is very ill of the gout; notwithstanding, a very noble Christmas kept at Raynham Hall, his residence. Since my last have been great entertainments by Mr. Cooke and Mr. Taylour in order to their standing as burgess for this place. Indifferently to consider their interests it is not to be said who is most likely to carry it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 18.]
Jan. 4.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 2nd the Unity of this port came in here from Havre de Grace, where she had been to repair some damages received at St. Malo in the last storms. The 3rd came in here the Katharine of Dartmouth and one more of Dover in her company from Nantes. Two days past they met 18 English merchantmen from Cadiz, wind at S.S.W., so they believe they are put into Plymouth. The tinners are very much satisfied with this coinage which began 30 Dec., which if they had not had, it would have brought tin very low in price, and the labouring tinners want of moneys, but now they are all contented. [Ibid. No. 19.]
Jan. 4.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. News the same as the last. [Ibid. No. 20.]
Jan. 4.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The ships I informed you by the last are still in port, with some other small vessels, among them two from Bilboa laden with wool and iron belonging to Plymouth. [Ibid. No. 21.]
Jan. 4.
Bristol.
Major J. Romsey to Williamson. I make no question but you know the temper of the inhabitants of this city, but, may be, not so positively how they are disturbed, as the enclosed will inform you, and the disadvantage that the prosecution may be to his Majesty. [Ibid. No. 22.]
Jan. 4. Inland advices received that day, being extracts from letters all previously calendared. [Ibid. No. 23.]
Jan. 4. Receipt by Sir Edward Carteret, Black Rod, for 6l. 7s. 6d. for his salary as Keeper of the Little Park at Windsor and for the maintenance of the deer there for the half-year ended Michaelmas last. [Latin. Ibid. No. 24.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Chief Justice of the King's Bench, the Recorder, and the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex for inserting in the next general pardon without any condition of transportation Richard Thornedell, citizen and armourer of London, convicted at the last Old Bailey Sessions for the manslaughter of Walter Clarkson, he having a wife and three small children entirely dependent on him. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 37.]
Jan. 5.
Durham.
Nicholas Salom to Sir C. Musgrave. Being desired by Mr. Fothergill to give you notice of the first likelihood of the vacancy of any prebendary here I acquaint you that I was yesterday informed that Dr. Neile, one of our prebendaries, is said to be in a weak condition, and it is thought he cannot continue long. He is now at Ripon, where he is Dean, Prebendary of York, Durham and Southwold (Southwell) and parson of North Allerton and Sigston, a place within two or three miles of North Allerton. He is the third prebendary at Durham, and Seggerston Hugh is his corpus. What other dignities, or if any more I cannot learn. With particulars of the patrons of the above preferments. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 25.]
Jan. 5.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About 11 last Sunday night arrived one of our packet-boats which came out from the Brill on Saturday when the boats were bringing the furnitures belonging to the Earls of Arlington and Ossory on board the yachts &c., and, when he had got outside the haven, he descried a great number of people on the shore at Gravesandt where he supposed the Earls were come for their embarcation, and not only so but one also, who said he belonged to my Lord Chamberlain, came over in his packet-boat, who reported they intended to land here, and that he was sent before on a message to Viscount Hereford to Ipswich. But notwithstanding their failing our diligent expectation of them yesterday, when the weather was fair, and no news as yet of them to-day now about noon, it being very foggy, we cease not our inquiries and looking out for them as well as we can. Since this day sennight when this packet-boat sailed hence, one of the best of the pilot-boats of the Brill was seized by a couple of French sloops. Wind, what there is, is southward of west. [Ibid. No. 26.]
Jan. 5.
past 10 p.m. Gravesend.
Sir Robert Carr to Williamson. I was in less than half an hour to have taken barge for London, not hearing anything from my Lord Chamberlain nor of him, but was informed by a waterman that two gentlemen at the Swan were very inquisitive whether the Greyhound were gone by or not, and seemed by their discourse as if they had come in the yachts, but would give no account of them. I sent a servant, not knowing who they were, to desire if they could give me any information concerning my Lord Chamberlain they would oblige me so much, to which I had no more answer than that they had not seen him since yesterday morning. They came out Sunday at 11, but I know not who they were, but am since informed it was Lord Latimer, who took a wherry and went immediately for London, and by some discourse among themselves seemed very desirous to be private. We all conclude my Lord will be here to-morrow before dinner, and therefore I resolve to stay for him. Lest the reason of my stay may be wondered at, I venture to give you this trouble, especially since I am sure not only my Lord Chamberlain but I shall have people represent things as little to our advantage as may be. [Ibid. No. 27.]
Jan. 5.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.S.E. No news. [Ibid. No. 28.]
Jan. 5.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. The ketch, whereof Cumber was master, which I lately by mistake informed was run ashore instead of one Mighills, is here, from Bordeaux bound for London. [Ibid. No. 29.]
Jan. 5.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 30.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 30 i.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
Commission for John Churchill to be lieut.-colonel of the Duke of York's regiment of foot under Sir C. Lyttelton in place of Sir John Griffith, and captain of the company whereof the said Griffith was captain. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 120.]
Jan. 5.
Dublin.
Sir G. Talbot to [Williamson]. After writing to you last, I had some farther discourse with the Lord Lieutenant about Sir E. Sutton's business, who promised me to report it as a thing fit to be granted as agreeable to the Act of Settlement, and differing from those grants whereunto a general stop is put, because Sir Edward proposes to place the '49 security on his discovered acres, and he has promised to report further that Sir Edward cannot reap the benefit of the grant, in regard to Col. Dillon's clause of preference, unless his Majesty will grant him a non obstante to that preference. The report will naturally lead to such a grant, which when obtained I beseech you to dispatch by the first. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 128.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant at the request of Sir Arthur Forbes for the erection of the castle, town and village of Mullingar, with certain towns and lands in the baronies of Moyashel, Magheradernon and Corkaree, co. Westmeath, into a manor, to be called the manor of Mullingar, with power to the said Sir Arthur, his heirs and assigns, to set apart 500 acres of the premises or less for demesne lands, and to alien in fee or for lives any part of the premises, to be holden of the said Sir Arthur, his heirs or assigns, notwithstanding the statute of Quia Emptores, in free and common socage or by suit of Court or otherwise by any lawful services, as also for making lands in co. Longford parcel of the manor of Castle Forbes, with powers of alienation as in the intended manor of Mullingar, as also for adding divers lands in the barony of Mohill, co. Leitrim, to the manor of Agherehunson in the said county belonging to the said Sir Arthur, with all such liberties and privileges as are thereby directed concerning the manor of Mullingar, with power to the said Sir Arthur to hold in each of the said manors a court leet and view of frankpledge and a court in the nature of a Court Baron, and to impark 800 acres or more in each of the said manors into parks for deer, with a grant to him of all waifs, strayes, &c., within the said manors, and also with power to hold a Court of record in the said manor of Mullingar before a seneschal to be appointed by him with jurisdiction up to 100l. And, for the better planting the intended manor of Mullingar, being at present the chief village in Westmeath and where the assizes or quarter sessions are usually held, directing that the assizes and sessions for the said county be at all times thereafter held in Mullingar, and with a grant of two additional fairs a year to be held at Mullingar to the said Sir Arthur, and further directing that the freeholders in the said manor of Mullingar shall have power to choose two burgesses to serve in Parliament. And for the above purposes directing such letters patent to be passed to the said Sir Arthur as may make the same good and effectual in law. [Nearly 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 243.]
Jan. 6.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About 2 or 3 this morning the packet-boats for Nieuport and Calais went to sea with the mails, having a fair wind at S.W. and fine weather. Very few passengers went over, and those strangers, seemingly of mean condition. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 31.]
Jan. 6. Commission for James Graham to be captain of the company whereof John Churchill was captain in the Duke of York's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 120.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant after reciting that Richard, Earl of Burlington and Cork, is now entitled to divers mortgages on lands therein described, all in co. Cork, except one in co. Waterford, and that the said Earl is now in possession of all the said lands subject to the said mortgages and that the equities of redemption of all the said mortgages, belonging on 23 Oct., 1641, to persons who were Papists and had not since been declared innocent, are by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation vested in the Crown in trust for the satisfaction of the arrears of the '49 officers, and that the said Earl has stated that the sums for which the said lands were severally mortgaged are so near the full value of the lands respectively that during the whole of the sittings of the Commissioners for executing the said Acts none of the said officers offered to accept the equity of redemption of any of the said lands towards satisfaction of their arrears, and that none of the said lands except those in Waterford are charged with any new quit-rents, and that the said Earl, having several arrears of pay due to him amounting to 16,000l., whereof he has yet been satisfied only 3s. in the pound, has besought for satisfaction of the said arrears a release of the equities of redemption of the said mortgages that he may be encouraged thereby to plant and improve; to the Lord Lieutenant, if he finds the said allegations to be true, to cause letters patent to be passed containing a grant of the said several lands and a release of the equities of redemption of the said mortgages to the said Earl and his heirs in full satisfaction of the remainder of the '49 arrears due to him and yet unsatisfied, he and they paying out of the lands in co. Waterford the new quit-rent now payable thereout and for the other lands 3l. per annum in addition to all other rents now payable thereout. [Nearly 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 259.]
Jan. 7.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. We are very barren of news, no boat having come from Holland since my last. Last night went hence one of our packet-boats. Wind is most southerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 32.]
Jan. 7.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. According to your command received to-day, I return Sir T. Morgan's packet. Here are above 150 sail, bound out for several ports. The wind seems N.E., but is so little as to be scarce discerned. [Ibid. No. 33.]
Jan. 7.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. The outward bound ships remain at Cowes expecting a fair wind. [Ibid. No. 34.]
Jan. 7.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. A very great quantity of tin has been coined here last week and this, about 1,500 blocks in all, which, I think, is more than has been coined in a long time before at one coinage, of which I hope his Majesty will receive the benefit. Wind W.S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 35.]
Jan. 7.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 5th came in here about 40 English merchantmen from the Isle of Wight and Plymouth Sound for places in France; wind S.E. They say the Straits fleet kept at sea, so that it is believed they are passed out of the Channel. The Amity of Falmouth come in with salt and brandy from Nantes reports that any Englishman may freely enter any goods for Holland without any prejudice to their goods or vessels. Other shipping news. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Jan. 7.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. News the same as the last. [Ibid. No. 37.]
Jan. 8.
Rydal.
Daniel Fleming to Williamson. Though my father served his late Majesty as a major under Sir Henry Fletcher, who lost both life and estate in that service, and though for his loyalty I was forced to purchase a great part of my estate in the time of the late rebellion, and ever since the restoration I have served the King as well as I was able in the chargeable and troublesome offices of sheriff, commissioner in all assessments, deputy lieutenant and justice of the peace in Lancashire, Cumberland and Westmorland, and as a lieutenant, captain, major, and now lieut.-colonel in the train bands of two of these counties, yet I shall not be so vain as to think I deserve anything of his Majesty, since I know the performances of subjects merit no reward. There are few that have so good a friend as you in Court, but they will be encouraged sometimes to act the part of a beggar, and, though I think I shall be a beggar before I shall be good at that trade, yet I think what is commonly desired may be reduced to the two known heads of honour or interest. As to the first, to acquaint you freely with my thoughts of so much thereof as is within my view, viz., to be either a knight or a baronet, I am not very ambitious of being the former, since I am content with ten of my ancestors having been favoured with that honour, and since this country has no want thereof. As to the latter, few enjoying it but by purchase, which makes it to me the less desirable, I shall not much think thereof. God having blessed me with 13 hopeful children all living, and my estate being but small, I have as great reason to look after interest for the providing for them as many other persons, yet would I not do it to the prejudice of any friend, nor lose my little substance in catching at a greater shadow. I know you now have it in your power to help a man to a good office, many becoming daily void. If you shall think fit to make use of my name in any worth a man's attendance and leaving his residence, I shall truly serve the King and you therein, and shall from time to time be accountable for what part of the profits thereof and to whom you shall appoint. Sir John Otway and others have solicited me to employ them to move you in my behalf, but I shall acquaint none with my thoughts save yourself. (Abstract in Twelfth Report of the Historical MSS. Commission, Appendix, Part vii., p. 115.) [1¼ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 38.]
Jan. 8.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind westerly. [Ibid. No. 39.]
Jan. 8.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday according to order I returned Sir T. Morgan's packet, and then the wind was seemingly fair, which towards night came N.E., and this morning about 180 ships in sight sailed westwards. [Ibid. No. 40.]
Jan. 8.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About 9 this morning the Nieuport packet-boat arrived and landed the mail. No passengers came over. The master reports no news, and says they talk nothing there of any skirmish between Mons. Turenne and the Imperialists. This morning passed by to the westward about 150 merchantmen from the Downs with a fair easterly wind, that they have so long waited for. [Ibid. No. 41.]
Jan. 8.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. To-day the Dutch fleet bound southward, which have lain here so long wind-bound, sailed. [Ibid. No. 42.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 42i.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Thomas Wyndham to be lieutenant and to James Kendall to be cornet to Sir Francis Wyndham in the Earl of Oxford's regiment. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 8.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir T. Chicheley to deliver to such person as the Duke of Lauderdale shall appoint one brass mortar piece of 13½ inches diameter, mounted on its carriage with limbers, ladles and sponges, two small brass mortar pieces of about 7 or 8 inches diameter, 24 granado shells for each mortar piece, 500 shells for hand granadoes, one handscrew and one double black gun, for service in Scotland. [Ibid. p. 9.]
Jan. 8. Caveat that no pardon pass to James Colliton for killing Elisha Bridges at Barbados, till notice be given to Mr. Auditor Bridges at his office in the Inner Temple. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 5.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Thomas Duppa, one of the Gentlemen Ushers daily waiters, praying a grant of messuages and tenements in Southwark devised by James Philips to the Mayor and Aldermen of Shrewsbury in mortmain, whereby they are now vested in his Majesty. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 11.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of John Fox, desiring a lease of the slaughter-house at Westminster and of the Duckoy (decoy) Pond (whereof his brother was keeper) in the New Forest, and of about 30 acres of land there for 99 years. [Ibid. p. 12.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Henry Osborne, praying a lease for 31 years of the toll of corn, cattle, &c. sold in the market of Knighton, Radnorshire, after the death of Matthew Meysey. [Ibid.]
Jan. 8. Patent for 14 years to Eustace Burneby of an invention for making all sorts of white paper for writing and printing. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 33.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Requiring them to admit and receive George, Earl of Winton, to be one of their number. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 149.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Commission to the Earl of Winton to be colonel of the militia regiment of foot in the shire of East Lothian and constabulary of Haddington, whereof the Earl of Tweeddale or Lord Yester, whose commissions are declared void, was colonel. [Ibid.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Requiring them, as soon as the season will allow, to put in hand the following works at Edinburgh Castle, to be perfected with convenient expedition. 1. The lower work of the entry at the outside round about to be lined with a wall sufficient to contain at the top a parapet of earth 13 or 14 foot thick. 2. At 30 or 35 foot distance from the said wall may be made a counterscarp round about, which counterscarp is to be taken four or five foot in the ground and raised a foot or two above the horizon or plane of the Castlehill. 3. The counterscarp to be provided with a palisado or fraise about it. 4. All the traverses or stops at the inside of the castle to be secured with sufficient palisados and gates. 5. A new wall in manner of tenaille to be drawn behind the inner gate, where the gun commonly called Mons Meg lies. 7. All the platforms to be well mended and laid, and all the guns therein not already well mounted on field carriages to be mounted on good ship carriages.
Though the additions and changes intended to be made at Stirling and Dumbarton Castles are to be deferred in consideration of the scarcity of money in the Exchequer, further requiring them to cause the platforms of both castles to be mended and all the guns therein to be mounted with good ship carriages, and to consider what repairs, additions or alterations are necesary in both of them, which they are to report, with the charge thereof, and further requiring them to mount 20 pieces of ordnance on field carriages and to have them and all necessaries thereto belonging in readiness to be carried into the field as occasion may require. [Ibid. p. 150.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrant for payment to John Slezer, the King's engineer in Scotland, in consideration of his late extraordinary pains and charges, of 100l. sterling above his ordinary allowance. [Ibid. p. 152.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Memorials of protection in the ordinary form to Thomas Hamilton of Redhouse, Arthur Forbes, Alexander Burnett of Frosterhill and Robert Johnstoun, town major of Edinburgh, for two years respectively. [Ibid. pp. 153, 154.]
Jan. 9.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday evening came in one of our packet-boats but brings no news, only a few passengers, and, as is said, a very fine barb for the Lord Chamberlain. Wind yesterday and to-day easterly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 43.]
Jan. 9.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About 4 this morning the packet-boat for Calais went to sea with the mail, and about 10 this morning arrived that from Calais and landed the mail. The master reports no news, save that they talk much at Calais of a great victory against the Imperialists by Monsr. Turenne, the particulars daily expected. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 44.]
Jan. 9.
Dover.
Robert Bostock to Williamson. Referring to his services to Charles II. in the Dutch wars and in his youth to Charles I., and to the grant made by Charles I. by the advice of Archbishop Laud of sequestrated ecclesiastical benefices to provide more amply for the preachers who accompanied the fleet on the expedition to the Isle of Re, an example which prevents him from despairing of the fulfilment of the King's promises, and praying his Excellency to afford him the shadow of his wings. [Latin. Ibid. No. 45.]
Jan. 9.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Yesterday came in a ship from Lisbon belonging to Portugueses, bound for Rouen with oranges after a passage of 16 days. The master, a Frenchman, says several Algerines are on that coast. Wind now N.E. so our ships for France and elsewhere are preparing to be gone. [Ibid. No. 46.]
Jan. 9.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Just now are arrived the Windsor of this place from St. Malo with canvas, &c., and the Increase of Barnstaple from Pulgan, a creek three leagues from that port, with wheat. At their coming away came an embargo from the King on all ships of his subjects, and, it is said, he intends to set out a great fleet this spring. The Maloins had designed 60 sail for Newfoundland, and have offered the King a present of 20,000 livres for leave for them to go. That King continues to raise what forces can be had both in Picardy and Normandy. They had news of a fight between Monsr. Turenne and the Confederates, the first having the advantage, but made no great rejoicing till a confirmation. The men-of-war set out of St. Malo are all come into port, and have had but little success of prizes. [Ibid. No. 47.]
Jan. 9.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. The long westerly winds and tempestuous weather have kept most of our outward bound shipping in port. The 1st the Mary yacht sailed hence, but was put into Beaumaris, having split most of her sails. The wind now being easterly, I doubt not but she and our other ships thither bound are got safe to Dublin. [Ibid. No. 48.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting that William, Earl of Strafford, and Thomas Radcliffe have by their petition set forth that their fathers, Thomas, late Earl of Strafford, and Sir George Radcliffe for valuable consideration before the late rebellion purchased the town and manor of Sligo and several other lands in co. Sligo from the former proprietors which were intended to have been confirmed to the said late Earl and Sir G. Radcliffe on the plantation then intended for Connaught, the effecting whereof was prevented by the late rebellion, and that the said Earl and Sir George at the time of their purchase (out of respect to the King's title then found to Connaught) did not take such legal conveyances from the former proprietors as they might have done, and that by the strict letter of the law the same were forfeited and vested in the Crown by the rebellion of the former proprietors, but that since the restoration the said manor, town and lands have been granted and restored to the said William, Earl of Strafford, and Thomas Radcliffe, by several orders of the Lord Lieutenant and Council made in pursuance of a power given them by the Act of Settlement and by a certificate of the late Commissioners for executing the Acts of Settlement and Explanation and letters patent passed thereon, requiring him to cause letters patent to be passed to the said Earl and Thomas Radcliffe creating the town and lands of Sligo (excepting the quarter of land called the Abbey quarter alias Carrowne Monaster and the half quarter of Knocknegane with so much of the town as stands on them) and all such lands as are restored or confirmed to them as aforesaid into one manor to be called the manor of Sligo, with a grant to them of a Court of the nature of a Court Baron and a Court Leet with a view of frankpledge, and a Court of Record to be held every third week with power to appoint bailiffs and seneschals of the said Courts, and with a grant of felons' goods, waifs, estrayes, &c., and with power to impark 2,000 acres or less for deer parks, and with power to hold two weekly markets and four yearly fairs at Sligo, to hold all the said premises to the said William, Earl of Strafford, and Thomas Radcliffe, their heirs and assigns for ever, at the yearly rent of 7s. 6d., being that now payable for the fairs and markets now held at Sligo, and the increased rent of 10s., with a proviso that the quarter called Knockbeg, the quarter and half of Ballinesihane and Leck, the half-quarter of Carrownegae and the quarter of Carrowerin be not comprised in this grant, the said William, Earl of Strafford, and Thomas Radcliffe having lately sold the last mentioned lands to Richard, Lord Colooney. [3¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 269.]
Jan. 10.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About 5 this morning the Nieuport packet-boat went to sea with the mail that arrived last night from London, but with no passengers. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 49.]
Jan. 10.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. The outward bound ships so long wind-bound both here and at Cowes all sailed last Friday with a fair wind which has continued ever since. [Ibid. No. 50.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Sir Joseph Williamson to Lord Culpeper and the Commissioners to treat with those of Holland. His Majesty has commanded me to commit to you the enclosed draft of two articles given in by the Dutch ambassador as the utmost he can yield to on the matter of trade in the East Indies, whereof you are to give a copy to the East India Company, and to receive their answer in writing. And, if this be not to their satisfaction, they are further to give you in writing whether they insist and think it necessary for their interest, that in case they cannot have the whole project as heretofore given in by them, rather to have nothing, or what expedients they can propose for accommodating this matter, it being his Majesty's great and earnest care to do what possibly can be done for the Company's advantage. You are prayed to bring a speedy and final answer from them with an account of your proceedings, as the Dutch Commissioners press extremely to be gone. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 16.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Reprieve to Garrett Condon, William Collingwood, Garrett Stack, Henry Lovell, Michael FitzGerald, and John King, convicted at the sessions of oyer and terminer lately held for the Admiralty of England of piracy and felony and sentenced to death. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 34.]
Jan. 10. Dispensation to Thomas Lewes, High Sheriff of Buckinghamshire, to come to London or elsewhere, he having no residence in the county and being a merchant of London. Minute. [Precedents 1, f. 40.]
Jan. 11.
Leicester Fields.
Nathaniel, Bishop of Durham, to Williamson. The motion made yesterday to his Majesty concerning the Deanery of Ripon was very seasonable, news being come this evening of Dr. Neile's death. You know very well how necessary dispatch in things of this nature is, and therefore I submit the person recommended for it to your care and favour. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 51.]
Jan. 11.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 6th came in here the Mary and Golden Hind of London, both bound for Guinea, in 3 days from the Isle of Wight. The day before they came in they met three French men-of-war. The Admiral commanded the Mary's boat on board. The commander told them they belonged to the Royal Company and showed their papers and passports, but the Admiral was very hot, and said they were false and made under a hedge, and fired a broadside and several small shot into them, but did no hurt, but at last, being better satisfied, sent the commander aboard again, and then the two other captains sent on board and desired they would take no advantage of this rash humour of their Admiral, but the masters have given an account of it more large to the Royal Company. The 10th came in the Speedwell of London from Bordeaux with wines for London, and the Industry of Yarmouth for Dover. They report that the King of France is raising 40,000 men against the next spring. By a small vessel from Plymouth it is reported that the grand party is all taken by the Dutch, but without any certainty. [Ibid. No. 52.]
Jan. 11.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 53.]
Jan. 11.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. There are at present near 100 ships in this harbour. 40 or 50 came in within these two or three days, the wind being E., most bound for France, 14 or 15 from France with wine, one from Avera (Aveiro) with oils for [South] Hampton, two from Bilboa with iron. Several bound for the West Indies and the western parts went out last Saturday. A vessel for Guinea complains of the affronts three Brest men-of-war gave them in their passage from the Downs. One of the company returned, being disabled by them for the voyage. [Ibid. No. 54.]
Jan. 11. Warrant to John Bradley, messenger, to search for and take into custody Col. Lovelace, and bring him before Secretary Coventry. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 120.]
Jan. 11. Warrant to John Bradley to carry Col. Lovelace to the Tower. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. 11. Warrant to the Lieutenant of the Tower to receive Col. Lovelace, committed for not having defended the colony and fort of New York according to his commission and duty. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. 11. Warrant from Sir J. Williamson to Nicholas Cropley, messenger, to search for and bring before him in safe custody in order to his further examination, John Brandling, minister, by whom Mistress Hide, daughter and heir of the late Sir Thomas Hide of Hertfordshire, being of the age of 12 or under, has been pretended to be married to one Emerton, she having been seized and carried away without her mother's consent. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 35.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 55.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Mayor and Deputy Governor of Dover. Sending a copy of Capt. Henry Jackson's petition which complained of himself and ship being detained by them, and desiring them to report the matter of fact in the affair. Minute. [Precedents 1, f. 41.]
Jan. 12.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 56.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 56 i.]
Jan. 12. Warrant for Edward King, at the sign of the Bottle, Parker's Lane, to be searched for, taken into custody, and brought before the King and Council on the 13th. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 120.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
Presentation of Thomas Tullie, D.D., to the Deanery of Ripon, void by the death of Dr. Neile. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 3.]
Jan. 12.
James'.
The Duke of York to the Prince of Orange. I believe you will not be sorry to hear of the Duchess being safely delivered. It is but a daughter, but they are both very well. I received your letter by the Earl of Ossory, and am very glad, both by him and the Lord Chamberlain to find you are so well inclined to have a peace, which, I am fully persuaded, is both for your interest in particular, as well as for the repose of Christendom, and good of our family in general. Holograph. [S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 3, No. 5.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury and Exchequer in Scotland. After reciting the letter of 1 Dec. last, calendared ante, p. 441, which directed a stop on any signature in favour of Francis Montgomery, and that by a letter of the Commissioners of the Treasury to the Duke of Lauderdale, dated 22 Dec. last, it appears that the signature presented in Exchequer by the said Montgomery was not for securing to himself the life-rent of the whole estate of Leven, but only of the barony of Inchlesly, proceeding on a resignation thereof made in Exchequer for his life-rent thereof, conform to the proviso in his contract of marriage with the deceased Countess of Leven, removing the said stop in the said letter of 1 Dec., and leaving them to do in relation to that signature as they shall see fit. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 154.]
Jan. 12.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. The Success belonging to Bristol, laden with salt, oil, olives and other goods was cast away last week in Timoleague Bay. All the fleet for the West Indies and other parts went hence this afternoon. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 129.]
Jan. 13.
[Received.]
Peter Herringhooke and others, merchants, and Thomas Blake, master of the Flying Hare, to the King. Petition reciting their former petition for relief against the seizure of the said ship at Harlingen, and the Order in Council thereon of 30 Oct., 1672, calendared in S.P. Dom., 1672–3, p. 99, and the order of 2 April, 1673, calendared in S.P. Dom., 1673, p. 112, recommending their case to the plenipotentiaries, to whom the petitioners accordingly applied and furnished them with all documents for making out their claim, if they had proceeded on the treaty at Cologne, but the said treaty being made and finished in England nothing of that nature was considered, so the petitioners had no benefit of his Majesty's recommendation, but remain without satisfaction for their great loss, and praying him to do for their relief as to his great wisdom shall be most agreeable. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 57.] Prefixed,
Order in Council on the above petition that Mr. Secretary Williamson acquaint the Dutch ambassador therewith and report his answer to this Board that such further order may be given therein as shall seem fit. Whitehall, 27 Jan. [Ibid. No. 57 i.] Annexed,
Order in Council commanding the Principal Commissioners of Prizes according to the 32nd article of the Treaty of Breda to discharge all ships and goods seized in any of his Majesty's ports before the declaration of war, or which were voluntarily coming to the same, and to release all persons belonging to the said ships, notice thereof be given to the Dutch Ambassador that it may be as ingeniously performed on his masters' part as it is now promised, and also referring to the said Commissioners terms proposed by Sieur Boreel by order of the States General touching the exchange of prisoners of war. Whitehall, 15 May, 1672. [Printed. Ibid. No. 57 ii.]
The said orders in Council of 30 Oct., 1672, and 2 April, 1673. [Ibid. Nos. 57 iii., 57 iv.]
Jan. 13.
Cockermouth.
William Orfeur, sheriff, and 18 justices to Williamson. The western part of this county being distant no less than 20 miles from any post-road, which causes much inconvenience, both to the gentry and the traders, by the uncertain and incommodious way of sending and receiving letters, requesting him to procure the settlement of a post stage between Penrith and Cockermouth. [Ibid. No. 58.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Sir John Robinson for 99 years, if any of his sons William, John, and James so long live, of the offices of Master Forester and Keeper of Farmingwoods in the Forest of Rockingham, Northants, and of Surveyor of the vert and venison there, and of receiver of the fines happening within the same, with the bailiwick of the Hundred of Orlingbury, and the bailiwick of Brigstock, except Gedington Woods, and the receivership of the Castleward rents. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 36.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Grant to the Commissioners for Tangier of all houses, tofts and lands therein belonging to the Crown in trust for the King, his heirs, and successors, with power to grant building leases for any term not exceeding 99 years. Minute. [Ibid. p. 37.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a renewal of the commission appointing the 21 persons therein named to be Commissioners for licensing hackney coaches in and about London and Westminster. [Ibid. p. 42, and S.P. Dom., Entry Book 21, p. 30.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Proclamation fixing the prices of wines for the ensuing year. Printed. [S.P. Dom., Proclamations 3, p. 331.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Proclamation, on account of the fears of foreign merchants trading to Tangier, declaring that the goods or estates at Tangier of any subjects of any prince or state, between whom and the King any rupture may happen, shall not be liable to seizure till six months after such rupture shall be published there. Printed. [Ibid. p. 332.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting that the town of Athlone with parcels of lands, tithes, fishings, &c., belonging to the manor of Athlone and to the late dissolved abbeys of St. Peter and St. Benedict were conferred on the Presidents of Connanght for the time being, and that Lord Berkeley, the then President, had, 13 July, 1663, obtained a decree from the Commissioners for executing the Act of Settlement for the houses, lands, &c., at Athlone as therein mentioned, that on the surrender of the said Lord Berkeley the said presidency was, 2 April, 1666, granted to him and Lord Kingston jointly, and there were also granted to them the keeping of the Castle of Athlone and the command of the ward as constable there, and of the town of Athlone, and of the lands and liberties of the Brawny, co. Westmeath, and of all the lands, &c., with the customs, belonging to the manor of Athlone and to the said abbeys and all other lands formerly held by any President of Connaught, that the said presidency had been since abolished, but the fees and profits thereof had been reserved to Lords Berkeley and Kingston, the grant to Lord Ranelagh, dated 30 July, 1672, (of which the particulars appear by the King's letter calendared in S.P. Dom., 1672, p. 360) of Athlone, &c., subject to the life interests of Lords Berkeley and Kingston, and that Lord Ranelagh had since agreed with those two Lords for their interests in the said lands, &c., directing him to issue commissions of inquiry into the King's title to the houses, lands, &c., belonging to the Crown in the town of Athlone and on the return thereof to cause letters patent to be passed to Lord Ranelagh and his heirs of the said castle, manor, town and lands of Athlone, and of the said lands and liberties of the Brawny, and of all the lands, &c., with the customs, duties, tithes, fishings and commodities belonging to the said castle, manor and town and to the said abbeys, in Roscommon and Westmeath, which have been enjoyed by the Presidents of the said province, to be held by him and them in free and common socage at the yearly rent of 100l., reserving to the Crown power to use the castle of Athlone for a fortress or garrison and to place therein such governor and forces as shall be thought fit, with a clause requiring the grantees to keep the said castle in good repair, and with another clause that the Crown would consent that an act might be passed in the next Parliament held in Ireland confirming the above grant. [9 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 246.]
Jan. 14.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last night sailed one of our packetboats with few passengers, and this morning another arrived. The master tells us of a Jew with a considerable store of jewels bound over in his last voyage to Holland with him, declaring himself first to be a Hamburger, but being examined by a French picaroon, who boarded the packet-boat and pretended he was a Middleburger, gave it presently under his hand he was so also, on which the picaroon took both him and his jewels away with him out of the packet-boat and another Jew with him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 59.]
Jan. 14.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind E.N.E. No news. [Ibid. No. 60.]
Jan. 14.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 11th came in the Hopewell of London with soap, &c. from Joppa. They have been trading at Argier and several places in the Straits. Coming homeward an Argier man-of-war that had taken a Sallee commission came up with them, but knowing she used to trade at Argier left her without doing any violence. They are bound for London and will put to sea the next fair wind. Several vessels came in here Monday and Tuesday from Yarmouth and other ports to the Eastward bound for France. [Ibid. No. 61.]
Jan. 14.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. News the same as in the last. [Ibid. No. 62.]
Jan. 14. Commission to Reynald Graham to be ensign to the Duke of Monmouth's own company. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 14.]
Jan. 14. Warrant for a licence to Philip Colby to enclose a certain way between the town of Chelsea and the town of Brompton, leading towards the town of Kensington, provided he make another way of the same length and breadth and as convenient in his own ground, as by a writ of ad quod damnum and an inquisition in pursuance thereof taken 24 Aug. last before the sheriff of Middlesex doth more fully appear. [Precedents 1, f. 41.]
Jan. 14. The Lord Keeper, Lord Finch, to the Lord Lieutenant. The first query in your letter of 29 Dec. must, I conceive, be answered by distinguishing of Reliefs. That Relief given by Magna Charta c. 2, is gone by the dissolution of the Court of Wards, as knight service itself is gone. But, if lands be held by knight service and rent, as it may be, then is the rent also parcel of the tenure, and, when by the late Act such tenures are turned into socage, the lands are held by fealty and rent, and such rents are preserved by the express words of the Act and Relief ought to be paid for them. The second query is more difficult in respect of the great consequences it may have. I once thought that such rents were rather a charge on the land than any part of the tenure of it, and that they were intended as a perpetual memento against all rebellion rather than as new rent-services, and I considered that the quitrents of Ulster were increased by the Act of Explanation, which passed long after the dissolution of the Court of Wards, so that the increased quit-rents could not possibly be any part of that tenure of the lands in Ulster, the tenure being settled before by the very Act of the dissolution of wardships. For this doubt's sake and to prevent vexation, I would never, when Attorney-General, suffer the escheators' patent for Ireland to pass, though I never doubted the office was legal and of great use as to escheats and casualties, but I always foresaw it would be troublesome. Nevertheless my successor, having long weighed and considered it, thought fit to pass the patent, and certified his opinion that the quit-rents ought to pay Relief, which being an opinion for the advantage of the Crown, I did not think fit to give it any interruption or stop at the Seal.
I have since made more serious reflection on the point, and advised with the now Attorney-General, Sir W. Jones, and we begin to think it probable a Relief will be due for those quit-rents; first, because the Act of 17 Car. I. passed in England (to which the Act of Settlement refers) appoints a rent to be reserved, which must be understood a rent-service, for the word reserved does not agree with a rent-charge or a rent-seck, and the Act also appoints that the tenure shall be in socage, so that, laying both these clauses together, they seem to import that the lands should be holden in socage, by the most ordinary service of fealty and rent, which implies Relief; secondly, the words Quit-Rents do not agree with the rent-charge or rent-seck, and therefore must be understood rent-service; thirdly, and principally, these quit-rents come in lieu of the old rents due to the Crown, and, where the old rent was greatest, the old remains. Therefore, as the old rent was rent-service and a Relief payable for the same, so in reason ought it to be with the new rent also.
What most of all imports your Excellency to know is the opinion of his Majesty on the whole matter. I acquainted him with it last Sunday, and he conceives it not fit to stir this matter at this time, or to proceed to exact these Reliefs, as affairs now stand in Ireland, but to wait for better circumstances, when the kingdom shall be a little more at ease and better able to bear it, and in the meantime that nothing be done in bar or prejudice of his right, by which I conclude there is no necessity of suffering the Escheator to be over busy in this matter, for, whenever the King shall think fit to set it on foot again, inquisitions may be found time enough, and 'tis possible a Parliament may think it worth their while to buy off the question of Reliefs, though the quit-rents themselves will never be parted with.
The state of the case touching the lapsed moneys, which was transmitted by your Excellency, stands referred to the Committee for Irish Affairs, who enter on it, next Thursday, the 21st, so is also the petition of the Nominees. [Copy. Nearly 3 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 130.]
Jan. 15.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 63.]
Jan. 15.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. Lord Townsend continues yet ill of the gout. Since my last Mr. Cooke's party here increases and Alderman Taylour's decreases, so that at present Mr. Cooke seems to have the greater party and in all probability will carry the greatest vote. [Ibid. No. 64.]
Jan. 15.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Some time since I gave you an account that the merchants have very much complained that the employment of their shipping was taken away by foreign ships passing as English by sea-briefs they have indirectly gained out of several ports in England. The like complaints daily increasing on the return of their ships from foreign ports, they met and made their addresses to our bailiffs to petition his Majesty to remedy this evil, for which the bailiffs have to-night sent up a petition to Commissioner Peaps (Pepys) to present to his Majesty. A gentleman this evening coming to the coffee-house from Mr. Shildreck, the grand teacher of our conventicle, reports you to be a great friend of Dr. Owen's and his, and how you brought them to the King's presence, the King and Dr. Owen going into a withdrawingroom, you and Mr. Shildreck waiting in the next room till Dr. Owen came forth, who reported that, when he informed his Majesty of the disturbance given his good subjects and that the like was done at Yarmouth, he was highly offended, saying, "What at Yarmouth? Well he would take a speedy course to redress it." The person that had this from Mr. Shildreck being called away abruptly broke off. [Ibid. No. 65.]
Jan. 15.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 66.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 66i.]
Jan. 15. Presentation of Samuel Crossman, M.A., to the rectory of St. Mabyn, Cornwall. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 64.]
Jan. 15. Pass to Capt. Buller and Ensign Buller. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 14.]
[Before Jan. 16.] Notice of a general court of the Royal African Co. to be held at the African House on Saturday, 16 Jan., at 3 p.m. for declaring the state of the stock and the choice of the Governor, Sub-Governor and Deputy-Governor for the ensuing year, and of another on Tuesday, the 19th, for the election of 24 assistants. Printed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 67.]
Jan. 16.
Oxford.
Dr. Thomas Tully to Williamson. Thanking him warmly for his kindness to him in the business of Ripon, which he hopes is past danger, otherwise it will occasion him some inconvenience, in regard it has taken air so much. [Ibid. No. 68.]
Jan. 16.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No news since my last. The wind has got somewhat more westerly of North these two days. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 69.]
Jan. 16.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The late N.E. winds give us no news. To-day the wind came S. and at noon W. very much varying. This morning we saw about 100 sail at the back of the Goodwin Sands. 'Tis reported they are most Dutch, some Danes, Lübeckers and those countries. They sailed southerly but are checked by these contrary winds. A topsail gale between the W. and S. [Ibid. No. 70.]
Jan. 16.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About 6 last night the Nieuport packet-boat arrived and landed the mail, and about 12 that for Calais went to sea with the mail. We hourly expect another from Nieuport and one from Calais. About 4 this afternoon passed by a fleet of Dutch merchantmen of about 100 sail for the Straits and elsewhere convoyed by young De Ruyter, who carries a rear-admiral's flag, and three more men-of-war, who performed the usual ceremony of striking his flag and topsail to the Castle, and fired 9 guns, and the Castle answered him with 7. [Ibid. No. 71.]
Jan. 16.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. Yesterday morning went hence four English vessels, which came from Amsterdam with cheese and other provisions for St. Valery. [Ibid. No. 72.]
Jan. 16.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. It being Sabbath day I have no list of ships. No news. [Ibid. No. 73.]
Jan. 16. Caveat, that nothing pass concerning a grant of a Teller's place in the Exchequer in reversion, till notice be given to Mr. Secretary; the King having promised the Earl of Manchester a reversion in favour of his son. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 6.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
The King to the General and Master and the remanent officers of the Mint of Scotland. Warrant that the reverse of the five species of coin of Four Merk, Two Merk, One Merk, Half Merk and Forty Pennies of silver for Scotland, shall have the impression as they are expressed and designed under this present warrant. At the foot are the designs for the said five coins. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 155.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant for renewing the warrant for coinage with the alterations designed and drawn at the foot of the last warrant. [Ibid. p. 156.]
Jan. 16.
Tintern Castle.
Robert Leigh to Williamson. Acknowledging his letter of the 22nd, and informing him that he would return to Dublin in 8 or 10 days, and make it his business to hasten his friends in that concern, and therein would observe his Honour's commands both as to the validity of the thing and saving the charges. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 131.]
Jan. 17. Dr. J. Fell to Williamson. On notice that Mr. Button, who formerly intruded into a canonry here, was lately accused before the Council of having had a hand in the late King's death, some of his friends have been very importunate with me to certify that, his principles being Presbyterian, he abhorred that execrable fact. But I, having no great skill to distinguish the principles of men of that way, excused myself, yet, having said that I verily believed him a most unlikely man to deal in such an affair, nothing would satisfy unless I would promise to signify thus much to you, which is the cause you have this present trouble. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 74.]
Jan. 17.
Queen's College, Oxford.
Dr. Thomas Barlow to Williamson. I am importuned by a good friend to signify a case to you and leave it to your prudence. One Mr. Button (the man and case possibly not unknown to you) is accused for being on the scaffold in a disguise when the late good King and martyr was murdered. His accuser was brother to Mr. Button's wife, who in her right had about 100l. per annum while she lived. Mr. Button allowed her brother 10l. per annum. She dying, and with her that 100l. per annum being gone from Mr. Button, he was unable to allow the 10l. as he had done formerly. Hereupon the brother accuses Mr. Button as one on the scaffold and principal or accessory to that most traitorous act. If the accusation be true and the accuser knew it, why did he conceal treason for 28 (sic) years? If it be not true, why does he now falsely accuse? The truth is, Mr. Button, when the King was murdered, was Canon of Christ Church, Proctor of the University and Public Orator, and, I verily believe and so do all I have met with, abhorred that villanous and horrid action. Having signified thus much, I leave it to your prudence and justice to assist innocence so far as you shall find it, for, I believe, it will come before you at the Council. My love to the good Dean of Rochester, and honest Tim. Halton. [Ibid. No. 75.]
Jan. 17.
Belford Westhall.
Thomas Carr to Williamson. There are some rumours in Scotland, very apprehensive that ere long there will be some orders from England for imposing the music of organs in their churches, and to press the Service Book or Liturgy of the Church of England upon them. For my own part, as I have told them, I have not heard the least thing from above whereby any such thing can be gathered, and therefore I really believe it is the subtle advice and insinuations of the teachers and leaders of those dissenting people in both nations to animate the spirits of all their followers from fears and jealousies to come to downright terms of opposition and rebellion, and indeed they have so far prevailed with them already, that, whereas at first they went to their meetings simply and nakedly, now they have begun to change their garb and to go better appointed and armed, and this they pretend to be for the greater security and defence of preaching the word of the Lord, by which it may be easily conceived that there is nothing whatsoever that their teachers put but this false gloss of the discipline and word of the Lord upon, but the ignorant multitude, their followers, will venture all they have for it, and what these things may tend to at last our own experience of the late troubles may sufficiently inform us, and therefore it were much to be wished that, as his Majesty's dominions are most happily united in his sacred person, so likewise there were an unity in matters of faith and external discipline, all being serene and calm in those kingdoms where this unity of profession is, witness all the dominions of the King of Spain, where never or very seldom any trepidations in the State are heard of, but yet, those people in Scotland, as also some amongst ourselves, having long sucked in this contagion of separation and being much confirmed in it by the late troubles, and having had a long time to make their parties good in both nations, whether it will be seasonable now to set this work on foot, or rather to suffer that men's spirits were made apter, and more prepared for it, and then to do it gradatim, as our wise Queen Elizabeth did in the change of the Popish religion, I leave to the wisdom of his Majesty and his Council. I know it is needless to inform so knowing a person as you are of the beginning and growth of these persuasions, Calvin, whom otherwise I reverence as one of our first reformers and an incomparably wise man, having begun it at Geneva, but it was Knox, of as dexterous a wit as those times afforded, that spread the contagion in Scotland, and thence into this our climate, only herein the judicious Calvin was more justifiable than the other, because he found that city in some disorder, especially in the ecclesiastic part, at his coming thither, having expelled their bishop and clergy, and knowing they could not elect another, he being yet alive, and the people ready to receive any impression, he found himself obliged, to tie them to a sole dependency on himself, to overturn the spiritual government de fonds au comble, as the French have it, and yet to make it smoother, he forgot not to put a compliment on the laity by erecting his Consistorial Court with two of them for one of the ministry, to be perpetual judges thereof; but the other set up his doctrine against a government there in being, which ended not with the abolishing of Popery, but still continued, after that was excluded by public order, with railing and stinging expressions against the magistrates of those times, only because they thought it not safe for that kingdom to have the Genevan discipline settled amongst them, and have raised their principles to a higher pitch of antipathy against monarchy than ever the learned Calvin designed, neither Mr. Knox nor his followers suffering their proselytes at all to consider that what the discerning Calvin did in his time was only calculated for the meridian of Geneva, and not so proper or adequate for other situations, whence it has followed that they have so far prevailed with the multitude, that whatsoever is said or done against their Consistorial ways (although there be no fundamental of faith concurring with it), the opposition thereof is presently termed the interest of the kingdom of Christ, and owned for one of the most eminent grounds of their good cause, and therefore, wherever this kind of government has got any footing or been mixed with any other, it has never been at peace till it has justled out the former, and thereby put all into disorder and confusion, every moderator in his presbytery or a general assembly usurping more arrogancy and power than the proudest of all the popes of Rome have ever done, if as blind an obedience were given to the former as has been given to the latter, and of this the late Kings of Spain have had no small experience by the loss of a great part of their Netherland interests, not to say anything of it amongst ourselves in the late evil times, for, when once they come to know their own strength, they grow insufferable, being without any end in their demands, till they arrive at the height of disloyalty and disobedience. Therefore my weak opinion is, that, as I think it not safe to have anything new or unaccustomed put on them (till things grow riper) knowing certainly with what aversion they are prepared to receive it, so I would have them kept low and under by due and proportionable laws made against them without anything of a connivance or indulgence, unless they know how to make better use of it, than they did of the former. If I may be called upon to serve you, either by the pen or to be sent on any secret design, be it never so hazardous, I will undertake it, and through the strength of God perform it. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 76.]
Jan. 17.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About 1 this morning the Nieuport packet-boat went to sea with the mail. Those from Nieuport and Calais are not yet arrived. Several vessels passing by from the westward advise that about the mouth of the Channel near the Land's End they met ten French men-of-war of 50 guns apiece and very well manned. They are supposed to wait there for the Dutch fleet that passed by here yesterday. [Ibid. No. 77.]
Jan. 17.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W.N.W. The Guernsey is at Spithead. [Ibid. No. 78.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant for delivery out of the stores at Kilkenny of one brass defective falcon 9 feet long, and two brass rabbonets to the Bishop of Ossory to be disposed of towards the casting of bells for his new church at Kilkenny. [Dated, probably by mistake, "in the 27th year of our reign." S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 121.]
Jan. 17. Warrant for making free the St. John of London, belonging to James Donalson, of London, a Scotch prize taken in the late war. Minute. [Precedents 1, f. 42.]
Jan. 18.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last Friday anchored in this bay two Scotch ships laden with wine and brandy from Bordeaux in 17 days. The masters say two or three English ships came in their company from thence, and that they left a great fleet there, English and others. To-day they loosed out of this bay and are gone northwards. Wind W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 79.]
Jan. 18.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson and to James Hickes. Excusing himself for not having written the last two posts, having had a great cold. No news. Wind southerly. [Ibid. Nos. 80, 81.]
Jan. 18.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 14th and 15th about 60 merchantmen put to sea from this, bound for several ports in France, wind N.W. The 16th put to sea the Industry and the Lion of Yarmouth with wines for London, the James of Poole from Ave[i]ro with oils for London, the Hopewell of London from Joppa with soap for London, the Hercules of Yarmouth from Bordeaux with wines for Middleburg and several others bound eastward. The 17th came in some small vessels from Wales laden with coals, which report that our Straits fleet is in Milford. [Ibid. No. 82.]
Jan. 18.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. News almost the same as in the last. [Ibid. No. 83.]
Jan. 18. Presentation of Miles Sutton to the vicarage of St. Helen's, Abingdon. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 64.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of the Gatehouse, Westminster, to keep in safe custody Roger Griffith committed for high misdemeanours against his parents, and now informed against for raising and transporting men to be employed in foreign service, till he shall answer before the King in Council for such a transgression and contempt of his proclamation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 122.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Marmaduke Darell about a difference between him and Sir Jeremy Whichcott, concerning the fifth part of the farm of the import on sea coals at Newcastle. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 12.]
Jan. 19. Fabian Philipps to Williamson. Requesting him to speak as soon as possible to the Lord Treasurer that in the disposal of Mr. Hilliard's office of Chamberlain of the Exchequer he would take especial care that Mr. Fauconbridge, who has long been a faithful and able deputy in that office, may be continued in his former employment. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 84.]
Jan. 19. Dr. J. Fell to Williamson. The collection Mr. Scott has made seems to be fully done, he having followed the catalogue lately put out of the books printed since the fire of London. For that reason, I presume, he mentions only the second and third volumes of the Monasticon, but, unless you are certain your friend has the first, it will seem a little odd to send an imperfect book. Moulin's Jugulum Causa is such a vile libel, as ought to be sent no whither but to the flames. The University reasons are verbatim in the history, which I know Dr. Barlow has sent already. The Catalogue of the books in our Library I find omitted in your note, and Dr. Morison's folio specimen of his Herbal, Aratus, Pachymerius, Cole De Secretione Animali, several Latin pieces of Mr. Boyle with some others of little moment, to which might be added Mr. Loggan's Description of all the Public Buildings here, which will make a very fine book, and is now in a manner quite finished. But, if your friend retain our language ever since his being here, as you say he does his affection to our country, I should think nothing could be so acceptable a present as the English books of note which have lately been printed among us. They both by their number and intrinsic value may very well deserve acceptance. If you desire it, I shall draw up a note of such as I conceive most remarkable. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Jan. 19.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Not a packet-boat at present here. Wind still N.W., which to-night has brought cold and ice. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Jan. 19.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.E. No news since my last. [Ibid. No. 87.]
Jan. 19.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 88.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 88 i.]
[Jan. 19?] Note of four caveats entered about benefices, the last being one of that day concerning a prebend at Worcester. [Ibid. No. 90.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Dr. Marshall, Rector of Lincoln College, Oxford. I write from the service I owe to the University where I was educated and my esteem for your person. Application has been made to the King in behalf of Mr. Ratcliffe, Fellow of your college, who has been denied the customary dispensation allowing him further time before entering into holy orders. I advise you to deal as usual with Mr. Ratcliff, unless there be some special reason to the contrary, for his friends here will press the King to interfere. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 182.]
Jan. 19. Caveat that no grant pass of a Prebendary's place of Worcester, before Secretary Coventry be acquainted with it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 6.]
Jan. 20. Notes by Williamson of what had been done in the last two sessions of Parliament and what had been left depending, and of the King's promises in his speech of 7 Jan. and at the recess, and of the reason he gave in Sept. at the Council Board for proroguing the Parliament, viz., to have time to do something he had not yet been able to do. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 90.]
Jan. 20. Notes by Williamson of votes, addresses, and other proceedings during the last two sessions. [Ibid. No. 91.]
Jan. 20.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. Yesterday and to-day was held here the quarter sessions for this division. There have been more guilty of small felonies and petty larcenies than have been known any one sessions these many years, nine having been whipped and branded, besides one felon for stealing a cow escaped. A very hard frost has set in here. It's generally here a very healthful season. [Ibid. No. 92.]
Jan. 20.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About 3 yesterday morning the two packet-boats from Calais arrived each with a mail, and last night arrived the mails from London for Nieuport and Calais. The Calais packet-boat went to sea this morning with the mail, but the Nieuport one, which has been long expected, not being arrived, the mail was not sent away, though a packet-boat lies in the harbour, which will not be employed to go to sea before next Friday. [Ibid. No. 93.]
Jan. 20.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Shipping news. Wind N.E. Yesterday, S.E. Wheat is fallen for the present above 6d. a bushel, though none is come in here from beyond the seas. [Ibid. No. 94.]
Jan. 20. Anthony Thorold to Williamson. This morning arrived the Fellowship of this place from Rotterdam bound for Rochelle. They came out with about 30 sail, some for London, but the greatest part for France. On Monday they met off the Isle of Wight a fleet of 40 sail from the southward with two Dutch ships of war of above 60 guns each for convoy. The master being very sick I could have but little advice from him, only the Dutch privateers come home apace and turn off their men, meeting but little purchase, and that the fruits of war are there very evident, many beggars about their streets, not usual amongst them. The late northerly winds have carried many of our ships outward bound. [Ibid. No. 95.]
Jan. 20.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last Thursday went out together about 200 sail, some home bound, some for France, some for the Straits; the wind northerly. A few small ships are yet here. Four or five came in to-day and last evening outward bound. One from London for Lisbon sprung her topmast, which fell on the mate's head, and he is brought ashore desperately wounded. Wind E.S.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 96.]
Jan. 20. Warrant to Sir Edward Griffin to pay a yearly pension of 52l. to Thomas Wyndham, groom of the bedchamber, to commence from Lady Day, 1673. [Copy. Ibid. No. 97.]
Minute thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 189.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Charles, Lord Buckhurst, of the rank of a Baron of England by the name of Baron Cranfield of Cranfield co. Bedford, and also of an Earl of England by the name of Earl of Middlesex. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 14, f. 133.]
Jan. 20. Memorandum that the Arms of Amsterdam, an English prize, belonging to John Smith of London, merchant, was made free on or about that day. [Precedents 1, f. 42.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting letters patent dated 13 May, 1661, granting to Jerome, late Earl of Portland, and Benjamin Weston (but in truth for Lodowick, late Lord d'Aubigny) a licence to transport clothes and woollen commodities for 31 years, which grant came afterwards to Frances, Countess of Portland, by the death of her brother, the said Lord d'Aubigny, and whereof she is at present in possession, and that the said Countess had besought the acceptance of a surrender thereof and a new grant for 31 years, and a release of the arrears of rent reserved by the said letters patent, for a grant to the said Countess of a licence of transporting and licensing others to transport to any parts beyond the seas in amity with the King all manner of woollen clothes as well white as coloured, unshorn and not fully dressed, for 31 years from last Michaelmas, she paying a yearly rent of 100l., with such privileges and immunities and under such covenants and with all such exceptions, &c., as the like licence was formerly granted to James, Duke of Richmond, and afterwards to the said Earl and Benjamin Weston, with a discharge and release of the rent reserved by the said letters patent up to the date of these presents and a pardon to the said Countess of all errors, &c., committed by her or them in the execution of the said letters patent. [4 pages. Ibid. f. 43.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
The King to Dr. Thomas Seele, Provost of Trinity College, Dublin, and to the Provost thereof for the time being. After reciting that William Palliser, Nathaniel Foye, James Kyan, John Pooley, and George Mercer, Senior Fellows, and Patrick Fitzsymons, Tobias Pullen, Patrick Christian, Richard Acton, Thomas Wallis, Philip Barber, Giles Pooley, George Browne, and William Lloyd, Junior Fellows of the College, have neglected to subscribe the declaration required to be taken by all Fellows of any College before 29 Sept., 1667, by the Act of Uniformity, but that such failure to subscribe was due to ignorance or forgetfulness, and that they have since subscribed the same, commanding him to readmit all the said persons to their respective fellowships according to the seniority each of them previously enjoyed, and further ratifying everything the said Fellows or any of them have done pursuant to the laws and statutes of the said College since their said omission of subscribing. [Nearly 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 275.]
Jan. 21.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind southerly, with fair, frosty weather. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 98.]
Jan. 21.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No packet-boat is as yet returned to go with last night's foreign mail. Wind yesterday N.W., but this morning, with fog and dark, moist weather, it is mostly S.W. and sometimes E. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Jan. 21.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson and James Hickes. No news. Wind S. [Ibid. Nos. 100, 101.]
Jan. 21.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson and James Hickes. Shipping news, the same in both letters. [Ibid. Nos. 102, 103.]
Jan. 21. Memorandum that the King David of Emden, a Scotch prize, belonging to John Smith, of London, merchant, was made free. [Precedents 1, f. 42.]
Jan. 21. Daniel Healy to Williamson. I have written to your Honour from Dublin and several places since concerning a brave estate in Ireland lying in the Queen's County, viz., the town of Tankardstown and the whole manor belonging to it, which is as clear a concealment as any in the world. Since I came from Ireland I have been very ill, but, if you appoint some certain hour, I will come and let your Honour understand all my mind. Over the leaf are particulars of this estate, which, if you but compass it from the King, I will make worth 1,500l. per annum, so that no lord concerned in any estate or interest in Ireland may hear anything of this, till it be at an end, for it would grieve my heart that after a discovery being made how this estate is settled any other should beg it, and then all my labour be lost. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 132.] Annexed,
The said particulars. Queen Elizabeth granted to Capt. Pierce Hovenden in tail male the town of Tankardstown and the manor formerly belonging thereto, which the Captain enjoyed during his life and died, leaving two sons, Walter and Pierce. Walter died without issue, and the younger Pierce had no issue by his lawful wife, but by his cousin, a gentlewoman, had a son, Thomas, who growing up became a Protestant to enjoy the estate. The younger Pierce died of the plague, having made a kind of scroll to his illegitimate son of the whole estate, signifying that he made him heir. Thomas then managed the estates, and called all the tenants to account, and took away their leases and began to give them new, and, because he was a Protestant and a Justice, nobody ever called his patent to account, and married and had sons and daughters, and died in the last wars of Ireland, leaving his eldest son John his heir. Then Oliver Cromwell seized on the estate and divided it between Lord Anglesey and Mr. Walker, who now lives at the manor house. Then John Hovenden sued Walker for his estate in the Court of Chancery, and Walker demurred because Lord Anglesey was not made a defendant, and Walker filed a bill in Chancery against John Horenden, alleging that his father was a bastard, and that he himself was more a right heir to the estate than any now alive, because his mother is of the Horendens. That bill now lies in Chancery, and one of them is afraid to be prored illegitimate and the possessor is afraid to be dispossessed. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 132i.]
[Jan. ?] Similar particulars by Daniel Healy relating to the above property, adding that Walker's mother was a daughter of Pierce Hovenden, the elder, and that Cromwell gave Walker his lot where he pleased to take it, who chose Hovenden's estate, and requesting that Healy may have a letter to the Archbishop of Dublin, the Lord Chancellor, to examine Walker's bill and Hovenden's answer, and hear the evidence that Healy brings, to make Hovenden an unlawful son, and that he may cause Hovenden's patent to be examined, and what year the patent was forfeited, and that he may have another to the Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench to assist him for the maintenance of the King's interest or of any concealments which of right fell to the King, and that in circuits he may assist Healy to maintain any forfeited lands or anything of right which fell or will fall to his Majesty, and that he may in his circuits keep an account in writing of what the said Healy brings before him. Endorsed, "1674/5." [Ibid. No. 133.]
Jan. 22.
Otherby.
Sir William Hartopp to Williamson. I received this morning a request from the Mayor of Leicester, for which town I am a poor servant in the House of Commons, to do him what kindness I could in this affair. It will be before you next Friday at the Council Board. He acted as a justice of the peace. You will have the judgment of 16 persons more of his opinion. The petition he presents on Friday is attested by most of any quality in these parts, and how excellent a man this our Mayor is as to harangue, be pleased to ask Sir R. Carr, whose concern is not inconsiderable in this corporation. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 104.]
Jan. 22.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 105.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 105i.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a lease to Edward Villiers and Richard Brett of all channels, creeks, banks or beds of sand ouse, oyster layings or beds of oysters and marshes belonging to the Lord High Admiral or the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports on the coasts of Essex and Kent thereafter mentioned, viz., Britlesea (Brightlingsea), Sinder Isle, East and West Mersey, Pyefleet, Tolesbury, Fingrego (Fingringhoe), Burnham, Faversham and the Isles of Sheppey and Thanet for 61 years from the date thereof, with a saving of the rights of any lords of manors adjoining the said coasts, and excepting the oyster pits in Britlesea, which are under lease to John Northage, till the expiration of that lease. [Precedents 1, p. 50.]
[Jan. ?] John Grove, master plaisterer to his Majesty, to the King. Petition praying a grant of the place of master plaisterer in reversion to his son, the petitioner having been a great sufferer even to the hazard of his life in the King's service, and having now since the restoration served in making fretted ceilings and other plaisterer's work in the King's palaces and in many public buildings and houses of the nobility, and having many hundred pounds due to him for his Majesty's works. At the side,
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Surveyor-General. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 106.] Annexed,
His report certifying that of late years his Majesty's works and many public buildings have passed through the hands of the petitioner's son, whom he finds sober, diligent, and as skilful in his art as any of his profession. [Ibid. No. 106.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 13.]
Jan. 23. Examination of James Reade, captain of a company in Col. Russell's regiment of Foot Guards, taken before the Duke of Monmouth in answer to articles exhibited against him by Lieut. Harris of the same company accusing him of having injured (i) his Majesty in his musters, (ii) his own company by withholding the pay of some of the soldiers.
As to the first article, it is objected to Capt. Read (1 and 2) that his own man, John Johnson and one Hugh Capon answered to the name of John Inald at two different musters. 3. That in the muster of July, 1674, William Birch and William Crome, soldiers of the Lieut.-colonel's company, answered to the names of Edward Roades and John Stowes, which was not denied by the captain, who answers that Roades and Stowes were both effective men in his company, the first of whom was absent, and the second wanted his clothes, who, being examined, confessed he hired one to answer for him by his captain's direction. 4. That James Hamilton, once a soldier in the said company, was mustered twice after his full discharge. 5. That John Meinfield, now a soldier in the company, answered to the name of Walter Taylor, before he was himself admitted into pay, which the captain does not deny, but says he then gave Meinfield half-pay out of his own purse, and that Taylor was then very sick; 6. That the captain returned a certificate from Rochester to the Commissaries' office that Edward Wittsee, soldier of the said company, was dead and buried, though Wittsee is now living, which the captain did not deny, but says he did it on misinformation; 7. That Augustin (sic) Thurnall personated Joseph Gill before Commissary Clarke, which was attested by the said John (sic) Thurnall, who added he was carried thither by Sergeant Walker, who told him it was the Captain's order he should personate Gill.
As to the second head, it is objected to Capt. Reade: 1. That, when he gives leave of absence to any soldier he stops their pay during their absence and reserves it to his own use, which was not denied by him, who says he uses it as a means to bring them sooner back to their duty; 2. That he often makes formal agreements with his soldiers for their pay, he giving them leave of absence, attested by James Dunbarr, who could not get leave to come from Rochester to London till he had consented to give his captain his pay during his absence, and obtained it on that condition; 3. That when he grants a discharge to any soldier he first articles with him to leave behind his coat, hat, &c. and all his arrears without any compensation, which was instanced in George Stones, who was not permitted to leave the company on any other terms, which the captain does not deny. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 107.]
Jan. 23.
Newcastle.
Cuthbert Dikes to Williamson. In virtue of a post warrant to Lieut. Innes of the Foot Guards, riding towards Scotland, he having his commission, his Majesty's pass and your warrant assisting him, I thought I might without danger press a horse to help him. My servants took one of William Lylborne's, a counsellor in this town, which had a sack of oats on his back when taken. For this Mr. Lylborne arrested me for 200l. and my two servants for 100l. each, in all 400l. He also bound over my men to answer at our sessions, and has put me to much charge and trouble. All the lawyers were against me, saying they would not own any post warrants from any subject, neither Duke nor Lord, for the statute said plainly no man could take any horse without the owner's consent. I pleaded it had been ever practised, when any man rode with commission or warrant, by the deputy postmasters to press horses for such, and keep their own for such as had neither warrant nor commission, as doctors, chirurgeons, or others hastening to see father, mother or relations a dying, whose business might be of as great concern as theirs who had both warrant and commission, but all this would not do, and I was persuaded to submit. He took my 40s. for damage and 23s. for costs, and my own charge was 40s. more, in all 5l. 3s. 6d. It has been many times granted to my predecessors to have a warrant dormant to help them in time of need. The Act says every postmaster must keep a competent number of horses for the supply of the public. How many that may be I cannot get construed, the law being silent. Our lawyers would not meddle in that point. Sir Richard Stote said in his thoughts four for this town was a competent number. I told him I kept six, and to take away complaints and keep my master and me from damage I would keep 8, which to their knowledge was more than my salary would maintain. Oats and hay are so scarce here that poor men cannot keep horses to lend for that service, and rich men will not lend for any money. Sometimes there is occasion for 10 or 12 or more, which it is not in my power to keep without the help of the town or country. My request is that you will write to our magistrates, that upon a great occasion to serve a lord or earl or such like they will grant me their assistance, and for small riding I shall never trouble them. Also for my loss and charge I crave your assistance to get it allowed me, either at the Exchequer or at our office, or where you think fittest. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 108.]
Jan. 23.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday was foggy and rainy, to-day clear and bright, wind westerly. No packet-boat these last 8 or 9 days has arrived from Holland, nor has any gone thither since this day sennight, all the boats being absent by reason of the contrary winds, which nevertheless brought in here a pink from Calais yesterday in little more than 10 hours, whence they also bring us no news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 109.]
Jan. 23.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Concerning the arrivals and departures of the packet-boats to and from Nieuport and Calais. [Ibid. No. 110.]
Jan. 23.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Yesterday a vessel of Amsterdam with salt from Cadiz came into Portland Road after 3 weeks' passage, and there also came in here the David of this port, having 10 days' passage from Portaport, but they bring no news. [Ibid. No. 111.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keepers of the Records in the Tower and at Westminster and elsewhere in England, to permit Mathurin Esnault, who has been sent over for that purpose by the Commanders and Knights of St. Lazarus of Jerusalem established in France, to search for records relating to the said Order or to other Orders hospitaller, military, secular or regular heretofore established in France and to take copies thereof, provided that, when he searches, it shall always be in the presence of a sworn officer, that the Lord Keeper be informed what records he desires copies of and his consent thereto be obtained, and that the transcripts be shown to him before they are delivered to Esnault. [Precedents 1, f. 46.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Being informed that the trial of persons guilty of great and horrid crimes is obstructed on pretence that, though they are notourly guilty by their own confession before the Council or some of them appointed to examine them, or before the Lords of the Justice Court, they are taught to deny and retract their confessions when brought to their trial, and that juries, for the most part consisting of persons altogether ignorant of law, are apt to be stumbled and made believe that such previous confessions are not a legal evidence, whereon they should proceed to convict them, unless they be renewed or adhered to before them, directing them to take some effectual course for removing that obstruction, and for that purpose to appoint a committee of themselves with power to call and meet with the Lords of the Justice Court and with them to consider what is to be done, and what ought to be holden to be law as to such confessions when used as evidences, and if these confessions, being signed by the parties, or, if they cannot write, by those who examine them, should be declared a relevant and legal probation, and such as delinquents cannot evacuate by pretending that they may disown or revoke them because not emitted or renewed at the bar, and to transmit the report of that committee to the King. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 157.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Lauderdale to the Lord President of the Session. Directing that James Binning, one of the outed advocates, be readmitted as advocate, provided he give the Lords of the Session such satisfaction, make such acknowledgements, and show such evidence of repentance as are mentioned in his petition. [Ibid. p. 159.]
Jan. 24. Dr. J. Fell to Williamson. I enclose a hasty account of our English books lately printed, with the prices usually demanded for them. Next post I shall attempt somewhat for Van Tromp, which I wish may be to any purpose. That which concerns Dr. Beeby will, I presume, allow some more time for recollection. It is most worthily done of you to have a concern for the memory of a dead friend, in this age when the greatest part of men have scarce any regard for the living. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 112.]
Jan. 24.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Your packet for the Governor of Barbados I received yesterday. There is not one Barbados ship in the Downs, but some are expected. I shall carefully deliver it to the first that comes in. With the Jamaica ships that went hence about Christmas were several ranting gentlemen, amongst which were two that lay a little way out of Deal to abuse maids. Two they caught one evening, and, had not help come in, they had forced them, both which have been distracted, and this morning one died mad. A topsail gale at S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 113.]
Jan. 24.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Last night arrived the mail from London, but the wind blowing something hard at S.S.W. the packet-boat would not venture to sea, but the master says (I suppose if the weather hold so fair and the wind continue) they will go to-morrow morning. About 11 last night the Calais packetboat landed the mail here. About 30 soldiers (some of them commanders) came over, belonging to Lord Douglas' regiment. They say he himself will be here with the next packet. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Jan. 24.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 115.]
Jan. 24.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. This afternoon are come in here a hundred and odd Dutch ships bound southward convoyed by four men-of-war commanded by young De Ruyter. In their company are about 8 or 10 East India ships. Off the Lizard they met a French man-of-war of about 70 guns, who engaged with the Dutch men-of-war about two hours, who were afterwards parted by a fog. Next morning the said French man-of-war, meeting one of his consorts of 40 guns, came again into the Dutch fleet, where they had a further dispute. The best Dutch merchant ships coming to the assistance of their men-of-war, the French were forced to leave them. [Ibid. No. 116.]
Jan. 24.
Haverford West.
Stephen Kelly to his son, Bryan Kelly, at the Paper Office, Scotland Yard. On the advice of my then next dear old friend I resolved for Ireland and came to Bristol, and continued wind-bound ever after, having four times gone to sea with many good passengers for Cork, and at last turned by the wind to Milford last Thursday within four miles of this, where my friend and fellow collegian Mr. Prynn dwells, at whose house I and another gentleman have lodged very well these two nights past, and this instant return to the ship and with the first fair wind set forth for Cork. I hope you and my son Ambrose are a comfort to one another. Do not trouble yourselves in my behalf, for I shall not want as soon as I be there, but on my blessing to you observe my directions concerning marriage without very great and certain advantage. If I were in your condition, notwithstanding my years, I may, since I parted from you, be worth 3,000l. I must confess that gentlewoman to whom I am engaged has given me such disgust, that I may very well pass humouring and adoring her, but the settlement of my resolved conscience, the duty I owe to God and love I bear her and always did, perseveres me in my old steadfast respects, and I pray God to bless and direct her. Pray give my many acknowledgements and much love to my cousin James Bryan, and direct your first letters to me enclosed to my cousin, Pierce Bryan. My health has been very well. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 117.]
Jan. 24. J. A. to —. There is very little news at present here, but much expected. Some talk there is of a Vicar Gen[eral], and who it is and what he is to do. Also a considerable old S— all friend says that there were intentions in some to have troubled the Nonconformists, and who they were that desired it and some of the reasons they gave for it, but it may not be convenient to insert them here, but, when I see you, I may give you a fuller account, and the same S— also says that since the late defeat given the Ger[mans] by the Fren[ch] there are alterations in counsels on account of the Nonconformist friends, and he seems to have many pretty reasons for it too long to insert here. There is much murmuring amongst some and much hopes in others of great things. [Ibid. No. 118.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Pardon to Jonathan Jennings, late of Ripon, for the killing of George Aislabie, late of the City of York. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 38.]
[Jan. before the 25th.] List of persons convicted at the commission of the Admiralty, viz., seven condemned to death for piracy in taking the Robert near the Vly, in taking goods out of another vessel there, and in taking the St. Anne near the Dogger Bank, one condemned to death for piracy in stealing goods and money out of the Palm Tree of Leith; Bartlet, Herritson and Marshall fined for not striking the flag and lowering the topsail, and six for breaking an arrest. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 119.]
Jan. 25. Sir J. Barckman Leyenbergh to Williamson. Since I saw you, I received two other packets, wherein is a copy of the letter you spoke of, as also a copy of the memorial, which I send you to peruse and copy till to-morrow, expecting a copy of his Majesty's letter to the King of France, touching Moeurs. On the back in Williamson's hand is noted, "Copies of the States' resolutions, the States to the King, the King to the States, two of each for M. Ruvigny, one for M. Leyenbergh. Copies of the King of Sweden to the States, the Swedish Ambassador's memorial at the Hague, all this for this evening." [Ibid. No. 120.]
Jan. 25.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 121.]
Jan. 25.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. There came in here the Mediterranean of London with pitch and iron for Leghorn. She left the Texel about 12 days ago with about 100 Dutch merchantmen for the East Indies and the Straits, convoyed by eight men-of-war, young De Ruyter admiral. The 22nd about three leagues off the Lizard, wind S.W., before she left the fleet, two French men-of-war bore up with the fleet, and they believe there were two or three more, but, the wind blowing hard, this ship made up for this harbour, and, after they were out of sight, they heard several scattering guns, but the wind was so hard they could not fire broadsides, so it is believed they lost one another in the night. Most of the fleet is put back for the Isle of Wight, on purpose to save their light moneys. Yesterday put in here two of the men-of-war belonging to the fleet with a merchantman and two Hamburgers. They have been as far as Mount's Bay. They lost the fleet before the French came up, for they can speak nothing of any fight. They have a Turk's ambassador on board, that has been in Holland, and is now returning. The ship that came from Holland reports they were taking in goods for Smyrna, but there came out an order from the States that no ships should take in any goods for those parts unless they had 25 guns and 50 men, so she having but 10 guns was forced to unload again and take in this pitch and iron for Leghorn. The Dutch were very unkind to him as he came in their fleet, making him bear up for every ship that came near him, and give place. There is a report here that two French men-of-war and three other ships are going from Brest to fetch soldiers from Ireland to serve the King of France. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 122.]
Jan. 25.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. News the same as in the last [Ibid. No. 123.]
Jan. 25.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Giving much the same news of the Dutch fleet and of the two Dutch men-of-war as in the last letter but one with some other shipping news. Here the Turkish Ambassador is said to have come from Sweden, to be homeward bound and then to be going Envoy to Poland. [Ibid. No. 124.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant remitting to Christian Bartelot, commander, and Dirck Geritson and Cornelis Mareshall, mariners, of the ship the Young King of Spain, the respective fines of 400l. and of 50l. each, laid on them in the Admiralty court for not striking the flag and lowering the topsail to the King's ship, the Woolwich, in the British seas. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 121.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to M. de Louvois. I have received your letter of 22 Jan. (N.S.), and I shall wait for what it shall please his Majesty to order about my regiments. Sir [Samuel] Clarke, lieutcolonel of my foot regiment, finding himself advanced in years, and much troubled with deafness, has asked leave to retire, which I have granted, and, to satisfy the claims of Mr. Staniers, Major of that regiment, I have written to him to do the duty of lieutcolonel, but, as I have reasons for not entrusting him with the entire command of that regiment, I should like to recommend a person to you to command it in chief in my absence with the commission of colonel, while always reserving to myself the honour that the said regiment should still bear my name, and obey my orders as in the past. To prevent this new charge costing more to the King, I will give the said colonel all the profits coming to me on account of that rank. I beg you to procure the King's approval of this arrangement. [French. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 18.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney-General for renewing the commission for the affairs of Tangier in the same form as at present, adding only the name of Sir J. Williamson, Principal Secretary of State, with a clause that it be to the present Principal Secretaries of State, and to the Principal Secretaries of State for the time being. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 38.]
Jan. 25. Warrant for a grant to Robert, Earl of Manchester, of the office of Chief Registrar in the Court of Chancery, to hold the same during the lives of his two sons Charles, Lord Mandeville, and Robert and the life of the survivor, immediately after the determination of the present interest of the Earl of St. Albans and Baptist May. [Precedents1, f. 45.]
Jan. 26.
Kirkby.
William Noell to Williamson. As the Mayor of Leicester is sent for to appear before the King and Council about a business which he determined betwixt the Excisemen and brewers, requesting Williamson to let him have his countenance, as he is an honest gentleman and a good subject. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 125.]
Jan. 26.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Early last Sunday came in two of our packet-boats having landed their mails and passengers, one at Yarmouth, the other at Lowestoft, one of which sailed that afternoon with the mails and passengers that waited here. Early this morning came in a third, the master whereof informs us that all the soldiers are drawn out of the Brill, so that the burghers themselves keep the gates, that all thereabouts are in quiet, their trade among themselves quick and open and their only discourse is of a peace shortly to be concluded. The wind has been southerly these two days. [Ibid. No. 126.]
Jan. 26.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosed is the list of part of the ships arrived here last Sunday. The reason you have not a full account is through the neglect of him I employ. To-day the young De Ruyter was entertained at our citadel, where he was welcomed by 11 guns. His ship in the Sound returned the same number for thanks. Here is a friend of mine who desires the Weekly Intelligence as you send me. Wherefore, if you please to send me a double Intelligence every post, I shall desire you to begin by the return of this, and advise me what the charge of it will be. [Ibid. No. 127.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 127i.]
Jan. The King's Paper to the Bishops. "That I would do all I could to suppress the growth of Popery, and therefore think it fit to have the advice and assistance of as many of the Bishops as can conveniently be got together. And I would have you debate and consider amongst yourselves what I can do for the effectual preventing of that danger and the preserving of the Church of England as it is now established by law, and I would have you let me know, as soon as you can, what it is you would offer me in order to these ends." [3 copies, one in Williamson's hand. Ibid. Nos. 128–130.]
Jan. The Bishops to the King. They acknowledge with thankfulness his great sense and care of religion, his gracious condescension in recommending to their consideration a work of so great importance as the upholding of that blessed and glorious reformation under which this kingdom has flourished so many years, and his firm resolutions and unwearied endeavours expressed in his answer to the addresses of both Houses of Parliament, and his proclamations frequently issued and directions given to the judges and justices, notwithstanding which atheism and profaneness daily abound more and more, and defections are frequently made on the one side to the superstitious and idolatrous practices and the usurpations of Rome, on the other to the pernicious and destructive novelties of the various sects raised in the worst of times. Though they are but a small part of their order and of the Church much smaller, they have several times met and conferred together, and having before their eyes in the first place the honour and glory of God they humbly conceive that nothing is more necessary than the suppressing of atheism, profaneness and open and professed wickedness, without the amendment or punishment of which nothing can avail to the preservation of a Church which God has threatened for such sins, unrepented and unpunished, to destroy. In the second place, having considered the laws which have been made for the suppression of Popery and for the support and preservation of the Church of England, they represent as their unanimous opinion that those laws are sufficient for the present securing the two ends propounded to them by his Majesty, and that the most proper and effectual expedient will be, if it shall please him, to give command that the laws may be duly obeyed and executed and to give directions for the removal of such obstructions as have hitherto hindered the execution of them, and also to countenance those who shall conscientiously endeavour that the laws may have their due and regular course and to discountenance those who shall endeavour to obstruct such proceedings, or shall continue refractory and disobedient, and shall pretend to any licence or encouragement to violate the laws. Signed by the Archbishop of Canterbury, and the Bishops of Durham, Winchester, Salisbury, Peterborough, Rochester, Chichester and Chester. [Copy. 3½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 131.]
Jan. [26?] The Bishops' advice about Roman Catholics. 1. That convictions of Roman Catholics be encouraged, quickened, and made effectual; and that to that end his Majesty would be informed how many have been certified up into the Exchequer and that process may issue upon them. That he will likewise be informed what other convictions are preparing, and what hinders the completing of them, and especially that care may be taken that persons of note, who are subject to conviction, be nowhere omitted.
2. That care be taken that no Mass be celebrated in any part of this kingdom, the Queen's chapels and those of foreign ministers only excepted. If any other place be found out where Mass is or shall be celebrated, that there may be a vigorous and effectual prosecution of offenders. That none of his Majesty's subjects be suffered to resort to the said chapels, but such as are menial servants to her Majesty or to foreign ministers.
3. That no person born within any of his Majesty's dominions who has taken orders by authority derived from the Church or See of Rome presume to remain in this kingdom after a day to be prefixed by his Majesty, under pain of suffering the penalties provided by law, and that within this prohibition be understood to be comprehended all such native priests as pretend a privilege to attend at Court or upon foreign ministers.
4. That his Majesty be moved to give effectual order that none be sent to be bred in any Popish Colleges or seminaries abroad, under the penalties of the law, and that such noblemen's or gentlemen's sons as can be discovered to be in any such colleges or seminaries be warned to return, and, if they have parents living within his Majesty's dominions, they are to be commanded to send for their children, as they will answer the contrary at their peril.
5. That if any Papist or reputed Papist presume to come to his Majesty's palace of Whitehall or St. James' or to any other place where his Court shall be, contrary to his late prohibitions, his Majesty would put some public mark of his displeasure upon him.
6. That his Majesty be pleased to take effectual care for the suppression of conventicles, and, whereas they support themselves by pretence of licences and authority from him, he would publicly declare that his licences were long since recalled and that they have no authority or encouragement from him. [Draft. Noted by Williamson as signed by the Lord Keeper, the Earl of Danby, the Duke of Lauderdale, H. Coventry and himself and by the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Bishops of Winchester, Salisbury, Rochester, Chichester and Chester. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 132.]
Draft in Williamson's hand of paragraphs 3, 4, 5 of the above. [Ibid. No. 133.]
A rougher draft of the whole of the above paper also in Williamson's hand, dated 21 and 26 Jan. [Ibid. No. 134.]
Draft of the clause against sending children to Popish seminaries abroad, also in Williamson's hand, dated 26 Jan. [Ibid. No. 135.]
Jan. 27. Methods for executing the above advice. 1. Convictions:—i. The Attorney-General to be ordered to inform himself speedily what convictions are on record in the Exchequer, and to cause execution immediately to issue upon them. ii. That letters be written from the Board to the Justices in the several counties commanding them forthwith to meet and certify his Majesty and the Board what convictions are preparing and what hinders the completing of them, and to take especial care that persons of note be not omitted.
2. To suppress Masses &c.—1. This to be notified in such public form as shall be thought fit, &c., that is, i. what relates to the Queen's and Ambassadors' chapels an order of the Board be printed and posted up, &c. ii. Hereafter, when the whole is advanced far enough and a general declaration or proclamation on the whole matter come abroad, then this to be put in as a part, as well what has been already done by the King in execution of it on his part, as what is enjoined as to this article to all others to do and observe on their parts.
2. As to the execution of what is notified, that the constables and churchwardens be set to watch at the issues of those places to take an account of who comes out, and to seize offenders, and to be enjoined to make searches in suspected places for Masses, &c.
3. Against native priests &c. i. The notification to be provided for in the proclamation or declaration to be issued, and a day to be prefixed now in the Council, by which they are to be gone. ii. As to the execution:—As to the Court by fixing the order at the Court Gate, St. James', and Somerset House for a very short day.
4. Against Seminaries &c. A kind of proclamation, &c., of the contents of this article.
N.B.—His Majesty to direct now in Council that the Secretaries get information, &c., who of note are abroad in seminaries &c.
5. Resort of Papists to Court, &c. The order to be repeated at the Court gates, &c., taking notice of the non-observance of the former orders, &c.
6. Conventicles, &c. The injunction to be by a proclamation, &c. to the effect of this article. N.B.—That this proclamation close with some little door of hope to dissenting Protestants, of what further degree of ease, &c., shall be advised by the Parliament, &c., which the King would be glad could be found out, &c. [Draft in Williamson's hand, headed "To be opened by the Lord Keeper. 1, the Heads; 2, particular remedies agreed upon; 3, the methods for executing it, which are in this paper," and two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, Nos. 136–138.]
Jan. 27.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. I enclose a copy of a letter written by Sir John Pettus to Justice Loane of Beccles. The copy from which I took it Sir John enclosed in a letter to Mr. Hall, one of the justices of this town. In this nature, it is reported, he sends them up and down Norfolk and Suffolk. He has been reported to be the champion for the Nonconformists to solicit for them at Court, and this letter now confirms them in their belief. [Ibid. No. 139.] Enclosed,
Sir John Pettus to Thomas Loane. I know my opposition to Mr. Bowen's alias Bohun's being a justice, against the certificates for him, has admitted of many constructions, and therefore I choose to write to you rather than to any others, because you live in the head town of those parts, and may dispose of the results of my thoughts as you think most fit. I acknowledge I opposed it on these grounds, that I had found him on several occasions of a very flexible and uncertain temper, and thereby apt, without consulting those employed to keep the peace of the country, to run rashly to the disturbance of it on a piece of vain glory or the suggestions of others for secret ends and pernicious for unpeopling and untrading our coast. Next, protesting I have no animosity to his person, yet I thought it derogatory to our Bench that anyone should skip from an informership into a justiceship.
The reason of my opposition was the nature of his certificate, not subscribed by any of us within 20 miles of him, but by gentlemen living 40 or 50 miles from us and him (some not having an acre in the county), and that such should thus impose a Justice on us, without first acquainting his Majesty or the Lord Lieutenant therewith, whereby he is properly the certifiers' justice rather than his Majesty's, nor civilly impart their intentions to the deputy lieutenants or justices of that district for an amicable concurrence. Certainly it is what I dare say they would not admit of from our district, and is a precedent of so ill consequence and strikes so at the rights of our district (having distinct liberties and usages from the other three districts of that county), that I could not but oppose it, for I affirm that all civil and military proceedings in Suffolk ought to have their source and progress from our district (because there lies the danger or safety of our county), and it was never otherwise disposed but upon mistakes (unless when the Committee of the Associated Counties in the time of usurpation constantly sat at Bury), so that, as Mr. Bowen is, as I conceive, the first justice that ever came in among us from the trade of informership, he was the first that ever was intruded upon us by those districts, for, let his other acquisitions or ingenuities be what they will, they were not the objects of my consideration but to support the true and just interest of our district, and therefore neither he nor his relations can justly except against this opposition. These were my essential reasons, yet being informed that hereupon some hot brains have censured me, as if I favoured the Dissenters, because I gave no better encouragement to his informership, I am obliged to justify myself and affirm that I am perfectly fixed to the doctrine and discipline of the Church of England according to the 39 Articles, and this Church teaches me charity, and discretion is but charity in another dress, which tells me there is a time for all things, and I conceive it is as true that the laws against the Dissenters are as open as that the King will not contradict those laws or any good subjects disobey them, but, it being evident that even where the King's residence is the laws in these matters are silent as well against the Dissenters as the Romanists and the like calm against them in most parts of this kingdom, may we not with modesty and safety infer, that, though his Majesty will not at present give any positive contradiction to those laws, yet he cannot but look upon it as a prudent and discreet act of his subjects by his example to use all possible lenity, especially till the constitution of affairs may admit of regulation or suppression?
Besides, he has heretofore tried almost all conceive measures, and now by this almost general connivance does he not plainly, as I conceive, without writing or printing, intimate to us, that he now makes an essay of all plausible and kind ways to win men to our Church, and must we think ourselves wiser than he ? Had I not personally given these kind insinuations to Mr. Bowen before he turned informer (for the other informers were merely by his instigation), I should not have thought myself offended, my duty and instructions being to keep peace. I confess I did not, nor ever will, impart the reasons of my conduct of my affairs but to my equals in commission with me or superiors, especially not to those who have no employment but their own intrusions, nor ought he in prudence or in justice to those who are commissionated with me to have done anything of this nature without communicating his intents to us, his neighbours, who were entrusted with the peace of the county. I will not parallel the cases, but 'tis very well known that Empson and Dudley lost their heads for putting penal laws in execution at unseasonable times, for summum jus est summa injuria even to the kingdom itself, and the discreet timing and executing a law is the true virtue and intent of a law.
Have we not had wars sufficient within and about us, and cannot we now have a little longer patience, rather than try experiments tending to commotion ? Hare we not read how the sudden fury of the Inquisition produced but of late years a civil war with the King of Spain of 40 years' continuance, and did not some such imposition on the Scots in our memory occasion another civil war of above 20 years, and, when there are so many unquiet heads both of Romanists and Dissenters, is it not fit to consider well before we strike at either or both, especially as we are intricated in foreign alliances or neutralities? I hope we may never hear of any prejudice to our Church from either, yet they are so considerably numerous, that I can assure you, they are both now under his Majesty's consideration, and the Bishops' assistance also required therein.
I think no gentlemen among us are so indiscreet as not to refer the result to those who govern us. 'Tis true, as justices we cannot deny an informer, yet where malice, &c. is the foundation, we may assume the prudent management of such cases, so as to preserve peace. However, I still think him not fit to be a Justice, who labours to merit a justiceship by being an informer, and so to crowd himself or be crowded in by others, because he may be a fit engine of their intended disturbances, for, had I not known the design to be so, I should not so freely vent myself, for I have a less doubt of prejudice from the other Dissenters than the Romanists, because these do not allow the very fundamentals both of our Church and State, and so can never be true subjects to this Crown, whilst they are subject to that religion, but the most sober of the other Dissenters agree with us in fundamentals but differ in some part of the fabric, concerning circumstances of government and worship, some of which we ourselves hold indifferent, if the supreme commands did not make them obligatory. Therefore, Rome and Spain having declined fire, faggot and much of Inquisition, and betaken themselves to more subtle means to suppress their opposers and increase their proselytes, let us learn and act by their experiences that there are easier and more certain ways to attain our desired ends than force, which oft exasperates, seldom reconciles.
I wish the Supreme of our Church may still hold the balance in his hands, and look strictly to each scale, that neither the Romanists nor the Dissenters should be forced (flectere si nequeo) to skip for shelter into the Romanists' scale to make it mount beyond the level, whence will follow the ruin of our Church, and next that of those Dissenters themselves.
There are also another sort of men so hot and fiery, so active and inexperienced, who labour much in those things which tend to the disquiet of the kingdom, (of whom we have a great share in this county), and who are almost as dangerous as the other two sorts of Dissenters, for by their indiscreet endeavours instead of suppressing those Dissenters, I dare say that they, though unwittingly and unwillingly, give them the greatest animation and increase.
Of all which premises possibly Mr. Bowen did not so well inform himself, when he went so unadvisedly on his informership. 4 Jan. 1675. [Nearly 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 139 i.]
Jan. 27.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Last night arrived from London the mails for Nieuport and Calais. The latter was sent away in the packet-boat about 6 this morning, weather fair, wind S.S.W. About the same time arrived a packet-boat from Calais and landed the mail. Very few passengers came over and those Frenchmen. They report no news save that a yacht attends Lord Douglas at Calais to carry him up the river, who is expected there as this day. 'Tis said the Nieuport packet-boat will go hence with the mail this evening's tide. [Ibid. No. 140.]
Jan. 27. Congé d'élire to the Dean and Chapter of Ely to choose Dr. Peter Gunning, Bishop of Chichester, to that Bishopric, void by death of Dr. Benjamin Laney. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 64.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Licence to Sir Stephen White, High Sheriff of Essex, to live out of his county. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 7.]
Jan. 27. Commission to John Berkeley to be captain of the company in the King's regiment of Guards, whereof Capt. Read was captain. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book44, p. 9.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant for four commissions for the visitation of the Universities of St. Andrews, Glasgow, Aberdeen, and Edinburgh respectively, the commissioners under each to give an account of their diligence to his Majesty before 1 Nov. next, and revoking all former commissions of that nature. [5½ pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 159.]
Jan. 27.
Dublin.
Robert Leigh to Williamson. I have forborne troubling you since my return, hoping to send you several particulars of things of advantage in the King's gift in this kingdom. Though I have several such things brought to me by friends, I have not yet met with many for your purpose, except such as are already in the lists of some of the grantees that have their orders to the Lord Lieutenant before now, viz., the Duke of Monmouth, the Duchess of Cleveland, Sir Gilbert Talbot, Sir Edward Sutton, Col. Cary Dillon and Lord Ranelagh and his partners, who have many hands at work to procure grants of all manner of titles. However, I doubt not in time to be able to serve you. The clearest thing I could light on now is the case of Mr. Graham set forth in the enclosed papers, whereby you will find that what he desires is absolutely in the King's grant, and is not unreasonable in him to ask, having already the King's letter to the same purpose, though it took not effect, and his ancestors having merited very much of the Crown, as shall appear when requisite, as it will that the person who keeps him out of his ancestors' estate procured it with much injustice. However, Mr. Graham being apprehensive that, whilst he beats the bush, some other may catch the hare, offers to secure you 1,000l. if you procure a confirmation of the King's grant to him of the land in question either in his own name or in yours, and recommend it to the Lord Lieutenant earnestly, or obtain that the patent be passed in England, as you will see more particularly by one of the enclosed papers, the 1,000l. to be paid out of the first rents of the land to be recovered, and he desires to know whether you will patronize him thus, that so he may send over a draft of such letter as shall be requisite, and give security for his performance with you.
I shall use my best endeavours to find out something that may be for your service, and am sure I shall hit upon it at last. It has been the news of this town this fortnight past that my Lord Chamberlain is designed our Lord Lieutenant, but I doubt it has no truth in it. I wish it were, so it stood with safety to his affairs in England. I am confident it could not but do well for his private concerns and your office. Postscript.—Since I wrote Mr. Graham says he is content to give 140l. a year, of the above estate, rather than fail of his just design, if the 1,000l. in money is not sufficient. Lord Aungier kisses your hands. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 134.] Enclosed,
Case between Richard Graham and William Weldon as to the Manor of Raheenderry and other lands in the Queen's County. King James by letters patent of 4 May, 1612, granted the premises to Sir Richard Graham and his heirs, with a proviso that he or his heirs should not alien the same or any part thereof for longer than 21 years without the licence of the King or the Chief Governor of Ireland for the time being, and thereby granted licence to the said Sir Richard to grant the premises to persons therein named for such uses as he should appoint, with a non obstante to the former proviso.
Sir Richard levied a fine and made a feoffment pursuant to this clause to the said persons, and thereby entailed the estate to himself for life, then to Elizabeth, his wife, for her life, then to Thomas, his eldest son, for life, then to John, son of Thomas, in tail male, then to Thomas, second son of Thomas the elder, in tail male, then to the other sons of Thomas the elder successively in tail male, then to the heirs male of Thomas the elder, then to William, Sir Richard's second son, in tail male, with remainders over.
Sir Richard died in 1625, his lady surrived till 1663, and during her life the lands were leased and mortgaged to Weldon, and sold to George Graham, Sir Richard's fourth son, as may appear by deed of sale and recoveries suffered thereon, viz., a præcipe was brought against the lady, and she vouched Thomas the elder, who vouched the common voucher, and by mesne assignment and a mortgage for 1,400l. Weldon comes to be entitled.
The estate by the original entail is now devolved on Richard Graham, son and heir of William, Sir Richard's second son, who brought his formedon for the lands against Weldon, but, being informed by his counsel that by the alienation to his uncle George the lands became forfeited to the King by virtue of the said proviso, obtained his Majesty's letter, that on finding his Majesty's title he may have the same passed to him, which stopped his proceedings at common law. William Weldon soon afterwards by petition informed his Majesty that he and his uncle Robert had purchased the lands for valuable consideration and made great improvements thereon, and prayed a stop might be put to passing the said letters, which was granted till the truth of the petitioner's pretences should be ascertained by a report from the Lord Lieutenant, and that in the meantime his Majesty's titles to the said lands might be found by inquisition. The Lord Lieutenant then summoned. Graham and Weldon and had a hearing before him in the Castle and found that Weldon had only a mortgage and by dragging out Mr. Graham's mother had entered into possession of the estate by force, and doubting the reality and truth of Weldon's deeds issued a commission to examine what sums were lent or paid by Weldon or his uncle to any of Richard Graham's ancestors, what mesne profits Weldon had received since his entry, what improvements had been made by him, and what is the yearly value of the lands. The jury found three of Weldon's deeds fraudulent and forged, and only two good, wherein was a mortgage for 1,420l. due to the said Robert Weldon, the mesne profits 340l. per annum received by the petitioner since Nov. 1663, the improvements 1,600l., and the yearly value of the estate in the petitioner's possession 530l., which return lies now before the Lord Lieutenant, who has since issued his warrant for a commission to find the King's title, which Graham is unwilling to speed, the title in law being already in himself, unless he were assured of having a confirmation of the King's former grant to him before the finding of the said title, and after the finding thereof his Excellency intends to draw his report and opinion therein to his Majesty. [3 pages. Two copies. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, Nos. 134 i-ii.]
Mr. Graham desires, as he cannot pass patent on the King's letter to him by reason of the stop by the letter on Mr. Weldon's behalf, and cannot on his own account procure another letter till the Lord Lieutenant report, which he cannot do till the King's title is made appear, and as, if Mr. Graham should discover the King's title, it's possible his Excellency might procure it for somebody else, that the King's letter may be obtained, strictly commanding the Lord Lieutenant that immediately on the finding of the King's title to the estate the same be passed to— or to Mr. Graham, he satisfying Mr. Weldon out of the mesne profits and in money all such real debts as shall appear by the returns of the Commissions of Inquiry to be due from his ancestors to Mr. Weldon and secured on the estate. As for the satisfaction demanded by Mr. Weldon for improvements, if the case were tried at Common Law no satisfaction would be allowed him, because he made them in his own wrong being but a mortgagee. [In R. Leigh's hand. Ibid. No. 134 iii.]
[Jan.?] Sir Edward Scott to the King. After reciting the order in Council of 5 Dec., 1673, (calendared ante, p. 46) by which a grant of 5,041 acres in Tipperary was ordered to Col. Vernon, with the arrears thereof, except what the petitioner and Maximilian Dempsey had received by virtue of their custodiums and the rents of the lands in their custodiums remaining in the hands of the Remembrancer of the Exchequer or of the tenants, praying a grant to the petitioner of letters patent to the Barons of the Exchequer, requiring them to pay to the petitioner the rents and profits in the Remembrancer's hands, and that he may receive the full rents and profits of his custodium from Michaelmas 1670 till the passing of the grant to Col. Vernon. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 135.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After recitals of various dealings with the lands in question and of the above petition, directing him to give the Barons of the Exchequer the orders necessary not only for Sir Edward Scott's retaining what he received by virtue of his custodium but also for his receiving the rents and profits of the lands comprehended in his custodium remaining in the hands of the Remembrancer or the tenants as prayed in the above petition. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 261.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting the letter of 20 Aug., 1673 (calendared in S.P. Dom., 1673, p. 504) which directed an allowance of the sum of 4,208l. 15s. 3d. paid by Sir D. Bellingham, deceased, as deputy to Lords Orrery and Massareene, and that it is averred that the irregularity of the said payments is only in their being paid after the Act of Explanation, and that it appears by the report of the Lord Chancellor and the Lord Chief Baron and Sir Abraham Yarner as Commissioners of Accounts and by the certificate of the Auditor-General that none of the said payments were ever passed on former accounts or that any allowance thereof was ever given to the said Sir D. Bellingham, and that all the said payments were made in obedience to the directions of the King and the Lord Lieutenant, requiring him to examine the said enclosed report and certificate, and, finding the said several payments to be made as above specified, to cause immediate allowance to be made of the said sum of 4,208l. 15s. 3d. or so much thereof as shall appear to have been paid by the said Sir D. Bellingham and to give forthwith effectual orders to the Commissioners of the Treasury and all others it may concern to allow to Sir Richard Bellingham on his accounts the said sum or so much thereof as may appear to have been paid by the said Sir D. Bellingham, and also that the said Lords Orrery and Massareene be also discharged from the said sums on their accounts, and that the same be respectively defalked and allowed on the accounts of Lord Ranelagh and his partners in pursuance of their contract, and further that immediate orders be given to the Barons of the Exchequer that no further seizure be made of any other part of Sir R. Bellingham's estate on account of the said 4,208l. 15s. 3d. than what is already seized in Tipperary. [Nearly 3 pages. Ibid. p. 264.]
[Jan.] Thomas Eyre to the King. Petition stating that the petitioner in the name of Thomas Barker petitioned the Queen's Board for a lease for 31 years of such things as he should discover and were never heretofore in charge, and for their licence to petition his Majesty for a longer term, which was ordered accordingly, as appears by their order hereto annexed, and that he has discovered several great quantities of barren and waste ground in the manor and lordship of High Peak, Derbyshire, of which her Majesty and her trustees have granted him a lease dated 24 Dec. last for 31 years, at the yearly rent of 50l., which is much too great, for the land is so barren that near the present value thereof must be expended, to make it answer the rent and the petitioner's charge, and therefore praying for a Privy Seal to her Majesty's Council and Trustees empowering them to grant him the whole term they have in the premises under the said rent and without fine. At the side,
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Chancellor of the Duchy. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 141.] Annexed,
His report finding the petitioner's charge in enclosing and improving the premises will be great and the profit not very certain, nor, will it be worth anyone's improving for the term the trustees have power to grant, and therefore conceiving it can be no prejudice but an advantage to grant his request, but that it is not proper to oblige her Majesty's Council to take no fine for increasing the said term. 29 Jan. [Ibid. No. 141 i.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 13.]
Jan. 28.
Colchester.
Capt. T. Reynolds to Williamson. Certifying that Mr. Ardrey, his near neighbour and tenant, is a very sober person and very industrious and willing to take any pains to get money. At the foot,
Certificate by William Shelton, rector of St. James', Colchester, subscribing to the above character, having observed Mr. Ardrey to be devout at church and having never discerned anything but sober in his conversation, adding that he has so much bewailed the miscarriages of his youth, that the writer hopes his present necessities, though in truth urgent, have not only extorted those acknowledgements, but the settled temper of his mind inclines him to sobriety. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 142.]
Jan. 28.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. This good weather we see several ships pass by to the Northward daily, and several of our ships are fitting out. We have an account from Holland of a small vessel of this town, laden with coals, which was judged to be foundered at sea, it having been a-wanting this six weeks. We hear she is run ashore in Friesland, and the master and most of the men lost, with one woman. Only one man is saved, who was the owner, a boy and a woman. [Ibid. No. 143.]
Jan. 28.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About 10 or 11 last night one of our packet-boats sailed for the Brill, but since my last none has arrived from thence. The wind continues southerly. [Ibid. No. 144.]
Jan. 28.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.S.E. No news. [Ibid. No. 145.]
Jan. 28.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. Since my last I had an account of a Dutch flyboat of about 500 tons and 12 guns, which was chased by two French men-of-war, but by the help of a dark night got safe into Foy, where she remains waiting for a convoy. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 146.]
Jan. 28.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Giving the same news as the last. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 147.]
Jan. 28. Sir J. Williamson to the Clerk of the Signet. His Majesty having declared that Dr. Ralph Brideoke should hold his prebend of Windsor and the rectory of Standish in commendam with the See of Chichester, desiring that no grant of the said prebend or rectory pass without notice to him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 6.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Jane Fitch, widow, on behalf of herself and Richard Pight. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 13.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Lord Crofts, praying a further lease for 51 years of the parcels of ground granted to Sir Edward Nicholas and Lord Arlington in the Old Spring Garden, reference to the Lord Treasurer to give orders for such a lease to be passed to the petitioner, or as he desires, or else to make his report on the matter, his Majesty being pleased to gratify the petitioner, if no manifest inconvenience will thereby arise to his service. [Ibid. p. 15.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Congé d'élire to the Dean and Chapter of Chichester, the see being void by the promotion of Dr. Gunning to the bishopric of Ely, with letter missive recommending Ralph Brideoke, D.D., Dean of Salisbury. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 3.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. After reciting the letter of 22 Dec. last concerning the letter of the burroughs, calendared ante, p. 475, and that divers of the outed advocates, if examined, may discover who were the contrivers or promoters of that insolent letter, and that those advocates are prohibited from coming within 12 miles of Edinburgh, directing them to grant warrant to any of them, who shall be cited for that effect, to come to Edinburgh, and remove back to where they were formerly confined within 48 hours after they are examined, and also to give them assurance that whatever any of them depones on oath shall not infer any guilt on the deponers themselves, and further authorizing them to grant permission to Archibald Turner, who has divers necessary occasions requiring his coming to Edinburgh, and particularly the great indisposition of his wife, to come to Edinburgh and remain there two or three weeks at the longest. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 165.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Proceedings before the Council. Whereas the Farmers of the Excise by their petition read the 8th instant represented that Francis Noble and Alexander Baker, two of the Justices and Aldermen of Leicester, on the hearing of an information had in favour of the defendants thereto wilfully made a false and illegal judgment in judging several quantities of exciseable liquors to be beer, whereas in truth it was ale, contrary to the positive evidence of the witnesses, to the great and manifest prejudice of the revenue, which, if not prevented, will be the clear loss of near one eighth of the Excise of all ale brewed in the kingdom, and it was ordered that a copy of the petition be sent to the Mayor and Justices of Leicester, and that the said Noble and Baker should personally attend this Board with an answer; Francis Noble, Mayor of the said borough, this day appearing accordingly and being heard, his Majesty was fully satisfied that he had given an undue judgment, the laws of Excise plainly declaring the gauger's charge upon oath to be good as to the quantity and quality; nevertheless on his humbly submitting to his Majesty and confessing his error, and promising not to offend in the like matter in future, he was pardoned and dismissed from any further attendance. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 148.]
Jan. 29.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. Yesterday Lord Townsend was here, chiefly, as is thought, to encourage Alderman Taylor, who stands for the burgess-ship for this town. Mr. Cooke's friends on the other side are as active to carry on his interest, so that it cannot be well said who is most like to carry it. This place is very healthful, and all public concerns in a well-settled good condition. [Ibid. No. 149.]
Jan. 29.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Mr. George Christie here had an English ship, all Englishmen, come from St. Martin's for London, who says that off Portland he met a double sloop with 4 guns and 45 men with French colours, but the men spoke French and Dutch. They commanded the English master on board, kept the master in his cabin, took out a hogshead of wine, and abused the master. The captain is a short brown man about 30 years old. Divers make the like complaint. The first work the privateers do, [they] take all their money and clothes, and most times drub both master and men. The wind is lofty, between S.W. and S. [Ibid. No. 150.]
Jan. 29.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The East India ship is of 600 tons and is admiral of all those here bound for the East Indies. [Ibid. No. 151.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. 151i.]
Jan. 29. Order for a Privy Seal to the Commissioners of Prizes to pay 200l. to Capt. William Hobbs for bringing home the East India prize, the Europe, taken at St. Helena. If the money arising from prize ships and goods has been all applied to other uses, the same is to be paid from the Exchequer as a free gift and without account. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 190.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a Privy Seal to the trustees of the Queen Consort, after reciting the petition of Thomas Eyre and the reference and the report thereon all calendared ante, pp. 557, 558, authorizing and directing the said trustees to grant to the said Thomas Eyre the whole term they have in the lands mentioned in the said petition under the said rent and with such clauses and covenants as they shall think fit. [2¼ pages. Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 38.]
Jan. [before the 30th.]
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting a grant to the Earl of St. Albans for his life dated 1 July, 1664, of the office of Governor and Captain of the Island of Jersey and of the Castle of Mont Orgueil and Elizabeth and of all fees, rents, endowments, &c., appertaining to the said office, and a further grant to him of the manor or lordship of St. Germain and of the lands, rents and revenues in any manner belonging to the late Priory of Vissett and St. Hylier in the said island and of the advowsons of all the churches in the said island also for his life, and that the King had been informed by the said Earl that Sir Edward Carteret had lately procured a grant to himself or some others in trust for him of the tithes of the parish of St. Hillier in the said island, which had always been paid to the governors and captains of the island, as part of the profits and revenues of that government, and that the King had never intended to diminish the revenues thereof, and that the said grant had been obtained by surprise and practice, authorizing and requiring the said tithes and all other things passed by the said grant to the said Sir Edward, which were parcel of the revenues and profits of the said government, to be duly collected as the same were before the grant to the said Sir Edward, and orders to be given forthwith to the King's procureur or advocate in the said island to issue out process against the said Sir Edward for repealing the same grant so obtained by him. [Draft. S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 27.]
[Before Jan. 30.]
Whitehall.
Commissions for Thomas Arden Price to be lieutenant to Capt. Henry Slingsby's troop in the Earl of Oxford's regiment, for George Wharton to be ensign to Capt. George Legge's foot company in the garrison of Portsmouth, and for Henry Slingesby to be captain of the troop, whereof Sir Edward Brett was late captain, in the Earl of Oxford's regiment. [All dated 1674, in the 26th year of our reign. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, pp. 122–124.]
Jan. 30.
Southampton.
Thomas Butler to Williamson. As he is informed that Dr. Brideoke, Dean of Sarum, is designed to succeed in Chichester the Bishop translated to Ely, requesting that, if his preferments are not all disposed of, he would remember his poor servant, whose family was ruined for the royal cause. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 152.]
Jan. 30.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Thursday evening came in one of our packet-boats, which the day before left the Brill, where the news was that the Swedes had put a stop on a great fleet of Dutch merchant ships in the Sound, on which he reports for certain the price of corn is risen in Holland, and that the Hollanders resolve to march with an army against them. About noon yesterday we had for 3 or 4 hours a great storm, the wind westerly, but to-day with rain it is southerly. [Ibid. No. 153.]
Jan. 30. Warrant to James Beck, serjeant at arms, to take Henry Buckley (Bulkeley) into custody and carry him to the Tower. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 122.]
Jan. 30. Warrant to the Lieutenant of the Tower to receive Henry Buckley, committed for challenging the Earl of Ossory, and keep him during the King's pleasure. [Ibid.]
Jan. 31. John Hall to Williamson. Begging his favourable assistance in procuring him some employ answerable to his education, having had by the fire of London a loss that has been his ruin, and that augmented by the decay of his dearest relations. His partial education with him in Queen's College, Oxford, and his readiness to help friends in distress, has enlivened this adventure. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 154.]
Jan. 31.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. No news. [Ibid. No. 155.]
Jan. 31.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Yesterday arrived here from Falmouth several ships belonging to this Dutch fleet, which were dispersed by a storm. [Ibid. No. 156.]
Jan. 31.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last Friday went out hence the two Dutch men-of-war I wrote of, being ordered to Plymouth by young De Ruyter, their admiral. They said they had not yet account of many of their fleet, so they doubt them taken by the French. Some few vessels came in here since my last outward bound, and some few went out to-day. Wind northerly. [Ibid. No. 157.]
[Jan.] Robert Watts of Romford, Essex, labourer, to the King. Petition for a reprieve to Rebecca, his wife, who has been convicted by a jury and condemned to die next Monday by the Commissioners for the gaol delivery for the liberty of Havering at Bower for murdering a newly-born child about 13 years ago, through the malice of a single person, who swore she had milk in her breasts at the time, to the petitioner's insupportable grief, with whom she has lived as an obedient wife about 10 years. [Ibid. No. 158.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Reprieve to Rebecca, wife of Robert Watts, of Romford, Essex, convicted of having murdered about 13 years ago her newly-born child, and condemned by the Commissioners for gaol, delivery of the liberty of Havering at Bower, Essex. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 41.]
Jan. 31. Pass for 30 horses, mares and geldings for the use of the Most Christian King and the Maréchal de Bellefonds. [Ibid. p. 49.]
Jan. Major Nathaniel Darell to Williamson. Recommending the bearer, Dr. Platt, to him as being the best judge of that most industrious piece of work he is now about, of which he will show him the commencement, hoping to be encouraged to go on, the design having passed the approbation of the University of Oxford, of which he is a member, and of the most intelligent people of this city in things of that nature. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 159.]
Jan. René Petit to Williamson. By my petition, which is to be read to the Council, I represent that I have been banished to my loss. It is true you have kindly ordered me to be paid about 100l., but that sum does not amount to a fourth of my losses, not to mention that of my time, besides that I believe my past services have well deserved it. I hope for the honour of your protection, and that what the King will do for me will enable me to continue to you my very humble and faithful services. [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 160.]
Jan. Lists of New Year's gifts paid that month, amounting to 41l. 12s. 9d., and of others paid by the Secretary of State, amounting to 23l. 9s. 6d. [Ibid. Nos. 161, 162.]
[Jan. ?] Joane Thorndell to Williamson. Petition praying him to remit his fees on account of her great poverty, her husband's transportation having been pardoned through his interposition. [Ibid. No. 163.] Annexed,
Certificate by the Churchwardens and Overseers of St. Mary, Whitechapel, that Joane Thorndell was delivered of a child 5 Jan. instant, and that she has three more children to keep, and that they must inevitably perish, were it not for the charity of the parish, and that they pay her 5s. weekly. 7 Jan. [Ibid. No. 163i.]
[Jan. ?] Chronogram for 1675 and congratulatory Latin Elegiacs addressed to Williamson by D. E. W. [Printed. Ibid. No. 164.]
[Jan. ?] Capt. James Reade to the King. Petition for a pension, having lost five brothers in the service of the late King, having been imprisoned for his Majesty near four months at Leith on bread and water, and 23 months in irons in the Tower, and then banished; has served in all the engagements (but one) at sea since the Restoration, for which he had a foot company given him, which is now (27 Jan., 1675) given to Capt. Berkeley. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 367, No. 165.]
[After Jan. 25.] Narrative by Thomas Bedford, Deputy Registrar of the Court of Admiralty, of the proceedings against three Ostenders for not striking to his Majesty's sloop, the Woolwich, in August, 1674.
On 30 Aug., 1674, about 5 or 6 leagues from Dieppe and about 18 westward from Rye, Capt. Henry Carverth, commander of the Woolwich, then convoying the John and Abraham, a galliot hoy, from the Downs to Guernsey, espied two vessels bearing up towards him before the wind, which was then westerly, which about 3 or 4 that afternoon came up with the sloop, and proved to be Ostend capers, one of 12 guns called the Young King of Spain, Christian Bartlot commander, and the other of 6, called the King's Arms of Spain, Cornelius Johnson commander, and they, being come within shot of the said sloop with their topsails atrip and their pendants flying, one at the main and the other at the fore-topmast head, Capt. Carverth, the ship having then his Majesty's colours abroad, viz., ensign, jack and pendant, fired a gun without shot at them to warn them to strike their topsails to the King of England, which they not doing he fired another with shot, and thereupon the caper of 6 guns fired a gun at the said sloop, and then Capt. Carverth fired another with shot, and presently after the same caper fired another at the sloop, and the other caper likewise fired a gun at the same time at the sloop, and both of the capers came almost aboard her, and demanded why she fired at them, to which Capt. Carverth answered it was done to make them strike to the King of England's colours. Capt. Bartlot replied that he had the like orders from the King of Spain, and both the capers absolutely refused to strike and did not strike, but commanded Capt. Carverth several times to strike, threatening to fire into him and sink the sloop if he did not strike for the King of Spain, which he refused to do, and then the capers seized and carried away the said galliot hoy then under the sloop's convoy, though it sufficiently appeared she and her lading belonged to English, which was testified in the Admiralty Court by the oaths of Capt. Carverth and the boatswain and chirurgeon of the sloop.
Shortly after the said Christian Bartlot and two of his mariners, namely Derrick Herritson and Cornelius Marshall, being met with in England were seized and committed to the Marshalsea and brought before the general sessions held for the Admiralty of England at Justice Hall in the Old Bailey on Thursday, 7 Jan., 1674[-5], and after the charge given by Sir Leoline Jenkins, wherein amongst other things he inserted his Majesty's right to the flag in the British seas as an ancient flower belonging to the Crown of England, the said three prisoners (the bill being found against them by the Grand Jury) were indicted for that they did not upon warning given as aforesaid strike to his Majesty's colours, the time and place before mentioned, the said place being within the British seas, which beyond the memory of man have been within the allegiance and of the dominion of the Kings of England for the time being as parcel of the kingdom of England, and are now within the allegiance and of the dominion of his Majesty that now is by right of his Crown of England, and that by an ancient and lawful custom and prescription observed beyond the memory of man the commanders and mariners of all ships of whatsoever foreign nation sailing on the British seas which shall meet or approach any ship belonging to the King of England for the time being and bearing his flag or colours have used and ought immediately to strike their flag and lower their topsail for a due acknowledgement of the supreme dominion of the King of England for the time being in and upon the British seas. (Then follows a copy of the indictment in Latin setting forth the facts above mentioned.)
On this indictment they pleaded Not Guilty, and were tried by a jury half English and half aliens, which brought them in Guilty on the said indictment, and the Court fined the said Bartlot for the said contempt of his Majesty and manifest violation of the foresaid custom 400l. and the other two 50l. each, which fines, on their petitioning the King and setting forth their poverty, were by his Majesty's favour remitted to them. [12 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. No. 166.]
Eleven copies of the above indictment dated 7 Jan., 1674–5, [Latin, Ibid. Nos. 167–177.]
Jan.
Deal.
Lists sent by James Neale to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 367. No. Date. King's Ships. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
178 Jan. 1 6 59 1 S.W.
179 " 2 6 60 3 S.W.
180 " 3 4 62 2 S.W.
181 " 4 4 69 3 S.W.
182 " 5 The same as before. S.
183 " 7 5 62 0 E.
184 " 8 2 6 0 E.
185 " 9 2 6 0 S.E.
186 " 10 1 2 0 E.
187 " 11 1 2 0 N.E.
188 " 12 1 2 0 N.E.
189 " 13 1 2 0 N.E.
190 " 14 1 0 0 N.N.E.
191 " 16 2 2 1 N.W.
192 " 17 1 3 3 W.
193 " 18 1 2 3 W.
194 " 19 1 1 2 N.
195 " 20 1 1 0 N.
196 " 21 2 2 14 S.W.
197 " 22 2 4 6 S.W.
198 " 23 2 4 0 W.
199 " 24 1 3 5 S.W.
200 " 25 1 3 2 S.W.
201 " 26 1 3 4 S.W.
202 " 27 1 7 3 W.
203 " 28 1 7 0 S.
204 " 29 2 13 0 S.W.
205 " 30 2 13 0 W.
206 " 31 2 13 1 N.W.