BHO

Charles II: May 1673

Pages 197-327

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1673. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1902.

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May 1673

[May 1.] Prince Rupert to the Earl of Arlington. I have ordered my secretary to send you a list of the ships now ready to go forth. We are now going to set ourselves in order to receive the enemy, if he attack us here. Our station will be near the Buoy of the Ose (Oaze) Edge, where we shall ride till the first westerly wind. As yet we have but a few of our small craft. If they may be dispatched to us in time I shall not much fear any disaster. The collier fleet is in sight, by which we hope to man ourself. [Noted as received 2 May. Holograph. Ibid. No. 103.]
May 1. Commission to — Carne to be lieutenant to Capt. Carne in the Marquis of Worcester's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 63.]
May 1.
Victualling Office.
Sir T. Littleton, J. Child, T. Papillon and B Gauden to the Navy Commissioners. Sending the names of seven lighter-men employed by them in victualling the Navy, who have been pressed, and desiring their discharge. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 114.]
May 1.
The Warspite, at Erith.
Capt. Amos Beare to the Navy Commissioners. To-day the Antelope, Capt. White, arrived here with warrant from Prince Rupert to take possession of the Warspite. He tells me the Antelope requires to be docked, in order to which I beg your order to take her into my charge, though all her people will be taken into the Warspite, and, if possible, I will save the spring. In the mean time, if his Royal Highness comes up I will beg the same. I beseech you to communicate the enclosed to the Surveyor. I often send to the Trinity House for pilots, but they commonly fail me. I now want one for the Warspite. I beseech of you one word to the Trinity House.
Postscript, 2 May. By 4 this morning his Royal Highness has given me the charge of the Antelope, to save the spring, if possible. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 115.]
May 1.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner Deane to the same. The Portland at her going from Spithead yesterday grounded on Nomansland, and lay about three glasses, but, I suppose, had little damage, for they went to sea, after getting off, and followed the convoys. The Resolution has all on board ready to sail, being wholly fitted. The vessel to take in the provisions and luggage of the Royal Charles is very much wanted. Pray let her be hastened away, ere the ship go out, to receive all on board that the captain desires. A great many soldiers are on board each ship, and, if it be not resolved how they shall be victualled, the ship's provisions ordered for 4 months from 1 April will prove but little when the Prince comes to join, and those ships will be in want almost by the time they should go to sea, which seems of so much concernment that I could not omit the desire of speaking with the Prince about it, if in town. Isaac Betts at Harwich, who took care last year of all the ships which came in and were fitted, doing the duty of a master shipwright's assistant when they were cleaned, prays you for some reward. If it might stand with your liking to give him 30l. for his year's service it would much encourage him. He is there at all occasions and has my direction to do whatever you please to employ him in, and, if he were not there, the King must be at three times as much charge to do that duty if ships come aground there. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 116.]
May 1. Indenture between Sir T. Chicheley, Master General of the Ordnance, of the one part, and Viscount Ranelagh of the other part, witnessing that the latter had received 500 pistols with holsters at 23s. 6d. a piece, and 500 carbines at 22s. a piece, amounting in all with the price of the vats for packing them in to 1,143l. 2s., which the said Viscount promises to pay to the Treasurer of the Ordnance Office out of the revenues of Ireland within two years, according to the King's warrant of 29 March last. [Copy. Printed form filled up in handwriting. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 148.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the report of the Committee of Trade to whom the petition of Thomas Canham and others, merchants of London, concerning the St. Peter of Hamburg, was referred 18 April, that the Earl of Arlington write forthwith to Sir William Lockhart, the Resident with the French King, to insist on restitution of the said goods in the same course as is afforded the French in like cases, and that the Hamburg agent be asked to write to their Resident at Paris to assist therein. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 104.]
[May ?] Vartanes di Chelehat, an Armenian merchant, to the Duke of Ormonde. Petition stating he had two bales of silk on board the Landsman, which was taken by one of his Majesty's ships, and that his Majesty had given to the rest of the petitioner's fellow countrymen 100l. each, which the petitioner by reason of his absence and having no friend here but his factor, Jan Nazaro, a stranger, could never receive, though he has waited six months in hopes of obtaining the same for the petitioner, and praying him to move his Majesty for the same allowance to the petitioner. [Ibid. No. 105.]
[May ?] The same to the Earl of Arlington. Petition identical with the last. [Ibid. No. 106.] Annexed,
Notarial certificate dated 10 Nov., 1672, Leghorn, by Giovanni di Racket and Ouanes di Sarucana, two Armenian merchants, that the petitioner is a resident there. [Italian. Ibid. No. 106 I.]
Bill of lading dated 19 January, 1672, Leghorn, of the two bales of silk. [Italian. Ibid. No. 106 II.]
May 2.
London.
Certificate by Pedro Juan and Chaire de Vetier of Armenia that the petitioner is the person that laded the two bales of silk on the Landtsman. [Ibid. No. 106 III.]
[May ?] John de Nazar, Armenian merchant, to the Earl of Arlington. Petition. His Majesty having sent to his Lordship a petition presented to him by the petitioner for his bounty in recompence for the loss of his goods, as he allowed the petitioner's fellow countrymen, praying him to take course therein for his relief, as he in his goodness and wisdom shall think fit. [Ibid. No. 107.]
[May ?] Clemiett de Mechitar, an Armenian, to the King. Petition for speedy dispatch of his cause with the Commissioners for Prizes for restitution of his own goods taken in a Holland vessel by his Majesty's frigates and also of other goods which he holds in trust for the Turks and for which his wife and children are hostages, the petitioner being now old and having served his Majesty's subjects in Smyrna near 30 years. [Ibid. No. 108.]
May 2.
The St. Michael, Buoy of the Oaze Edge.
Prince Rupert to the Earl of Arlington. We are just now setting sail, the wind N.W., for the Downs. Our intelligence is that De Ruyter with some ships is in the Schoneveldt. I have sent two frigates to discover the truth. In the meantime I shall endeavour the joining of our squadrons before I attempt any other design. As yet I can hear nothing of our friend, Mr. Holland. I appoint him to be in a dogger with his crew, but there's no news of either. I think it will be necessary to look after him. [Holograph. Ibid. No. 109.]
[May 2?] Note that Capt. Robert Holland went on board the Tulip dogger by the Prince's order, and sailed from London towards the fleet on Friday, 2 May. [Ibid. No. 110.]
May 2.
8 a.m. The St. Michael, at the Edge of the Buoy in the Nore.
Capt. Hartgill Baron to the Earl of Arlington. Just now his Highness has weighed anchor, wind N.W. and a good gale, so I hope we shall make a good proceed to-day in our design for the Downs. A person from Ostend was just now on board the St. Michael, who informed his Highness that from the tower there he saw 36 ships of the Dutch behind Blaekenborough sands and said that the Zealand fleet are not yet near ready, and that the Admiral had not 30 men on board these. I shall give an account of what happens remarkable in the fleet. As I have formerly been a lucky instrument to carry a great deal of good news to his Majesty, I hope I shall never have any other to present. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 111.]
May 2.
8 p.m. Sheerness.
Major N. Darell to the Earl of Arlington. I am just returned from the fleet, which anchored about three this afternoon, the Red squadron below the Shoe and the Blue not far from it, the fireships a league beyond them. The mist occasioned their anchoring sooner than they would have done. The wind is still N.E. and begins to blow this evening. [Ibid. No. 112.]
May 2.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wishing that he may be successful in the negotiations committed to his care, and recommending to him James Crosse of Southampton, a good merchant, who proposes to wait upon him in his voyage, and whose business is, as he believes, in his own way of trade. [Ibid. No. 113.]
May 2. Inland advices received that day. Harwich, 1 May.—Yesterday sailed by the coal fleet for the River, about 200 sail, the rest having remained at Yarmouth. Portsmouth, 1 May.—Wind E.S.E. The Guinea and Barbados ships, &c., are sailed with their convoys. Falmouth, 28 April. —The Recovery of London arrived from Bordeaux says there were then at Rochfort about 50 great men-of-war, and that most of them were in good readiness, and would put to sea in 8 or 10 days. Weymouth, 29 April.—The French man-of-war that has been some time in Portland Road sailed yesterday for Brest. Hull, 30 April.—Last Wednesday Capt. Thornton's company marched from Ferrybridge to Doncaster. A Swede came in from Bordeaux. Southwold, 30 April.—The collier fleet is passed for the River. They met several capers but received no harm, being secured by their convoys. Pendennis, 28 April.—Last Saturday came in a vessel of Falmouth laden with tobacco from Avenna (Havana). She went out again next day, but was chased by a Dutch caper, but whether taken or not we know not. [1¼ page. Ibid. No. 114.]
[before May 3.] Sir Thomas Clarges to [Williamson ?]. Requesting him to inform Lord Arlington that he left this note at the Duke of Albemarle's request, desiring that the commissions to Thomas Woodward and —Gibbs in his regiment be dated 3 May, because it is the day of general muster. [Ibid. No. 115.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
The King to Sir Robert Wiseman, Advocate-General. As Sir Fretcheville Holles was at his death indebted to the Crown in 1,500l. and left Dame Elizabeth Holles, his widow, but no issue, and appointed Sir Robert Clayton and John Morris his executors, but as they have not taken upon them the execution of the will, nor renounced the same, the money cannot be recovered, requiring him and Samuel Francklin, the King's procurator, to summon the said widow and executors and all others interested before the Judge of the Prerogative Court, that the said executors may be compelled to accept or refuse the execution of the said will, and in case of refusal by the executors and by the other persons entitled to administration with the will annexed, requiring the judge and surrogate of the said court to grant administration to Sir William Turner of the Middle Temple for the King's use. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, p. 145.]
May 2. Commission to Robert Browne to be lieutenant to Major Porter in the Duke of Buckingham's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 61.]
May 2. Commission to Henry Belasyse to be captain in Lord Belasyse's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
May 2. Commission to Philemon Manwaring to be captain in the Marquis of Worcester's regiment. Minute. [Ibid. f. 62.]
May 2. Commissions to Thomas Oldfield and William Morgan to be lieutenant and ensign in Capt. Manwaring's company. Minutes. [Ibid.]
May 2. Commission to Thomas Mathews to be captain in the Marquis of Worcester's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
May 2. Commission to William Mathews to be ensign in Capt. Mathews' company. Minute. [Ibid.]
May 2. Commission to Sir John Hamby to be captain in Lord Belasyse's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
May 2. Commission to — Merick to be ensign to Capt. Barton (?) in the Duke of Buckingham's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
May 2. Commission to — Fage to be ensign to Captain Theodore Russell's company in the Marquis of Worcester's regiment. Minute. [Ibid. f. 63.]
May 2. Commission to — Burgesse to be ensign to Capt. Carne in the Marquis of Worcester's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
May 2. Warrant for a licence to Sir Nicholas Slanning, to exercise for 14 years his invention of a cheaper and more excellent way of melting, forging and refining iron, and other metals, with turf and peat, to the great preservation of wood and timber, which of late years has been very much destroyed by reason of the great quantities daily used in iron and other mineral works. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 199.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Henry, Earl of Norwich, Earl Marshal of England, granting to Margaret, widow of the late Thomas Danby, the precedence which she would have held, if her father, Col. William Ewer, who was killed at the battle of Hessom Moor, fighting for the late King, had survived her grandfather, William, Lord Ewer, Baron of Witton, and become Lord Ewer, and directing him to register these presents in the College of Arms. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 200.]
May 2. Minutes of the business of the Board. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 117.]
May 2. — Porter, purser of the Dragon, to the Navy Commissioners. According to your order of 25 April on the bottom of my petition that I should give a list of those who had been paid, and also of those who had not been, I certify that none received anything from me, except 18, whom I lent moneys to, which will be answered me again when their short allowance is paid. Therefore my seabook is a list of 190 unpaid. Now, forasmuch I have not wherewithal to satisfy those people who daily perplex me, both men at sea and women ashore, who are strange creatures to deal withal, who will not hear any manner of reason, I humbly beg you to order me a bill for this short allowance. [Ibid. No. 118.]
May 2.
The Warspite.
Capt. Richard White to the same. I am come up to Erith by command of his Royal Highness to take command of the Warspite, and by his order have carried with me 130 men. I desire you would send me 150 tickets by Lieutenant Culpeper, and also that I may have a small vessel to attend for the getting of men. [Ibid. No. 119.]
May 2.
Scarborough.
Isaacke Newton to the same. I have sent you a list of volunteer seamen from the Vice-Admiralty of Yorkshire, and have noted as well as I could who went by sea and who by land. Scarborough has outdone all the rest of the ports here, both in the number of men and the least charge in conduct money, as shall appear when I return my accounts to the Navy Office. Hull and Bridlington might have afforded a great many more. Though my deputies at both are honest and active men, yet extraordinary things from the inhabitants of those places are never expected by me. [Ibid. No. 120.]
May 2.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner Deane to the same. The wind presenting this morning the Royal Charles and Resolution set sail to Spithead. With this little trial of the Royal Charles we conceive she will answer expectation. [Ibid. No. 121.]
May 2.
Dartmouth.
Thomas Norman to the same. According by your orders of the 25th I have sent away to Plymouth to Mr. John Buckham, deputy Vice-Admiral there, for Capt. Colt and others of his Majesty's ships 134 men, a list whereof I enclose. What other men come in from the country I shall also send thither. Also by way of Poole I have sent about 10 more to be sent to Portsmouth. I have several others impressed, and hope to have them to send next week. A fleet was seen off our port going westward. What they were I could not learn, though with my own boat I endeavoured it myself. If not a Dutch fleet, I conclude them to be Ostenders, Hamburgers, Danes or Swedes. I have advised at Plymouth of it, that, if the enemy, notice may be given you or his Royal Highness. Several guns were shot in the offing, which, if friends, I conclude was feasting. I believe they could not pass without being met by some of his Majesty's ships to the Eastward, if any were cruising. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 122.]
May 2.
[Received.]
Phineas Pett, shipwright's assistant, to Lord Brouncker. Having been for several days visited with a Woolwich ague, so violent that it has hindered my addresses to your Lordship and the Board of late, the alarm and warning that sickness gives to all creatures to prepare for death enforces me to beseech you to speak to Sir T. Allin for the dispatch of my Scotch affair. I have many a time pressed it, and had a grant that the first leisure time it should be done. I desire nothing but what is just and right. The prejudice both of body, family and loss of time is well known, besides the hazards and difficulties I ran in my faithful endeavour to make that a real service to his Majesty. I hope, through your favour and help, I may have the credit due on the account, and such an allowance as has been customarily given for a salary. If able I shall tomorrow write more at large to the Board about it. Thirteen shipwrights and four labourers were lent Capt. Beare on Saturday to sail the George fireship. They have carried her to the Buoy of the Nore, and the commander keeps them and will not let them return to their work. It is of bad consequence in the discouragement of the men, besides a hindrance to the works. The bearer's husband, William Duckworth, is one of them, and she comes to solicit you for redress. [Ibid. No. 123.]
May 2.
Navy Office.
Certificate by Sir J. Smyth that John Geare, formerly purser of the Guinea, has cleared his victualling account for the said ship's company between 8 May and 9 Oct. 1667, and that he has no other account depending in the office. [Ibid. No. 124.]
May 2. Tender by Sir W. Warren of New England plank at 3d. a foot. [Ibid. No. 125.]
May 3. Advices received that day. Harwich, 2 May. — Wind E. Yesterday we heard some guns. Capt. Thurston in the Essex ketch had a rencontre yesterday with a Dutch privateer, wherein he spent about 40 shot, besides those shot from Dunwich and Aldeburgh, whereabouts they met, where the Dutchmen with 8 guns pressed after the rear of our collier fleet, attempting to take some. She was well manned, but perceiving she could do no good made the best of her way home, and, the wind being easterly, our ketch could not gain anything on her. Aldeburgh, 2 May. — Wind N. and by E. About 9 to-day the Dutch fleet of about 70 sail, great and small, came into this bay, but kept their course southward, making no stay. They fired two guns. They were about three leagues off. Ostend, [30 April]/10 May.—Just now appears in sight a fleet, supposed to be the Dutch, above 70 in number. It is mighty calm weather, and late, so that we can hardly perceive them. Our little boat, I believe, is among the said fleet. It is believed they are very ill manned, and that they will keep close to this shore. All our discourse here at present is of war, they making what preparations they can, and breaking all the bridges on the river of Ghent and Bruges to hinder the passage of the French. Leghorn, 14/24 April. — Though the Holland privateer Dolphin would not be invited out of Porto Ercole by the Dartmouth (that is still at sea) firing a gun before that port for that purpose, we hear this morning he has sent out his boat and taken a considerable French bark from Marseilles with goods for Rome and Naples. It is said all his men have left him to about 20, and that he will be hardly able to get from whence he is. [1¼ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 116.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Capt. William Stevenson to be lieutenant to Capt. John Seymo[u]r, and to George Coe to be ensign, and to Anthony Stampe to be lieutenant to Lieut.-Colonel Sir Ralph Knight's company respectively in the Duke of Buckingham's regiment. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 84 and p. 90.]
May 3. Commissions to Robert Seppen to be lieutenant and to William Hewitt to be ensign to Capt. Warwick Mohun in Lord Vaughan's regiment. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 59.]
May 3. Commissions to — Gibbs to be ensign to Capt. Lassells, and to — Woodward to be lieutenant to Capt. Sydenham, both in the Duke of Albemarle's regiment. Minutes. [Ibid.]
May 3. Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor General for a pardon to William Calverley, for rasing, counterfeiting or altering any writs or processes of the King's Bench, or other proceedings at law. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 38.]
Docquet of the above pardon, dated 8 May. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 334.]
May 3.
Woolwich Yard.
Capt. Amos Beare to the Navy Commissioners. Thomas Storme has supplied his Majesty's ships all this winter with ballast, and I have employed his lighter in several works. I should have had a lighter of ballast on board the Warspite 30 April, which is yet wanting, by reason of this man's being forced out of his lighter and his servant beaten and abused very much, but I am not yet informed whose men they were. Without your order for the pass and repass of this man or some other the service will suffer. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 125.]
May 3.
The Henry, below the Shoe.
Capt. John Wetwang to the same. I am very well manned with volunteers, who came up in our ketch and the colliers to the number of 200. The ketch's victuals being expended I beg he may be new victualled. [Ibid. No. 127.]
May 3.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to the same. I thank you for the assurance in yours of the 1st, viz: not to be against anything that may tend to my advantage, which I acknowledge must arise only out of my obedience to his Majesty and a satisfaction in doing my duty; but for pay, salary, &c., as I never had anything heretofore, so for this I never expect any, and to this day the money expended in my Holland journey is not fully paid, about which I never troubled you, knowing it was not under your cognizance. I am further confident your provision therein is chiefly cautionary, viz: that his Majesty's naval affairs suffer not, and an unnecessary charge be occasioned, neither of which I am or will be in the least guilty. I have got supplied the necessary wants of the Swiftsure, as the boatswain and carpenter partly acknowledged yesterday. I could never get them to set down their demands regularly, but just as coming to make use of things they found the want of them. Their supplies from above being set down as sea stores, they would not contribute anything out of them to furnishing the necessities of the ship. As soon as they have finished I will make up this account, by which, and the bills of lading she received, you will easily judge how provided she will set to sea. I know no remora at present from anything I am concerned in, even by Mr. Kirke's own confession. The Essex ketch came in yesterday, and received your orders for victualling. She had a contest with a privateer of 8 guns on Thursday off Aldeburgh, and by it, as the captain reports, secured the rear of our great collier fleet. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 128.]
May 3.
between 4 and 5 p.m. Harwich.
Silas Taylor to the Navy Commissioners. I had closed up this enclosed with an account of what was judged, that Prince Rupert was sailed yesterday as low as the Shoe Beacon, which was brought me by John Westbrowne, master of the Barbabella ketch, a tender. He saw them sail at about 8 or 9 yesterday morning. This morning we saw a fleet lie before us, as soon as the sun had chased away the mist, although it was hazy, of which we could give no certain conjecture. Considering the wind and tides we concluded it was not the Prince, but at last the certainty was attempted to be known, and getting to a fair sight of them, they were found to be the Holland squadron at anchor, about 48 sail under 3 flags. They anchored behind Bawdsey Sand and the Sledway. Just before sealing this I perceive them under sail, standing Eastward, wind S.E. I know not but they may have a sight of the Prince, which we have not yet on shore. [Ibid. No. 129.]
May 3.
The Deal dogger, in the Downs.
John Fox to the same. By Capt. Wylde's order the Deal dogger sailed westward to impress men, and in the action my boatswain had the hardship to break his leg, so I greatly fear his performance of our voyage. Therefore I humbly request your pleasure therein. [Ibid. No. 130.]
May 3.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner Deane to the same. In answering yours of the 30th desiring my judgment as to Mr. Eastwood's allowance for purveying the frame timber in the New Forest, I conceive it worth 3s. a load for what was hewed, amounting to about 260 loads. As for his attendance at London, he was from hence above a quarter of a year, and, as he affirmed, it was to attend the passing his accounts at the Navy Office, the truth of which I refer to your examination, and, if found true, to be allowed as it seems fit. When I was at the Board, it was desired I should think of some subsistence for him, to ease his Majesty of making him a superannuated officer, both to do the King some service and himself to live. I believe bearing him on the hulk at a shipwright's pay, and allowing him one servant, will do very well, and then, as the custom is, he shall be charged with all the careening stores, which he can do as well as a younger man. I pray that the 100l. for beginning the work in the New Forest may be impressed to William Collings, a person fit to manage that work to all our contents. Lastly, let me earnestly pray the present sending down of the warrant for the trees, which I mentioned in both my former letters. The moulds are ready, the season spends, and our men lose time. If the southward ships come not in here, we can discharge 30 caulkers, some joiners and others. If it be thought convenient to discharge any, I shall send up the number we can spare, and what the money may come to to pay them off. Our poor men beg your favour to remember the Lord Treasurer of their wants. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 131.]
May 3.
Bradnam, near Bridport.
Capt. Sir Roger Cuttance to the Navy Commissioners. I received a letter yesterday from the masters of the vessels which are returned to Weymouth, without receiving their freight for the naval stores they carried to Portsmouth from Mr. Steventon, because, as he said, he had lost the letter I wrote to him giving an account of what tonnage each had, and what per ton, and that you had written to me that he was to pay them according to the agreement. I beg you would order him to pay the freight to the party who carries the other letter I have now written to Mr. Steventon of the tonnage and freight. [Ibid. No. 132.]
May 3.
Bristol.
Christopher Griffith, Mayor, to the same. Enclosing a further list of the seamen who have been enlisted by him, and have received the bounty and the conduct money, hoping they have all appeared on board the several ships according to their engagements. [Ibid. No. 133.]
May 3.
Bristol.
John Young to the same. Giving an account of the progress of the new ship being built by Mr. Baylie, and beseeching a supply of money for himself. [Ibid. No. 134.]
May 3.
Drury Lane.
The Earl of Anglesey to Lord Brouncker. I have spoken lately with the Lord Treasurer about the payment of 3,000l. to me, of what is due for a year last Christmas, whereof I have consented 1,500l. should be used for the Chest on the condition before agreed, that when the Auditor has finished my account, which I daily importune, it be repaid me again, if so much does not remain due on my account. I desire therefore that warrants may be granted for two 1,500l., whereof I will assign one as aforesaid, and that the other may be sent me. I desire your Lordship and the Board to call Mr. Waith and Mr. Fenne before you to adjust the accounts of the Chest, and to discover what money is in their hands, that it may be speedily paid to the Chest as far as due, or to me. [Ibid. No. 135.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant for the further adjournment of the Parliament, which stands adjourned, from the second Wednesday in June next to the second Wednesday in November next. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 179.]
May 3.
Dublin Castle.
Warrant from the Lord Lieutenant to Mr. Oliver Plunkett [titular Archbishop of Armagh] to meet Sir Hans Hamilton and Sir G. Rawdon at Drogheda on the 7th for answering such questions and declaring his knowledge in such matters as they shall propose to him. [Copy. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 149.]
May 3.
Lisburn.
Lieut. Lancelot Bolton to Viscount Conway. Repeating his inquiry if the men quartered at Ballinderry are to provide for their horses as they are quartered, with their landlords, or appoint them to graze with the troop in the field, and in the latter case, as it is not to be expected they can carry their saddles and arms 7 or 8 miles on foot to their duty, desiring his lordship's orders to remove them to Lisburn, and asking permission for Mr. Cruikshank, who has been very ill, to go to Dublin with Sir G. Rawdon's troop and answer the duty of a man of theirs left with the writer, as he has such a desire to see his wife and settle his affairs. [1¼ page. Conway Papers. Ibid. No. 150.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting the letter of 31 Jan. last (calendared in the last volume of the Calendar, p. 500) and that it appeared by the account taken in pursuance of the said letter that there remained unpaid of the sum chargeable on the Farmers for Customs and imported Excise from 15 March, 1671–2 to 15 Jan. 1672–3, 21,500l., requiring and authorising him to give immediate and effectual orders to them to pay into the receipt of the Exchequer in Ireland without delay all the sums they have detained of the rent payable by them from 15th March, 1671–2 till the 1st instant, excepting 12,000l. which the King is pleased shall continue in their hands for answering what he shall think fit to allow them on their pretences to defalcations on account of the present war, and also excepting what by the letter of 14 Dec. last they were permitted to stop towards the reimbursement of their advanced money, and, in case they neglect or delay to pay in the moneys so detained except as hereinbefore excepted, or shall from the said 1st instant stop any part of their rent without an order first obtained, or shall not pay in their rents reserved quarterly, requiring and authorising him not only to cause strict proceedings to be taken against them there, but also to cause the Lord High Treasurer of England to be certified thereof, that such further proceedings may be taken against them in England as shall be thought fit, and further directing him to give strict and effectual orders to the said Farmers and to the Commissioners of the Revenue and to the Commissioners of the Treasury there, that, as often as moneys be paid into the Exchequer or assignments given into the country in discharge of any rent due from the Farmers, the sums so paid or assigned be applied to the rent of some one branch of the revenue and not be paid or received on account in general of the rent of the said farm, the contrary practice having already occasioned great uncertainty in the accounts of the revenue. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 427.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 151.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Directing a grant to James Hamilton, Groom of the Bedchamber, in fee simple, of the towns, lands and hereditaments in the liberties of Galway and the counties of Wicklow, Queen's County and Longford, specified in the schedule calendared ante, p. 186, to be held at the present rents, and further directing him to cause such commissions to be issued as may be necessary for ascertaining the title of the Crown to the said premises. [Nearly 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 429.]
May 4. Nicholas Oudart to the King. Petition, praying him to order such way to be taken for his restitution, by the offices of the plenipotentiaries with whom he is going to the treaty, to his estate and employs, as shall be thought meet, a paper of his sufferings and grievances being formerly presented to his Majesty, the Lord Chancellor, and the Secretaries of State. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 117.] Annexed,
Copy of the said paper, calendared ante, p. 91. [Ibid. No. 117i.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
Circular letter from Williamson to Col. Gylby, the Earl of Ogle, the Governor of Scarborough, and to Sunderland, Whitby, Bridlington and Boston. Informing them that the Dutch fleet, about 70 in all, of which 46 or 48 are judged to be men-of-war, appeared on Friday morning off Aldeburgh, and were at anchor yesterday behind Baudsey Sands, and by his Majesty's commands desiring them to signify it to all neighbouring parts on the coast in order that all vessels may be warned to look to themselves, and those bound southward are not to stir till further order, or till they are assured of the way being cleared. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 118.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissaries General of the Musters for mustering during their absence Benigne Ragoeis and John Christmas, trumpeters respectively in the King's and the Queen's troop of Guards, appointed to attend the Ambassadors extraordinary going to the treaty of peace at Aix-la-Chapelle. [Sign manual. Countersigned "Arlington." Ibid. No. 119.]
Minute thereof, dated the 5th. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 61.]
May 4.
The St. Michael.
Prince Rupert to the King. The Holland ships, which came to make use of their sinkers, are now returned to the gross of their fleet in the Sledway. Your Majesty will receive from Lord Arlington what we resolved here, and our humble desires to your Majesty and his Royal Highness in order to your service. I am doubtful the orders given to the ships in the Downs to come round by Long Sand Head may prove prejudicial, the enemy lying where they do. My hope is, the wind being not very good, they will not venture out, and will have the alarm time enough to prevent mischief. Here are some great ships as yet very ill manned. As to the French Ruby, Rainbow and Unicorn, the sight of the enemy and turning down hither has hindered sending the muster-books your Majesty gave order for, but I hope they will be ready by the next. I beseech your Majesty to order that the Sovereign and the rest may be hastened down. [Holograph. 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 120.]
May 4.
The St. Michael, near the Buoy in the Middle Ground.
Prince Rupert to [the Earl of Arlington]. On intelligence sent this morning from Harwich, I called a Council of War at Sir John Harman's, where were present all the flag officers and many seacaptains. My letters from Harwich telling me that the same advice was sent overland to you I need not repeat that. Our result to-day was, that all the rest of our ships yet in the River and also fireships and small craft may be speeded away to us, and likewise the Sovereign and Victory at Sheerness, and the small craft there also, and that his Majesty will write to Comte d'Estrees to sail with our ships at Portsmouth in company with the French fleet to the Downs or the back side of the Downs (? Goodwin), we conceiving, and on very mature deliberation, that, if they come thither, I shall with our fleet here drive the enemy to a great strait, and securely join with the French fleet. I have written this also to his Royal Highness and desire your furtherance in this. If the French fleet is not arrived, or does not think fit to sail, let our ships hasten to the Downs. I am sorry our ships in the Downs are ordered hither. The enemy now being at the mouth of the channel I apprehend them in danger. Misdated 4 April. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 121.]
May 4,
5 p.m. Sheerness.
Major N. Darell to the Earl of Arlington. Sending the following copy of Sir E. Spragg's letter to him which he has just received by his boat he sent for intelligence, viz:— Yesterday morning being at the Shoe Beacon, we discovered the enemy, who were at the west end of the Gunfleet. Our scouts make them 28 in number. We are using our utmost endeavours to welcome them. If the wind ever so little favour, we will drive them out or on the sands. If they are stronger than I mention I suppose they will attack us this morning. All our small frigates, fireships and tenders are to the eastward of us. I expect to hear of them this tide, if at all; if not, they will retire. The Prince, half way between the Middle Ground and Shoe Beacon. 4 May. With notes on the back by various postmasters of the times they received and dispatched it. [Ibid. No. 122.]
Sunday night
[May 4 ?]
[Lord Arlington] to Sir J. Williamson. The French comedians complain they shall find little or no convenience for the transportation of their goods and persons on board the ships. You understand the King's mind enough towards such occasions to afford them all possible facility and to assure them yourself of it. Likewise his Majesty would have you accommodate a gentleman of quality of Piedmont, the Count de Solar, who has taken leave of the King and Queen this evening, with a passage in your yacht. [Ibid. No. 123.]
May 4.
Woolwich.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. As in his letter of the 2nd, calendared ante, p. 203, using the attack of ague he is suffering from as an argument for payment for his Scotch affair. Postscript. There is a small bill in my Lord's hands for my extra allowance for Sheerness, which others have received in the like case long ago. If you speak to my Lord to order the same it will be a great help to me and my family in my present sickness. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 136.]
May 4.
The Warspite, at the lower end of the Hope.
Capt. Richard White to the Navy Commissioners. The 4th we weighed and anchored at the lower end of the Hope, where we stay for our powder and shot. Had it been aboard we should have got to the Buoy of the Nore this tide. I hear a great many men are pressed into the Tower. The want of a ketch has been a great hindrance of this ship being manned, so I would desire you to order me a vessel, and to speak to his Royal Highness to order me a proportion of men. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 137.]
May 4.
The Happy Return, in the Downs.
Capt. John Stanesby to the same. In pursuance of yours of the 1st I sailed for Dover, where Mr. Daukes surveyed the bowsprit, and finding it very bad went immediately for Foulstone (Folkestone) where he had a galliot hoy's mast, which however proved much too little and also rotten. He has sent me word he cannot do anything to the assistance of my bowsprit, but only acquaint you with its condition, which I hope may produce an order to some other place. To-day I received an order to stand into the Downs where I am now at anchor, and to-morrow shall sail towards the Prince. [Ibid. No. 138.]
May 4.
The Cambridge, against Grays.
Capt. Arthur Herbert to S. Pepes (Pepys). I left London in such haste that I had not time to apply for some blank tickets for our discharged men, having several of them dead, and their relations continually soliciting me for their tickets. I desire you will deliver 100 to my purser, Mr. French, and beg I may have my bill of imprest made out, for my lieutenants have been at very great charge in re-manning our ship. We are now under sail, and intend to go as low as the wind will serve us. [Ibid. No. 139.]
May 4.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to the King. Concerning the proposed grant of the Phoenix Park and Peter Talbot. (Printed with some verbal differences in Camden, Essex, Vol. I., p. 80.) [4 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 152.]
May 4.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to the Earl of Arlington. Concerning the Phœnix Park and Peter Talbot. (Printed in Camden, Essex, Vol. I., p. 84, where Sir Hary Hamilton should be Sir Hans Hamilton.) [2 pages. Ibid. No. 153.]
May 5,
5 a.m. Sheerness.
Major N. Darell to [the Earl of Arlington]. I hope your Lordship has received the letters Capt. Crow brought me last night from the fleet, which I sent up to Chatham with great difficulty, it being a very hard matter to get boats here at this time. Therefore I beg that two or three small ketches be appointed to wait here to carry your letters while the fleet is on this coast. I have likewise desired Lord Winchilsea to appoint three or four orderly men to be constantly at Queenborough to convey to the posthouse at Sittingbourne such letters as shall come to me from the fleet. I have heard nothing from the fleet since last night. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 124.]
May 5,
9 a. m. Sheerness.
The same to the same. Having hired a ketch this morning to carry a letter to the Prince, he met Sir J. Chicheley's tender, and gave him the letter, and afterwards a ketch from the fleet told him that yesterday there were about 36 sail of the enemy at the Buoy of the Gunfleet in sight of our fleet, and there they continued till 4 in the afternoon, being half ebb, and then stood off to the Long Sand Head to the remainder of their fleet, which the ketch man judges to be 60 sail. At 7 this morning our fleet was riding about the Middle Ground with their anchors apeak, and ready to sail, intending to fall down the following ebb. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 125.]
May 5.
11 a.m. Sheerness.
Major N. Darell to the Earl of Arlington. Even now I called a Heligolander ashore, who confessed to me in private that he was on board De Ruyter yesterday, who has 70 great ships, and is resolved to sink 17 in the Middle Ground, to which end he uses all the art he can to tempt the Prince towards him, and is resolved to sink four at Harwich, of all which I am just giving the Prince an account by my boat. The Heligolander came over the Flats, I suppose by De Ruyter's order, to miss the Prince. [Ibid. No. 126.]
May 5.
Buoy of the Middle Ground.
Prince Rupert to the King. Though our foe have not taken the opportunity of this N.E. wind, and therefore it is not likely they will as yet attempt anything upon us, yet, if they should get positive orders or be better fitted from home than perhaps they are at present for the like attempt, this post will not be maintained but with the loss of ships, and doubtless we shall lose more than if we made an attempt on them. Wherefore the opinion of most and the chiefest of our officers is, that, on the first opportunity of a fair wind, we set sail and make our way through the enemy's fleet, which consists at present, as far as I can yet learn, of 70 ships, 42 of them men-of-war. I therefore most humbly beseech that all things necessary may be sent to strengthen us. Sir James has the particulars, besides the Navy Commissioners. [Holograph. 2 pages. Ibid. No. 127.]
May 5.
The St. Michael.
Prince Rupert to the Earl of Arlington. A dogger was brought me, having on board three Dutchmen and an Englishman, their pretended master, laden with lobsters to be delivered at Queenborough. That the goods may not be damaged I have given the Dutchmen leave to proceed to Queenborough with their lobsters and a letter to the Mayor there to secure them till further order from you. I shall keep the Englishman here. I am most confident they have been with the Dutch fleet, and they cannot give any satisfactory account of themselves. A person on board says he knows these Dutchmen very well, and that they belong to Zerick Zee. [Ibid. No. 128.]
May 5.
The St. Michael, going to set sail from the Middle Ground.
Prince Rupert to the Earl of Arlington. The Dutch are out of sight. Whither they are gone is as yet unknown. They took the opportunity of a fog and deceived all our frigates. If there be any fear, it is of those ships which had orders from his Royal Highness to move from the Downs. If any harm come to them, I hope his Majesty will remember it comes by cross orders, which I beg may be hindered hereafter. Sir J. Worden has sent orders to the captain of the French Ruby to send an officer with pressed men to London upon some information. I have made bold to put it in my pocket. We are now making all the haste we can out of this Narrow. [Originally dated the 5th but altered to 7th but endorsed as received the 6th. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 129.]
May 5. List of books, French, historical, &c., purchased by Williamson from Mr. Scott, from 6 April, 1672, to 30 Jan., 1673, among them being Paradise Regained, price 3s., and various works of Heylin, Ussher, and Selden, some being apparently intended as gifts to Queen's College, Oxford, the total price being 81l. 13s., with note of payment thereof on the above date. [Ibid. No. 130.]
May 5. Commission to Thomas Rous to be lieutenant to Sir William King's company in Lord Power's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 59.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
Recommendation to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Col. John Fitzpatrick desiring a reference of what he has to allege touching the grant to him of the quit rents of his estate in Ireland, to which some stop has been put. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 67.]
May 5. Warrants to the Lord Chancellor for putting the Great Seal to two commissions respectively appointing the Earl of Sunderland, Sir Leoline Jenkins and Sir Joseph Williamson to be Ambassadors Extraordinary and Plenipotentiaries to treat for peace with the United Provinces, and Thomas Chudleigh to be Secretary of the said embassy. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 39.]
May 5. Minutes of the business of the Board. [3½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 140.]
May 5. Four protections from the press for one month to four sailmakers employed by Thomas Edmondson on his Majesty's works. [Printed forms with blanks filled up by hand. Seals. Ibid. Nos. 141–144.]
May 5.
Woolwich.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. Reminding them of his letter of yesterday about his private affairs. Last Saturday the Antelope arrived, ordered hither by his Royal Highness for a dock. Though as yet we have had no order from the Board concerning her, yet knowing it will please you that all possible dispatch be given her, we intend to-day to bring her into the dock, hoping thus to get her work dispatched so as to launch her this week, to save the present spring tides. The workmen the George fireship carried off with her will be much wanted here again. I spared them only to help him to sail from this place, he promising to return them the same night, and he keeps them of his own head, without any order from you, a thing prejudicial to the service. The caulkers lately returned to Deptford will be much wanted here for the Antelope. Wherefore I desire your order to Deptford for sending them, otherwise the Swallow's work will be obstructed. The commander of the Royal Katherine had his pinnace you ordered, and the four boats for the doggers will be speedily ready. [Ibid. No. 145.]
May 5.
Woolwich Yard.
Capt. Amos Beare to the same. The 20th I had 13 shipwrights of Mr. Pett to help down the George fireship and likewise sent four labourers on board. This I did in pursuance of Prince Rupert's order given me by Capt. Legg. The five riggers I had were dispersed in other ships. I ordered those men to anchor in the Hope, and so to come from her, and had a boat with them for the purpose, but when come into the Hope Capt. Marshall gave them fair words to go down into Lee Road therenigh, and forced them to anchor. Next morning they desired they might be gone, as I had directed them, but the captain's reply was, he was now in sight of the flag and out of my reach, and forced them to bring the ship to sail, and got down to the fleet. Last Friday two of them got hither with the boat and with Marshall's knowledge. However, before they came away they had been with the Prince, who told them they should remain, till he could provide others for the ship. I am at a very great loss for these men, for their wives are very unkind in their language to me, for they had nothing with them more than what's on their backs. I beg three or four lines to his Highness for their release, and your letter to Capt. Rooth for my ten riggers, or else you may expect to hear of my end very shortly, for what with carpenters' wives and riggers' wives, I am not able to stand it long, but shall be forced to fly.
The 2nd his Royal Highness gave me his verbal order to take charge of the Antelope, then at Erith, and if possible, to save the spring. I hope this tide we shall get her into the single dock. Capt. White has taken all her men save 20 soldiers. Within this six weeks her forefoot has spoiled two cables. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 146.]
May 5 and 18. Receipts of the above dates by Aloisio dello Re, notary of the magistracy of the armaments, for sums of 206 and 144 scudi received from Jean Bardou and William Flas (Flawes) in payment for two slaves and one slave respectively bought for the service of his Majesty of England. Italian. With certificate in Latin at foot by Nicolas Cotoner, Master of the Knights Hospitallers of St. John, that the said dello Re is a public notary and is notary of the magistracy of the armaments. Seal of the Master impressed. [Ibid. No. 147.]
May 5–17. Eight notarial acts, of the sales at or between these dates at Valletta of various Moors, Turks, Egyptians and negroes, by various persons to Jean Bardou and William Flawes for galley slaves, attested by Pietro Fiore, of Malta, notary. With certificate at foot, similar to the last, by N. Cotoner, that the said Pietro Fiore is a public and credible notary. Seal of the Master impressed. [Latin. 20 pages. Ibid. No. 148.]
May 5.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to Lord [Arlington]. I find here 1,421l. at the King's disposal, in the hands of Thomas Taylor, being part of the balance of Sir G. Carteret's account. The whole balance stands thus. There is decreed against Sir R. Bellingham, son of Sir Daniel, about 17,000l.; besides, this Taylor is to pay the above sum, and has the money ready; there stands to be received of Corker 1,600l., which three sums compose the whole of Sir G. Carteret's balance. His Majesty has already granted 2,000l. to Secretary Coventry, 1,000l. to Sir G. Carteret, and another sum to Mr. Legg, but all these are expressly charged on Sir R. Bellingham's part, so that this 1,421l. remains clear for his Majesty's disposal, and also the 1,600l. on Corker. My desire is that you will move his Majesty that I may have a letter to receive this 1,421l. from Taylor, to employ it on such public occasions as I shall think fit. There is the harbour of Kinsale to be cleansed, a most necessary work, and persons already bargained with for 500l. to do it, and I cannot find any other means to effect it. This 1,421l. was discovered by one Claypoll, who pretends a debt from his Majesty part paid in some former governor's time, and he says about 150l. remain due to him. If he proves it a just debt, I shall compound it as low as I can, and pay him out of this money. The remainder I shall employ on some public works here, and render an exact account of laying it out. As soon as I find how the other 1,600l. rest, I shall, if his Majesty approve, make the like proposal for that, and, in regard there is no self interest or profit to any private man in it, I hope I shall not be denied in either. Since my last, Peter Talbot presented a petition to the Council, whereof a copy is enclosed. The substance and almost the very words were contained in a petition he presented to me a few days before, and I had answered, that I would put the business in such a way of examination as I should think fit, and that he might satisfy himself, that neither he nor any other should have any injustice done them. Now his presenting this his second petition to the Council was looked on by them as a great contempt of me, and in the nature of an appeal from the Lieutenant to the Board, and thereupon they all generally resolved to commit him, but I was willing enough to have his commitment suspended, so we only gave him a reprehension and dismissed him. [2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 154.] Enclosed,
Peter Talbot to the Lord Lieutenant and the Privy Council. Petition, the same in substance and almost in words as his former petition, calendared ante, p. 186. Noted as read at the Board 5 May, in the petitioner's presence. [Copy. Ibid. No. 154 i.]
May 6. R. Ferguson to his wife. I was much surprised on my return yesterday to find thee gone, and very much troubled to understand the cause, which I did by Mr. Berry's letter. I hoped to have heard to-day how you got down and how you found Mrs. Berry. None arriving heightens my fears. I pray the Lord she may escape, and that in a failure of other means he would exert his own immediate wisdom, power and goodness in raising her up. If Mr. Berry thinks I can serve him by consulting any person about her I shall be ready to do it. If thou returnest not to-morrow, fail not to let me hear from thee. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 131.]
May 6,
past 5 a.m. Sheerness.
Major N. Darell to William Bridgeman. I received yours about 4 this morning by the messenger, and have taken all care to speed him away in the Spy sloop, who cannot go before 11, it being now against wind and tide, and the wind strongly contrary at N.E. [Ibid. No. 132.]
May 6.
Sheerness.
Major N. Darell to the Earl of Arlington. Sending an enclosure just received by his little yacht from Prince Rupert. [Ibid. No. 133.]
May 6,
5 p.m.
Major N. Darell to the Earl of Arlington. I hope before this you are satisfied from the Prince that De Ruyter's fleet consists of about 70 sail, sinkers, fireships, men-of-war, and attendants, which is the account the Prince has from his own scouts, the menof-war being but 42. The Diamond is just come into the Swale. To-day at 11, 17 boats came out of the fleet, and just then his Highness fired a gun to sail from the buoy of the Middle Ground. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 134.]
May 6.
The St. Michael, near the Buoy of the Middle Ground.
Capt. Hartgill Baron to the Earl of Arlington. Major Darell has sent an express with the news he had from a Heligolander. His Highness hopes the 70 ships will not be thought men-of-war, for his scouts bring in the same number, among which are 42 men-of-war, as I suppose his letters have already given you an account of. He spoke with one on board that spoke with the same Heligolander, and gave the same account as to number. Little more has occurred here since his Highness' last to you. We have an ill wind at N. and by E., and it blows hard. [Ibid. No. 135.]
May 6. Commission to William Stowe to be ensign to Sir John Hanmer in the Duke of Buckingham's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 61.]
May 6.
Victualling Office, London.
Sir T. Littleton, J. Child, T. Papillon and B. Gauden to the Navy Commissioners. We shall do what is possible about the immediate victualling of the 10 ships you mention in yours of to-day. We conceive if your victualling vessels were ready to take in the said provisions, it were much more certain than to send them down in hoys, but, as it is your order, we shall comply therewith. All the Newcastle's provisions are already shipped off, those of the Dartmouth, Portsmouth, Pearl, and Success we have ordered to-night from Ipswich, and to the others we are shipping off from hence, and give directions to the masters of the hoys to pursue the directions you have given us. In reference to the extra water-cask this is the first intimation we have had that you expected to be furnished with any from us for the water-ships, and therefore we have not made such preparation, as we would have done, had we received earlier notice. We shall forthwith get ready what we possibly can, but desire that the price and manner of payment may be first settled. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 149.]
May 6. Commissioner Tippetts to the same. Being now ready to take boat, and uncertain of the time of my return, I thought it necessary to acquaint you that the horse-boat is come up to Deptford, and, if you judge it convenient, may carry water down the River to some of the men-of-war, but, if you do not employ her otherwise, I desire she may take in 10 or 15 last of tar for Chatham ropeyard, and make up her loading with what else is ordered of the late demands of that yard, whereof Mr. Hayter can give you an account. I have consulted our stores of masts and considered the enclosed tenders. If you can have a pennyworth of the number and sizes undermentioned you may do well to buy them. Of the other from 20 hands to 13, there is sufficient in store. The timber mentioned in Mr. Lewsley's letters may be worth the buying. With list at foot of the masts wanting at Deptford and Woolwich. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 150.] Enclosed,
Thomas Lewsley to [the Navy Commissioners]. Having received your order for the speedy supply of Deptford stores with 60 loads of elm timber, I have an account of 50 loads in 50 pieces, lying at Snodland in Kent, and not knowing at present where a better parcel may be, nor on better terms, I lay the same before you. The above timber may be delivered into the stores at Deptford for 40s. a load, ready money, which I apprehend to be near 5s. cheaper a load than any of the like quality will be bought this year, for what elm was felled last year is now generally expended. The whole charge of the parcel will come to 100l. ready money. 5 May. [Ibid. No. 150i.]
The same to the same. I lately received a second letter from Mr. Gibbons of about 1,000 loads of oak timber, out of which will arise a considerable parcel of compass and some knees. The straight timber will mete at 60 feet, and he will deliver it at Chatham dock for 44s. 6d. a load, 500l. in hand, the residue as the timber shall be delivered in, discounting the imprest. 5 May. [Ibid. No. 150 II.]
May 6. William Yeames and three other boatbuilders to the same. Requesting that their bills for boats built for the present expedition, which were supplied at a very low rate, might be assigned for speedy payment. Noted, that Mr. Yeames was called in and acquainted that their bills should be assigned in due course. [Ibid. No. 151.]
May 6.
The Hawk fireship, Deptford.
Capt. John Lukes to the same. Requesting them to order him three small guns, as he has but three on board, and likewise his small arms and ammunition, and such things as they know are necessary, adding, that he intends to sail to Woolwich that evening's tide, and to remain there till he waits on them for his orders. [Ibid. No. 152.]
May 6.
The Sovereign, near the Black Stakes.
Capt. John Hayward to the same. I have received the 49 pressed men on board, and from Chatham 36 who were riggers, and the greatest part decribed (decrepit) men and boys, for they kept all fit for service to themselves. I intend to set the greatest part of them ashore. We have on board, soldiers and all, 650, amongst whom I cannot find above 120 seamen. What I shall do for men to sail the ship, I know not. I beg your assistance in taking what care may be at London for men, for now no ships come by here, nor are any men to be had here. I have sent my lieutenant to London to endeavour what he can for procuring men. Most of our provisions are on board. My carpenter is very sick, and, I fear, he will not be able to proceed. His mate is a very able and industrious man, and is not unknown to the Board, as appears by his certificate. I desire he may proceed as his deputy for the voyage. [Ibid. No. 153.]
May 6.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner Deane to the same. The yacht being near finished, we think to launch her this week to hasten the setting the mast, and to rig her to get about the first opportunity. I wrote long since for such old lead and iron as the stores afforded, which was promised to be sent about in the White Fortune, but was not. I must desire a present letter from the Master of the Ordnance to Mr. Bennett here for about 20 tons of shot of 24 pounders or other to ballast her, and, when she comes about, it may be taken out, and such iron weight put in as Sir T. Chicheley desires to have made by Mr. Hooke for an experiment, and I shall send some moulds how big they may be made, so that, till we have an order for shot, the vessel cannot come about. I therefore pray it be speedily done, for we shall very much want it. The warrant for the timber in the New Forest is not yet come. I pray it may not be forgot to be sent down. Enclosed is a tender of 470 trees to make 658 loads of oak timber at 40s. a load, which will be of great service. It is extreme good and great lengths, all top trees out of copses, and for the very same we paid last year 43s. a load. However, if we shall have it, I shall endeavour to get abatement or at least take off the imprest. Beforehand we must buy timber while it may be had, for I find not a load of plank intended to be sawed, and so, if occasion, we must cut out of our own timber or else repairs cannot go on, when ships come in. We have a bare yard, in so much as the Reserve's works must-cease, had we not got a good load of timber of Mr. Moody's here in town, for which I have promised payment. I hear of but three more parcels of timber in these parts. If tendered, I hope we may have your concurrence in the purchase, if a pennyworth can be had. I shall send the price and quantity.
Should it happen the enemy should engage the Prince in his passage this way, and the fleet should come shattered, I do not see what can be done for their supply, the remaining part of our small stores being sent in the White Fortune towards the supply of Plymouth stores, and what remained has been spent in supplying several ships come in for repair and sent to sea, as long as we had either sails, cordage, anchors, cables, or masts. There was always a demand sent up for such commodities from London to complete every ship, but none came except a little in the White Fortune and this last hemp and cordage from the Dutch prize at Portland, so that we are extremely barren of all other things, if the fleet comes this way and is in want, which I speak of, that a provision may be made, if any likelihood of action this way. We are in great want of the handscrews sent about for repair. I pray two dozen pair may be sent about with the White Fortune. The winds continue easterly, so that the men-of-war designed for the Downs, if not other ways ordered now we hear the enemy is out, cannot sail from Spithead. Capt. Haddock expects to sail the first opportunity if not contradicted. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 154.] Enclosed,
The said tender by John Player and William Oxford. [Ibid. No. 154 I.]
May 6.
Plymouth.
John Lanyon to the Navy Commissioners. Giving an account of the progress of the repairs of the Hunter, and recommending John Bone to be her master, as Erasmus Joy, previously recommended, has since shipped himself in another vessel. [Ibid. No. 155.]
May 6.
Plymouth.
Capt. George Colt to the Navy Commissioners. I began on my ship last Monday by order from a letter Mr. Mayor had from you, and question not but to have her ready that day three weeks, and fear nothing but the want of three great guns and small arms, for they have left her very bare of all those stores. We have enough here of all else, and find Mr. Mayor very willing to supply us. I have all my officers but my master, which Mr. Mayor desires the recommending of to you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 156.]
May 6.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner Deane to Commissioner Tippetts. We have no oars in stores, nor enough for the fleet and sloops which are built. The last 50 dozen sent about has drained us dry, but, if we can procure any against the White Fortune come, they shall be sent. I wish she were arrived, being wanted. I suppose Capt. Salesbury will send you up the account of what is in stores which is little or nothing more than the last hemp, and that inconsiderable if the fleet arrives here, when there comes not a ship to Spithead but wants supplies, but, if the fleet have any loss of anchors, cables, masts or sails, there can be no expectation of being supplied or fitted here. There is a general want of all other stores, as has been often repeated, for, since the survey, nothing has been demanded more than to fit out the ships under repair, and of that a great quantity which was to come from London was never supplied, so that all the stores we had at the survey have been spent to supply such ships as have been fitted from time to time, and should have been supplied from London, had it been intended we should have a store with us, and what we had left was sent about to supply the wants of Plymouth. I hint this lest you should think us to be in any condition of supplying the fleet, if an engagement should happen, as the Prince is coming about, and the enemy at sea, who may perhaps force him to fight on unequal terms, which I wish may not fall out, lest it bring us to extreme straits. I believe you have laid the barrenness of the stores of the other yards as well as ours where it concerned you, but, if they be not supplied for a second fitting out the fleet which may soon be called for, let me beg for the King's safety, the nation's good, and our own security that the state of the stores be pressed home, and that money may be procured to provide what can be had, before so pressing occasion happens, as will unavoidably fall out if the fleets engage, and ours returns very much shattered. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 157.]
May 6. Capt. Jasper Grant to W. Hewer. Requesting him to send by the bearer 10 blank tickets to discharge some men that lie in town before he goes away. [Ibid. No. 158.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Whereas the late Commissioners for executing the Acts of Settlement and Explanation by their decree of 1 Jan., 1668–9, adjudged that 1,500l. was due to Richard, Earl of Burlington and Cork, out of the arrears of rents and securities belonging to the '49 officers pursuant to clause 198 of the Act of Explanation in compensation of several lands and houses in the town and liberties of Youghal, which have been since evicted from him, and whereas, notwithstanding the said decree and the King's letter of 18 April, 1671 (calendared in S.P. Dom. 1671, p. 193) no part of the said sum has yet been paid him, directing him to give all necessary and effectual orders for the speedy paying to the said Earl of the said 1,500l. out of the rents and profits which have or should have been received by Sir Alexander Bence and Edward Corker or either of them out of the lands and securities belonging to the '49 officers since 30 Nov., 1660, or to cause to be assigned to the said Earl for the said sum such good bonds or other securities as he shall accept, and as have been taken for the better securing of the said rents and profits due to the said '49 officers, and further ordering him to cause a list to be brought him of all such rents, profits and securities belonging to the '49 officers as have been or ought to be received by any persons intrusted by or on behalf of the said officers. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 430.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 155.]
May 7,
12 noon. Sheerness.
Major N. Darell to the Earl of Arlington. I have just received intelligence that Prince Rupert reached near the Gunfleet last night, and by daybreak this morning weighed, so it is guessed that before night he will be at sea. The enemy's fleet lies between the Whiting and the Long Sand Head. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 136.]
May 7. Commission to William Belasyse to be lieutenant to Capt. William Broxholm in Lord Belasyse's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 61.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
The King to Denzil, Lord Holles, and other trustees of the Queen. As in 1661 Agardsley Park, part of the Honour of Tutbury, co. Stafford, being parcel of the Duchy of Lancaster, was leased for 41 years to Edward Vernon, who has been at considerable charge in improvements thereof and intends to be at a further charge, and therefore petitions for a lease for 41 years in reversion after the former lease, but this requires a special warrant, the park being part of the jointure of the Queen, which can not be leased for such term as is petitioned for without one, directing them to grant the said reversionary lease, on such conditions as they think fit, on account of his services to the late and present Kings. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 215.]
May 7. Licence to the Earl of Bridgewater to impark 200 acres in the parishes of Ivinghoe and Pitchelsthorne in Bucks and Herts. [S. P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 40.]
Docquet thereof dated 3 June. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 344.]
May 7. Minutes of the business of the Board. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 159.]
May 7. Thomas Baynham, purser of the Reserve, to the Navy Commissioners. As he understands his captain is going out of town and has not signed his books which have been so long in Mr. Lewis' office, praying their order for the same or his reasons to the contrary, and to consider how hardly he himself is dealt with as not having received any of that last bill signed by their Honours, nor necessary money from Sir Dennis, nor a farthing of pay for almost three years, besides his disbursements this voyage for relieving the men on the Irish coast this last winter. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 160.]
May 7.
Redriff.
Capt. J. Perriman to the Navy Commissioners. I could find at Barking only two smacks fit for the service, the Welcome and the Elizabeth and Mary. I ordered the masters to attend you this morning and to bring their smacks to Woolwich there to measure and tallow, if you think fit. I hurt my leg so that I cannot go, which hinders me from waiting on you. The masters of the victuallers now employed desire provisions for their men, as without them they will not stay on board. Capt. Dupuy can inform you who is ready to fall down at Barking. They tell me that yesterday 8 of our men-of-war and a hoy going down the Swin came aground, but all came off again (they know not what damage they received), and that on Saturday night the Prince went down in his barge to view the Dutch fleet. The next morning it proved calm, and he stayed till fair daylight, and counted 77 sail in all. The Cambridge was last Sunday as low as the Buoy of the Oaze Edge, the Warspite yesterday in the Hope, with her fore-topsail loose. [1¼ page. Ibid. No. 161.]
May 7.
Woolwich.
Phineas Pett to the same. I gave you an account in my letter of Monday of our intentions to dock the Antelope that day, which was accordingly done. The same day I caused the caulkers to breeme her. I moved you for sparing us the eight Deptford caulkers lately returned, as we are forced to take away all the caulkers from the Swallow. However we shall bring the Antelope's work into such a posture to-morrow that I doubt not to launch her either noon or night tide. The false keel supposed to be broken away was little or nothing damnified. What spoiled the cables was an iron stirrup which fastened false keel and gripe together, which in several other ships has been found very prejudicial to the cables, so I had it wholly taken away, and used another expedient for fastening the false keel and forefoot together, that shall never damnify the cables. I hope we may be able to launch the Swallow the next spring tides. The ordinary deals demanded are greatly wanted. Enclosed is a demand from the Royal Prince by Sir E. Spragg. If I have your command, we have opportunity to send the provisions by a Barking smack going to the fleet. [Ibid. No. 162.]
May 7.
Chatham.
Commissioner Tippetts to the same. In my passage down I found 18 ships, doggers, tenders, &c. (Then follow particulars of some fireships and doggers.) The Warspite is below Holehaven. The commander and pilot promised to sail, if possible, the very next tide. The Diamond came in at Sheerness yesterday, and is said to be very leaky, foul, and out of provisions. She is had on board the hulk for her careen, and may be ready to heave down Friday, and to take in provisions next Monday. I also went on board the Victory and Sovereign; the first has about 260, the latter 600, but few are said to be seamen. Now considering the present state of affairs, and his Highness' letter, pressing the dispatching away of all vessels belonging to the fleet, I am in some strait what to do. In case the Victory and Diamond may be got ready and sent away forthwith, they may be of great use in this juncture. Commissioner Beach is now going down with me to Sheerness. He concludes with me it's better the Sovereign remain alone, being ill-manned, and no pilot willing to undertake her, but on a fair opportunity of wind and tide, that by taking 150 or 200 men from her the Victory, which wants nothing but men, may be presently sent to the fleet and the Diamond also, if by heeling 4 or 5 strakes by the hulk she can be made but tolerably tight and clean. I request your opinion by the next to the master attendant, and then to Commissioner Beach at Sheerness, as I intend to return from thence the next flood and see how the vessels in the River have observed orders. [Nearly 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 163.]
May 7.
The Sovereign.
Capt. John Hayward to the Navy Commissioners. I received orders last night from Prince Rupert to sail and hasten to the fleet. Our condition is very bad through our great want of seamen. I gave you yesterday an account of the number we had, so few that, if we are not further supplied, we are not able to work our ship. I sent up my lieutenant yesterday to give an account of our condition and a ketch to him to bring down what men he could meet with. [Ibid. No. 164.]
May 7.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to the same. Last night I received your order concerning Mr. Kirke's being entered from the launching of the Swiftsure. This morning Lieut. Mayo brought a letter from his Highness to Capt. Rooth to sail hence if he could. His guns are mounted, and his sails at the yards, but he wants men and victuals. I foretold him what he should find from Essex and Suffolk. I know of none he has received yet, or of any he is like to have from them, and, if men be not sent him, I cannot imagine what he will do. For his victuals Mr. Robinson, the agent at Ipswich, in his letter to him excuses himself by the neaps, (it was that which formerly was complained of). However the springs are now and he has promised to send, though, he says, he has received no order from above for her sea stores. The Essex ketch is washed, tallowed and victualled, and intends to sail to-morrow, and so does the Golden Hand ordered to Sheerness. Lieut. Mayo says his Highness was a league below the Middle Ground when he left him this morning, and believes he intends for the Gunfleet this evening. The wind blows fresh from the East still. We cannot hear of the Dutch fleet, except that they are said to be gone home. They have stopped our packet-boats at the Brill, and so we have no news. [Ibid. No. 165.]
May 7.
Bristol.
Francis Baylie to the same. Thanking them for their promise to order him suddenly a bill for 500l., and hoping they would pass it and pay it speedily, for he cannot proceed with the ship without speedy payment, since nothing can be bought there and no men can be hired but for ready money. [Ibid. No. 166.]
May 7.
The Anne.
Capt. Thomas Eliot to the Navy Commissioners. Sending two muster books from 12 Jan. to 30 April last, but he cannot set the clothes, never having had any account of what was delivered in his predecessor's time, but he gives an account of what men were entered, and who were dead, discharged or sick ashore during the voyage. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 344, No. 167.]
May 7. Request by Thomas Lewsley for a warrant to Deptford, to send 50 sprucia deals down to Sheerness. [Ibid. No. 168.]
May 8. Lord Belasyse to W. Bridgeman. Asking him to request Lord Arlington on his behalf to procure a commission for Capt. Belasyse, the bearer, for Lord Francis Pawlett's company in his regiment, who goes off for refusing the oaths, and desires to resign to the other, his Majesty having allowed the officers who quit on that account to present fit persons to him, and also desiring a commission for Thomas Frankland for the lieutenant's place Mr. Belasyse had in Capt. Broxholm's company. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 137.]
May 8.
Holborn.
Jacob Smyth to Viscount Conway at Dublin. Pressing him to fulfil his promise to return him some money out of Ireland, as he is a very poor man and in great want, and to relieve him with that which is his own, if it be but part. [Conway Papers. Ibid. No. 138.]
May 8. Receipt by Michael Bebington to Williamson for 50l. received for the use of the Earl of Arlington. [Ibid. No. 139.]
May 8,
8 p.m. Sheerness.
Major N. Darell to the Earl of Arlington. Explaining that he had been unable to send his lordship's letters to Prince Rupert and his secretary to the fleet, and requesting him to dispatch his packets to Harwich. [Ibid. No. 140.]
May 8.
The St. Michael.
Prince Rupert to [the Earl of Arlington]. Since my last, which I doubt was wrong dated, I gave very good words to the pilots, sent ketches on the Middle, Middle Middle, and Hook of the Middle Grounds, and so turned through with the whole fleet, though this was never done before on an ebbing tide and is expressly forbidden in the rules of the Trinity House. It was effected with great facility, the wind then at N.E. by N. We are now at anchor, the North Foreland bearing South-westerly about 5 leagues. It being foggy I cannot promise getting any further, but you may assure his Majesty I shall lose no time to get to the South Sand Head, and there stay for the rest of my fleet and the French. I have no return from the Nightingale and Pearl. They were in chase of some Dutch ships which steered S.E., so I believe their fleet will not lie in our way. However I beseech that no time be lost in setting out the ships that are yet behind. The captain of the Diamond went into Chatham river to clean without speaking with me, though he be upon my list, doubtless with Sir J. Werden's orders. If the officers of my fleet have any other way to apply themselves than to me I beseech you to consider how it can be possible for me to bear any command amongst them. I keep Dowsett here, to send you notice of our adventures between this and the South Sand Head. [Holograph. 2 pages. Ibid. No. 141.]
May 8.
Dover.
Lawson Carlile to Williamson. At 12 to-day parted hence your servants and horses and those of Sir L. Jenkins under a fair wind at S.S.W. for Ostend, and immediately after came a vessel from Nieuport with passengers, who say of a certain, that the Holland fleet join to-day with the Zealand, who are very weakly manned, so the whole fleet intends to be on our coast as to-morrow. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 142.]
May 8. Commission to the Earl of Northampton to be colonel of the regiment whereof Lord Belasyse was colonel. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, p. 63.]
May 8. Licence to John, Earl of Exeter, to hunt this coming summer in any part of the forest of Rockingham. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 203.]
May 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Thomas Staples of the Middle Temple, and William Cooke of the Inner Temple, London, of the office of steward of the Honour and Castle of Windsor, and of the courts of record in the same, and of the office of clerk of the constable of the said castle, and of the office of clerk of the said Castle, which offices have been surrendered by Thomas Jenner and Charles Whitaker. [Ibid. p. 204.]
May 8. Grant to the Duke of Lauderdale for his life of the custody of the New Park near Richmond, with the lodges, walks, &c. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 334.]
May 8. Pardon to John Hemsworth for killing John Crow. [Ibid. No. 335.]
May 8.
Victualling Office, London.
Josiah Child, T. Papillon and B. Gauden to the Navy Commissioners. In answer to yours of the 7th we never understood it was our duty to provide extra water cask, nor do we know anything in our contract leading thereto, and so we informed you last year on the like occasion, and also that we could not afford them under 27s. per ton (besides iron hoops), carriage down, shipping off, watercarriage, bungs and bung cloth and the charge of coopers attending their filling included, on which you promised us an imprest for our money at Lord Brouncker's lodgings, but desired some respite till you were better furnished with cash, though as yet we have had no such imprest, which we think it but reasonable to insist on, extra water cask being literally excluded in our settlement of payment by the Lord Treasurer, and this we hope you will be so just and favourable to us as not to deny, it having been ordinary for the Board to buy water cask of others as well as the victuallers, and not to demand them of the victualler but on particular agreements for that purpose, which we desire may be settled at your first leisure. Notwithstanding, rather than the service should suffer, we will send down the cask to the three ships you mention are at Deptford, though we are assured but one of them was there when you wrote. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 1.]
May 8. William Cleggett, late purser of the Foresight, to the same. Having after a three years' voyage and a year's attendance (by the accident of war) passed his accounts for the said time, and having disbursed much money during the voyage, praying that he may have the balance of his accounts assigned by tally on the Customs, since the orders his captain received could not have been complied with, but by his purse. Noted that a bill of imprest for 800l. was granted him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 2.]
May 8.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to the Navy Commissioners. I received yours of the 6th last night. Yesterday Mr. Robinson, the victuallers' agent at Ipswich, came here, and, I believe, betwixt him and the captain the victualling is so settled that the Swiftsure will in two or three days have in all her victuals and provision. Capt. Rooth has been very active in forwarding everything of her concerns, but men come not in, and had it not been for the willingness of the two companies of land soldiers on board, he had been more backward than he is. I guess he will hasten out the sooner now his ketch is come last night with some few men more to him. The Prince yesterday afternoon sailed down as low as the Buoy of the Gunfleet. We had a perfect sight of the flags. To-day the wind is uncertain in the south and west, so dark withal that we could scarce discern them. Some of the foremost are said to be under sail, standing into the sea as is supposed. This morning the Essex ketch sailed to cruise betwixt this and the Galloper. [Ibid. No. 3.]
May 8.
Harwich.
Capt. William Mather to the same. I have received orders from his Royal Highness to bring the Golden Hand to Sheerness to be fitted there for a fireship. We were discharged but yesterday of the stores brought down for the Swiftsure. I have got a pilot. The wind is at present S.S.E., with very dark weather, but we shall lose no time. [Ibid. No. 4.]
May 8.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner Deane to the same. Yesterday the Royal Charles and the other ships in company sailed from Spithead, the wind easterly. They anchored without St. Helens Point. To-day the wind is fair, and their sails are loose. Whether they sail or wait for the French fleet, which is expected every hour, I do not know. If they move I shall inform you. Pray let the warrant be sent for the trees in the New Forest, for else we shall lose much time, and the season of the year which must be made use of, or else the ship cannot be effected according to expectation. I pray also that the 100l. may be imprest on William Collings, as in my former, to which I have received no answer. [Ibid. No. 5.]
May 8.
Portsmouth.
Walter Slingesby to the same. Sending particulars of all the provisions belonging to his Royal Highness, brought in two vessels of Weymouth and received into the stores there. [Ibid. No. 6.]
May 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Allan Master, of Carcath, his heirs and assigns whatsoever, of the lands of Upper and Lower Castlemadies and other lands therein mentioned, lying within the Stewardry of Kirkcudbright and Sheriffdom of Galloway, and of all the bonds and other securities all which formerly pertained to John Grier of Daltoun or to John Grier, his father, or either of them at the time of their decease, and now are fallen to his Majesty, and are in his disposition as ultimus hæres. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 183.]
May 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation to the Corporation of Edinburgh of Charles Maitland, burgess of Edinburgh, his heirs and assigns whatsoever, as heretable tenants of the houses, &c. therein described, which pertained heretably to Gilbert Stewart, stabler, or John Stewart, writer, his son and heir, and are now fallen into his Majesty's hands as ultimus hæres or otherwise. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 184.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
John Richards to Williamson. I am commanded by Lord Arlington to acknowledge his receipt of yours of yesterday. He excuses himself from writing himself, having no more to send but the enclosed order you desire. I must also acknowledge yours to myself. That to Mr. Perwich I sent away last night. I enclose a copy of my lord's cipher with Sir. W. Lockhart, and, if I can persuade his Lordship to write that letter to the Bishop of Strassburg, I will send it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 143.]
May 9.
11 a.m. Whitehall.
Sir J. Werden to Williamson. I am glad Sir Francis Leeke is so punctual in obeying orders, against some other occasion when it may be of consequence, and I hope, as soon as he receives those from his Majesty he will be ready to further your voyage. I have also enclosed you the Duke's orders to let your billanders pass. We suppose Prince Rupert by this time over against Dover. The French last Tuesday were three leagues from Plymouth, 22 sail and 3 fireships. The Dutch by letters this day are over against Schonveldt in Zealand, and that squadron is 12 sail. [Ibid. No. 144.]
May 9.
8 a.m. Sheerness.
Major N. Darell to the Earl of Arlington. Stating that he had been unable to send his Lordship's last packet to the Prince and inquiring how he must dispose of it, and adding that he cannot learn how far the fleet is advanced or where the enemy is. [Ibid. No. 145.]
May 9.
4 p.m. Sheerness.
The same to the same. Just now comes in a ketch from the fleet, which he left off the North Foreland at 5 last night, all under sail, and sailed all night, so by this time the master judges the Prince may be about the height of the Isle of Wight, and before he came away the scouts brought word that the enemy's fleet was about West Capell and the Wielings. [Ibid. No. 146.]
May 9.
9 a.m. The St. Michael, in the road before Rye.
Prince Rupert to the Earl of Arlington. I wrote to you yesterday by Baker the messenger, and after his boat was off and under sail I received intelligence by the Nightingale and Pearl that the enemy was gone over to West Capell. They were very near them. There were six flags and about 70 more, men-of-war, and sinkers and attendants; of men-of-war about 42 according to my former accounts. A sloop is just arrived from the Comte d'Estrées, who tells me by this the French fleet is about the Isle of Wight, and I also received a letter from Capt. Haddock that last Wednesday morning he weighed with the Portsmouth ships from Spithead. I expect them here the next tide. [Ibid. No. 147.]
May 9.
Dungeness.
Prince Rupert to the King. Your Majesty will perceive by my letter to Lord Arlington yesterday the diligence used to get through the Middle Grounds. I hope it will be to good purpose, Monsr. d'Estrées being now at St. Helens, as I am informed by a French sloop, which I sent back immediately with a letter giving notice of my intention to anchor here till the French appear. From this place I can at any time, if De Ruyter should come out again with his fleet, turn up to the Downs in one tide, and take my measures from thence according to the intelligence I shall get. I will also take this time to muster the ships' companies, and dispose the supernumeraries to such as want men. Your Majesty therefore will not think it ill done to expect the French squadron here, and therefore I beg your positive orders to hasten them away. Haddock is turning up to me also with all the ships he has. I hope this flood he will be in sight. I am in great pain what to do with the companies left behind at Portsmouth and Southampton. I fear Haddock did not take them along, so it must be left to Narbrough to do it. Your Majesty will please remember that besides them I shall want 3 in the Sovereign, 2 in the Victory, 2 in the Warspite, 2 in the Swiftsure and one in the Crown, 16 at least, which is a considerable body of men, all which I leave to your consideration. [Holograph. 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 148.]
May 9. Inland advices received that day. Those not previously calendared are:—Harwich, 8 May.—Yesterday we discerned our fleet, above 70 sail in all, at anchor at the Buoy of the Gunfleet, and to-day we see them stand off to sea. Six companies of the Duke of Albemarle's regiment are coming hither. Portsmouth, 8 May.— Yesterday Capt. Haddock with the Royal Charles, Mary, Gloucester, Resolution, Rupert, Dreadnought, Dragon, Mermaid, and Ann and Christopher, Supply, Robert and Rachel fireships, was to sail, when they received the news of the French fleet being near. They all sailed Eastward, and are now at anchor as far as we can well discern them, so that, when the French fleet arrives, they are in the way, ready to join them, and so pass altogether to the Downs, the wind being now fair. Plymouth, 6 May.—To-day appeared in sight 32 of the French fleet. They went out of sight to the Eastward about 3 this afternoon. The wind was then easterly, but is since come W. Falmouth, 5 May.—The 2nd came in the St. Susan of Granville, which came from Dieppe with 50 great merchantmen, some of 20 or 30 guns, bound to fish upon the Bank. The 3rd arrived a vessel, which met the French fleet, 80 sail in all, off the Isle of Wight. Newcastle, 6 May.—In port here are above 150 laden colliers, which cannot sail for want of convoy and a fair wind. Boston, 7 May.— Having this morning received notice of the Dutch fleet's being out, we have directed that no vessels stir till further order. Ostend, [7]/17 May, by express.—The master of a small vessel just arrived from the North of England informs me that last night he was amongst the Dutch fleet at anchor at Schoonevelt, between this and Zealand, about 65 sail in all, 40 of which were men-of-war. The master was on board some of them and says they are very ill manned. [Two copies. 2¼ pages. Ibid. Nos. 149, 150.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Winchilsea, Lord Lieutenant of Kent. Recommending him to continue as treasurer of the militia taxes Lieut.-Col. Richard Manley, who faithfully discharged the office under the late Duke of Richmond and Lenox, and to reimburse him the sum of 171l. 9s. 6d., the balance due on his accounts given in when the Duke went ambassador to Denmark. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 70.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard Goodhart, of Newington parish, Surrey, to take care that no person destroy the King's fowls from St. James' Park, which frequently fly over to Larrow Moor pond and other ponds and ditches in and about Newington, where disorderly persons kill them with dogs and guns, which are to be seized, and the offenders detained and their names certified to the Board of Green-cloth, which shall order their punishment. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 211.]
May 9. Warrant to Sir F. Leeke, Governor of Gravesend, to suffer three billanders with the train and equipage of the Ambassadors going to Cologne to proceed. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 41.]
May 9. Sir Jeremy Smyth to the Navy Commissioners. Enclosing an estimate of the present state of the victualling with an account of the issues for which the indents are come to his hands, and the remains in the several ports, adding that he is no ways able to see how the contractors will be able to answer the declaration for 30,000 men for 8 months. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 7.]
May 9.
Woolwich.
Phineas Pett, shipwright's assistant, to the same. I suppose Sir T. Allin has given you notice that yesterday we launched the Antelope. If we could have the eight caulkers from Deptford yet in any time it would have been a great furtherance to the service, as the haste of the Antelope enforces us to take the caulkers from the Swallow, which I would endeavour to get ready to launch by the next spring tides. Yet, if we cannot have them to-morrow morning to help us in the dispatch of the decks and upper works of the Antelope, I hope we shall now make a shift without them. [Ibid. No. 8.]
May 9.
Sheerness.
John Rudd to the same. To-day the Diamond is cleaned and afloat. She is going to take in her guns and is ready to receive her provisions. She may be ready to sail in two or three days at furthest. To-day the Golden Hand is come in here from Harwich to be fitted, and no order has been received from you as yet for doing it. [Ibid. No. 9.]
May 9.
The Katharine fireship.
Capt. John Voteer to the same. Informing them that he had arrived that morning at the Buoy of the Nore, and had found the fleet gone, and desiring their orders whether he should follow them, or attend the Sovereign and Victory there. [Ibid. No. 10.]
May 9.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to the same. The Golden Hand received orders from his Royal Highness to sail to Sheerness, there to be fitted with fireworks. This morning they sailed, wind easterly, and by 8 passed by the Warspite, the guard frigate, about the Buoy of the Gunfleet, so that probably if this wind holds, she will attain the place appointed her before this can reach you. The Prince sailed yesterday, and, though the first part of the day was dark, and the wind southerly and westerly, yet in the afternoon they had it easterly and northerly, and we hope he may by this be got to Portsmouth. The Swiftsure is taking in her provisions with all possible care and haste, that so she may be quickly ready to go away to the fleet. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 11.]
May 9.
Dartmouth.
Thomas Newman to the Navy Commissioners. Since my last with the list of the impressed men I have sent about 15 more to Portsmouth, and, as more come in I shall dispatch them away, and per next send you the account of volunteers on free bounty, and then hasten to you the account of impressed. Last Wednesday night passed by our harbour the French fleet. The Admiral's boat was ashore and landed a passenger who went that night away post for London to his Majesty. They consisted of 22 fighting ships, and were about 33 sail in all. I hope before this they are joined with ours, and are all together, ready to meet these insolent Dutch. [Ibid. No. 12.]
May 9.
The Hunter, in Catwater.
Capt. George Colt to the same. You ordered me 100 seamen from Mr. Newman of Dartmouth. I heard nothing from him, but the men came hither, and I went to the Vice-Admiral here, and shewed him your letter, but he would take no notice of it, but sent them away to the fleet. They were so bad I think he has done me a kindness. I shall be ready to sail within these twelve days, and, if his Royal Highness would let me cruise off here to the westward, I doubt not but within a little time to be well manned, for this country is still full of able seamen. I desire you would order me the articles of war with some books and tickets. [Ibid. No. 13.]
May 9. Estimate of the charge of making a chamber chimney in Mr. Shish's house. [Ibid. No. 14.]
May 9. Viscount Ranelagh to Lord [Conway]. We are now without any letters from Ireland since 26 April, but expect some hourly, by which I hope to find you have received my several late letters. The occasion of my writing now is to acquaint you, to whom I must hide nothing, with the great misfortune I think myself under at present, which is the heavier, because I cannot find I have deserved it, nor can I guess who has been false and malicious enough to bring it upon me. But that some one had the power to do me ill offices I am certain, otherwise I cannot believe the Lord Lieutenant would have fallen so severely on me as he has done in his letter of the 26th. That you saw it before it came away I cannot imagine, for had you, I must conclude the great friendship I have always received from you would have engaged you to defend my innocence. What respect I have always paid the Lord Lieutenant you are in some measure a witness. I am certain I have made it my study to do nothing that might give him the least offence. On this account I have declined intermeddling with any business of Ireland, except my own, further than seconding whatever he recommended, or I thought he desired, though I well know this proceeding made me very considerable enemies. I must tell you in particular that I find by this letter of the 26th that somebody has industriously suggested that I intended to procure the King's letter for allowing me the Farmers' defalcation out of the twelve months' arrears, whereupon he not only represents several inconveniencies which would attend such an allowance, but says that difficulties will always attend the employment of Lord Lieutenant, whilst Lord Ranelagh both solicits and procures letters without first acquainting the Chief Governor. As to the suggestion, I must assure you it was altogether groundless, for I never yet could be persuaded to move or think of anything which might lessen the Army's expectation, being resolved to place my pretences to defalcation rather anywhere than upon them, and I have been so far from desiring an allowance for the Farmers' defalcations, that I have long since declared I would not speak of deductions or allowances to be made me, till the war be ended, and the King's affairs may better endure my having a satisfaction than I am sure yet they can. All I expect in the meantime is, that I may not meet with rigour in case I am forced by the intervening of disappointments to be less punctual in my payments than I otherwise would be, and I must own, and have owned, that the Lord Lieutenant in this has been most obligingly kind to me in delaying to sign the warrants, and not exacting further than he finds we are able. As to my soliciting and procuring letters, I think I may safely say I have asked none but what were either warranted by my covenants, or were necessary to quicken the Farmers in the performance of theirs, nor have letters been signed merely because I asked for them, but they have been constantly referred to the Lord Treasurer, without whose approbation nothing yet passed for me. That the King should do for me whatever he promised I think is most reasonable, and I am certain the Lord Lieutenant is of that opinion; and, since my covenants are well known and were made long before he was declared Governor, I hope I need not ask leave to move the King for what is my due. What other letters have been signed by my soliciting or procurement I cannot remember. I am sure I have opposed several, and ought not to bear the blame when I have suffered the smart. But instead of enlarging on this, I conjure you by the friendship you both promised and have shown me, to let me freely know who and what has raised this storm in the Lord Lieutenant against me, than which nothing can be more sensible to me, for I know nothing but a great dissatisfaction could have engaged him to such a letter. Let me assure you, I will not be provoked ever to lessen that respect I have for him, whose favour I would purchase at any rate, my esteem for, as well as my obligation to him, being very great. Therefore, if I have offended, let me know my crime and I will humbly ask pardon; on the other hand, if busy, false suggestions have done me hurt, let their author be never again believed against me. [3 pages. Conway Papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 156.]
[May ?] Paper by Lord Ranelagh in answer to the Lord Lieutenant's letter of 26 April concerning the Farmers' defalcations. The Lord Lieutenant several months ago wrote to the Lords of the Treasury and Lord Arlington, that he and the Council could not proceed further therein, and therefore desired their opinion, whether the King on granting the farm intended any defalcation of rent in case of a foreign war, the words "foreign war" being omitted in the present demise, though inserted in the former. What the King has done herein was on a solemn hearing of the Farmers by their counsel, the Lord Treasurer, and several Lords of the Council being present, Lord Ranelagh, though no ways concerned himself, a defalcation to them being one to him, opposing all along their pretences. As to the intentions of Lord Ranelagh and partners to apply the defalcation thus allowed to the arrears of the Army now paying in, the King is assured that, by his grant to them, they have not in the least a power either to judge of, or apply their defalcations when and where they think fit. All they can do is to offer their pretences to his Majesty or the Lord Lieutenant and Council, who are thereupon to give judgment and orders. Lord Ranelagh has been so far from desiring leave to apply this defalcation to the said arrears, that he has not yet even demanded any allowance for it, any more than for several other sums he has disbursed for the King's service, though not within his contract, and he has assured his Majesty, that, as hitherto he has gone on with the due payment of the Army without any stop or deduction, though the Farmers upon pretences have detained great sums from him, he will continue paying them their just dues, referring himself for allowances and defalcations till the present war be ended, when his Majesty may assign him satisfaction on what fund he shall think most convenient, so his Excellency was much misinformed by those who suggested that Lord Ranelagh had any such design, nor can the King understand how the Treasury is quite taken away from the Lord Lieutenant, and that he is forced to guess at what is intended to be done, since his Majesty will remember that no payment can be made by Lord Ranelagh without a warrant first signed by the Lord Lieutenant, which is all any Lord Lieutenant ever had to do with the Treasury, except the disposal of the concordatum money, which continues in the same method it did formerly. Besides, Lord Ranelagh is obliged by a positive clause in his contract to give as often as required a particular account of all his proceedings, and thereupon to follow such directions as the Lord Lieutenant shall think fit. As to Lord Ranelagh's soliciting and procuring orders without first acquainting the Lord Lieutenant, it is alleged that he never yet asked any letter from his Majesty, but what was warranted by his covenants, that no letter on his asking has been signed without being shown to the Lord Treasurer, and his approbation had thereon; that all letters thus signed have been directed to the Lord Lieutenant solely, who may represent, upon receiving any direction, what he judges convenient for the King's service. As to what is said, that the present establishment has not at all provided for the supporting of defects and contingencies, which always happen, the King says the money allowed for concordatum is designed only for those uses, and that he cannot find there was ever in any establishment any other provision made for them, which is at least as much now as in Lord Robartes' time, or the greatest part of Lord Berkeley's government. Besides what the concordatum affords, he finds by a paper transmitted from the Lord Lieutenant that the extraordinary charge of the troops of the army being quartered by turns at Dublin is defrayed out of the sea regiment money, and that several gifts, to which the concordatum is properly liable, are fastened on that fund. [Over 2 pages. S.P. Ireland Car. II. 333, No. 157.]
May 9.
Treasury Chamber, [Dublin].
Sir Alexander Bence, R. Sandys, J. Winckworth, Edward Roberts, and Thomas Scarth to Sir Henry Ford. Stating that they had perused the King's letter of 12 March, calendared ante p. 40, for the remittal to Lady de Courcy of the year's value, and that they had nothing to object thereto, for if Lord Ranelagh and his partners cannot have present reimbursement by the means therein mentioned, they will be entitled to the respite of the payment of so much of the growing pay or entertainment on the establishment till they shall be reimbursed. [Copy. Ibid. No. 158.] Prefixed,
Copy of the said letter of 12 March. [Ibid. No. 158 I.] Annexed,
Memorandum in Lord Ranelagh's hand that Lord Arlington in his private letter to the Lord Lieutenant may desire him that the King's letter, notwithstanding what the Commissioners of the Treasury have writ, may be punctually observed, since by that letter the Commissioners may reimburse themselves out of the sea regiment money if necessary, and need not leave either civil or military list unpaid. [Ibid. No. 158 II.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Whereas Sir George Carteret, late Vice Treasurer of Ireland, being indebted on the balance of his account ended 20 Jan. 1669[–70], 21,106l. 3s. 3¾d., whereof 5,415l. 4s. 2½d. was acknowledged by Edward Corker, formerly deputy to the said Sir G. Carteret, to be due to the Crown from him, the said Corker with two sureties, 8 May, 1671, acknowledged a recognizance to the Crown of 10,830l. 8s. 5d. conditioned for the payment of the said sum of 5,415l. 4s. 2½d. by two equal moieties on 24 June and 24 Aug. then next, and whereas the said Sir G. Carteret states that the said Corker and his sureties accordingly paid into the Irish Exchequer 1,663l. 6s. 8d. part of the sum for which the recognizance was acknowledged, and have in further satisfaction thereof paid by the King's command to Robert Fitzgerald 2,919l., to Col. Richard Laurence 800l., and to Philip Alden 100l., all which were debts due to them for which they had warrants on the Irish Exchequer, amounting to somewhat more than the said sum of 5,415l. 4s. 2½d., and that, though the said several payments have been allowed by the Irish Court of Exchequer, and by letters patent of 6 June 1672, the penalty of the said recognizance, which was forfeited because the said sums were not strictly paid on the days thereby appointed for payment, was released to the said Corker and his sureties, so that the said Court has ordered that no further process issue against either the said Corker or his sureties, the said recognizance still remains on record in the said Court and has not been cancelled or delivered up, and therefore the said Sir. G. Carteret is not yet legally discharged of the said 5,415l. 4s. 2½d., part of the said sum due on the balance of his account, directing him, if he finds the said allegations to be true, to give orders to the Chief and other Barons of the Exchequer to cause the said recognizance to be cancelled and delivered up to the said Corker and his sureties and for discharging the said Sir G. Carteret of the said 5,415l. 4s. 2½d. [2¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 433.]
May 10.
London.
Edward Wayte to Viscount Conway. Requesting him to pay to a person he shall appoint in Dublin two, three, or four hundred pounds, or what sum he pleases, and he himself will take care for its return, and begging that his Lordship will pardon his rudeness and trouble and impute it only to his pressing necessities. Postscript. I am glad the coats came safely, though late, which was not my fault, for I sent them according to my time and order. [Conway Papers. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335,No. 151.]
May 10.
Dungeness.
Prince Rupert to [the Earl of Arlington]. By the bearer Mr. Barthu (? Bertie) I received yours dated 8 April, and was not very sorry to see the mistake. I dispatched to you Cornet Dowsett about 9 yesterday, who brought you, I doubt not, last night the news we had of Monsr. d'Estrées nearing the Isle of Wight. We expect him in sight next flood. I chose this road to expect him, being most fitting to consult and set our ships in order for our next design, but it is my duty to tell you our defects, which besides our careless setting out as want of flags for signs, good rigging, graplins against fireships and many more I am sure to hear on, our want will be undertaking officers. I could have wished you at the council we had when the Dutch appeared. You would have found then the weak hearts amongst us, and doubtless, if I had not been positive, the opinion would have been to quit the post, and retire, alleging that it was so resolved when there was a greater strength in the River of ships and fireships than now we had. Sir J. Harman is sick, Narbrough not like to be here. Judge then in what loss I shall be of commanding officers. I therefore once more desire you to try to get Sir R. Holmes into play, Mr. Barthu telling me he was sure Sir Robert desired to go on any honourable conditions. Pray propose this way to his Majesty, which is to make him a Lieut.-General, or send him aboard, and I will give him the command, when there's occasion and without any disturbance to the officers of the fleet; in the meantime he shall go in my ship. Mr. Barthu will tell you more, I have discoursed of this with him at large, and pray assure his Majesty I have no other design in this but his service. Postscript. As I was closing this, an Ostender came on board, who relates that the Zealand fleet will not be ready a good while, and that De Ruyter lies in Schonveldt with 60 sail. [Holograph. 2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 152.] Perhaps enclosed,
I understand his Majesty believes our fleet is better manned than last year. I beseech him to consider that the French Ruby, Stavoren, St. George, Rainbow, Unicorn, Sovereign, Triumph, Swiftsure, Victory, (the smaller I will not reckon, though I could name above a le [a] sh) visibly want seamen to stand to their guns and tackle. [Ibid. No. 152 I.]
May 10.
The Prince, against Rye.
Sir C. Lyttelton to [the Earl of Arlington]. Wind N.E. Yesterday we came hither to an anchor. Prince Rupert having advice the French fleet were off the Isle of Wight, sent a dispatch to hasten them hither, which they can but slowly do, the wind blowing very fresh and contrary. The Royal Charles and our other ships there, we hear, are coming up, and, if we do not mistake them for the Straits fleet, are in sight. As soon as our fleets are joined, I understand we shall move towards the Dutch fleet, and that, if they will not venture out of their holes to engage, we shall use what means are possible to go within the sands to them, and that, according to the strength we hear they have, we have ships enough of such a draught as will be sufficient to go in and beat them; but that whether that can be done or not, it's resolved we shall land upon them. I pray God give either way his Majesty's affairs good success. Postscript. They reckon the French fleet will be here in three tides after they have notice, and I suppose they had it last night. By an Irishman that came yesterday from Ostend, bound for Galway, we hear that the Dutch fleet with 64 sail, 16 whereof are great flyboats, is at Schonveldt. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 153.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Lancelot Lake, praying to be admitted into the farm of 12d. per chaldron on the coals vented out of the Tyne, enjoyed for 12 years by Sir Jeremy Whichcot, and promised by him to the petitioner, that he may call the persons concerned before him and endeavour by some amicable way the obtaining of what the petitioner here desires, or, in case he does not prevail therein, to report to his Majesty what may be done any other way for the petitioner's gratification. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 68.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of William, Lord Widdrington, who has found out several fines &c. belonging to the Queen Mother, for a grant of a moiety thereof. [Ibid.]
May 10. Minutes of the business of the Board. With note that Friday, the 9th, the Board meeting and Sir T. Osborne coming to them, the Board was private in the discourse about paying tickets, and read few of their letters that day. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 15.]
May 10.
Woolwich Yard.
Capt. Amos Beare to the Navy Commissioners. The Antelope is now ready to receive her provisions. I hear no news of our carpenters from the Georgefireship, nor of my ten riggers from Capt. Rooth. I beseech the Surveyor for six dozen boat oars and two dozen barge oars for the Antelope and Swallow. [Ibid. No. 16.]
May 10.
Sheerness.
Capt. William Mather to the Navy Commissioners. Informing them of his arrival there with the Golden Hand, where he awaits their further orders. [Ibid. No. 17.]
May 10.
Hull.
Thomas Thompson, master of the Love ketch, tending on the Gloucester, to the same. I have 50 men on board besides the ketch's company and am stopped by the Mayor and Governor, ever since the embargo came here. Our victuals being near out I desire your order for more, and also to sail as soon as I dare venture to sea, for the Mayor and Governor will not let me go without your order. Also there were two Holland capers at the mouth of the Humber yesterday, one a dogger, and the other a small vessel with two topsails. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 18.]
May 10.
The Swiftsure, near Harwich.
Capt. Richard Rooth to the Navy Commissioners. I received yours of the 8th for discharging the riggers sent down by Capt. Beare. Several of them, having entered themselves as volunteers have received the bounty money, and the rest, according to the Prince's orders, shall be returned when we come to the Buoy in the Nore, his Highness giving me orders to impress not only riggers but all such seamen, carpenters, caulkers, and others as are fit for the service to bring the Swiftsure about. [Ibid. No. 19.]
May 10.
7 a.m. Portsmouth.
Commissioner Deane to the same. Just now a ketch has come in here, who says Prince Rupert with the fleet is at anchor about two leagues this side of the Ness with 42 men-of-war, and that Capt. Haddock in the Royal Charles is within 7 leagues of him, and also that the French fleet of 26 men-of-war and 6 fireships are about two leagues to the eastward of this, so that in all probability both fleets will join to-day. [Ibid. No. 20.]
May 10. Capt. J. Perriman to W. Hewer. Requesting press warrants for six victuallers therein named. [Ibid. No. 21.]
May 11.
1 a.m. The St. Michael, at anchor off Rye.
Capt. Hartgill Baron to [the Earl of Arlington]. By command of his Highness and to prevent lies and forerunners of less accidents, which commonly are represented in multiplying glasses, I humbly present this to your lordship. At this minute the Orange Tree fireship by some accident (what I cannot yet give an account of) was set on fire and is now burning, being the next ship to us. How this happened I cannot give as yet the particulars, but, it happening so near the shore, this is presented to prevent any alarms and to satisfy his Majesty and Royal Highness. Our ships from Portsmouth are arrived and also the Warspite. They set sail last Thursday, and then no news of the French fleet's arrival. Postscript. The fireship is just burnt out without any further mischief. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 154.]
May 11.
The St. Michael, before Rye.
Prince Rupert to the Earl of Arlington. Acknowledging his letter by Monsr. Chaplin, who dined on board with him, and whom he had ordered the Kitchen yacht to carry on board the Comte d' Estrées, and desiring him to present the enclosed (being the next letter) to the King. [Ibid. No. 155.] Enclosed,
May 11.
Dungeness.
Prince Rupert to the King. This is in obedience to your Majesty's commands to write without ceremony. Monsr. Chapplin brought me your letter of yesterday. I have dispatched him to his Master to let him know your pleasure is I should expect him here. I gave him besides some books of instructions and a scroll so that during his turning up they may be translated. To-morrow I intend to change my ship. Capt. Haddock believes she will beat all the frigates in the fleet. She wants some ballast. Some of the new turned guns being here, I intend to strike those she will have supernumerary into the hold, which will serve for ballast, and perhaps some other occasion. Your Majesty will have heard of an accident to one of our fireships this morning, out of which a poor little boy saved himself very oddly, for being pressed by the fire within board, he leaped into her yawl, which was hung in her tackles. It happened they were burnt so equally that the boat fell plump into the water and came off. I have the captain in hold and intend to try him by a Council of War. Seven frigates are victualling in Dover Road, and two cruising on the South Sand Head so that we needs must have news time enough to get ready before an enemy approach us. If they go the other way on your coasts, we may receive your directions in 6 hours and then one tide brings us all to the South Sand Head. God preserve your Majesty and your good fortune, without which I had not been here, I doubt. [Holograph. 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 155 I.]
May 11. Commission to Francis Watson to be under-lieutenant and major of the Queen's troop of the Guards commanded by Sir Philip Howard. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 69.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Henry Frederick Thynne, in reversion after Thomas Ross, of the office of keeper of the King's libraries, salary 200l. a year, to hold the same during his natural life. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 203.]
May 11. Capt. Augustus L' Hostein to the Navy Commissioners. As soon as I went hence to Woolwich I found an order for the smack granted me, the master having promised to be there to-day. At present I crave the favour of a boat with four or six oars, to assist the smack, and attend the frigate afterwards, to hasten the pressing. Being now ready to fall down to-morrow as far as the Long Reach, whence I intend to send men to press, I thought fit to remind you of the press money, which is required on such occasions. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 22.]
[May ?] Sir William Pargiter and other trustees for John Loader and others to the King. Petition stating that divers lands and hereditaments, some time the estate of Henry Martin or Margaret his wife, came to his Majesty by the attainder of the said Henry, and were granted by him to the Duke of York, from whom by several mesne conveyances they became vested in the petitioners in trust, and that the petitioners have now prevailed with the said Henry and Margaret Martin to consent that one or more fines or recoveries be levied and suffered by them either severally or jointly with others to the petitioners of the said hereditaments if his Majesty give leave, and therefore praying a warrant for a Privy Seal to the Court of Common Pleas, signifying his Majesty's pleasure that such fines or recoveries be levied or suffered. At the foot,
May 12.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Solicitor-General. At the side, His report, dated the 15th, in favour of granting the petition. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 156.]
[May ?] Warrant to Henry Martyn to levy a fine on the estate that was his, now belonging to Sir W. Pargiter and others. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 48.]
[May ?] William Gorsuch to [Lord Arlington]. By your Lordship's order of 21 Aug., 1671, a caveat was entered at the Signet, and at the Lord Keeper's, that no pardon should pass for Sunniebanke Vesie, Cressett Stonehouse and Lawrence Kempe, convicted of manslaughter, without notice to your Lordship. Henry Parker, Clerk of Assize for Oxfordshire, contrary to this order, took the opportunity at the time of changing the Seal from the Lord Keeper to the Lord Chancellor, to put the said persons into a common gaol delivery, whereby he has cheated your Lordship's office, the Attorney-General and others of the fees due to them. I therefore humbly request that Parker be sent for to appear before your Lordship. Mr. Richards can give a fuller account. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 157.]
May 12. William Gorsuch to [Lord Arlington]. To the same effect as the last. [Ibid. No. 158.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Williamson. About noon yesterday Lord Arlington received your letter, giving an account of your being forced back by contrary winds to Queenborough. I hope the weather has been more favourable and that this will find you safely arrived on the other side. At present there is little of moment here. The French post arrived yesterday brought us no letters from Paris, and those from Italy had nothing worth extracting. This morning came three packets from Holland, but I shall not give you from hence news of those parts. Enclosed is the extract of our inland letters of to-day. The French fleet consists only of 22 men-of-war, four fireships and some tenders; the rest are yet expected. Here is a discourse of the King's going to Dover, though as yet no day is fixed. To-morrow Lord Arlington goes for Euston to pass some days there, and has desired Sir R. Carr to have an eye on his office in his absence. Yesterday at the Committee, my Lord enquired for some papers remaining in your hands, concerning martial law, amongst which was one written with the King's own hand about mustering of men. I looked over all the papers in your desk, but could not find these. [Ibid. No. 159]. Enclosed,
May 12. Inland advices received that day. Harwich, 11 May.—One of our packet-boats arrived about 9 this morning from Holland advises, that the Dutch fleet lay about the Island of Schowen, that they account themselves about 50 men-of-war, that the Holland squadron is with them, and that the Zealanders are very backward in their preparations. We hear by a second that arrived about noon, that the Dutch give out they intended to sink ships in our channel, had not the Prince hindered them by being at sea, and that all the Amsterdam ships, but two, are got over the Pampus. Portsmouth, 11 May.—The French fleet rides at anchor in sight, but about 7 leagues off. By a ketch that waits on the Royal Katharine we hear the Prince is at anchor on this side the Ness. It is believed that the men-of-war, that sailed hence, are come up to the fleet. Truro, 8 May.— Two or three small Dutch capers on our coast have taken several colliers from Wales, but freed them again without any great damage. Plymouth, 9 May.—Since the French fleet went by two other great ships have appeared passing up the Channel, said to belong to the French fleet. Weymouth, 10 May.— Yesterday afternoon the Weymouth, a merchantman of this place, broke loose, and drove itself and another vessel against our wooden bridge, and broke down a great part of it. Boston, 10 May.—A Swede is come, which met two capers at sea, and we hear of three others besides, that have lately appeared off Scarborough. We have stopped all Dutch ships here, because of the Dutch fleet being out. Rye, 10 May.—The fleet continues at anchor off this place, expecting the French fleet, and the other men-of-war from Portsmouth. [1¾ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 159 I.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
J. Richards to Williamson. Concerning the letter to the Bishop of Strassburg on Mr. Sherewood's behalf. I cannot persuade my Lord you expect one for yourself to that bishop, so he begs your excuse for this night, especially because he intends to-morrow to go for Euston, and being tired with the trouble of leaving. An express to-day from the Prince does not assure the French squadron is joined with them. You may very well believe they are very nigh. I cannot learn the King's first intention of seeing them holds. [Ibid. No. 160.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. About 7 Friday afternoon Mr. Smith died at the house, whither he had been removed the Saturday before. He was very sensible to the last. The next night I waited on him to the grave, Dr. Lamplugh himself saying the office of burial. Last night Major Lloyd told me he was commanded by Sir Thomas Meeres to bring me a printed book containing the transactions in the case of Sir W. Courteen to send you, without which nothing could be done in that business. I told him you had commanded my care in it and I would send it by the first messenger. Mr. Coxe, Sir R. Southwell's kinsman, being the first I hear of going that way, promises to bring it you safe this week. I trouble you with nothing of the affairs of the office, Mr. Yard telling me he does that. Sir Robert Carr is very observant of your desires to him in relation to us. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 161.]
May 12.
The Sovereign.
Col. James Hamilton to [the Earl of Arlington]. Sixty-three able seamen from Newcastle are newly come on board in a ketch belonging to this ship. The officer that brought them says that last night he spoke with the master of the Portsmouth pink, whose boat had been ashore at Yarmouth yesterday, where the news was that the Dutch fleet were at anchor at the Long Sand Head, but how many or what rates he knew not. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 162.]
May 12. Copy of the rules of 12 Sept. 1666, for precedence of regiments calendared in S.P. Dom., 1666–7 p. 118, with alterations which appear by the rules of 28 May calendared post p. 304. [Ibid. No. 163.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
Commission for Sir Ralph Knight to be Lieut.-Colonel of the Duke of Buckingham's regiment, in place of Sir Edward Scott, and captain of the company whereof he was captain. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 69.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Duke of York to order an embargo on all merchant ships in the port of London and the river Thames, except those going to Tangier; to continue till further notice. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 201.]
May 12. Warrant for John Vollet to be made a free denizen. Minute. [Ibid. p. 205.]
Docquet thereof dated 28 May. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 339.]
May 12. Reference to the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster of the petition of Ralph Hansby for a longer lease of an estate in the Duchy. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 69.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Elias Ashmole praying for the customs on so much paper as shall be required for the second edition of his book, The Laws and Ceremonies of the Order of the Garter, that he may give order for the allowance of so much paper, custom free, as he shall think fit. [Ibid. p. 70.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Jean Jacques for payment of 112,500 French livres due from the late King to Jacques Marchais, and accepted of him by the petitioner, in satisfaction of Marchais' debt to him. [Ibid.]
May 12. The King to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen and the Mercers' Company. Commanding them to allow Sir Thomas Baines, Professor of Music in Gresham College, to enjoy the salary and other emoluments of that office during his absence, he being about to accompany Sir John Finch, Ambassador to the Ottoman Court, to Constantinople. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 42.]
May 12. Minutes of the business of the Board. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 23.]
May 12.
Victualling Office.
Sir T. Littleton, Josiah Child, and T. Papillon to the Navy Commissioners. We never heard till now that it was any question, whether water-cask delivered into waterships were extra or not. Whether we have delivered all we should to ships on their victualling is another question, to which we answer, we have, and, if we had not, we suppose yourselves will judge we should have heard of it before. We acquainted you by our last that we would deliver water-cask to complete the lading of those three ships, as judging there was more than ordinary haste thereof from what was written to us by Prince Rupert's command. But, as new questions never so much as started before are frequently brought in controversy on us, we pray you to provide what more extra water-cask you have occasion of, after these ships are laden, from some other hands, it being our endeavour to decline as much as possible all disputes, wherein we may be in danger of giving you offence, though in our own necessary justification. For what we have already delivered we shall rely on his Majesty's favour and justice. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 24.]
May 12. John Fowler, late Judge Advocate, to the Navy Commissioners. Having received nothing of his pension and being behind thereof for seven months, craving them to issue their orders to the respective offices, the same to be delivered to William Hewer, whom he thereby appoints to receive the same. [Ibid. No. 25.]
May 12. Commissioner Tippetts to the same. Giving an account of how the fleet has been supplied with sea stores and in particular with colours, hoping that having perused it they would not blame him for want of due care, with particulars of the standards, flags and pennants sent to the St. Michael, and adding that he has made provision of both red and blue flags to be sent to Portsmouth by wagon for the ships that are to come in there, and that the Priscilla ketch, which is to go down to-day or to-morrow, may carry the colours with what else is to go down. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 26.] Enclosed,
Note of flags made in May and June 1672, with patterns of a white and red flag, and a yellow and white flag. [Ibid. No. 26 I.]
May 12.
Woolwich.
Phineas Pett to the same. The extraordinary want of the ordinary deals, 20 foot deals and sprucia deals formerly demanded forces me to remind you, that we may speedily have them for the present dispatch of the works in hand. I hope the fits of the fever have left me, so that I may shortly be able to wait on you and shall then bring with me a description for a fourth-rate frigate to draw less water than any of that rate, which his Majesty and Royal Highness, when they were here, commanded me to prepare for their view. Wherefore I shall hasten it up to you before these present works are done, that, if it be thought fit we shall proceed thereon, it will give employment to the best of our men to be in readiness for future service, and so put off and discharge such part of the worst of them as we can best spare. [Ibid. No. 27.]
May 12.
Woolwich.
Richard Brereton to the same. Informing them that of the 17 vessels lately hired to attend the fleet as victuallers but four are as yet arrived in Woolwich Cheque, and giving their names and the number of men on board each. [Ibid. No. 28.]
May 12.
Chatham.
Phineas Pett, Edward Gregory and Matthew Hanch for T. Wilson to the Navy Commissioners. Giving the weights of two of the furnaces of the London with those of the cocks and solder. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 29.]
May 12.
Sheerness.
Sir William Jennens to the same. I received a letter from Commissioner Beach, informing me it is your orders that I should not stir till further order, and also that I should return the men I had from the Diamond, which I have done, though my necessities are very great. I have sent up my lieutenant once more with the ketch to try what he can do to get men, but more out of hope that you will take me into your consideration and send me some, for I can find none in these parts. Several men have been on board about three weeks, able seamen, who expect the bounty money. I have applied to the commissioner here, but he says he has no money. Pray take me into your consideration, and do not let me be singular, for I am sure that all the ships that went from hence had it. I am afraid it has hindered several men I know of from coming to me, because there was not money to pay those on board. [Ibid. No. 30.]
May 12.
Bristol.
Capt. Jasper Grant to the same. I began my journey on Thursday, and arrived here on Saturday. To-day we proceed to impress on the rivers and elsewhere, but the mayor will not imburse any money for first-rate ships according to the King's bounty without further order. I therefore desire you to write to Sir John Knight to assist me, for I find from what I can understand here that he is a very serviceable man in such matters. [Ibid. No. 31.]
May 12.
Bristol.
Francis Baylie to the same. Reminding them of the third payment of 500l. so long due to him, assuring them he is in a sad condition for want of it, so that he does not know well what to do for want of money to carry on the work of the ship, and praying them to make out a bill to him for that sum and let Mr. Hewer have it in order to return it to him. [Ibid. No. 32.]
May 12. Request by Thomas Lewsley for a warrant to the storekeeper at Deptford to receive from Edmund King the capstan bars, ash, and handspikes therein mentioned. [Ibid. No. 33.]
May 12. Note by Mr. Sprigg of the victualling vessels in the Swale for the seven men-of-war therein mentioned, which want convoy to secure them to the fleet. [Ibid. No. 34.]
May 12.
Dublin.
The Lord Lieutenant and Council to the Earl of Arlington. Having communicated to the Council that part of his Majesty's letter of 31 Aug. last to me relating to a new sort of farthings lately coined and made current by proclamation in England, which he supposed would be conveyed hither in sufficient quantities for furnishing the people here, we conceive them of singular use to this place, and, upon inquiry not finding any yet stirring here, we desire you to acquaint his Majesty therewith the first opportunity, and to beseech him to order so many of them to be speedily sent here, as may amount in value to 3,000l., or, if we cannot be conveniently thence supplied with those same farthings, we may receive his allowance to use such other means for our supply as we shall think agreeable to the kingdom's wants. If they are sent over, they will have freer allowance here and greater encouragement to come hither, if the proclamation, by which they were made current there, were renewed here. We further remind you of former letters of 9 July and 14 Aug. last sent you from this Board, intimating our inclinations of issuing a proclamation against exporting the coins of this realm, which we have ever since forborne to do, attending his Majesty's directions, but the necessity the kingdom is reduced to being extreme great, and importunate of such a proclamation, we most earnestly renew our desires that with all possible speed his Majesty's pleasure therein may be signified to us. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 159.]
May 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant by the Duke of York for an embargo, in pursuance of the order calendared ante, p. 238. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 164.]
May 13.
noon, Whitehall.
R. Yard to Williamson. Last Sunday we understood of your being forced back from Margate Road to Queenborough, and, though the winds here have ever since been contrary, yet we thought you would have again removed thence, till we were told otherwise by your letters received this morning, which made me direct my letters last night to you in Flanders. Yesterday morning came three Dutch packets together bringing only letters from Bulstrode and Tucker. From the former were two directed to Sir L. Jenkins and yourself, giving you an account of his having bought your horses, and that he would make all the haste he could with them for Flanders. Other news given in his last letter calendared ante, p. 236. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 165.] Enclosed,
Copy of inland advices, being identical with that calendared ante, p. 236, adding:—Harwich, 12 May.—No news. Weather thick and cloudy. Portsmouth, 12 May.—The French fleet has weighed anchor, and is endeavouring to make all the way they can to join our fleet. [Ibid. No. 165i.]
May 13.
night. Whitehall.
R. Yard to Williamson. At noon we sent you what we had by express; we have since received no letters of any kind. Sir R. Carr commands me to tell you he has not anything at present to write. [Ibid. No. 166.]
May 13.
noon. Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. Last night we wrote to you to Antwerp, hoping you had been gone out of the River before. Friday night Mr. Smith died, and was buried the next night; the Dean of Rochester doing the office himself. He was very sensible to the last, always acknowledging your favours to him. Mr. Everard and I waited on his body to the grave. Lord Arlington went at 3 this morning to Euston, and stays there till Saturday. All this morning Sir R. Carr has been at the office, and will be constantly so, till his return. All things at your house are very well, the century (sentry) coming constantly all but the first night, when I entreated the continuance of that favour from the officers, who readily gave orders in it. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 167.]
May 13.
noon. Whitehall.
W. Bridgeman to Williamson. I am sorry by yours of yesterday to find you stopped at so ill a place as Queenborough, where I hope you will not stay long. Nothing is come to-day from the fleet. The last letters mentioned the joining of the Portsmouth squadron with his Highness, who was resolved to ride at Dungeness till the arrival of the French. By a letter from Sir R. Holmes this morning we have reason to believe they may by this time be joined, because he says the French were yesterday so far past the Isle of Wight that he could not send a letter from the King to Monsr. d'Estrées on board, but returned it. We hear the Dutch ride still on the coast of Zealand. A further account of them Mr. Yard will send you in the extract. The King has, I think, resolved the completing his companies now on board to 100 each, and nominated the Duke of Buckingham, lieut.-general, and Col. Russell, major-general, for this summer's expedition. The Prince has fully resolved immediately after the junction to endeavour to land on the coast of Zealand except the Dutch will come out and fight him, which their Gazettes say they will. I enclose a paper drawn up about the beginning of this war by Sir Philip Meadowes, which I found among other papers, and showing it to Lord Arlington he directed me to send it you. News of Lord Arlington's departure as in the other letters. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 168.] Perhaps enclosed,
Discourse by Sir P. Meadowes, on the sovereignty of the sea, as regards (1) the right of fishing; (2) judicial cognizance of maritime causes; (3) the right of restraining foreign ships of war from entering certain seaswith a draft article concerning the fishery conform to the above discourse, stipulating that the Dutch shall abstain from fishing, without special licence, withinleagues of any part of Great Britain or Ireland, with a corresponding restriction on the people of Great Britain and Ireland as to the coasts of Holland, Zealand, and Friesland, with arguments in favour of the proposed article. [44 pages. Endorsed 1674, but I think the paper must be earlier and is the one referred to in the above letter. Ibid. No. 168 I.]
May 13.
11 a.m. Whitehall.
John Richards to Williamson. I put into Mr. Oudart's hand at parting a letter for the Bishop of Strassburg, whereof Mr. Sherewood was to be the bearer, to whom he promised to deliver it with his own hands. My lord went at 4 this morning to Euston, intending six days stay. In all probability the fleets are joined, we hearing from the Isle of Wight that the Comte d' Estrées was gone thence so far that they despaired of reaching him with an express, and from our fleet, that they saw a fleet coming towards them, which they supposed to be the French. [Misdated 12 May, but see his last letter and Ball's of this date. Ibid. No. 169.]
[May 13.] Major Nathaniel Darell to Williamson. I just now received the enclosed from Mr. Bridgeman, by which you will see how I am directed to send the packet I mentioned to you, which I can only recommend to the Postmaster of Sittingbourne's care, which is likewise out of the way to Rye. The only news here is that there are ketches come down to me to send out as I shall see occasion. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 170.]
May 13.
Sheerness.
Major Nathaniel Darell to the Earl of Arlington. This morning the vessel with the train of artillery on board is come into the Swale, the wind being contrary for going to the fleet, and besides want of convoy makes him stay for his Majesty's commands. The two smacks are come, which I will employ for the present in two several stations to bring intelligence, and, when Prince Rupert comes back towards the Foreland on this coast, I will employ one of them constantly with your packets to the fleet, and the other I will keep here to be ready to run up to Chatham with the letters he shall bring from the Prince. [Ibid. No. 171.]
May 13. Warrant to Sir Robert Long, Receiver-General of the Revenues late in jointure to the Queen Mother, to pay 500l. to Sir Henry Heron, K.B., for long and faithful service to the said Queen, he having received no entertainment during the troubles or before, nor any reward at any time. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, p. 147.]
May 13. Commissions to the Duke of Buckingham and Col. John Russell to be lieutenant and major-general respectively in this summer's expedition against the States-General under the Duke of York as generalissimo. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 61.]
Drafts thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, Nos. 172, 173.]
May [13 ?] Commission to Sir Jeremy Smyth to be adjutant-general in the same expedition. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 63.]
May 13. Warrant to the Lord Lieutenant to reprieve William Neylane, if condemned for killing Capt. Tiege Mac Mahon. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 43.]
May 13.
Chatham.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. Sending the measurements and tonnage of the Constant John. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 35.]
May 13.
Sheerness.
John Shish to the same. Informing them that, the Golden Hand fireship being come into the Swale, several of her fireworks are out of repair, and her mainmast is very defective, and desiring their order therein. [Ibid. No. 36.]
May 13.
Harwich.
Thomas Kirke to the same. Since the launching of the ship being refused help from the yard I applied to Capt. Taylor, who lent me as much as comes to 70 days for one man. With particulars of how he employed the men lent by Capt. Taylor, and also of the iron-work and deals received from Capt. Taylor. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 37.]
May 13.
Portsmouth.
St. John Steventon to the same. Informing them that he has paid one of the vessels for transporting the cordage from Weymouth, and that the other is expected that day, and that both will come to 35l. 2s., which he prays to be ordered to him. [Ibid. No. 38.]
May 13.
Plymouth.
John Lanyon to the Navy Commissioners. I delivered your warrant to John Bone, and informed him of the condition you obliged him to, which he promises to perform. With particulars of how the work of the Hunter was going on, and of some alterations in her. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 39.]
May 13.
Chatham. Dock.
Phineas Pett to Thomas Hayter. According to the Board's order I have sent up 8 of the spikes (2 of each kind) made by Mr. Foley according to the patterns sent for the sheathing of the Royal Prince, and also 8 ordinary ones. These were demanded as extra spikes to be made according to pattern, and being so much, and being such clever work, I see no reason but that he ought to have an extra price. [Ibid. No. 40.]
May 13.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to the Earl of Arlington. I have only to acquaint you with the examinations concerning Peter Talbot, copies of which I transmit. You will find your name has been made use of here, but much to your honour you are fully cleared of any imputation which can be laid upon you for countenancing the exercising of any foreign jurisdiction in this kingdom, as appears by the conclusion of the first examination. This gentleman, Peter Talbot, having early notice of Byrne's petition, has been very sedulous to take in all papers and letters which were under his hand, so that much of the discovery of this matter has been prevented by his knowledge of this petition. I have given him his pass, and left him at his choice either to make use of it presently, or stay till he could clear himself of the crimes laid to his charge. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 160.] Enclosed,
Examination of Dr. Oliver Plunkett, titular Archbishop of Armagh. Asked what he knows of any foreign jurisdiction exercised by Peter Talbot, he says, he heard he excommunicated friar John Byrne of Kilcock, and he saw a letter from the said Talbot in his own hand, directed to Dr. Patrick Plunkett, titular Bishop of Meath, setting forth that he had declared Byrne excommunicated for not obeying an interdict on the inhabitants of Kilcock, and desiring the said Patrick Plunkett to warn all the parish priests of the diocese of Meath to beware of the said friar as of an excommunicated person. Being demanded what he knew or had heard concerning the levying of moneys in Ireland from the Roman Catholics for agency abroad on their behalf, he says about Candlemas Term in 1670[–1] being in Dublin, he was called to a meeting by the said Talbot at the house of Capt., now Sir Thomas, Newcombe, at Oxmantown, where many of the Irish nobility and gentry were assembled of all the provinces except Ulster, but none of the clergy that he remembers were present except Talbot and himself. There Talbot propounded that the examinate should exact moneys from the clergy of Ulster for the agency of Col. Talbot in England on behalf of the Roman Catholics in Ireland. The examinate answered that he did not know before of any such meeting about that affair, and that he could not consent or conclude of any such matter, none of the said province being present, and he thouhgt it dangerous for him to undertake the levying of money of the King's subjects without authority. Then it was further propounded by the Earl of Westmeath that those present should give a voluntary contribution. Thereupon Talbot and the examinate each said he would give 10l. But the examinate being informed the day after by George Plunkett, priest in St. Thomas Street, that Talbot was levying the said 10l. of his clergy, and that he, the said George, to the best of the examinate's remembrance, gave 20s. towards it, and had also paid 20s. before to Talbot towards the agency of Mr. Netterville in England, and perceiving the said money was exacted from the clergy there, when Mr. Tu[i]te, being collector for the said money, came to demand his 10l., he told him he would not pay any moneys till he had spoken with his clergy in the province of Armagh, as well as Talbot had done with his in Leinster. And afterwards the examinate declined the payment thereof, and neither received nor paid any part of it, nor did any other to his knowledge pay any part of it, but several of the gentry at the said meeting then promised payment towards the said agency, but the examinate does not remember their names or what they promised to pay, except that Francis Barnewell promised 5l. Lord Berkeley being then Lord Lieutenant, he went presently to him, and acquainted him with the said meeting and passages there, which his Excellency said he had notice of already and advised him not to contribute anything towards the charges of any agency, which the examinate observed accordingly, and a day or two after went out of Dublin, and does not know what was acted there in the said affair afterwards. Being further demanded what he knows of Talbot's declaring to him and others of the clergy here of any power he had from his Majesty over them all or of his exercising thereof, he says in 1670, in the time of Lord Berkeley's government, he himself summoned all the Roman Catholic archbishops and bishops to Dublin to declare their loyalty to his Majesty, where they met and drew up a remonstrance. And cariance happening as to who should deliver it to his Excellency, after they had all signed it, and it had been agreed that Sir Nicholas Plunkett should present it, this displeasing Talbot, he declared before the said bishops that he had authority from his Majesty to oversee and govern all the Roman clergy of Ireland. The examinate answered that he desired to see the said authority under his Majesty's hand and seal or such a signification thereof from some of his ministers as should oblige his obedience thereunto, which when Talbot could not or would not produce, he told him that neither he nor any of them was bound to obey him. Moreover Talbot wrote about eight months ago to the titular Bishop of Meath, declaring that Father Patrick Maginn had lately written to him by Lord Arlington's order, to the purpose aforesaid, viz., that he should admonish or oversee the actions of all the Romish clergy of Ireland, and give notice of such misdemeanours as he should observe in them to his Majesty's ministers to have offenders punished according to their demerits, and that having observed many things acted by the Romish Archbishop of Armagh fit to be corrected, and particularly about changing a certain nickname viz.: MacIchy (in English the son of a blind man) which Talbot said was now really become a surname, and was in the power only of the King and Parliament to alter, the said Archbishop of Armagh should retract what he had done in prohibiting the custom of using such nick-names in families or else should be punished by his Majesty's ministers. Whereupon the examinate, being informed by the said Patrick Plunkett and others, that Talbot had frequently given out he had such an authority over the examinate and all the rest from his Majesty or his ministers, and having got into his hands Talbot's said letter sent it over to Lord Philip Howard, almoner to the Queen, to know whether Talbot had any such power, as he pretends, from his Majesty or any of his ministers. The Lord Almoner answered that no such power was given to Talbot from his Majesty or Lord Arlington or any other of his ministers. 8 May.
Examination of Edmund Wall, a Dominican friar. About five months since to the deponent's best remembrance, after Mass at the Dominican Chapel in Bridge Street, Dublin, Peter Talbot declared that friar John Byrne was excommunicated by the laws of the church for violating an interdict he had put on the town of Kilcock, and exhorted all persons to beware of him. 5 May.
Examination of Edward Chamberlain, a Dominican friar. To the same effect as the last. [4 pages. Copies. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 160i.]
Examination of John Reynolds of Dublin, a Dominican friar. 8 Sept. last at the Dominican Chapel in Bridge Street, Talbot in person declared friar John Byrne an excommunicated person, as the deponent was informed by persons present, and 2 Dec. last Talbot likewise declared the said excommunication at the Jesuits' Chapel, Dublin, as the deponent is likewise informed. Thursday or Friday before St. Martin's Day last, Talbot in presence of the deponent and many other Romish clergy at a public assembly in Bridge Street aforesaid, declared that Byrne was an excommunicated person, and the question whether it was lawful for them to imprison him was resolved in the affirmative. The deponent and William Ash, a Dominican friar, were then employed by Talbot to Byrne with a warrant from Sir Maurice Eustace to show it to Byrne and to persuade him to depart from Kilcock, otherwise the warrant should be put in execution. Last October at a public meeting of the Romish clergy at Bridge Street, the deponent being present, Talbot publicly declared he had an authority and power from the King over the Romish clergy of Ireland, to banish, punish, and correct them, and the said Talbot wrote several letters to that purpose, and particularly to Oliver Plunkett, titular Primate of Armagh, and to Constantine Keeffe, Provincial of the Dominicans. The first was shown and read to the deponent by the titular Bishop of Meath, and was to that effect. Talbot commanded the deponent to write to the said Provincial to come to Dublin within ten days, otherwise he would have him clapped up in prison by virtue of his said power from his Majesty. The deponent being at an assembly of the Romish Clergy in Dublin, Talbot declared that a marriage then celebrated by a Protestant minister betwixt two persons whereof one was a Roman Catholic and the other a Protestant, viz.: Simon Luttrell and a daughter of Sir Thomas Newcomen was not lawful, and shortly after, as the deponent heard, the said parties were married again by Talbot. 5 May.
Examination of Christopher Farrell, a Dominican friar. Talbot, in the Dominican Chapel in Bridge Street, the deponent being present, declared about a week or ten days ago that Byrne was an excommunicate person de jure for disobeying an interdict on the town of Kilcock. The deponent has heard that Talbot threatened to excommunicate also Dr. Anthony French at the Capuchins' Chapel in Dublin, but knows not whether he was excommunicated. The deponent has heard from Friar Reynolds and John Ussher, a Jesuit, that Talbot had a commission or other authority from the King to punish the Romish clergy of Ireland that should be refractory to their superiors. 5 May.
Examination of Michael Fullam, a Dominican friar. Concerning Talbot's declaring Byrne excommunicate at the Dominican Chapel, and his hearing him declare he had an authority from England, as in several of the previous examinations. 5 May.
Examination of Ignatius Gernon, a Franciscan friar. He had heard from Anthony Garland, a Franciscan, that Talbot had threatened him and others that he would excommunicate him, if he would not leave Dublin, and that the said Anthony had lived at Dundalk for several years past, by reason of the said Talbot's prosecution against him. The deponent has heard that Valentine Cruise, John Read, and Francis Coppinger have likewise been removed from Dublin by Talbot's threats, and that Francis Coppinger was removed from being Provincial in this kingdom by the See of Rome, contrary to the customs of this kingdom, which used to choose their own Provincial, and that the authority for removing Coppinger was sent into this kingdom to Talbot. 5 May. [4 pages. Copies. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 160ii.]
Examination of Dennis Egan, parish priest of Kilcock, co. Kildare. Being demanded if he received any letters or orders from Talbot lately concerning excommunicating Byrne, or for interdicting the parishioners of Kilcock, he says about August last he received a letter from him commanding him to forbid the parishioners of Kilcock to hear Byrne's Mass. He that brought it (he does not now remember who it was) also delivered him a message from Talbot to read the letter to Byrne, which he did at the Market Cross in Kilcock, divers others being present. Last September he received by the hands of Patrick Realy, a parish priest, an instrument signed by John Whelan and Dominic Dempsey, Vicars or Deputy Vicars-general, and dated 12 Aug. last, a copy whereo is annexed, the contents whereof he published to some of the parishioners of Kilcock, and showed it to others. Being demanded to produce the letter received last August, he said that, after he had a summons to appear to be examined, he acquainted Talbot therewith and showed him his letter, which Talbot took into his own hands and kept it, and that that very morning he attended the said Talbot, and desired to have the letter again, but Talbot told him he had broken it, but would acknowledge its contents, if required. The examinate being further demanded whether he had not forbidden the parishioners of Kilcock to hear his own Mass or denied to christen their children, says he did forbid them, and was commanded by his superiors to do so, because they did not obey the said interdict, and that he had christened children, but had refused to admit some of the said parishioners to be godfathers for the same reason of disobedience. 12 May. [1½ page. Copy. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 160 III.] Annexed,
The said instrument. That the moderation of the Government in not prosecuting the Roman Catholic clergy for exercising their functions might not be abused by our indiscretion in being too public therein, it was ordered by our spiritual superiors that those thought guilty of that fault should moderate their zeal, so that the neighbouring Protestants might have no cause of complaint. The only person who did not comply with their orders is Byrne, Dominican prior of Kilcock, who, not content to travel up and down the country in his monastic habit, ceases not to blow his horn to assemble the people in Ms chapel there to Mass and sermons, it being one of the greatest roads and markets of this kingdom. Complaint thereof being made he was commanded by the Roman Catholic Ordinaries of Dublin and Kildare to be more discreet and private, and he contemning these commands, it was ordered that no people should be admitted to his Mass or to any other in or within a quarter of a mile of Kilcock. He contemning this command also and continuing to blow his horn without any regard to the laws of the land or the canons of the Church, we, being concerned for the souls and peaceable behaviour of the Roman Catholics of the Diocese of Kildare, which the said Byrne disturbs, declare, that by his disobedience and his continuancy in his dangerous and damnable courses, he has separated himself from the communion of the Roman Catholic Church, and therefore all members of the same Church are bound to shun his conversation, and also that of those of whom he pretends to be superior, and who live in his [priory ?], neither ought they to give him or them any alms, but to look upon them as vagabonds or sturdy beggars, and all are bound to obey the justices or constables, when their aid is required for apprehending or leading to prison the said Byrne, if the magistrates think fit to punish his crimes. This we only declare, and we do not intend to exercise any foreign jurisdiction contrary to the laws of the land, but only advertise the Roman Catholics that Byrne's priestly character or religious profession can be no protection for his seditious and scandalous proceedings, nor ought to deter them from helping the King's officers to apprehend or carry him to prison when legally required. [Copy. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 160 iv.]
Examination of William Ash, a Dominican friar. About All Saints last Talbot told him that Byrne was an excommunicate person, and warned him not to converse with him, for he would excommunicate him if he did. The deponent inquiring why Byrne was excommunicated, Talbot answered it was because he said Mass at Kilcock, when the town was interdicted. The deponent has heard from several that Talbot declared he had a letter from the King of England authorising him for governing and ordering the Romish clergy of Ireland. [12 May. Copy. Ibid. No. 160 V.]
Examination of Daniel Byrne of Kilcock, innkeeper. Since October last, Gerald Nugent, Jesuit, parish priest of Killdrought, Dominic Dempsey and John Whelan, pretended Vicars-General of Kildare, Patrick Realy, parish priest of Donadea, and Dennis Egan, parish priest of Kilcock, in several assemblies before many hundreds of men and women interdicted the town and inhabitants of Kilcock, by special orders, as they declared, of Peter Talbot, titular Archbishop of Dublin. The deponent has seen, in the said Egan's hands, the authority sent from Talbot as aforesaid, and Egan declared to the deponent that, till the townsmen of Kilcock were absolved by the said titular Archbishop from their interdict, they could not lawfully speak or drink one neighbour with another, or be gossips, and that they were incapable of any Christian burial. The said Talbot told the deponent that the women of Kilcock, and particularly the deponent's wife were whores to Friar Byrne, on purpose, as the deponent believes, to breed dissension betwixt Byrne and the townsmen. By a letter publicly read in the market at Kilcock, written, as the deponent believes, by the said Talbot, the said Byrne was commanded to leave Kilcock, otherwise he should be sent to Bridewell or Barbados. The said Egan declared publicly before the congregation at Mass about 14 days ago at Kilcock, that he had gone to the said pretended Vicars-General of Kildare to get off the interdict, and that they had directed him to the said Talbot, who promised that within a few days it should be taken off.
Examination of Michael Cradock, innkeeper, of Kilcock. About six months since Dennis Egan often declared publicly and privately that the town of Kilcock was interdicted, and the deponent believes it is still under the interdict. About four months since the said Egan refused to christen the deponent's child, because the godfathers and godmothers lay under the interdict. The deponent saw a letter signed Peter Talbot to the said Egan for Friar Byrne to leave the town of Kilcock within four days, and that the novices should go to another convent, and saw another letter from the said Talbot to the said Egan, but knows not what the contents of it were, except it were the interdict itself. 7 May.
Examination of Edmond Fyan, merchant, of Kilcock. About a quarter of a year ago he was at Mass at Kilcock, when Dennis Egan declared the town interdicted, and that, as he declared, by authority from Peter Talbot, titular Archbishop of Dublin. The deponent has heard and believes that the said town still lies under the said interdict, the cause of it being a difference betwixt Friar Byrne and the said Egan. About a fortnight ago the deponent heard that the said Egan at Mass forewarned the people of Kilcock that were interdicted to come to Mass there. He knows of no money collected for agency in England or elsewhere, but what the priests demanded for Easter offerings and such like perquisites. 7 May.
Examination of Patrick Plunkett, titular Bishop of Meath. 17 June, 1670, at a meeting of five or six Romish Bishops at Mr. Reynolds' house at the Bridgefoot, Dublin, Peter Talbot declared that he had authority from his Majesty of England to correct and punish all the Romish clergy of Ireland, which being disapproved by some present, and particularly by Oliver Plunkett, titular Primate of Armagh, who desired to see it, saying if it were so he would obey it, the said Talbot did not produce any such authority. Some few months after, the said Talbot shewed the deponent a letter from Father Patrick Maginn, importing that he, Talbot, was to correct the vices of the Romish clergy of Ireland, and that it was by the advice of Mr. Secretary Arlington. A copy thereof was sent by the said Talbot to the said Oliver Plunkett by the deponent's conveyance with a letter from the said Talbot to the same effect. Oliver Plunkett answered that he had sent him only a copy of a letter, and how authentic it was he did not know, but would send into England, and as he should receive an answer, so he would demean himself. The deponent has been informed that the Earl of Arlington has disowned that he ever gave any directions to the said Father Patrick to write any such letter. The deponent received a letter from the said Talbot, intimating that friar John Byrne was de jure excommunicate, for he had violated an interdict imposed by the Vicars-General of Kildare on the town and inhabitants of Kilcock, and desired the deponent to send the same to his clergy to take notice of it, and the deponent accordingly sent copies to his clergy in the diocese of Meath, but the deponent has neither the said letter nor a copy of it. 12 May.
Examination of Thomas Dillon, a Carmelite friar. About three quarters of a year ago at an assembly of the Romish clergy in Dublin, Peter Talbot demanded of the deponent whether a marriage celebrated by a Protestant minister was lawful, which the deponent affirming to be so, the said Talbot opposed it very much, and, as the deponent has been informed, the said Talbot married again Simon Luttrell and a daughter of Sir Thomas Newcomen after they had been married by a Protestant minister. 12 May. [Copies. S.P. Ireland, Car. II, 333, No. 160 VI.]
[May ?] Analysis of the above evidence, showing by which witnesses it was proved that Talbot had exercised foreign jurisdiction and pretended an authority from England for punishing and correcting the Romish clergy, and had raised money for agency. [Ibid. No. 161.]
May 14.
night. Whitehall.
R. Yard to Williamson. Since I wrote yesterday we have received no news save what is enclosed here. The French post came this afternoon but had no letters directed to you either from Paris or Italy, except the enclosed French Gazette. This morning the King received letters from the Prince dated yesterday, saying that the Major of the French squadron was come on board him, and assured him that the whole squadron would be in sight towards the evening. Early Friday morning the King intends for Rye, to see the conjunction of the fleets. Mr. Perwich by this day's post writes that the Earl of Sunderland was so ill that he would not be able to leave Paris these seven days, and that the French King has remanded his ambassador from the Court of Spain. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 174.] Enclosed,
May 14. Inland advices received that day. Newcastle, 10 May.—An embargo is laid on all ships here. Several ketches belonging to the King's ships went hence yesterday morning, but, knowing the Dutch are out, will, I hope, be careful. The Guinea and Crown passed by the day before yesterday. Lynn, 10 May.— Wind N.E. Saturday arrived a Danish ship in 8 days from Norway, having seen no privateers till he was off Humber, where he met two Dutch privateers, which boarded him, and took away most of his victuals. Yesterday came here a fisherman from Whitby, which was put ashore near the Spurn by one of the said privateers. Plymouth, 11 May.—Yesterday arrived 20 merchantmen from Morlaix and St. Malo, convoyed by the Adventure. There is a report that a ship laden with masts was taken last week about the Land's End. Yarmouth, Isle of Wight, 12 May.—The men watching on the hills here counted this afternoon 25 sail in sight. If bound eastwards, I hope they may be the Straits fleet. Weymouth, 11 May.—The Tiger, a French man-of-war of 44 guns, left behind for convoy to some Bordeaux ships and others, having done this, came yesterday into Portland Road. Portsmouth, 12 May.—About 10 yesterday, the French fleet sailed eastward to join the Prince. They are 24 men-of-war and six fireships, besides tenders and victuallers, the admiral being mounted with 102 guns. Yesterday came to the Isle of Wight the Dragon, which is to proceed for convoy to Dublin. Rye, 12 May.— To-day the ships from Portsmouth came up with the fleet which lies at Dungeness, and the Prince went on board the Royal Charles. [1¾ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 174 i.]
May 14. Warrant to Sir Edward Griffin, Treasurer of the Chamber, to pay 150l. yearly to the Countess Marshall of Scotland, Lady of the Bedchamber to the Queen Consort, for her lodging out of Court. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 147.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lord Chamberlain, the Earl of St. Albans, to swear in Henry Savile, to be Groom of the Bedchamber supernumerary, in order to his admission on the first vacancy. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 210.]
May 14. Minutes of the business of the Board. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 41.]
May 14.
Victualling Office, London.
Sir. T. Littleton, Josiah Child, T. Papillon and B. Gauden to the Navy Commissioners. Having a large quantity of beer and other provisions ready at Ipswich and Chatham, we pray you to order as soon as possible so many victualling ships as may take in 300 tuns of beer to Ipswich, and one to Chatham to take in 100. We the rather desire this may be expedited because the Lord Treasurer this morning ordered us to provide a large quantity of bread and beer for soldiers on a new contract. Postscript. We are informed the victualling ships below make great delays in taking in their beer, and enclose the testimony received from a lighterman that carried beer to the Marigold. [Ibid. No. 42.] Enclosed,
May 14. Certificate by Daniel Wyand that on the 13th he went on board the Marigold with a lighter of beer, on which day they took in but three butts, and up to about one to-day but four more, there being but fire men and a boy on board. They refuse to allow another lighter of beer to lie alongside. [Ibid. No. 42i.]
May 14. Whitney Parry to the same. I was gunner of the Mary Rose for 8½ years, and being in the last engagement utterly disabled for further service by wounds, his Royal Highness by order of 4 March last, directed the Board to allow me a pension equal to the salary and allowances I enjoyed. Being impoverished by having spent already above 80l. under cure, I beg you would grant me allowance of wages and victuals for myself and my servant from the day of my discharge last June. [Ibid. No. 43.]
May 14.
Woolwich.
Phineas Pett to the same. Having had no answer to his letter of the 12th, again reminding them of their great want of deals, mentioning the 80 loads of elm timber in those parts of which they were formerly informed, as it is very profitable to have always a reasonable quantity of such timber in the yards, and inquiring whether the breadroom of the Swallow is to be sheathed with thin lead or white plates. [Ibid. No. 44.]
May 14.
The Elizabeth ketch, in Yarmouth Road.
Capt. Edward Robinson to the same. After our arrival from the coast of Holland we fell in with Yarmouth, and then made towards the Gunfleet, but meeting with five Holland men-of-war put us to secure ourselves under the shore at Dunwich, and one small hoy belonging to London, laden with coals. Being so surrounded we went off to sea the first opportunity and got to the Roads. We lost our boat and oars. To-day I got ashore to get a boat and fresh water, and as soon as possible shall make way to the fleet, unless otherwise ordered. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 45.]
May 14.
The Royal Charles, westward of Dungeness.
Capt. Richard Haddock to the Navy Commissioners. I desire that another cable for this ship I formerly wrote about, may be embarked on the White Fortune and sent to us, and also a spare topmast and two fishes. We now ride with the fleet about two leagues to the westwards of Dungeness. The Prince came on board us yesterday. The French fleet are in sight of us. I doubt not they will be with us to-day, the wind being at S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 46.]
May 14.
Sheerness.
S. Hunter, clerk of the cheque, to S. Pepys. I send the books of the Prince and 14 other ships. Since the beginning of something like a yard here, which has much increased my business and requires somebody's continual attendance, I was bold to request that one of the clerks I am obliged to keep might be borne on the daybook here. This was refused on examination of the Duke's warrant, which allowed me but 100l. per annum for myself and clerks, which being before the business here was so considerable, was judged very reasonable and I was and am bound to be very thankful for it, especially to yourself, to whom I will always acknowledge I owe my being, encouraged by which I am bold to beg it may be a well being, which I must confess it is not, for you may consider after the deduction of 30l. per annum for each clerk out of my salary, under which nobody capable of business will serve in a place so ill provided and unhealthful, my part will be but small. Therefore I beg you to take this so necessary and reasonable a provision into your consideration and wholly refer it to your judgment. [Ibid. No. 47.]
May 14.
Bristol.
Francis Baylie to Commissioner Tippetts. Giving an account of the dimensions of the ship he is building, and of her progress, and asking leave to use several logs of his Majesty's timber there, which is fit for little, the value thereof to be discounted out of the money due to him. [Ibid. No. 48.]
May 14. Christopher Coles, junior, to William Hewer. Enclosing his bill and begging him to show them to the Board, and get them rated, for they were goods sent in by order of the purveyors, and Mr. Pett of Woolwich stopping the vessel there that was loaded with plank, timber and treenails, desired him to let him have it, for he could not launch the Swallow without those goods, being contented to take the same prices as he had for the goods last served in, and enclosing also his bill for oars, and hoping their Honours will give him Mr. Body's price, but leaving it to their pleasure to give what they please for them. [Ibid. No. 49.]
May 14.
Charlemont.
Thomas Windesor to Viscount Conway. Concerning his lordship's having ordered him not to pay his rent but to let himself be distrained, when his lordship would then replevy on the King's account, and requesting his lordship to procure for him from the Treasury 40l. on account of his arrears as lieutenant to the late Lord Charlemont's troop that he may repay Dr. Clarke, the Dean of Winchester, that sum advanced to his wife. [Conway Papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 162.]
[May ?] Edward Brabazon to the King. Petition, praying that, since four years ago the Earl of Ossory, then Lord Deputy, was written to by the King's command to grant the next vacant captaincy of horse to the petitioner, who nevertheless still continues out of all employment, his Majesty would bestow on him some other equivalent employment, or else bestow on him out of the revenues of Ireland such a sum as may enable him to purchase a command in the Irish army. [Ibid. No. 163.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Directing payment to Edward Brabazon as a free gift without account of 1,000l. out of the 13,730l. 8s. settled for the maintenance of a sea regiment which shall be saved out of the pay thereof immediately after the end of the war or proclamation of peace with the United Provinces. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol 8, p. 432.]
May 15.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Williamson. I received yours of the 12th from Sheerness, but would not answer you thither, supposing the wind has by this given you opportunity of getting to sea, and then I doubt not the yachts will have address enough to fetch some ports in Flanders. Capt. Sackville intending for Cologne, I could not pass without saluting your Excellencies. Lord Sunderland is ill at Paris of colic. Pray let me know how to address to you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 175.]
May 15.
Spring Gardens.
Sir R. Southwell to Williamson. I have mourned sufficiently for your ill treatment by the wind and weather after our departure, and never before thought I should envy the mayor of Queenborough, who has had so much of your good company. Mr. Coxe has now got freedom to go and be witness of all the transactions at Cologne. I presume to recommend him to your good grace and protection. He was with me in Flanders and gave me some help, no man that I know better improving a memorial from English into French. I have nothing to tell you new from the Board, unless that the victuallers' contract is to determine next Christmas by consent, Sir D. Gauden and his son immediately disappearing, yet, bearing share in profit and loss, they are to have inspection into all. Some say it will be hereafter managed by Commissioners, but the three that stand hope to engross it to themselves, which will hardly be, if they do not give great proofs of their dexterity this summer. We talk much now of a descent and great commissions given out to his Royal Highness, the Duke of Bucks, &c. One Sir Ralph Knight has taken the place of Sir Edward Scott, but still we have him at the Board, he and Vernon being the most staple customers we have. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 176.]
May 15.
9 p.m. Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. I received yours about 8, and went to Mr. Thornborough about the wine, but he went this morning to Rye, whither his Majesty goes to-morrow morning early, so I was fain to show your letter to Lady O'Brien, who will order all things you mention to be got ready to be sent as soon as possible. I have your letter to Sir Jeremy Smyth and every minute expect his return. If it not been in such haste her ladyship says she could have got your Excellencies something to eat, but she will do what she can. To-day we have had no letters. Last night the French packet came double, but Mr. Yard said there was no news in it. Last night came an express from the Prince at Rye, saying that then the French fleet was within two leagues of him, so he hoped to be joined with them in a few hours, on which his Majesty has sent away his goods to-day for Rye, intending to follow himself at 4 to-morrow morning with his Royal Highness. This evening his Majesty was at the office with the Lord Chancellor and others, and stayed two hours. The town says my Lord Treasurer receives the Sacrament next Sunday. Mr. Thynne has a warrant passed by Secretary Coventry for the reversion of Mr. Ross's place. The other day I bought by chance a little book printed in 1651 in French of all the treaties and leagues made by France with their neighbour Princes since 1621, with other curious remarks of history. If you had it not, I should be glad to send it. Just now my Lady's butler comes and says he has been with the Quaker about the wine, and this evening's tide serving at 11, they cannot prepare so much bottled in two hours, but will do it as soon as they can, and the tide serving at 11 to-morrow morning, she hopes that may do as well. No Rhenish wine is yet come, nor will it be ready to draw off till next week. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 177.]
May 15. Sir Robert Carr to Williamson. As I was concluding a letter to you, I received yours of to-day. I am sorry the wind is so cross. I will acquaint Lord Arlington by to-night's post how matters are with you, and will also acquaint the King, who to-morrow morning with the Duke goes to Rye, where the fleets lie, which joined yesterday morning. The only news is that the French have taken a strong place in the East Indies, called, I think, St. Thome, but I will give order that you fail not of the abstract. My wife and niece are your humble servants. Mr. Collingwood is just come to see me in my new employment. I long for Lord Arlington's coming back more than ever, for my double diligence, which has been but necessary at this time, has almost wearied me. My Lord could never have been absent at a more improper time. I hope what is talked will not prove true, but my hopes are not very strong. [Ibid. No. 178.]
May 15.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Duke of Buckingham, Lord-Lieutenant of the West Riding of Yorkshire. The King approves of Lord Henry Fairfax, nominated by his Grace as one of his Deputy Lieutenants. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 81.]
May 15. Commission to the Earl of Mulgrave to be Governor of North Yarmouth, and of all forces there. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 62.]
May 15.
Whitehall.
The King to the Duke of York. Having resolved to transport 10,000 foot and 100 horse to the coast of Holland, and approved an estimate of the Navy Commissioners of the charge thereof, and also of that of maintaining them and 5,000 foot soldiers to be taken out of the fleet, during their transportation and for two months after their landing, requiring him therefore to order the Navy Commissioners and the Victuallers of the Navy to provide immediately the necessary shipping and provisions. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 206.] Annexed,
Estimate of the charge of transporting 10,100 foot and 100 horse to Holland, and maintaining them, and 5,000 soldiers more from the fleet, for 2 months after landingtotal, 48,827l. of which is required in ready money 33,707l. [Ibid. p. 207.]
May 15. The King to the Commissioners of Prizes. Having granted 6 Sept. and again 23 Nov. 1672, the prize vessel, Young Prince of Denmark, alias William and Elizabeth, to Benjamin Batten, who, the said vessel being seized by the Prize Commissioners, cannot obtain its delivery without paying incidental charges amounting to the value of the ship, which he is unable to do, ordering them therefore to deliver him the said ship free of charge. [Ibid. p. 209.]
May 15.
The Golden Hand, at Sheerness.
Capt. William Mather to the Navy Commissioners. Requesting them to order him to victual there, or cause it to be sent from London, as they have not above ten days' provisions, and, as nothing is done yet for the fitting of the ship, hoping they will order him a new mainmast, for neither it nor the bowsprit is fit to go to sea. Postscript. This morning I spoke for victuals and also for a boat, but he answers me I must go from whence I came. Therefore I hope you will order me to Commissioner Beach for these necessaries. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 50.]
May 15.
The Assurance.
Capt. Ralph Lasshells to Sir Jeremy Smyth. Yesterday we put ashore at Calais the soldiers we brought from Leith, in number upwards of 800. To-day we are come to anchor in Dover Road, where we wait for further orders. Our victuals grow very short, but I hope we shall be suddenly supplied. [Ibid. No. 51.]
May 15.
Woolwich.
John Burgess to Commissioner Tippetts. Giving an account of the provisions stolen out of the King's stores, 22 Aug. last, amounting in value to 39l. 16s. 0½d. [Ibid. No. 52.]
May 15. Tender by Mr. Buckingham of the oak timber therein mentioned. [Ibid. No. 53.]
May 16.
2 p.m. Letter Office, London.
R. Yard to Williamson. Last Wednesday night I received yours of that morning, and understood your thoughts of sailing that evening, which was the reason I forbore sending to you by that night's ordinary. This morning I first received yours dated yesterday, which happened thus. Yesterday afternoon there was a meeting at our office. After the Lords were gone, Sir. R. Carr directed me to go to the Earl of Northampton for some directions concerning the commissions for his regiment, and to stay at his house till he came home, which I did till it was late, and then went to my lodging. This morning I waited on Lady Katharine, who had given directions for all things as she thought best. (Describing the steps he had taken for sending Williamson the wine). We have not any letters yet from Flanders or Holland, so I have nothing to communicate but the enclosed inland extract. This morning early the King went for Rye. The last news from the fleet was that the French fleet was in sight. I called here to see if there were any letters and to have Col. Whitley's favour for forwarding this. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 179.] Probably enclosed,
Inland advices. Bridlington, 12 May.—Last Thursday anchored at the back of the Smuddy Sand a small Dutch caper of 4 guns. He afterwards forced a small vessel ashore, but was forced to leave her. Last Friday passed by in the offing the Crown with another small frigate bound southwards. On Saturday passed southward a dogger and a ketch with men to the fleet. Portsmouth, 15 May.—Yesterday came in here the Falcon from Brest, which came with the French fleet as far as Plymouth, where she put in to take some seamen on board for the Royal Charles. Newcastle, 13 May.—This morning came in here an English redeemed vessel from the Texel on Sunday last, which says all the great ships at Amsterdam are got over the Pampus and were taking in their men, but can give no account of the Dutch fleet, except that he believes they are somewhere on their own coast. Plymouth, 15 May.—Here are come in about 25 merchantmen from Morlaix, Bordeaux, and other parts of France convoyed by the Adventure. Here is fitting for his Majesty's service a late Dutch privateer. Weymouth, 14 May.—The French man-of-war, the Tiger, is now in Portland Road. A Dutch caper of 10 guns came yesterday into our bay under French colours. We saw him afterwards chase a hoy from Portsmouth. Harwich, 15 May.—By a Scotch vessel laden with coals we understand that last Friday and Saturday off the offing they saw five Dutch men-of-war, and afterwards again six, one of them bearing a flag on the foretop. They came near our shore and afterwards stood off again. Portsmouth, 15 May.—We hope by this the French fleet is joined with the Prince. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 179 I.]
May 16.
At night. Woolwich.
R. Yard to Williamson. Concerning his things sent away. This morning Mr. Smith came hither, who left the fleet yesterday evening. The French were not then joined with us, but were within a league. This afternoon came in three Flanders mails and one from Holland. I have sent you copies of Mr. Nipho's letters and large extracts of the rest. The King will be back next Monday, about which time or the following day my Lord will likewise return. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 180.]
May 16. Sir J. Barckman Leyenbergh to Williamson. Our Ambassadors were all the last week arrived at Aix-la-Chapelle. They write nothing of going to Cologne. The Spanish passports were left in the hands of Monsr. Appelboom, to whom I gave orders last post to direct them for Antwerp. The States-General have declared to set Carre and two more at liberty, if Zas and Arton may be exchanged against them. The King's going this morning to Rye you know already, but, let me tell you, the rumour is more hot than commonly of the Duke of York's going ere long with eight or ten thousand men in company of a great many persons of quality to join with the fleet on some expedition of great consequence. I pray God to prosper all England's endeavours, yet you know what is promised, not to see the Dutch entirely destructed. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 181.]
May 16. The Earl of Northampton to the Earl of Arlington. Requesting a commission for Lord Asteley, who has agreed with Sir Philip Tyrwhitt about his company. [Ibid. No. 182.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. We have all this day been making extracts of the three Flanders and two Dutch packets, which Mr. Yard sends you. The Duke of Buckingham went this morning (as given out) to Yorkshire to raise some regiments for this summer's expedition, and the whole town is full of news of a great army to be raised to prosecute the war against the Dutch. We have nothing here but wet weather. Mr. Yard found the smack Sir Jeremy ordered would not sail till to-morrow and so hired a boat on purpose. [Ibid. No. 183.]
May 16. William Morgan to Viscount Conway. Since as executor to his own cousin, Walter Fitzwilliam, brother to Lord Fitzwilliam of Northamptonshire, and formerly carver to King James, he has been forced to go to law with Francis Wrenham, a Low Country soldier, for money Mr. Fitzwilliam left with him, and after his death with his son and heir, who pleads he had no assets of his father, and since he understands his Lordship paid young Wrenham two or three great sums of money, requesting information whether young Wrenham did receive such sums of his Lordship, and if so, on what account. [Conway Papers. Ibid. No. 184.]
[After May 16.] Account of numerous small sums received, probably for quitrents, the first dated 28 Nov., 1672, and the last, received from Abingdon Hospital, 16 May, 1673. [3¼ pages. Ibid. No. 185.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Lord George Fitzroy, or Palmer, the King's natural son by Barbara, Duchess of Cleveland, and to the heirs male of his body, in reversion after the determination of a lease granted by King James to Sir Thomas Waller, at a rental of 500l. a year, of the prizage and butlerage of all wines brought into England, with successive remainders to Charles, Earl of Southampton, and Henry Fitzroy, Earl of Euston, other natural sons of the King and the said Duchess and to the heirs male of their bodies, and also for a grant to George, Viscount Grandison, and Edward Villiers of the said rent of 500l., in trust for the said grantees. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 218.]
May 16. Grant to John Lawrence of the office of Receiver of the first fruits and tenths, with 200l. per annum for himself and 20l. for his clerk. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 336.]
May 16. Warrant to pay to George Wharton, Treasurer of the Ordnance, 200,000l. [Ibid.]
May 16. Minutes of the business of the Board. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 54.]
May 16. Eleven pursers on behalf of themselves and pursers in like condition to the Navy Commissioners. Stating that having attended at this office for an order for the present payment of the necessary money his Majesty granted them, and on the victuallers for the necessary money they ought to pay them on their indenting, they have not received one penny of either, so that they are unable to satisfy those who entrusted them with necessaries with which they supplied the King's ships, and having run out their own stocks they are no longer able to subsist without present relief, and in the meantime they hear that Prince Rupert is incensed against them, being misinformed that they are idling ashore, and therefore praying that their Honours would order them present redress, and would give them their letter to the Prince to satisfy him, that they have been necessitated to attend their Honours and the contractors, and that they are not idling as represented to his Highness. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 55.] Enclosed,
Certificate by four of the above that they have indented with the victuallers and have not received their necessary money. 16 May.
Certificate by two of the above and another purser, that they had attended at the Victualling Office in order to indent, but had refused to do so, because several pursers have already indented, and cannot get their necessary money. 16 May. [Ibid. No. 55I.]
Andrew Hawes to Lieut. John Godwin. It is now a week since I indented, and though I pressed for my money very hard to one of the contractors, there is no prospect of money. Mr. Portman knows not when there may be, 14 days the soonest, and then not certain. I'll attend my duty on board and not run the hazard of the Prince's displeasure. There is extra money that I hope may come more seasonable than that from the contractors. If you take out the bill, and receive the money my woman will be obliged to you. 9 May. [Ibid. No. 55 II.]
May 16.
Victualling Office, London.
T. Papillon and B. Gauden to the same. In answer to yours of the 14th and 15th, we have ordered all the victualling hoys to sail for the Downs from Sheerness the first opportunity. We conceive you misapprehended our desire of sending victualling ships for Ipswich, which was not for taking in the provisions designed for the supply of the 10 ships of war, intimated in ours of the 6th, but for taking in 300 tuns of beer, which lies there ready to be put into victualling ships as part of the beer to be laden to follow the fleet, and may go off thence as commodiously as from any place, and therefore we pray you to order such a number of victualling ships thither, as may take in that proportion. We also desire you would order a victualling ship to Portsmouth to take in a proportion of flesh there for the month's provision to be sent after the fleet. His Royal Highness formerly required us to make provision there for the speedy victualling of 16 or 18 men-of-war expected home, which occasioned our sending great stores thither, and now all those ships, except those with Capt. Narbrough, being supplied elsewhere, we have an overplus there ready to be put into such victualler as you shall appoint. [Ibid. No. 56.]
May 16.
Woolwich.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. Repeating his inquiry whether they shall plate or lead the breadroom of the Swallow, and reminding them of their great want of deals and elm timber and bricks. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 57.]
May 16.
The Sovereign, in Queen-borough Swale.
Capt. John Hayward to the same. I have little news except our want of seaman. Since my last I have received by my ketch that was to the northward 60 seaman, volunteers and pressed. I was in hopes of a supply of men from London. I sent my lieutenant in one of my ketches for the purpose nigh a fortnight since, but I hear he has got but very few. I understand a great number of the best watermen are still in the River. I beg I may, if possible, have a supply from London, for my hopes are small of having one from the fleet. I have sent for our tenders down from London, if they have no hopes of getting men. I intend the best sailer of them to the westward and the other to the northward as far as Yarmouth. We victual on board, soldiers and others, near 750, of which I judge there may be 200 seaman. [Ibid. No. 58.]
May 16.
Woolwich Ropeyard.
W. Bodham to Commissioner Tippetts. Begging him to procure the Board's pass as petitioned in the enclosed. [Ibid. No. 59.] Enclosed,
W. Bodham to the Navy Commissioners. Petitioning their licence to be absent 8 or 10 days to see his brother, who is very dangerously ill, he not having been in Norfolk for above four years, adding that he has engaged Mr. Burgess, &c., at the dock, and Mr. Russell in the yard to have an extra care in his absence, and has a very honest and useful servant himself. [Ibid. No. 59 i.]
May 17.
The Royal Charles, in Rye Road.
Hartgill Baron to Sir L. Jenkins. I received yours and presented the enclosed to his Highness, whose answer is enclosed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 186.] Enclosed,
Prince Rupert to Sir L. Jenkins and Sir J. Williamson. I have communicated yours of yesterday from Sheerness to his Majesty and Royal Highness who are now on board. Their opinion is, and I conclude the same, that, you having a pass from the Dutch for your baggage it will be safer than a convoy can be, for, where the enemy now lies, the frigate that is convoy will be in very great danger, if not lost. The Royal Charles in Rye Road. 17 May. [Ibid. No. 186i.]
A copy of Prince Rupert's letter. [Ibid. No. 187.]
May 17.
past 10 p.m. Bobbin[g].
Major Nathaniel Darell to Williamson. Believing your Excellencies more favourably used the second time than the first, I recommended your packet which came to me this morning to the Postmaster of Sittingbourne to send to Dover, which I thought the nearest way and the surest to find you. However, I have sent to recall it, if possible, which I fear it is not, but as I come back I will stop it in the Postmaster's hands at Sittingbourne. One of my best horses died this morning, but my neighbour, Sir George Moore, lends me his coachman and horses to put into my coach which shall be at your service on Monday morning at what time you please. My little yacht shall attend your Excellencies at King's Ferry. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 188.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
Sir Edward Walker to the Navy Commissioners. By order of the Lord Treasurer and the Foreign Committee, enclosing the draft of an agreement between his Majesty and the Victuallers of the Navy for victualling land soldiers, which they are desired to consider and put into such a form as is agreeable to such contracts, and to return it with all speed, that so it may be established by order in Council. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 60.] Enclosed,
The said draft. The King in Council agrees with the Victuallers of the Navy for the victualling of 10,100 land soldiers for one month, to be furnished each man per diem with one gallon of beer, wine measure, one lb. of bolted wheaten biscuit and ½ lb. of good Cheshire cheese, that shall continue for 6 months after the delivery on board any vessels appointed to receive the same in the Thames at the charge of the said victuallers, the said victuallers to find for the purpose woodbound cask and bags, for which his Majesty is not to pay anything, but only to cause them to be returned to the victuallers, *and to pay for such as shall not be returned 10d. for each biscuit bag and 10s. for each ton of cask,* and also 6d. per man per diem for every man so victualled as aforesaid, the receipt of the parties to whom the victuallers shall be appointed to deliver the victuals to be a sufficient voucher to them to pass on their account. His Majesty further agrees with the said victuallers for the victualling of 15,000 land soldiers for two months, to be allowed each the same proportion of biscuit and cheese, but no beer, for which they are to receive 4d. per man per diem, and to have the biscuit bags returned them or be paid for them as aforesaid, and the like receipts to be sufficient discharges to them for passing their accounts. In case his Majesty shall think fit to appoint any part of the said cheese to be supplied by oatmeal after the rate ofpint of oatmeal in lieu of ½ lb. of Cheshire cheese, the victuallers are to perform the same and to find cask for it at their charge. In case any part of the said victuals shall not be taken off, an allowance is to be made to the victuallers of one quarter part of what such provisions not taken off would have amounted to, if they had been actually delivered according to this contract, the time and manner of payment to be as the Lord Treasurer shall adjust with Sir T. Littleton. On the back in Pepys' hand in substitution for the above words within asterisks is:— "who are to be paid for such of them as shall not be returned after the same rates and manner as by the Navy Contract they are in the like case, the Commissaries of the Army or whoever else shall stand chargeable with the provisions to be reckoned as the Purser." [Ibid. No. 60i.]
May 17.
Victualling Office.
Josiah Child and T. Papillon to the same. In answer to yours of to-day, considering the money you owe us for extra water-cask delivered last year, the very short notice you gave us this year, your frequent buying of extra water-cask when you could not agree with us and our predecessor, and the many unusual scruples you now raise herein, and likewise the great haste we are in to provide cask for our victualling that is under contract, and that you have not, nor yet do agree with us in the price, we must desire your excuse that we do not, nor can deliver those water-cask you now require from us, till at least it be adjusted how we shall be paid, and what we shall have for them, there being nothing that we know in our contract or reason obliging us thereto, and therefore, though no men are more willing to accommodate his Majesty's service or to comply with yourselves in anything, and particularly in this, of which we think it will appear we have given some considerable proof already, yet, till at least a price be ascertained, we must renew our former request, that you must supply yourselves with extra watercask from other hands. If what we write touching this be not satisfactory, we shall leave it with entire submission to the judgement of the Lord Treasurer, or whomsoever his Majesty shall appoint. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 61.]
May 17.
Sheerness.
S. Hunter to the Navy Commissioners. In answer to yours of the 13th, I sent, three or four days after the fleet's sailing and my last muster, all the ships' books by the best and speediest conveyance I could find. If any miscarried, I hope you will not impute it to my fault or neglect, for, because men formerly absent return every day to the ship, I cannot, to do the King and the men right, till her sailing complete her musters. Therefore it is impossible for the captain and pursers to take their books with them, though the pursers or stewards might so keep their books to agree with mine that they might at all times be able to furnish the muster masters with exact books.— (The rest of the letter is a repetition in almost the same words as in his letter of the 14th of his request to be allowed a clerk.) Postscript. Some volunteers here belonging to the Sovereign and Victory are impatient for want of their bounty money, which, for want of a supply from Commissioner Beach, I have not been able to pay. Also the workmen borne on the books here are somewhat necessitated for want of board wages. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 62.]
May 17.
Bristol.
Capt. Jasper Grant to the same. I will pay no bounty money to any. It is always here the Mayor's business to pay it. I am pressing all about here and have got but 32 men. I hope when the wind westers I shall have more. I think to send what men I shall get by Tuesday next to Portsmouth with a man to wait on them there, hoping your orders to receive them there for Sir E. Spragg. [Ibid. No. 63.]
May 17.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to the Earl of Arlington. I received a letter from his Majesty concerning the abatement of the year's value to Lady Courcy, which, as I usually do in such cases, I have communicated to the Treasury Commissioners here, whose answer, with the copy of his Majesty's letter I have herewith transmitted to you, which when you have perused, I presume I need not set forth the inconveniencies that may follow on such a precedent, if it should be allowed that a stop should be made on any part of the money pay- able on the establishment, and therefore I cannot but conclude that some other course will be taken for the lady's satisfaction. There is a bargain made on his Majesty's behalf with Col. Sandys, for a piece of ground near a fort at Galway, being so necessary to that place, as indeed his Majesty cannot be without it. The sum agreed on is 800l. payable out of any moneys not comprehended in Lord Ranelagh's grant, but the gentleman, not finding anything whereon to fix it, petitioned to have it placed on the Concordatum, which his Majesty referred to me. This gave me ground to search into the bargain and having heard it was a little unreasonable on the King's part I appointed Sir Francis Gore, the present, and Col. Lessone, the late Governor, and Francis Morgan, an alderman of Galway, to give me an account on what terms Col. Sandys acquired it, knowing it to be part of the lot of the '49 officers. I enclose a copy of their return, wherein you will find this land was set out to them as a compensation for 118l., and these men conceive its true value to be no more, for which his Majesty has covenanted to pay Col. Sandys 800l. The best thing I know of this contract is that the money is not yet paid. Part I am told he has received, but I am not certain how much. I have had the good luck to make a better agreement for his Majesty with the Bishop of Ossory for Chichester House. I have saved the King some money in rent and have still reserved it in his power either to purchase the house at the rate he values it at, or in some years time to declare the bargain void. Before this comes, I suppose you will have received a letter from us here concerning farthings. I earnestly desire that, if any be sent, they may be the very same which were lately coined for the use of England, for if of a meaner sort it would give great opportunity for counterfeiting them. If we cannot have the self same farthings, his Majesty may please to refer it to me to provide for this country in that particular, and I will take the best care I can to see it done with most advantage to the public. I confess there may be a gain of 4,000l. or perhaps 5,000l. or 6,000l. to the person who shall have the uttering of them, but whatever I do in such a thing, I desire it may be barefaced and known what profit arises from it; yet doubtless, if we can have the self same farthings now current in England it will be most convenient for the public. I must not omit to mention that Lord William O'Brien, the Earl of Inchiquin's son, pretends on his father's account to have some interest in the uttering of farthings here. Therefore if he should offer anything on that subject, I only warn you he is a person concerned. We have had several debates in Council about the raising the value of Spanish money here. There has been great difference of opinion among men of all sorts, which seems strange to me in a thing of this nature, which is not merely notional, but rather practical and experimental. I confess I cannot be convinced how the calling of any sort of money more than it really is, can make the world take it for more than its intrinsic value, nor can I discern how anything can make the kingdom abound with silver but the true fixing of the balance of trade. However in a matter so much disputed I dare not be over positive of my being in the right. Therefore, if his Majesty shall think fit to consult about it, Mr. Henry Slingsby, Master of the Mint, is a person very proper to be advised with, whom I have heard myself discourse very rationally on this subject. Sure I am that the want of money is very great in this kingdom, but the causes of it evidently proceed from the great quantities carried out for the pay of those regiments now maintained in England, as also from persons of great fortunes, who, their estates being here, constantly reside and spend their revenues there, but chiefly from the war, which has hindered all trade here, and stopped the exportation of all our native commodities. Proper remedies, when seasonable, ought to be applied to these evils, and in the meantime, till the war be ended, we must weather it out as well as we can. I acknowledge yours of the 10 May with some enclosures, among them an answer to my letter concerning the Farmers' defalcations, to which I might very easily reply, but it is not my intention to enter into disputes. [4 pages. S.P. Ireland. Car. II. 333, No. 164.]
May 17.
Hillsborough.
Roger [Boyle], Bishop of Clogher, to Viscount Conway. Describing a visit to Portmore from the previous Monday till that day, where the loughs, woods, meadows, and parks were all flourishing. [1½ page. Conway Papers. Ibid. No. 165.]
May 17.
Newry.
Lieut. Lancelot Bolton to Viscount Conway. On my brother's request to meet him here, he leaving this country, I came hither yesterday, and found Monsr. Britton going to Dublin. He was saying that by your permission he might continue in the troop or leave it at pleasure. Last Thursday I marched the troop into the troopers' field to graze, and charge 40 men to answer the rent, if you approve. Those I leave out are the officers' servants. Some of the Ballinderry men I quartered at Lisburn. By the next I will give you an account of what Mr. Keeting does. [Conway Papers, Ibid. No. 166.]
May 18. Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I., p. 1). [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 189.]
May 18.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Williamson. This morning we received your letters, telling us of your being forced back the second time from the Foreland to Sheerness. I hope the third time has proved more fortunate, and that this will find you at Dover. I wish you had met with the wine and other things sent hence, for the sending of it was both troublesome and chargeable. I wrote to you twice on Friday, once by express and once by ordinary, and, if the former came not before you sailed that night, they must both have come to you yesterday. Since we have nothing of moment to communicate. Enclosed are the advices we have received. The King is expected home to-morrow or next day, and likewise Lord Arlington from Euston. Sir J. Werden is at the fleet with the Duke. I have minded Mr. Richards to write to remind him of your desires concerning convoys. It is reported here at Court that several more new regiments are to be raised and that the Duke of Bucks. is going down to the North for that purpose. I received the enclosed from Lady O'Brien for you. This stayed for Sir R. Carr. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 190.] Probably enclosed,
Inland advices received that day, 17 May. Rye, 16 May.—This morning the French fleet which have been in sight two days, came up to and joined our fleet. They consist of not above 22 men-of-war, besides tenders and fireships, but more are coming from the southward, which are judged to be the other 12 expected. Yesterday the captain of the fireship was tried by a Council of War, but is cleared, nothing being proved against him. Harwich, 16 May.—Passengers from Holland say that Tromp is gone to sea with the Amsterdam squadron of 18 menof-war, to join De Ruyter, and then the Dutch fleet will be 65 men-of-war. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, Nos. 190 I, 190 II.]
May 18.
Whitehall.
J. Richards to Williamson. I observed your directions in writing to Mr. Perwich, who, by last night's letters from France assures me he has signified to yourself that he intends a punctual correspondence with you. Yours of the 16th offered me an occasion of shewing my desire to serve you, but Sir J. Werden is with the Duke at Rye, and Lord Arlington is not yet arrived from Euston. Mr. Bridgeman being now with the King and Duke, I think it proper, and Sir R. Carr advises, to recommend it to him to solicit for convoys for your equipage, as I do by express this very moment. Perchance you may not have heard what Mr. Henshaw writes from Copenhagen of the 3rd, that a Holland caper lately brought in a Scotch ship to Bergen, taken some say 15 leagues, others 9, off that coast; Monsr. Greffenfeild says but 5. The governor sent to demand the prize as belonging to the subjects of an ally, taken in their master's streams. The caper having refused to part with it was at last compelled by force, and lost one man in the scuffle. He himself was sent for in custody to be questioned for his misdemeanour. The Holland ministers talk high upon it in that Court, and call it a breach of the peace. 'Tis thought they hope by this to make all other nations take notice of the extent of their streams. The Senate of Venice has chosen a new Resident for England, Signor Paolo Sanotti, who has had four Residentships already, though not yet 40. Lord Sunderland's of the 14th says he is still sick, and would not desire you to stay for him at Liege, but that that part of your equipage which was made at Paris should be sent to you, and that his physician gave him hopes he should quickly follow. The Duke of Monmouth is entered on his command of Lieut.-General of the French Army, and the King expresses himself extremely satisfied with him. Lord Duras' troop has likewise joined the King's forces at Courtrai. They are much esteemed by his Most Christian Majesty, and joined with the Garde du Corps in a brigade, and do equal duty with them. On Friday morning the French squadron joined with the fleet under Prince Rupert, then but 24 ships, besides fireships, tenders, &c., but the rest are expected every moment. His Majesty is still there, and we hear nothing yet of his return. The wind continuing still contrary, 'tis supposed he may stay a day or two longer than he designed. Lord Arlington, we think, is still at Euston. He intended to be here to-morrow. If anything hinder him, 'twill be the hope of the King's stay at the fleet. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 191.]
May 18.
Whitehall.
[Contains de-ciphered text] Sir R. Carr to Williamson. I am heartily sorry you have so many delays. I have ordered Mr. Richards to write to Mr. Bridgeman the contents of your letter and Sir L. Jenkins'. My Lord is not yet come to town, at which I am heartily troubled. M y Ld Tresure[r] will certainly go of Osborn in, which you, I suppose, believe, will make mad work. I have and will declare what I think for I will not be under him. My wife and niece present you with their service. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 192.]
May 18.
Canterbury.
Robert Francis to Williamson. Yesterday afternoon with much difficulty I arrived at the fleet in Rye Bay, though above 4 leagues from the shore. His Majesty and Royal Highness were both on the quarter-deck when I came on board, and took my express themselves, but did not think a convoy necessary. His Majesty was of opinion I should find you at Sheerness at my return, saying it was impossible you should be able to keep the sea with so high and contrary a wind. Already 27 of the French men-of-war have joined us, which, with ours at present in the fleet, make up above 80 sail besides victuallers and tenders. The French admiral is said to be bigger than ours, and carries more guns. The whole fleet intends for the Downs, and to seek out the enemy as soon as wind and weather permit. It is not yet known, when, or what way his Majesty will return for London. This morning he came ashore to a small town called Lydd to walk and view the beach. He lies on board. Mr. Bridgeman is attending him, Lord Arlington being gone into Suffolk. I received from him a letter written by his Majesty while I was on board, to Whitehall, which I was ordered to put into the post-house here or elsewhere and see it sent away by express to London. I offered to carry it myself, but Mr. Bridgeman told me my seeing it sent would be sufficient. I heard no news on board of Captain Narbrough or the fleet under his convoy. A Council of War was held yesterday on board the Royal Charles and was nearly up when I came on board. The Duke and Sir John Werden being both on board, Mr. Hugard could do nothing at London, and therefore I sent him by post from Rye to hasten to the rendezvous. I send this with the enclosed from Sir N. Armorer to the postmaster of Dover, whose care in safe conveying them to you I engaged, when I passed by there on Saturday. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 193.]
May 18.
Dungeness.
Prince Rupert to Sir R. Carr. I address myself to you, believing Lord Arlington to be still in the country. What was resolved about leaving this place you'll receive from better hands. We desire from you that the victuallers may not fail us, and that the Sovereign and the rest of the ships now in the River, or the rest without her, may turn out to us. I hope now there is a precedent the impossi- bility will not be objected. If to this we could have Morgan, the Governor of Jersey, instead of whom you'll find in proposition for a Major-General, it would be no disservice. If Lord Arlington comes, pray acquaint him that his Majesty promised Sir R. Holmes the government of Cork. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 195.]
May 18.
Woolwich Yard.
Capt. Amos Beare to the Navy Commissioners. Mr. Pett can launch the Swallow this spring, but, if you allow us to keep her in the dock another spring, I am certain we shall save time by it. I have lessened my number of sailmakers and riggers, by preferring them into several ships, which I hope you will not take unkindly. I send an account of the nine ships come down hither, how many people, and what beer they have now on board. I will do all in my power to dispatch them. There will be a very great loss of tonnage in these ships for want of puncheons. Some of them can take in four or five of beer or water in puncheons, but not one butt more. The lightermen that bring the beer down make this their general practice. No sooner are their lighters made fast but they are gone, so that we are forced to sling and fill the beer ourselves or else it must lie by the side. Now when they are but 10 or 12 in number, it makes their work go dead and heavy to spare two good men to sling and fill. The craft bringing the beer or provisions ought to sling, fill and hook our tackles. Till you commanded me, the delay lay here; but, when I can catch any of the lightermen, I force them to do this part. I could heartily wish the masters of all these ships were dispatched down hither. If you would think fit for some old decayed masts or fishes to be cut for quoins, as the wood they carry for their own use is not sufficient for the stowage of the beer, it would be no loss to the King in order to stop their leakage. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 64.]
May 18.
Deal.
B. St. Michel to the same. Last night I received an order from Sir John Harman (of which a copy is enclosed) to furnish the Happy Return with what stores I had in my custody to the boatswain's and carpenter's demands, as a bowsprit, sails, coils of small rope, &c., most of which I had to supply them with, but upon any rate (though I offered for boat hire and men any content) I could be supplied with none to send the things to Dover Road. It not a little troubled me, that in the great need of the Happy Return, I could not be serviceable to his Majesty's concerns. I request you to send to Mr. Pett of Woolwich to make all the dispatch he can in finishing the vessel appointed to be built for me, that I may have her in readiness on such and other occasions, which may daily be expected for his Majesty's service. [Ibid. No. 65.] Enclosed,
The said copy of Sir J. Harman's letter dated 15 May, the London, at anchor with the fleet before Rye. [Ibid No. 65.]
May 18.
The Hunter, in Catwater.
Capt. George Colt to the same. I received yours of the 13th, wherein you write if I had demanded my papers I might have had them. If you have not forgotten, I did demand them and imprest moneys, but you told me you could not grant it, till you knew whether the ship would be delivered me, and then you told me you would send it down to Plymouth. I have received an order to sail, and intend to do so next Thursday. I send you an exact account of the ship under my command. I desire you would move his Royal Highness that I may have an addition of 20 men, by reason she is such an open ship. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 66.]
May 18. Thomas Yeabsley, Daniel Perrett, and Andrew Horsman, of Plymouth, merchants, to the Duke of York. Petition stating that the inhabitants of Plymouth, Exeter, Topsham and Dartmouth lately petitioned his Royal Highness for a settled convoy for such ships as trade to Wales for coals and culm and other places on these coasts, because of the great danger of their being taken or destroyed by Dutch capers which then were and still are very numerous in these western seas, and praying that the petitioners' ship, the Royal Oak, may be received into his Majesty's service on the hire and terms usual at London for ships of the like dimension and fitness, and may be appointed for the settled convoy of such ships as trade for Wales and other places on these coasts. At the foot,
Certificate by John Lanyon, mayor, and 26 others, merchants of Plymouth, of the strength of the above ship, and of the number of guns she can carry, and that she will be, as they conceive, very fit and serviceable in the above employment or otherwise. [Ibid. No. 67.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Williamson. Yesterday evening we sent by express what we then had, which we hope met you at Dover. This I sent under cover to Mr. Shaw at Antwerp. Sir R. Carr told me this morning that, when Lord Arlington comes to town, he will mind him to write to the Prince concerning convoys for the billanders, and will speak himself to the King and Duke, when they come to town which will be to-day or to-morrow, when Lord Arlington likewise will be here. We have only the extract of the inland advices to communicate. I doubt not you have heard that the Duke of Bucks is gone to the North to raise 5,000 men. He is made Lieut.-General of the army, and Col. Russell Major-General, and the officers of the ordnance have by the King's order brought in an estimate of the cost of providing a train of 12 pieces of cannon, horses and shipping the same. This morning Sir R. Carr received an express from Mr. Bridgeman relating that the fleet was making what way they could towards Dover, and that the King would be in town to-morrow. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 195.] Enclosed,
Inland advices received 19 May. Rye, 17 May.—About 3 yesterday afternoon his Majesty and his Royal Highness arrived, and after dining in the town went on board the fleet. We received his Majesty with all the acclamations of joy this poor place is able to express, the train bands were in arms, and the Mayor and Aldermen in their formalities, and the great guns were fired, with several volleys of small shot. Bridlington, 15 May.—Yesterday passed by six laden vessels eastward. We have not lately heard of any Dutch capers, but have an account of four or five Dutch men-of-war, cruising northwards of Flamborough Head. Plymouth, 16 May.— The Adventure that went hence this week to convoy the Morlaix ships, returned this evening. Boston, 19 (? 17) May.— Yesterday arrived three vessels with coals from Sunderland, and two the day before, without convoy. They heard of no Dutch capers on the coast. Portsmouth, 18 May.—No news. Wind N.E. Stockton, 16 May.—Wind N.E. Deal, 18 May.—13 of his Majesty's ketches and one man-of-war are now coming into the Downs, but are not yet anchored. Wind N.E. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 195 I.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I., p. 2.) [Ibid. No. 196.]
May 19.
Dover.
Lord Alington to Lord [Arlington]. The Hollanders, being returned to their own coast, after a bravado on ours, makes me believe they so well know their own weakness, as to be only this summer on the defensive at sea, as well as at land, which may occasion his Majesty to take other resolutions than when I spoke with him, he then telling me he should not think of a descent till a sea fight was over, and that there would be certainly action in the French army though the other was uncertain, but hearing now of a great train of artillery, and that in all probability the Hollanders can never so defend their coast but that we may land, I offer my services to be ready on the first notice to repair wherever I am commanded. Otherwise I continue my journey to the army of the Prince de Condé or Monsr. Turenne, whichever I shall find at Cologne is likely to be first in action. [Ibid. No. 197.]
May 19.
The Anne.
Capt. Thomas Eliot to Capt. H. Baron. Seventy sail are in sight, as reported from Dover Castle. It is judged by all that they are the Holland fleet. 'Twas thought fit by all the commanders of the ships in Dover Road to acquaint his Highness by this bearer. We intend to be betwixt them and his Highness to-night, and then every ship to repair to his respective squadron. If they appear not to be enemies to-morrow morning, we intend to return to Dover Road to take in the rest of our provisions. [Ibid. No. 198.]
May 19. [The Earl of Ossory] to the Earl of Arlington. You will hear before this of my not being able to resist the temptation of supplying a vacant flag. Believe me it proceeded most from my desire of expressing my gratitude to so kind a master, and next that I feared the world might unjustly think that having had a signal mark of favour I would sit down with that honour and afterwards manage myself, a meanness I shall never be guilty of. The Duke was very kind, as he has always been in my concerns. I beseech you to send me all sorts of news and gazettes. Pray make my compliments to my sisters and my nephew and niece. I am now going to speak with the Prince concerning my ship and squadron. [Ibid. No. 199.]
May 19. Caveat that no grant of the Wardenship of the Mint pass without notice to Sir Thomas Wharton, to whom it was long since granted in reversion. [Ibid. No. 200.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master of the Ordnance, to order the providing a train of artillery of 12 pieces of ordnance, 6 mortars, and 8 petards, with their equipage and the particulars specified in the estimates annexed, to attend a number of soldiers to be sent to the coast of Holland. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 72.] Annexed,
Abstract of the charge of the said train of artillery, with powder, shot, &c. and of the charge of transportation and pay of the officers and soldiers thereof for 3 months; total—15,408l. 17s. 4d. 13 May, 1673. [Ibid. p. 73.]
Additional estimate of the charges of the tents, kettles, and working materials to be provided for the said train; total—2,345l. [Ibid. p. 76.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
The King to the Duke of York, Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports. As the safety of the kingdom may require some militia regiments to be drawn to the sea-side, authorizing him to order the Cinque Port regiment to be ready on the first warning to march to the castle of Dover, and other castles on the Downs, on notice from the Governor and commander-in-chief; and to direct the respective companies to obey the commands of the governors of the castles in which they may be disposed. [Ibid. p. 78.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
The King to Charles, Lord St. John, Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire. As some militia may have to be drawn to the sea-side, requiring him to order one regiment within his lieutenancy to march to Portsmouth, as soon as the governor thereof shall give him notice, who are to follow the orders of the governor whilst they continue in the said garrison. [Ibid. p. 79.]
Memorandum that similar letters were written to the Lord Lieutenants of Essex for a regiment to march to Harwich; of Suffolk for one to march to Landguard Fort; of Norfolk for one to Yarmouth; of Northumberland for one to Tynemouth and one to Berwick; and of Kent for one to Gravesend and one to Chatham. [Ibid. p. 80.]
May 19. Secretary Coventry to the Duke of Monmouth. Directing him to continue 17 gentlemen therein named, who were deputy lieutenants to his predecessor, as his deputy lieutenants. Minute. [Ibid. p. 81.]
May 19.
Whitsun Monday.
Minutes of the business of the Board. The Board met about taking up several vessels to transport soldiers to Holland, as well as on the Saturday before, about raising money for them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 68.]
May 19.
Victualling Office, London.
Sir T. Littleton, Josiah Child, and T. Papillon to the Navy Commissioners. We have jointly considered the agreement we had almost closed upon this morning, and as the price therein is no new demand, but the same we always told you was the least we could afford cask at, considering the charge we are at besides the bare price of it, and likewise that we cannot find by any of our predecessors' accounts of the last Dutch war that any such cask was sold cheaper, but often dearer, we must beg leave to adhere to the agreement as proposed to you at the Board. Wherefore we entreat your confirmation of the said agreement of which we send a copy, and that you will give us an imprest of the sum intended, on which we shall apply ourselves to the performance thereof with all the expedition we can, except you please to buy the cask elsewhere, which we the rather desire, because all the coopers we have and can procure are fully employed in other work relating to his Majesty's service under our management. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 69.] Enclosed,
The said agreement stipulating that the price of extra water-cask be 27s. per ton, besides iron hoops, but that the Board be always at liberty to buy of any other persons. [Ibid. No. 69 i.]
May 19. Four of the eleven pursers who petitioned 16 May, to the Navy Commissioners. Since our petition Mr. Portman, cashier to the contractors, has paid us the necessary money due upon our indents, and now we pray you to give us your letter to the Prince to convince him that the relation he has received from some persons in the fleet, that we are "drunckning" and idling ashore is not true, but that we have been kept by attending to get our necessary money. [Ibid. No. 70.]
May 19. John Heathcocke, late commander of the Golden Hand, to the same. Being suspended from my command on some information of neglect I made my petition to his Royal Highness and am directed to the Board to declare my innocency, wherefore I crave that you would permit me in before you to clear my reputation. [Ibid. No. 71.]
May 19.
Woolwich.
Phineas Pett to the same. On Saturday I saw a letter to the officers of this yard to prepare and ship away a 21-inch cable, a spare topmast and two fishes for the Royal Charles. I not only the same day dispatched my part of your commands, but spared the ropemaker hands to finish the cable, so that was also finished on Saturday, and the provisions all put on board the victuallers accordingly. Yesterday I received yours of the the 15th and accordingly shall see the Swallow's breadroom sheathed with thin lead, but first it shall be dried and paid with pitch as you directed. Your direction for the men's working these holidays came also but yesterday, when most of them were scattered to their homes, yet I laid an injunction on them, when they left work on Saturday night, to be all hands at work on Tuesday morning upon forfeiture of a month's pay. However I have got some men of the town at work here to-day on the keels of the shallops, which we are forced to make of oak for want of elm. We may, if you require it, launch the Swallow the present spring tides, but, as the masts are not yet fixed in their places, the riggers having been otherwise employed, and there being much iron work above water yet to be put on her, which we wait upon the smith for, I judge that if we kept her to the following spring, she will be in a capacity to sail the sooner and those works be dispatched at a cheaper rate. [Ibid No. 72.]
May 19.
Chatham.
Phineas Pett, Edward Gregory and Matthew Hanch for T. Wilson to the same. In obedience to their commands of the 15th advising that for fixing the cocks lately taken off the London's furnaces 30lbs. of solder will be required for each, though Mr. Lake, the plumber, affirms that 20lbs. or thereabouts is enough, which, however, they cannot offer as a sufficient proportion. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 73.]
May 19.
10 a.m. The Hatton ketch, Sheerness.
Capt. Isaac White to the Navy Commissioners I received an order from his Royal Highness to convoy the victuallers at Sheerness and all other ships belonging to the officers of the Ordnance to the Downs or Dover Road to the fleet, and so dispatch for Guernsey. As soon as I received it I set sail, the wind being N.E., and came into the Swale on Saturday morning. I gave an account to the victuallers, who told me they would not go out without a fair wind, but I have now fired a gun to-day, and, if they do not come out, I am resolved to take out all the masters of the vessels and carry them prisoners to the fleet. [Ibid. No. 74.]
May 19.
Sheerness.
S. Hunter to the same. There are upon the books here but 28 workmen, who are in want of, or expect, board wages. The Golden Hand has yet 10 days' provisions on board. Till they are expended, I presume you do not intend she shall enter into petty warrant. [Ibid. No. 75.]
May 19.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner Deane to the same. Enclosed is our poor men's petition, which they pray may be laid before his Royal Highness for relief. They are in a very poor condition. The workmen are gone into the New Forest, and as yet I hear nothing of the 100l. promised to be imprest on William Collings to begin felling of the trees to set the men at work, which pray hasten down, or else the men must stand still and no redeeming of the carriage if any time be lost, which pray prevent by this small sum at present. The Prince has sent for the three sloops which will be ready for the first opportunity. The yacht is ready. I desire to know what number of men shall be entered besides officers to bring her about, and whether she shall come alone or with the first man-of-war that goes for the fleet. Capt. Haddock has written from the fleet for the victualler for their ship, which as yet I hear never a word of. Lord Lumley offers 500 loads of timber and 100 loads of knees, a good pennyworth, and is content to take his money in course. The pay will be very remote, and the knees exceeding good he offers at 50s. per load, and the timber for beams, large, and compass, at 38s. per load. Being last Friday to see it, I conceive it a bargain very fit to be accepted, and mighty useful for the works in hand. Lastly, when many sick men come from ships, the chirurgeon gives them a certificate to return to their ships, which gives them opportunity to go about the country, some towards the Downs, some to the West, and so avoid the service. I think it were mighty well to move his Royal Highness that the sick and wounded, when well, be sent into the several yards, where they may be sent to the fleet, and so get on board their own ships, or at least help to man the fleet, where now they get away and cannot be made runs, although they appear only at pay table, being set sick ashore. I find not one in eight returns to his ship, and many men are lost by this means. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 76.] Enclosed,
The workmen of the Yard at Portsmouth to the Navy Commissioners. Petition stating that the petitioners have almost fire quarters' pay due to them, and that they cannot be trusted to subsist themselves and their poor families, by reason that the people who gave them trust hitherto are become themselves unable to buy wherewith to furnish them, their stocks being already decayed, likewise his Majesty's taxes are now collecting, and the poor petitioners know not what shift in the world to make, and that unavoidably their household goods must be seized and taken from them for debts to their utter undoing, and praying that their Honours would take pity on their sad and deplorable condition to represent the same to his Royal Highness for a remedy. Signed by about 120. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 76 i.]
May 19.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner Deane to the same. Amongst other matters I laid before the Board when in London were these two which seemed to have your full concurrence. First, either to enclose all orders from the Board to the officers of the yard in my letters, or to signify such orders are gone, that I may see them executed and return the progress therein, that thereby no delays or double orders be given for the same thing, as I instanced several cases when orders have lain dormant, and perhaps not produced to the other officers.
Secondly, that all bills might be filled up here, that thereby those who certify them might see the price and make judgement of its worth, for I showed how some things were almost double the price they were worth, or intended. The bill for masts had been returned some time since, had I not met with what I doubt the Board did not intend by this second bill, for I never knew of the first bill passing nor this last, but by this occasion of the certificate, which I am doubtful was not put in by a liberty taken to do the merchant more service than the King. Here is this former bill compared with this second, which is advanced 102l., but for what I cannot judge. If the first had been abated for any defects it ought to have been inserted in the bill; if not, where was the reason of this advance in the second. To make this very case a reason why I would have bills filled here, and not in the power of an officer to give away the King's treasure without control, see how every great mast is raised even beyond any mast in the contract or any price set by the Board, as that biggest mast of 22½ hands 62l., which was not mentioned in the contract at all above 21 hands. But so it will happen till it be brought to appear plain to prevent it by having no bills pass from hence till we see whether the King has right or wrong done by the certificate, which the Board cannot tell if it be fully certified it answers contract. Now this bill is so certified, and there is not a mast of those dimensions or price in the contract. [Over 2 pages. Ibid. No. 77.] Enclosed,
Bills of 4 Oct. 1672 and 16 April 1673 for the Gottenburg masts, cantspars, &c. of Sir William Warren, Justice Wood and Mr. Shorter, delivered at Portsmouth, arranged in parallel columns, showing an excess in price in the second over the first of 102l., the dimensions of many being given as larger in the second than in the first. [Ibid. No. 77 i.]
May 19.
Dublin.
Sir Arthur Forbes to Lord [Arlington?]. Your commands by me to the Lord Lieutenant were faithfully delivered, and I doubt not by this time you have received an answer to every particular. Affairs here are all in a quiet condition, and men's minds to a great degree settled, much of which is attributed to your faithful and prudent management. Our troops are to change all their former quarters, as those in Munster will remove to Ulster, and those there to another province. This, I know, will not please the officers, yet it is his Majesty's service to keep them in motion, for a troop fixed for 13 years in one place, in my opinion, is not much better than those of the militia. What I have long apprehended, I fear will suddenly come to pass, the not payment of this army. Our treasury is empty, nor can I see how our undertakers can possibly perform what was promised. I desire your lordship would keep this to yourself, for it will be too soon demonstrable. Wishes are all the return I can make for the great favours you honoured me with whilst I waited on you at London. [1¼ page. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 167.]
[May?] Sir Hugh Cholmeley to the King. Petition for a confirmation of the site of the late dissolved monastery of Whitby and the manor, lordship, and port of Whitby with a grant of liberty to make a new port in the said manor. At the foot,
May 20.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney-General, and his report dated the 30th in favour of the petitioner. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 201.]
May 20. Another copy of the reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 71.]
May 20.
The Anne.
Lord Alington to Lord [Arlington]. As the plenipotentiaries about 8 yesterday evening were ready to sail for Calais, the Anne, that lay headmost of the frigates now in this road, discovered a fleet coming up to them, believed to be the Dutch of about 70 sail, which gave us so warm an alarm that every one prepared to receive them and some let slip their cables. The Ambassadors sent an advice boat to the Prince and an express to Rye to give him notice of it. This made me about 9 go on board the Anne, where I found our captains together consulting, and, after discourse that usually happens where one is not ordered to command in chief, they concluded in a resolution whereof I send you a copy, and sent the Greyhound with it to the Prince. About 11 the Nieuport packet-boat informed us they were a fleet of Hamburgers of about 30 sail. However the Anne, Mary Rose, Assurance and Guernsey made up towards them. About 3 this morning we discovered them to be what was told us by the packet-boat, and our two scouts, the Nightingale and Pearl, with them. When they came near us, we found them to be 23 sail, and one man-of-war, their convoy, of 54 guns. The Anne fired a gun, at which they all lowered their topsails, and their man-of-war saluted us with 5 guns, as did likewise two of their merchantmen, and they had the usual returns. Capt. Eliot sent his lieutenant on board their convoy to have the captain or lieutenant come aboard him. The lieutenant came and excused the captain on his indisposition. He told us they came out of the Elbe three days ago, that all things were quiet, and that they had not heard any of the armies had been lately on action. As they were yesterday off Ostend, between the Wielings and the West Cape, a Dutch man-of-war of 36 guns came up to them and told them where our fleet lay, and that ours was joined with the French, that Van Tromp came to their fleet last Friday, and that they were now 80 sail of fighting ships. The Hamburger told me he did not see their fleet, nor did he believe they were so many as reported. Three of this Hamburg fleet went off last night for the Downs, bound for London, part of their lading hemp; the rest are bound for Spain and Portugal. Fourteen frigates are now in this road, taking in provisions, some have been here these ten days. I believe the ill weather has been the occasion of their long stay, but they complain very much of the victuallers. This evening I embark for Calais, where I hope to find our ambassadors, for they cannot get from thence till to-morrow morning. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 202.]
May 20. Capt. John Shales to the Navy Commissioners. They being charged to find arms in his company of the Trained Bands, are to serve in their own persons, or nominate forthwith six fit men henceforth to bear such arms as they are charged with in the muster-roll, and they are to appear or send their own, not borrowed arms, and to take heed they lend not their own to others. Printed form with alterations in writing. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 78.]
May 20.
Victualling Office, London.
Josiah Child and T. Papillon to the same. As beer is what will be first and chiefly wanted in the fleet, and as Capt. Narbrough's squadron, who are to victual at Portsmouth, for which we have made a very large provision, still keep out, we find that, besides the furnishing of that fleet, we can immediately spare 200 or 300 tuns of beer to be shipped thence to the fleet under Prince Rupert, and therefore pray you, if you think it convenient, to order victualling ships to be sent there immediately to take it in, or else to direct the Commissioner on the place to take up ships for that purpose, and if you please, likewise for the transportation of 1,000 or 1,500 bags of bread which shall be ready there. [Ibid. No. 79.]
May 20.
Sheerness.
John Rudd to the same. To-day the Victory sailed out to the Buoy of the Nore. The Golden Hand may be ready to sail in 4 or 5 days at furthest. [Ibid. No. 80.]
May 20.
Sheerness.
Sir William Jennens to the same. I am very sensible it is not the business of the office to man the King's ships, but I had directions from Capt. Hayward to send up my ketch to you, in order to receive men by your means, and having tried all ways I know about getting of men, and found but small effects, I did not know whom better to apply to, for I had 50 watermen ordered me by his Royal Highness's order to Watermen's Hall, and received of them but four boys, and believed it in your power to force them to a com- pliance, there being more watermen yet behind than will man the Sovereign and us. I do not doubt you are informed I have received 80 men from a dogger that had pressed them for the French Ruby. I received but 63, and five of them Frenchmen, which I am sure I must not keep when I come to the fleet, neither do I desire their company, and several of them are very young. If I tell you I have 40 seamen, I am very kind to him that brought them me. My ketch is come from London, having done little good there. Except I receive help from persons of more power than myself, my condition will be very bad. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 81.]
May 20.
The Golden Hand, at Sheerness.
Capt. William Mather to the Navy Commissioners. I received yours of the 17th to-day, but I have not yet been with Mr. Hunter, because I have so much to do aboard, for we set our mainmast yesterday, and for our dispatch I must not be absent, because I have but few hands on board. I desire you will let me have a foretopmast, for that I have is not fit for service. Likewise I hope you will consider the bigness of our ship, that I cannot sail her with the 20 hands I brought from Harwich. I hope you will hear by the next that we shall be shortly fit. [Ibid. No. 82.]
May 20.
Queenborough Swale.
Capt. John Hayward to the same. Since my last we have not had any opportunity of getting out with as bad fortune in getting men, for we have put 28 sick ashore, which are more than we have got with our best endeavours, and I now have several sick aboard. I hoped we should have got out this tide, but the winds being variable and easterly, there is no possibility. I assure you I shall take the first opportunity. The Victory, which lies below us, I hope, will get out this tide. I expected to have received orders from Prince Rupert. I have sent several letters to him, but have received no answer. I wrote to Sir John Werden last week to desire an order from the Duke of York, if I had none from Prince Rupert before, but have received no answer. Several commanders of fireships and other vessels are here, expecting orders, but I have not had any about them. Postscript. The Victory, which was got without the fort, met with the wind easterly, and is now coming in again. [Ibid. No. 83.]
May 20.
Faversham.
Robert Bagnall and Robert Dunnal to the same. In answer to yours of 10 April, requiring us to give you an account of the grounds and the power to stop certain timber bought for his Majesty's service passing from this to Sheerness, unless a cocquet were first taken for passing the same to sea and a bond given for the safe delivery thereof, the grounds were the discharging of our duty to his Majesty, that his goods might not be permitted to pass into the open seas without securing them to be landed at the place assigned. The power is derived from the Act for preventing frauds in the Customs, wherein it is enacted that no goods shall be put on board to be carried to the open sea from any port, creek, &c., to be landed at any other place of this realm without a sufferance first obtained, and that the master of every vessel taking in such goods, shall, before the vessel be removed out of the said port, take out a cocquet, and become bound to his Majesty with good security for the delivery thereof in the place for which they shall be entered, and the reasons for our so doing was in discharge of our oaths formerly made for the due execution of this said Act obliging us thereto. Great quantities of powder also are weekly exported hence to London without cocquet or security under pretence of his Majesty's goods, but whose it is, or whither it goes, we are not able to give an account. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 84.]
May 20.
The Swiftsure, in the Salt Road, near Harwich.
Capt. Richard Rooth to the Navy Commissioners. The 15th I fell down to this place, in order to my getting out and repairing to the Buoy in the Nore in obedience to his Royal Highness's commands, but have ever since been prevented by the easterly winds that have blown very hard. I presume the ship will want caulking, the decks and sides being very much shrunk and very leaky. I therefore crave you would order the shipwright at Sheerness to send some caulkers on board when I shall arrive at the Nore. I want above 100 of my complement, though no ways on my part to procure them here have been omitted, but the magistrates of Ipswich are very faulty, whereof I have given an account to Sir John Werden. [Ibid. No. 85.]
May 20. Christopher Coles, jun., to—. As he has a vessel, the Betty, of Arundel now loaded with compass timber and treenails, which he intends for Woolwich, requesting him to get him a protection to save the men from pressing. [Ibid. No. 86.]
[May][20]/30
Leghorn.
Capt. Thomas Harman to the same. By Lord Middleton's order I arrived here 21 May, and finding a fit place and a good opportunity I cleaned the Tiger, she having been eight months off the ground. I likewise ordered my several officers to make a demand of such recruit of stores as they wanted, there being none at Tangier, and we having been out of England five months, and like to continue much longer, my commands being to wait on the garrison of Tangier and to follow the Governor's orders. All things seem to be as cheap here as in England, and I hope you will receive much satisfaction in what I have done, Lord Middleton's desire being that I shall cruise off Sallee with two brigantines, which will remain at Tangier ready for my return, which I hope will be in 25 days after this date. She being already careened and guns and ballast in, may sail in 4 or 5 days at furthest, wind and weather permitting. [Ibid. No. 87.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Directing him to issue commissions for ascertaining the particular remainders and reversions expectant on all the estates tail in Ireland, the remainders of which are vested in the Crown, and on the returns thereof to cause letters patent to be passed to such of the present proprietors of the present estates tail or to such other persons as the Earls of Ossory and Carlingford, Viscount FitzHardinge, Lords Kingston and Aungier, Henry Brouncker, and Sir John Trevor shall desire and present to him from time to time, containing a grant of all such particular remainders and reversions to such of the said proprietors or other persons respectively as shall be so desired, to be held by them in fee simple at such rents and reservations when they fall into possession as the respective present tenants in tail are now subject to, with a revocation of all previous letters to that effect on which letters patent had not yet been passed, other than letters to that effect given to present proprietors of estates tail, which are to continue in force. Noted in margin, "Lord Grandison et alii." [2 pages. S. P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 442.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
Order in Council, after reciting an order of the 14th made on the petitions of Dame Elizabeth Harvey, relict of Sir Daniel Harvey, and Thomas Panton setting forth that a patent now passing on behalf of the Duke of Lauderdale will include the petitioners' respective interests to Harleton Lodge and Petersham Lodge in the New Park at Richmond, that the said patent should be stopped till all parties concerned were heard, that, all parties that day appearing and being fully heard by their counsel, the patent should pass as it is, only the word "Lodges" being expunged throughout, and that the present stop be taken off, and no further stop or caveat be entered. With note that the above order was, the 23rd, by his Majesty's especial order read and approved in the Council. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 203.]
May 21. Inland advices received that day. Yarmouth, 19 May.—The 14th off Cromer were taken by a Dutch caper of two guns two laden colliers, each of about 300 tons. Yesterday afternoon several sail appeared on the back of our sands, which scared in our mackerel men. At first we thought them to be the Dutch fleet, but we hear since by some vessels that came through them that they are 30 Hamburgers with two convoys bound for the Straits. Southwold, 19 May.—To-day we had notice that the Dutch fleet of about 40 ships was to the eastward of Lowestoft, which brought all our mackerel ships in. Hull, 18 May.—Yesterday arrived a light billander from Ostend which came thence last Thursday, and says the Dutch fleet lay within five leagues of Flushing, about 70 sail in all. Harwich, 20 May.—If the passengers from Holland are to be credited, the Dutch look upon themselves as unable to engage our fleet, and therefore intend to keep them in to secure the Maes, believing we intend to make some attempt thereabouts, or else patiently to expect what advantage winds, want of victuals, sands, or shoals may in 5 or 6 months afford them. Plymouth, 17 May.—No news. Newcastle, 17 May.—The easterly wind keeps our laden fleet still in port. Rye, 20 May.—This morning the fleet weighed and stood off to sea. In the afternoon we heard so many guns, we judged it an engagement, but a boat came in this evening says it was only salutes at the coming of the Royal Sovereign and other ships to the fleet. The fleet is now at anchor off Dungeness, but much further to sea than formerly. Rye, May 21, 6 a.m.—This morning, the wind being W., the whole fleet weighed and are gone eastward. The sternmost is got eastward of the Ness point, so I believe they reach the Downs or further to-day. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 204.]
May 21.
10 a.m. The Royal Charles, under sail off Dover.
Col. James Hamilton to Lord [Arlington]. Wind W. and by S. I presume this will meet you in Whitehall, where I believe the dispatch sent last night has also found you. You had none by it by me, because I was all yesterday contriving with my officers how to recruit the regiment, in which I foresee so many difficulties, we being all at sea, London, Westminster and Southwark being forbid us, that really I almost despair of having the King served as he ought to be in this, and, though I am confident it was done for the best, because it is so ordered by those that see better than we do, yet we all admire how it is possible this service should be done in the scarcity of men everywhere, and, if it became us to ask questions where we are implicitly to obey, it might have been one, whether the regiments remaining on shore, who are at all hours able to get men, might not have spared us part of our recruits, and fill again. I enclose this packet to you, because it is only on the interest of him to whom it is directed that we depend, and consequently it is materially the King's service it should be sent immediately where it is directed, and therefore I hope you will pardon the trouble. I presume Prince Rupert has given you an account of Monsr. d'Estrées having passed over the difficulty of setting up the union flag, which was done yesterday when the Prince was on board him. Last night a yacht was sent for the Sovereign and all the other ships in the river. She is also to call at Harwich for the Swiftsure. We have a fine gale, that will, if it stands, carry us in 24 hours where we would be, and when we are there, our business will be concerted before we come in sight, and then, with God's help, there is reason to expect we shall give our master a good account of our business in a few hours. We have been looking over the fighting and sailing instructions, in the translation of which into French there are many gross and very material errors, which will be rectified to-day and sent on board Monsr. d'Estrées. The boat is going, and therefore I have no more time. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 205.]
May 21.
3 p.m. The Royal Charles, just anchored on the edge of the flats of the Foreland 3 leagues E.N.E. of the lighthouse on the Foreland.
Col. J. Hamilton to Lord [Arlington]. Wind S.W. Here, I suppose, we shall adjust all our design upon the enemy, which, I believe, will not take up above a tide or two, and then we shall go straight to them, in which the sluggishness of the French sailing will abate much of our speed, we having outgone them so far this morning that we have stayed for them with our foretopsail only, and that upon the cap, for these 4 or 5 hours rather, and they are but now come up with all the sail they can make, which to me appears very extraordinary, and what, methinks, sufficiently secures us against the grave apprehensions of those politicians that would persuade us they will be soon our masters at sea. If in the meantime they do their part to help us to master the Dutch now, I think we may commit our future concerns with great resignation to Providence, as to what they may be 50 or 100 years hence. If this small stay brings us the Sovereign and the other ships in the River, which was partly the design, it will be a considerable addition to our fleet, which, as it is, appears to me of a vast force and what none the Dutch have can possibly withstand, humanly speaking, yet I am of opinion, if their fleet be all together, they will rather put to sea and hazard in that way than let us practise any design upon them in their harbours. I say this, because I believe it were cheaper for them to be beaten t'other way, and they are for having all things at the best rate. The ammunition ships are not yet come to us, which put the Prince somewhat in pain, but I got an exact list of what they have on board whilst they were at Sheerness, which I showed him, and finding by it that everything was provided that he desired, he was satisfied and extremely pleased with the punctual performance of the Master of the Ordnance. I am extremely in pain for the recruits of my regiment, but I have, I hope, satisfied the Duke by Sir J. Werden that I have taken for it the best method I could at this distance. It would be very kind of you to let me have the News sent me from your office, as it was last year. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 206.]
May 21. Commission to Robert Parsons to be lieutenant to Major Molineux Disney in the Duke of Albemarle's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a.,f. 62.]
May 21. Commission to Richard Goddard to be ensign to Capt. Francis Kelly in the same regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Mary, the wife of Sir William Killigrew, the Queen's Vice-Chamberlain, for a lease for 54 years of the manors of Rosedale and Leven. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 71.]
May 21. Minutes of the business of the Board. [2¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 88.]
May 21.
Victualling Office.
Sir T. Littleton, Josiah Child, and T. Papillon to the Navy Commissioners. We have sent off already as much as we compute will fully load all those victualling ships that are gone down to the loading places appointed by you, including even the three we had notice of yesterday, and the two we had notice of but today from our own agent, and by to-morrow morning we shall have laden as much as we think will fill all the ships you have freighted, if they were down at the loading place, which we conceive is but three more than are already gone down, and of all only three are laden with dry provisions, the rest is beer. There may want yet vessels to carry five or six hundred tons of beer more from this, besides what we intimated to you for Portsmouth and Ipswich, the shipping here taken up falling short of the quantity first intended. [Ibid. No. 89.]
May 21. Thomas Lewsley and R. Mayors to the same. Having in obedience to their orders been up the river as high as Windsor, sending a return of all the barges which, they conceive, may be any ways fit for service, with the dimensions of each. [Ibid. No. 90.]
May 21.
[Read.]
Lord Widdrington to the same. Requesting them to enter his ship, the Widdrington, for a water ship. [Ibid. No. 91.]
May 21.
[Read.]
Henry Browne, muster-master to the Vice-Admiral of the Red, to the Navy Commissioners. Requesting that muster-books be sent to supply the ships of that division, of which he sends a list, and also that the complement of men to each ship may be sent from the office. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 92.]
May 21.
Sheerness.
John Rudd to the same. To-day sailed from the Black Stakes and Sheerness the Royal Sovereign and the Diamond to the Buoy of the Nore. The Golden Hand has not any provisions come aboard yet. She may be ready to sail in four or five days. [Ibid. No. 93.]
May 21.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to the same. Yesterday evening the wind changed from East to West, where it continued till about noon. The Essex and Elizabeth ketches, meeting off Orford Ness, came this morning into the Rolling Grounds. Capt. Robinson informs me that last Sunday afternoon he saw a Dutch fleet of about 45 men-of-war and fireships, besides tenders, on the back of Yarmouth Sands, who, with very little stay there, made for their own coast again. About noon to-day the Swiftsure sailed out beyond the fort with the westerly wind, and coming into the Rolling Grounds found the wind so short, being southerly, that she returned and anchored in the Salt Roads. She went hence without tabling for her waistcloths, which we could not furnish her with, and, as I am informed, not very proportionably gunned or very well manned, yet by all concluded to be an excellent sailer. [Ibid. No. 94.]
May 21.
Deal.
B. St. Michel to the same. Giving an account of the stores supplied by him to the Nightingale and Happy Return by orders from Prince Rupert, and Sir John Harman, and, as he had been extraordinarily perplexed for want of hands and boats to send them off, and at last had to hire some of the soldiers there, desiring them to order the speedy dispatch of the boat building for him at Woolwich, and also that he may have their order to entertain two more hands during this war, as four are too few. Postscript. This afternoon the whole English fleet, together with the French, are sailed by the back of the Goodwin to the Northward. We saw them from Deal beach. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 95.]
May 21.
Bristol.
Capt. Jasper Grant to the same. To-day I had brought me 15 seamen out of Wales, besides the 34 I gave you an account of the last post, and will send them in the morning to Portsmouth. This town got me but two men as yet. I endeavour to get what men I can. The warrant I received from you to press in London I intend to use in Gloucestershire. [Ibid. No. 96.]
May 21.
London.
James Prick to S. Peppes (Pepys). I was security for John Gare, late purser of the Guinea, and after 3 or 4 years' attendance he has accomplished the passing of his account, as appears by the enclosed certificate, which has proved my ruin. I am still sued in the Exchequer, and am not able to pay the charges there, amounting to above 10l. I have spoken with Mr. Yares (Hewer) to have the said purser's extra necessary made out, on which I could have borrowed money to pay the Exchequer charge, but he refuses. Hearing by public applause your general inclination to do good gave me the presumption to crave your order to Mr. Yares to make out the said Gare's extra bills, as I am speedily to return on board the Sovereign. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 97.] Enclosed,
Certificate by Lieut. John Godwin that Gare has cleared his victualling account between 8 May and 9 Oct., '67, and that no extra necessary money is charged to his account. 19 May. Navy Office. [Ibid. No. 97 I.]
May 21.
Charlemont.
Thomas Windesor to Sir G. Rawdon. Concerning his being desired by Lord Conway not to pay his rent, &c., as in his former letter calendared ante p. 253, and requesting him to ascertain whether Lord Conway received it, and whether his lordship will relieve him in his great necessity. [Conway Papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 168.]
May 21.
Charlemont.
Major Sidney Fotherby to Viscount Conway at Dublin. Regretting he had incurred his lordship's displeasure, concerning his lordship's assistance in behalf of Lieut. Booth's parting with his employment. He had told Mr. Booth it would be a hard thing for him to get leave to sell his own employment and buy a foot company, and that he himself would not meddle or make with it. At Ensign Hemsworth's request he had written to his lordship in their behalf, but, when he considered of it really, he requested his lordship by Capt. Chichester not to give his assistance, if it was not done. [Conway Papers. Ibid. No. 169.]
May 22.
Sheerness.
Major N. Darell to the Earl of Arlington. The Sovereign, Victory, and Diamond went out of the Swale yesterday, none remaining behind. A yacht is come to the Nore, with an express from the Prince, to hasten away the above ships. About 5 yesterday morning the fleet sailed from the North Foreland and are judged to be this morning at the Long Sand, and, 'tis believed, may be before night on the coast of Holland. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 207.]
Thursday night [May 22.] Col. J. Hamilton to the Earl of Arlington. Requesting his recommendation to the Lord Lieutenant in favour of his relation, Dr. Butolfe, a man eminent in learning and piety, chaplain to the late and present kings, who, having been a dean a long time, with reason aspires to be a bishop. [Ibid. No. 208.]
May 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant for payment of 6s. a day to James Halsall, appointed Governor of Calshot Castle, Hants, in place of Henry Pawlett, deceased. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 148.]
May 22. Licence to Thomas Herbert, High Sheriff of Monmouthshire, to be absent from his county. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 108.]
May 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the appointment of Sir Robert Wiseman, AdvocateGeneral and Dean of the Arches, as one of the Commissioners for Excise, fee 500l. a year, on approval of him by the Farmers of Excise. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 223.]
May 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the payment of 300l. a year to Lady Mary Tuke, Dresser in Ordinary to the Queen. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 48.]
Docquet thereof, dated May. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 342.]
May 22. Warrant for the payment of 60l. a year to Lady Mary Tuke for board wages in lieu of diet. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 48.]
May 22.
Navy Office.
Sir T. Allin, Sir J. Smyth, and Sir J. Ernle to Hartgill Baron. As well for the coming to a true knowledge of what water-cask were put on board any of the first, second, third, or fourth rates now with the fleet, as for the better enabling us to make the fleet such further supplies of water as shall be necessary, we desire you to procure his Highness' directions to the respective pursers to send you such an account of what quantities of water-cask they have received from the victuallers since 1 June last, as they will be ready to make oath if required. We wish this could be obtained with all speed, as it is to enable us to do his Majesty right in a controversy depending between him and the victuallers, they refusing to send any water-cask to the fleet but what his Majesty must pay extraordinarily for, saying they have issued to each ship the full proportion they are by contract obliged to put on board them, which appearing to us very improbable both from the greatness of the quantity and the little convenience most ships have for stowing it, and the same much importing his Majesty's service, this trouble, we doubt not, will meet with your pardon. At the request of the pursers mentioned in the margin, we have to acquaint you that on our asking the Victuallers of the Navy the reason of their not paying them their necessary money, they informed us they were not able to do it from their want of money, and that it was last Saturday before they were dispatched by them, which we signify to prevent the prejudice which otherwise might attend them for their absence from their ships, which, as proceeding from no fault of theirs, we are assured on your acquainting his Highness therewith, will not be imputed to them, as it ought to have been, had it arisen from any neglect on their parts. [1¼ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 98.]
May 22.
London.
Andrew Wardlow to the Navy Commissioners. Requesting that the bearer, Matthew Bird, whom he has appointed master of the William and Thomas, may have a press warrant. [Ibid. No. 99.]
May 22.
Sheerness.
John Rudd to the same. To-day the Royal Sovereign, Victory, and Diamond sailed from the Buoy of the Nore for the fleet. [Ibid. No. 100.]
May 22.
The Swiftsure, in the Salt Road, near Harwich.
Captain Richard Rooth to the same. In my last I informed you I was for several days prevented by the hard easterly winds from sailing to the Buoy of the Nore, in obedience to his Royal Highness's commands, but yesterday morning, the wind S.W., we got under sail, and just in the Narrow, between Landguard Fort point and the Altar, the wind southered so much on us, that, if the ship, which works exceedingly well, had not stayed, she had undoubtedly been ashore on the fort side, whereon, the pilot being by no means persuaded to turn out, I thought good to come here again, whence I shall improve the first opportunity that presents. News of the fleet as in the next letter. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 101.]
May 22.
The Essex ketch, Harwich.
Capt. Seth Thurston to the Navy Commissioners. To-day being in my station between the Sunk Head and the Longsand Head, we spied a sail, which we thought was a privateer and stood after, but, when we came up, it proved to be the Spy, who informed me that Prince Rupert with the French fleet joined rode at the North Foreland. I was also informed that last Sunday 90 odd sail with two flags were seen off Yarmouth Sands, supposed to be Dutch, but since I had a certain information that they were Swedes and Hamburgers bound through the Channel. Yesterday the Swiftsure was coming out of Harwich, but, the wind taking her short, anchored again. [Ibid. No. 102.]
May 22.
Harwich.
Capt. Peter Cooper to the same. His Highness ordered me with the Spy sloop under my command to come into Harwich, to have her rudder and stern repaired, but Commissioner Taylor says there is nothing here of the King's but victuals, and advised me to acquaint you, and I most humbly crave an answer what I shall do. I was sent away from the Prince between 8 and 9 last night, and came in here about 12 to-day. [Ibid. No. 103.]
May 22.
The Hatton ketch, at anchor in the Downs.
Capt. Isaac White to the same. I convoyed the victuallers that were at Sheerness with the ships laden from the Tower with ammunition and stores to the North Foreland, and having been at anchor not above four hours the fleet anchored within two leagues of us about 6 yesterday afternoon, but, the wind blowing fresh, the victuallers would not venture off that night, but in the morning several of them weighed and went to the fleet, and some stood back again for Margate Road, and I believe, because the wind blows very hard at S.S.W., that they are gone over the Flats, and then, the fleet being all under sail by 5 this morning, standing away to the northward, I made the best of my way for the Downs, being bound with stores for Guernsey from the Tower, and shall the first opportunity of wind make the best of my way thither. [Ibid. No. 104.]
May 22.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner Deane to the same. I have stayed two days to receive an answer about a vessel to carry provisions as desired. None can be had here except one that's fitting and promised to be ready in nine days, which is the utmost that can be done here. It is an old flyboat of about 220 tons. Capt. Wylde in the Centurion desired a month's provisions to complete his victualling spent with the Prince, which is delivered accordingly. He has had some small supplies, but wants a water-boat, having left his own at Dover, but why I know not. The Drake is come to Spithead, and is supplied with 14 days' provisions, and also the Young Spragg with a month's, having but one day's provision on board. The two sloops are victualled for one month for 12 men each, by the Prince's order. I pray the 100l. be imprest to William Collings for converting the trees in the Forest, or else all the men must stand still. [Ibid. No. 105.]
[May 22]/June 1.
Leghorn.
Lodovick Balbiani for Sir T. Clutterbuck to the Navy Commissioners. Informing them that he had drawn a bill upon them at two months payable to Jasper Clutterbuck or order for 493l. 13s. 3d., being the disbursements for stores and victuals supplied to the galley there from 1 March to that date, hoping they will order the punctual discharge of the bill, and adding that no meat had been placed to account for the galley for several months, which will follow in the next. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 106.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Directing a grant of a pension to the Duke of Buckingham in terms identical with those of the letter of 1 Feb. previous, calendared in the last volume of the Calendar p. 510, except that it is to commence from Lady Day 1672 instead of from Michaelmas 1672. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 435.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 170.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. Concerning the Lord Treasurer's having become a Roman Catholic, the intended rendezvous of the army at Blackheath, &c. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 5.) [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 209.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Williamson. Giving much the same news as the last. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 3.) [Ibid. No. 210.] Probably enclosed,
Inland advices received 23 May. (Part is given in those calendared ante p. 278.) Deal, 20 May.—No ships at present in the Downs. Last night passed by without the Sand 20 Hamburgers, which we at first took for the Dutch fleet. Portsmouth, 20 May.—No news. Wind S.E. 20 May, Harwich.—If we may believe those that come from Holland, the Dutch do not look on themselves as able to engage us at sea this summer, unless assisted by some great advantage of wind, &c. Dover, 21 May.—The fleet is sailing northwards with a very fair leading gale at S.S.W. Deal, 21 May.—About 8 this morning we espied the fleet sailing eastward, and now about 2 in the afternoon the headmost are supposed to be near the Banks of Flanders. They are about 12 miles from us, and are at least 150 sail. Harwich, 21 May.—This morning came the Essex ketch from the coast of Holland. Last Sunday afternoon he saw the Dutch fleet, about 45 men-of-war, on the back of Yarmouth Sands, and after having for some time stood backwards and forwards they all made sail for their own coast. The Swiftsure has been out, but was forced in again by contrary winds. Lyme, 21 May.—By a vessel from Guernsey we have advice of the good condition of that island. Last night and this morning arrived here ten barks of this place from Morlaix. A fleet of 19 merchantmen came thence at the same time, convoyed by a French man-of-war. Weymouth, 19 May.—Yesterday afternoon the mayor and bailiffs of this town, being justices of the peace, with their constables, went to a meeting of Independents and broke it up. Dartmouth, 20 May.—This coast is at present pretty clear of capers. Portsmouth, 22 May.—The Centurion, convoy for the Straits, is at Spithead, and so are the Drake and Spragg, which came convoy to some merchantmen from Morlaix. Pendennis, 19 May.—Yesterday came in here two or three small vessels from Bordeaux bound for Ostend. About 60 Swedes, Hamburgers, &c., came with them from Bordeaux. Aldeburgh, 21 May.— Last Monday we had an alarm of the Dutch fleets being on the coast, but it was a mistake. Boston, 21 May.—We hear of no capers on the coast, so our vessels begin to venture abroad without convoy. Harwich, 22 May.—We have advice that the fleet anchored last night off the North Foreland which bore from them S.W. and by S. about 4 leagues, and this morning early they stood N.E., having the wind fresh at W. Deal, 22 May.—Last night the fleet anchored at the Flats of the Foreland, N.N.E. of it, about 3 or 4 leagues off, in very good ground. About 7 this morning they weighed, the wind at S.W., and stood of to sea towards the coast of Holland with a topsail gale. The Prince has with him about 80 stout men-ofwar. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 235, No. 210i.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Williamson. Since sealing our letters Sir R. Carr has charged me to present you his most humble service, and to tell you he would have written had he known of anything of moment to communicate, and that as soon as he does he will acquaint you therewith. [Ibid. No. 211.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
William Bridgeman to Williamson. I must beg your pardon for having three of yours to acknowledge. The two former I received while at the fleet, and the last returning to London, where I had no opportunity to do it, the fleet then riding at least three leagues from land, and we in a constant hurry. I spoke to the Duke and Prince about the convoy you desired, but without success, as I presume Capt. Baron advised you. I was glad to hear of your safe landing at Calais and wish you good success in the rest of your journey. Last Tuesday the Prince weighed from Dungeness, and anchored that night off the North Foreland, and yesterday morning sailed thence towards the coast of Zealand, in search of the Dutch fleet, which, we are informed, lay in the Wielings, above 80 men-of-war besides fireships and other vessels, yet according to all advices but meanly manned. Our fleet consists of above 150 sail of all sorts, whereof about 80 are men-of-war. The Sovereign and Victory are still in the River, but will sail in a few days after the fleet to join them. The town and indeed every place here is full of the Lord Treasurer's laying down his staff, and they will have it that the Treasurer of the Navy is to succeed him, which by some circumstances seems not improbable altogether, but this is only town talk. By the last letters from Sir B. Gascon it seems the Emperor is unwilling yet to declare his mind concerning the Princess of Innsbruck, though it is concluded on all hands he intends her for himself, and that he has been much pressed to it as well by Sir Bernard, as the Empress, his mother. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 212.]
May 23.
Whitehall
J. Richards to Williamson. Congratulating him on his safe landing and wishing him a successful journey and negotiation. All hands will write to-night what probability there is of our fleet's being by this time on the Dutch coast, having been seen the 21st from Dover and Deal, and yesterday standing off the North Foreland for the coast of Holland, with a fresh gale. The recruits of our forces at land go on with all possible vigour. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 213.]
May 23.
Wallingford House
Philip Lloyd to Williamson. Concerning a letter of credit sent to Williamson, his bill from Dover, a bill drawn on him by Samuel Tucker, of Rotterdam, the repayment to Mr. Backwell of the expenses of Williamson's last voyage to Holland, and other business matters. [1¼ page. Ibid. No. 214.]
May 23. News for Jerome Nipho. From Lisbon of the 6th instant they tell us that they were in frequent consultations to advance their trade, and to answer the Spanish ministers, who press them to a league with that crown and Holland, which, though favoured by the commonalty is highly opposed by the great ones, who think it dangerous to make these two nations friends for fear of a reunion in case of a failure in the House of Braganza, and that they were resolved for the King's greater security to fetch him from the Terceiras, and to keep him in a fort in that kingdom, the French minister telling them that if they keep not their leagues with them they would fetch him thence. Lord Belasyse's regiment is now commanded by the Earl of Northampton on that Lord's resignation. Yesterday's letters from Dover say that about noon on Wednesday the fleet was sailing by there for the North with a very fair leading gale at S.W., and that they guessed them about that time to be upon the Banks of Flanders. From France we hear that the King since receiving the ratification of the treaty between the Elector of Brandenburg and himself had sent a courier to his envoy at the Emperor's Court with a copy of the same, with orders to complain to the Emperor of the breach of his word made before the beginning of the war with Holland, that he would not concern himself in it, since which he has sent his army down the Rhine, and so retarded his conquests, and to tell him that, if he should do the like this year, he would send his army into his Hereditary Countries to repel force by force, his Most Christian Majesty declaring them only his enemies that succoured them. At the same time returned another courier from Spain with that Queen's answer to the French King's demands to have Spain quit wholly the Dutch interest, but the answer is not yet known. (News from Rye the same as that calendared ante p. 278.) We hear this morning from Harwich that early yesterday the fleet sailed from the North Foreland, where they had anchored the night before, for the North East, standing over for the Holland coast, having a fair topsail gale. We daily expect a further account of them. His Majesty has resolved to augment his foot regiments to 100 in each company complete, and resolves to have a general review of all his forces upon Blackheath on the 14th, for which great preparations are making, his Majesty, his Royal Highness, the Duke of Buckingham, and almost all the persons of quality about the town intending to be present. (News about Col. Russell as in the last two letters.) [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 215.]
May 23.
Welbeck.
The Duke of Newcastle to the Earl of Arlington. Being satisfied that the particulars in the enclosed are true, requesting him to favour Mr. Booth, the bearer, by reading it and admitting him to represent his condition more at large, and to obtain his Majesty's pardon for him to prevent the shedding of innocent blood. [Ibid. No. 216.] Enclosed,
Case of Mr. John Booth. He is rector of Bothall and was the Duke's steward for his revenues in those parts. Through his discovery of the misdemeanours of Andrew Clayton and James Bell, who were employed in his Grace's concerns, they were removed, whereupon they with their accomplices did not accuse Mr. Booth for 14 months, but at York Assizes in Lent, 1671 [–2] exhibited an information against him for diminishing the coin, producing as witnesses Anne Smithson, formerly his servant, and Joseph Usher, a boy of Clayton's. The woman swore in effect that she saw Mr. Booth clip a half-crown 18 months before, and the boy swore that the last payment of his Grace's revenues made by Mr. Booth was mostly clipped money, though neither of them had received any money of, or conversed with, Mr. Booth for 12 months before. At last Lammas assizes at Newcastle Mr. Booth pressed the judges for a trial, and a jury was impanelled, but the woman from remorse or fear refused to swear what she had before informed. The prosecutors then moved the Court for an adjournment of the trial till the next Lammas assizes, pretending they would then bring other witnesses against him, though when requested in Court by Mr. Booth to name these witnesses, they named none at all. Considering the prosecutors are many, rich and malicious, it is feared they may suborn witnesses, and that the rather, as they have already by offering bribes attempted to suborn divers of Mr. Booth's servants. [Ibid. No. 216 I.]
May 23 James Cole to Sir Robert Southwell. As a proclamation for wearing English manufactures is not found convenient, begging that the enclosed may be put into the London Gazette. [Ibid. No. 217.] Enclosed,
Declaration of the King in Council in pursuance of the address of Parliament and the application of the Weavers' Company, that he has resolved henceforth to wear none but English manufactures except linen and calico, and has ordered the Master of the Great Wardrobe to buy none other for his use, and the Lord High Chamberlain not permit any persons to come into the presence wearing foreign manufactures, also that the Lord Treasurer give orders for seizing all foreign goods imported contrary to law, the King's moiety thereof to be burnt. Whitehall. May, 1673. [Ibid. No. 217 I.]
Order in Council of which the above is an abstract. 9 May, 1673. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 219 II.]
May 23. Warrant for granting the dignity of a Baronet to Halswell Tynt of Halswell, co. Somerset. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 224.]
May 23. Grant to Francis Warre of Hestercombe, co. Somerset, of the dignity of a Baronet. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 337.]
May 23. Grant to Dame Unton Warre of 1,095l. creation money due from the said Francis Warre, with discharge to him for the same. [Ibid.]
May 23. Warrant for payment to Sir Stephen Fox of 10,000l. without account, for secret service. [Ibid. No. 338.]
May 23. Revocation of letters patent formerly granted to John, Lord Roberts, of the office of keeper of the Privy Seal, and grant of the said office to Arthur, Earl of Anglesey. [Ibid.]
May 23. Warrant to the Exchequer for payment to the Duke of Ormonde of 6,000l. without account in consideration of his surrender of a pension of 1,000l. per annum, and also for payment to him of 1,000l. more, being for a year's arrear of the said pension due next Midsummer. [Ibid.]
May 23. Minutes of the business of the Board. [5 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 107.]
May 23.
Victualling Office, London.
Sir T. Littleton, Josiah Child and T. Papillon to the Navy Commissioners. According to your direction last week we wrote to our agent at Ipswich to freight some vessels there for transportation of the beer and other provisions, which are ready there, to the fleet, but he answers that he cannot meet with any ready for that service, so we would request you to order victualling ships thither, in which, as we conceive, there will be no loss of time, as they will be there so much onward in their way to the fleet, besides, there seems to be an unavoidable necessity for it, because shipping cannot be procured there at present. We likewise hear from our agent at Portsmouth that Commissioner Deane can take up there only one ship of 200 tons, and therefore we would pray you to appoint victualling ships thither for taking in 300 more tons of provisions, which shall be immediately dispatched on board them as soon as they arrive. It is now time to be loading one month's provisions which his Majesty appointed to be shipped on victualling ships for the further supply of the fleet, which we are ready to send on board, as soon as you give us notice that your victualling ships are ready for receiving it, which we desire may be with all possible expedition. None of the masters of the victualling ships already laden have as yet signed their bills of lading, which pray command them to do that they may be ready to sail on the first notice. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 108.]
May 23. The masters of ten hired merchant ships to the same. Our ships are ready riding in the River, but no men can we get till they are assured to enter into pay on appearance, and, on our late being before you, you acquainted us we should have two mates and a carpenter, but, our ships being large, we are allowed in merchant's service as well a boatswain, gunner and cook. We pray you to consider it, and to signify your pleasure when our respective ships shall enter into pay, and that they may be allowed such officers for the better governing the ships' companies; and also, as the masters of small ketches and vessels not above one-sixth of the tonnage of our ships are allowed 4l. per mensem, that we may be allowed such suitable augmentation for our own pay as shall be thought fit, and that you would order us one month's imprest, as soon as our ships are appraised, to enable us to fit them for their intended service. Noted that the Board's answer was that the boatswains, carpenters, and mates of all ships carrying six guns and under should be paid as the like officers in sixth-rates, and those of all carrying above six as officers of fifth-rates. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 109.]
May 23.
[Read.]
Thomas Lewis to the Navy Commissioners. Concerning two tickets to Edward Cooper delivered to Mr. Cavenah, one of his Majesty's servants, who produced a letter of attorney from Cooper's administrator, which are now lost. [Ibid. No. 110.]
May 23.
Woolwich Yard.
Captain Amos Beare to the same. Giving the names of 10 victualling ships ready to sail from Gallions, adding that to-morrow night he will have six or seven more full, and that these ships, had they had puncheons of beer or water cask, could receive 40 more tons among them. [Ibid. No. 111.]
May 23.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett to the same. Sending the measurements of the Happy Return pink. [Ibid. No. 112.]
May 23.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to the same. Yesterday the Kitchen yacht came in here with orders for the Swiftsure to sail to the fleet either at the Longsand Head, or else on the coasts of Holland, if they were not found at the first place. She had been first at the Buoy of the Nore to give the same orders to the ships there. The Swiftsure wants many things, which she hoped to have got at Sheerness, had she gone up thither, especially tabling her waist cloths, change of some of her guns, a platform for her wounded men, and many things which were either not sent or not sufficiently furnished. I have done for her even beyond my power, and the Prince, being now taken with the sailing of the Kitchen yacht, would not suffer her to go to the Thames, but here she must be washed and tallowed, and without written orders, because she is one of the King's own vessels for his particular use and conveniency, and not only she, but the Spy also by his Highness's orders must be refitted, and all this at Harwich, where nothing is to be had, the small stores here formerly being drawn dry, wanting deals, nails, canvas, pitch, tar, cordage, and truly everything that befits a royal store, and most of these not to be supplied here with money, as I have often informed you. The yacht is in great haste for an extraordinary use, and the Spy to be sent back to the fleet for an extraordinary service, and the situation of Harwich is extraordinarily convenient for such dispatches, and all this while this port is neither supplied, nor the Prince informed of the state of it, so I must expect a continual trouble without relief, as has always formerly befallen me, when our fleet has been this way. I am washing and tallowing the yacht, whose sides were foully green, and mending her boat, which could not swim, but my credit decays amain. I am providing the Swiftsure's accounts for you, by which, and the want of my salary (not having received anything since last Midsummer), you will be enabled to guess my condition, which I beg you would take into consideration. Yesterday towards evening, I was informed the Sovereign, Victory, Diamond, Antelope, Holmes, and two fireships anchored in the Gunfleet, and that they sailed this morning towards the Longsand Head. The Swiftsure is windbound, as she has been these two days since her attempt to go out. The wind is southerly. I saw a letter from Capt. Haddock last night, saying our fleet are 150 sail, small and great, and that, when they leave the Longsand Head, they may be found before West Cappell in the island of Walcheren. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 113.]
May 23.
The Fortune flyboat, in the Downs.
William Ricketts to the Navy Commissioners. I went into Queenborough Swale according to your order, and heard that the ships you ordered me to go to the Downs with had gone the day before, so, the wind presenting fair, I made the best of my way to the Downs, thinking I should have met with Prince Rupert off the Foreland, where he rode the 21st, but they weighed and went from thence before we could get sight of them, and to-day we are safe arrived in the Downs, where we intend to continue till your further orders. No men-of-war are in the Downs now. The Hatton ketch is here. [Ibid. No. 114.]
May 23.
Plymouth.
John Lanyon to the same. The Hunter being now ready (which would be in the Sound if wind and weather permitted), I am getting in the bills and preparing the accounts, which I hope to send you next post. You will have heard by an express of the arrival of the Straits fleet convoyed by Captains Narbrough and Robinson, and of two from East India, &c. The winds continuing all at S.S.E. keep them all here, so that the officers of the men-of-war are coming on with their demands of supplies. What I can procure from my friends I shall endeavour to accommodate them with, but I can do no more for cordage, being straitened therein for the supply of the Hunter beyond what I imagined. In the mean time I thought fit to acquaint you hereof, that you may dispatch away the stores proposed, or excuse me, if the commanders complain for want of what I cannot help them. [Ibid. No. 115.]
May 23.
The Fairfax, in Plymouth Sound.
Capt. John Narbrough to the same. I arrived this morning here with the Fairfax, and with me the Monmouth, Bristol, Nonsuch, Argier, London Merchant, and the Thomas and Edward, and Prudent Mary fireships, and 70 odd sail of merchant ships, which came from Spain and Portugal with me. I want provisions, which I hope may be supplied here for one month, three cables, and a best bower anchor and stores. I have had much contrary winds since my putting out from Cadiz, which have caused a tedious passage. [Ibid. No. 116.]
May 23.
The Monmouth, in Plymouth Sound.
Capt. Robert Robinson to the Navy Commissioners. I must beg your excuse for not writing from Cales, it being the fault of those that came from thence at such a season, as no man would have believed they would.
Not having stayed the days allowed me I complied with the request of the merchants and Capt. Narbrough for keeping company together for England with those French ships we lost company with off the Southward Cape. We have kept company very well. 26 April we came out of Cashcales (? Cascaes), and arrived here this morning, a long passage though with much hazard, for yesterday most of fleet were at daybreak between the Bishop and Clerks of Scilly. The Fairfax anchored, but got off safe again, and some by tacking and some by bearing up from one island towards another we got well off. The Bristol with ten sail came in yesterday, that got clear before the rest. I have ordered a month's victuals to this ship, the Bristol, and the fireship. The late captain of the Prudent Mary is dead, and I have put in his place the lieutenant of the Bristol, and Mr. Ellis from us to be lieutenant there. Our carpenter is dead also. I have put in his room his son, George Warren, a very worthy person. All is at his Royal Highness's pleasure, but I desire your intercession on their behalf. If I omit anything, it is by being troubled at a very great loss I sustained since I was out, which, without my presence at home, will ruin me and mine. I therefore beg your intercession with his Royal Highness for my liberty to set my family in order, without which my estate is wholly lost. Capt. Narbrough is of opinion not to stir hence till an answer is received to know his Royal Highness' pleasure, because it is not certain how or where the enemies' fleet is, with which I comply in my opinion, though I would have those ships with the fleet as soon as may be, and I hope to receive order to that purpose by the next post, except a fair wind present, and certain news how the fleets are, when I shall venture to come for the Downs. The money you sent me by bill to Cadiz I received, and shall give account of it accordingly. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 117.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Requiring him to issue his warrant to the Commissioners of the Treasury for payment to Capt. Edward Fitzgerald 250l., being the arrears of his pension, out of the moneys appointed for maintaining a sea regiment. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 436.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting the letter of 1 Feb. last, calendared in the last volume, p. 509, concerning the pay of the Irish forces in England, and that accordingly several warrants had been signed for the pay of part thereof under the Duke of Buckingham's command from 1 July 1672, when they were first settled into a regiment, till the 2nd inst., and of the rest thereof under the command of Lord Le Power, from 1 Oct. 1672, the time they were mustered in England, till the 2nd instant, whereby Lord Ranelagh and his partners were ordered not only to pay the said forces for the said respective times according to the present establishment for Ireland, but also to discharge the additional pay due to them according to the settlement and allowances made them during their continuance in England, which warrants the said Lord Ranelagh and his partners have paid; requiring him with the assistance of the persons appointed in the letter of 30 Aug. last to examine and state the payments they have made to the said forces, allowing no payment but what shall be vouched by the said warrants and the field officers' receipts thereupon, and, because the said payments by virtue of the additional allowances exceed the sums settled by the establishment for the regiment therein called the English regiment and for 12 companies of the army there, he is to state the amount of such excess, and allow the same to the Commissioners of the Treasury out of the moneys laid aside by the establishment for sea service, and sign the necessary warrants for that purpose, and he is to direct them to produce the bills of exchange by which the forces have been supplied, that so the charge of the exchange may appear, which charge he is to allow them out of the same fund, deducting thereout 6d. in the pound as directed by the letter of 23 Oct.; and further directing him to pursue the directions given by the letter of 30 Aug. last as to examining and auditing the disbursements from Christmas 1670, when Lord Ranelagh's undertaking began, till 1 July last and to carry on the same from that date till 1 Jan. last, including in the account the three months' pay due to the military list on 31 Dec. last, though the same was not payable till afterwards. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 457.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 171.]
May 24. Secretary Coventry to the Earl of Northampton. The King is satisfied with what he writes and confides in his affection and diligence. The occasion is so pressing that the remoter regiments have orders to march, though their recruits be not ready. The King expects a general rendezvous at Blackheath in a few days. The Prince is supposed to be on the coast of Holland. The Dutch fleet is strong in ships but weak in men. The French King is come without opposition through the Spaniards' dominions to the part of Flanders belonging to Holland. Something of moment is expected daily. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 82.]
May 24. Secretary Coventry to the Earl of Winchilsea. The King is satisfied with his letters, and promises that when the militia are employed, care shall be taken for their subsistence. His Majesty consents for his lordship to visit Yorkshire for a month or 6 weeks, provided he leaves the militia in a good posture. [Ibid.]
May 24. Secretary Coventry to the Earl of Ogle. I rejoice at the hopes of your suddenly coming amongst us. An express was sent last night to the lieut.-colonel to march the regiment immediately, the occasion not permitting delay. Any recruits will be very welcome, but the march must not be delayed for them. I expect hourly news of an action between the Prince and the Dutch. [Ibid. p. 83.]
May 24. Secretary Coventry to Lieut.-Colonel Villiers. I hope you received the express last night; no delay must be admitted as to marching, and such recruits as are yet to make must follow. No oaths are now to be put upon the foot soldiers. I told Mr. Lock to send down copies of the order. I beg you not to bring a ragged regiment, lest you should be taken for a resurrection of Sir John Falstaff's—which would be a sad case, for that body is not likely easily to be glorified. March therefore afoot to avoid these reproaches, and come up with so slender a body that a boat that draws 2 feet of water may carry you. With your old bulk, you might come aground but hardly on land, which would discourage the regiment, who have this advantage, that their lieut.-colonel cannot run away, and marching at their head, will make the front cannon-proof. Whatever comfort the Secretary of State may have in your gallantry in the expedition, Harry Coventry will be very glad to see Ned Villiers at Whitehall. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 83.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of incorporation to the paviours of London, by the name of the Master, Wardens and Company of Paviours. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 225.] Annexed,
Articles of the charter to be granted to the said Company. [Ibid. p. 226.]
May 24.
Weymouth.
George Pley, senior, to the Navy Commissioners. Enclosed is a list and an account of what seaman I have lately pressed, and who have received imprest and conduct money for Portsmouth, being by warrant of 8 April last from his Royal Highness. The account mentions who had only imprest money, and who both imprest and conduct money, for I doubt those that came not to receive their conduct money never went off for Portsmouth, but absent themselves from their dwellings in obscure places, though I have used all manners of ways to apprehend and discover them, both by myself and by the deputy-lieutenants and justices. Unless some be made examples, they will take encouragement always to absent themselves on the like occasions. I desire you to order the payment of the money I disbursed in this service to Mr. John Knight. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 45, No. 118.]
May 25.
[Received.]
The post occupied by the Dutch between Amsterdam and Utrecht has been reconnoitred by the French. The commander ordered 200 Dutch to make a sally, seeing some French approach, but as they turned out to number 600 they were repulsed, and they have taken post in some houses near the said post, but they are at present in a condition to defend it well. [French. Extract. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 218.]
May 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir John Robinson, Lieutenant of the Tower, to release Francis Witherborne, condemned in March, 1672, by Sir Thos. Lynch, Lieut.-Governor of Jamaica, as a pirate, and sent a prisoner to England, he being desirous to serve in the Fleet. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, p. 87.]
May 25.
The Royal Charles, north westerly from Ostend 5 leagues.
Capt. Richard Haddock to the Navy Commissioners. The 22nd we sailed from the Flats of the North Foreland, and that evening anchored thwart of Ostend, it bearing S.E. by S. 5 leagues distant. Then we saw the Dutch fleet, who came to sail, some of them, and plied to the westwards, and berthed themselves nearer the Split Channel. The 23rd we weighed, sailed and drove, being little wind, till we had Ostend steeples south somewhat easterly 5 leagues distant, where we now ride within the Oyster Banks in 11 fathoms. The Northeastermost part of the Dutch fleet bear off us E.N.E., and the Southwest end, East southerly near 3 leagues distant from us. They consist of 84 sail small and great, more we cannot count, nor can our scouts which have been very near them, of men-of-war, fireships and others. Part of them ride open of the Split Channel if not in it, and others near the Dorloo Channel. We judge by their small number that the Amsterdam squadron is not yet joined with them. Since we anchored here we have had very bad weather, wind at W.S.W. and S.W. Some of our ships have broke from their ground tackle, the St. Michael for one drove a mile or two and brought up again, and now rides abreast of us. His Highness commands me to write you to provide and send a cable or two for that ship and one or two for us. Two small French ships on the windward side yesterday ranged foul of each other. One lost his head and bowsprit and since his foremast, and is drove to leewards, but rides in our view; the other we cannot perceive to be much damaged. This is all the damage we have yet received, as we can perceive. The Sovereign, Victory, and Diamond came near the fleet yesterday. They ride now in the off gage of us. We want fair weather to attack our neighbours, which God send us in good time. Postscript, dated the 27th. Since writing these lines we have had the wind blow very hard, but now little wind at S.E., very thick and rainy. We ride near our anchor, ready if the Dutch come out. His Highness desires you to send two cables for the St. Michael, she having lost one anchor and cable, and two for us. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 119.]
May 25.
Plymouth.
John Lanyon to the Navy Commissioners. My last acquainted you with the dispatch of the Hunter, but I omitted to acquaint you that the collector of the customs has been with me, demanding custom for her, as he says he has order from the Commissioners for the Customs to require for all prize ships, as well men-of-war as others. I told him she is his Majesty's, and is to be employed as a man-of-war, and is therefore different from others that the commanders sell to private persons, but for his satisfaction I promised to acquaint you of it, and to desire you to let the Commissioners know that this ship, formerly called the Abraham's Offering of Flushing, is so employed by your directions, pursuant to his Royal Highness' order. The Straits fleet are yet in port with the men-of-war, &c., that came in with them, and propose to sail to-morrow evening. [Ibid. No. 120.]
May 25.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting the letter of 6 Jan., 1672 (calendared in S.P. Dom., 1671–1672, p. 70), and that some doubt may arise what was intended by the releases thereby directed to be given to Lord Aungier, declaring that the true intent and meaning was that the Commissioners of the Treasury should give or cause to be given an Exchequer acquittance for the sum remaining due to the Crown on the balance of Lord Aungier's account, which was to be made up by the moneys to be deposited in the hands of the Lord Chancellor to 14,000l. besides the interest, as the recompence to Lord Aungier for surrendering the offices and places mentioned in the said letter. [1¼ page. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 438.]
Draft thereof, dated the 24th. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 172.]
May 25.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Directing and authorising him to give the necessary orders to the Commissioners of the Treasury for payment to him of the sums of 1,421l. and 1,600l. remaining in the hands of Thomas Taylor and Edward Corker respectively, to be employed by him for such public or necessary uses as he shall think fit, wherein he is to have a particular regard for issuing 500l. towards the cleansing of the harbour of Kinsale. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 444.]
May 26.
London
John Paige to Williamson. I must first congratulate you on your safe arrival at Calais. To-day we have received the confirmation of the sad news of the taking of our island of St. Helena by the Dutch. Last July our company sent out a man-of-war of 36 guns and 400 tons, with 120 seaman and 75 soldiers carrying 40 barrels of gunpowder, 30 great guns and 150 muskets with other ammunition, to fortify the island, with ironwork, timber, &c. She arrived there 16 Nov. last, and about 20 Dec. appeared four ships, which proved to be men-of-war belonging to the Dutch East India Co., which left Amsterdam in April, 1672, for Cape Bona Speranza, where they took in some soldiers. The Admiral had 40 and the others 36 and 32 guns, and a pinnace 16. They immediately attacked our man-of-war and castle, who defended themselves with much resolution, and forced them to leave the road. Two days after they went to another place, and landed some men, and were there twice repulsed. In the meantime arrived a French ship of 22 guns from India, and another of the Company's of 26 guns, but their men were so sickly and weak they added very little to our strength. The Dutch continued their daily alarms and landing for ten days, till our men were quite harassed and tired out for want of rest, so that on New Year's day they landed 400 men, and took one of ours prisoner, who confessed to them the strength of the island. We, having not above 170 fighting men, were forced to retire to our fort, which they doubted they could not keep, so they embarked, both men, women, and children, and carried away what provision and ammunition were in the fort, spiking the guns, and went to Brazil to refresh, where they hired a nimble Portuguese frigate to ply off the island, and give our India ships notice of its being taken, though I fear she will be chased away by the Dutch, and so our 12 ships expected from India, which are worth 400,000l. or 500,000l., may be in great danger of being surprised. A more particular relation is sent to Lord Arlington. Yesterday we had the good news of Capt. Narbrough's arrival off Plymouth with 80 merchantmen under his convoy of 7 men-of-war, which last Tuesday at daybreak were like to be most of them lost on Scilly at a place called the Bishop and Clerks. Capt. Narbrough was within twice the length of his ship of the rocks, and so were most of the merchantmen and men-of-war. Near 2,000,000 of pieces of eight and in silver were aboard the menof-war. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 219.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Williamson. News of the taking of St. Helena and of the arrival of the Straits fleet, as in the last. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I, p. 8). [Ibid. No. 220.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
News for Mr. Nipho. This morning his Majesty and his Royal Highness went down by water to Greenwich, and returned in the evening. From all the ports we hear of the thriving condition of trade, ships daily going in and out without the least damage, and from Plymouth of the arrival of the Straits fleet, and by a vessel come to Lyme we hear of a French man-of-war of 16 guns that has lately carried four Ostenders into Brest, and four more into Havre. We have heard nothing of our fleet to-day, but suppose they are on the coast of Holland. [Ibid. No. 221.]
May 26. Inland advices received that day. Plymouth, 23 May.—Last night and this morning arrived the Straits fleet, about 90 in all. 60 of them were in great danger, being got amongst the rocks of Scilly before they knew where they were, but they all got off without damage. They were convoyed by the Monmouth, Bristol, Fairfax, new Nonsuch, and two or three more frigates. We have advice from Falmouth that some of our Virginia ships are arrived there. Falmouth, 21 May.—To-day came in the Laurel Tree of London from Barbadoes, which she left about ten weeks since with three more, one of which was taken seven days afterwards by a Dutch caper of 22 guns. Lynn, 24 May.—This morning arrived the Francis of this place from Malaga, which parted from the fleet last Sunday night off Scilly, 100 sail in all, convoyed by 7 men-of-war. We hear a French man-of-war of 16 guns has lately carried four Ostenders into Brest and four more into Havre. Portsmouth, 25 May.—No news here. Wind W. Harwich, 25 May.—Yesterday the Swiftsure sailed hence towards Hollesley Bay, and to-day are under sail several other vessels likewise bound to the fleet, of which we have not had any news, since they stood for the coast of Holland. Wind W., fresh. Lynn, 23 May.—Wind W. Boston, 24 May.— The 21st and 22nd appeared a great fleet off Saltfleet haven, standing northwards, but they were so far at sea that we could not discover what they were, but what makes us think them men-of-war is that they do not sail according to the favourable wind they have. Whitby, 22 May.—Our vessels begin to pass to and fro without any disturbance, no enemy having lately appeared on the coast. Stockton, 23 May.—No news. Wind W.S.W. Bridlington, 23 May.—This morning came into this bay 60 light colliers from Yarmouth convoyed by the Portsmouth pink. [2¼ pages. Ibid. No. 222.]
May 26. G.W. to Williamson. Congratulating him on his safe landing, and adding that he had been inquired for by the persons of honour he last met at the writer's house. [Ibid. No. 223.]
May 26,
Victualling Office, London.
Josiah Child and T. Papillon to the Navy Commissioners. In answer to yours of the 24th, we are glad you have made that experiment of a contract with the coopers, which we think will be found in the issue of less advantage to the King than what we offered, but we are very ready to furnish you on the same terms, praying you to let us have the bill of imprest by Mr. Hayter, without being clogged with any other expressions more than on account of extra water-cask delivered and to be delivered, which we took to be his Royal Highness' sense at the debate, and so to order our payment that it may run parallel with the coopers', otherwise it will not be equal. As to victualling ships, if his Majesty or Royal Highness had put it upon us, as the contracts import, we should have given the best account we could thereof. Now you know we have no fund for it, nor money, nor has that business been in any hand but your own, ever since we had to do with the victualling; besides, it is excluded in our settlement with my Lord Treasurer. All the hoys, about 19 or 20, which by your order we have sent to several places, are now by Prince Rupert's verbal command to our agent who was on board him, returning to this river to be emptied into greater ships, which occasions us to renew our former desire for the speedy ordering of victualling ships to receive not only what is in these hoys, but also the whole month's provisions from this and other ports. Many of the masters of the victualling ships have lately signed their bills of lading. The reason they did it not before was the want of their imprest money. Their staying for beer we cannot credit, because our care was such as generally to have so much beer ready laden in lighters as to fill two ships, before we had notice one was ready to take it in, and, since we have heard of their breaking stowage, we have ordered puncheons and hogsheads to be sent down to fill them up, but to put other provisions in victuallers laden with beer we found inconvenient for the service last year, which makes us avoid it now. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 121.]
May 26.
Woolwich Yard.
Capt. Amos Beare to the same. Yesterday the captain of the Antelope in Long Reach sent to me for men to help his ship down into the Hope, which I am not able to do at present. A very great complaint is coming to you against me. The lightermen, who bring down the beer and provisions have refused to do their part, and would stand and look at our people, and not help us, so I was forced to bang several of them, to bring them to good manners. Seeing I cannot have all my riggers, I beseech your favour to Capt. Rooth to clear Noah Flood. He is the foreman of my rigging house, and lost a leg in the last Dutch war. [Ibid. No. 122.]
May 26. Jonas Shish to [the same]. Sending the measurements of the Rebecca of London. [Ibid. No. 123.]
May 26.
Bristol.
Captain Jasper Grant to the same. I beg your letter to Sir John Knight, he being the only man I found here to serve his Majesty in this command laid upon me. I daily send men to Portsmouth, not by the help of this place. They have not got me one man. I am at charges to keep men at the harbour's mouth and boats to comply with your commands. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 124.]
May 26.
Bristol.
Francis Baylie to the Navy Commissioners. Desiring them to mind his condition and to order his bill to be made out for his third payment, which has been so long due, and that present payment may be made, because of his necessity for it to carry on the ship he is building, the work being almost at a stand for want of it. [Ibid. No. 125.]
May 26.
Wallingford House.
Report by Lord Clifford on the reference to him of Col. John Fitzpatrick's petition that he has forborne to pass the grant of the quit-rents prepared for the petitioner, because neither the value of the quit-rents nor the lands out of which, nor the persons by whom they were payable were expressed therein, whereby it was uncertain what was granted, that he had since been informed by the petitioner that the lands, the quit-rents of which are desired, were all set out to the officers and soldiers of Col. Stubber's and Col. Abbott's regiments, and are now held by them or others under them, and he has also been given a list of the lands from which the said rents are issuing with a particular of most of them amounting to 396l. 2s. 8d. per annum, besides some others amounting to about 100l., so that the value of the rents desired will amount to about 500l. per annum, which being thus ascertained, the grant will not differ from the nature of other of his Majesty's grants of grace. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 173.]
Draft of parts of the above. [Ibid. No. 174.]
May 26.
Portmore.
John Tattnall to Viscount Conway. Sending up a brace of bucks according to his lordship's commands. [Conway Papers. Ibid. No. 175.]
May 27.
London.
E[dward] S[eymour] to Lord [Conway]. Your last letter found me at Bradley, where I resolved to have stayed this summer. But the unlooked for alterations, which are coming to pass here, brought me back sooner. I suppose I shall not be the first to present you with the particulars. It's no less than my Lord Treasurer's quitting his staff, to whom, I may confidently assure you, will succeed Sir T. Osborne, and, if the news of the town be current, a very humble servant of your Lordship's is to have his place. For many reasons I do not approve of your not coming over. I am sure, if I had pursued the method you now practice, I had still lived the cashiered justice, modesty being not the virtue of this age. If I passionately desire anything in this world, it is the seeing you here. I beg it of you most heartily, being confident that by your presence we shall the better serve our master and one another. I can assure you, you will have unlooked for welcomes. [Conway Papers. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 224.]
May 27.
9 a.m. The Royal Charles, at anchor on the Oster Bank.
Prince Rupert to the Earl of Arlington. Wind all this morning S.W., and just now S.E. I think it my duty to give his Majesty this account, which I desire may be presented by you. Tuesday, the 20th, after a warm alarm from off Rye, where I then rode at anchor, which proved a fleet of Hamburgers, I weighed and turned up with the whole fleet to Dungeness, the wind fresh at N.E., and anchored that night, the wind then shifting to S.S.W. The 21st, I weighed again at 3 a.m., and made the best of my way to find out the enemy, and proceeded that night to the flats off the [North] Foreland, and anchored there. The 22nd, at two in the [morning] I weighed again, and sailed on my course towards Schonveldt [where] I had some intelligence the enemy lay. That evening proving clear I discovered them from the topmast head in Schonveldt as we judged, and that night I anchored about 7 or 8 leagues from them. They rode at anchor in one line E. from us. On this discovery I resolved to attack them, their number seeming not very considerable, that is, about 85 the whole fleet. The 23rd I weighed again, having concluded and ordered what frigates and fireships should attack first, and how the other ships by the soundings of the small crafts before them might safely second that attack, but that day proved so great a calm that I was forced to drop anchor again, intending on Saturday morning to have attempted them, but Saturday proved a storm, and it blew hard all day Saturday, Sunday and Monday, so I was then also disappointed. I lie here yet at anchor, but it now rains, and is so thick that I cannot discover where they lie. I hope the first good weather to give an account of them. Their number yesterday, to the best of my intelligence, was 75 great ships and flyboats, the small craft and attenders being gone off from them to buoy out the channels behind them. But five flags were discovered. Whether Amsterdam ships are joined with them I yet know not. We have suffered but very little damage in this storm. The Comte d' Estrées own ship sprang her foremast, the outside being all rotten before, and one of their fireships lost her bowsprit. I sent my carpenter immediately on notice of it to Capt. Young to give what assistance I could so as to fish it to make it serviceable at present, which is by this time so done, that I hope she need [? not] be sent in to refit. The Sovereign, Victory and Diamond are come to the fleet, but so ill manned that very little service can be expected from them. The Diamond proves so leaky that she can but just swim. No news yet of the Swiftsure. Many ships begin to call for victuals, which will, I hope, be sent away to me with all expedition, else the service must necessarily suffer. I earnestly desire you to press a quick dispatch herein, which at this juncture will be a most considerable service to his Majesty's affairs. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 225.]
May 27.
The Royal Charles.
Prince Rupert to the King. I have forbore writing till now, still hoping to send a more pleasing account, but the weather has been so stormy, that though we lie within less than two leagues of our foe, we durst not attempt to weigh our anchors. It blew so hard that we were fain to strike topmasts and yards, and all we could do was to keep some ketches under sail to sound the grounds about us. This has lasted since the 24th. Last night the wind slackened, so we got up our masts and yards. During all this one of my afflictions was the contradictions of our ablest pilots. Some would have the enemy to lie open of both channels, the Rane in the middle, some open of the Split only, for all this while no certain mark was seen but Ostend, but at last by bringing all together, we find they lie from the Rane towards the Steenbanck, so that they may either go to sea or in, which the first opportunity of weather shall discover to us. This morning is so hazy that we cannot see to do anything, though we have a fair wind at S.W. Since the last resolution of coming hither I have not yet spoken with my officers, but my resolution is, if we drive them in, to anchor in their place, if to sea, to follow them. We can find no less water on all these banks than 6½ fathoms. Most of our fleet lies upon the Oster Bank. The body of the enemy, De Ruyter, bears due east of me, Ostend southerly. We anchor in 11 fathom. Our losses are as yet not considerable. The French, I fear, have suffered more than we, but all is not worth troubling your Majesty with at present. [Holograph. 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 226.] Perhaps enclosed,
An account of one of our smacks. West Cappell land E. by S. ½ southerly about 4 leagues. Found a mere knoll about two smacks' length 3 fathom under water. The Dutch fleet's body bore S.E. about two leagues off, our fleet S.W. by S. about a league and a half from the Vice-Admiral of the Red. This we believe to be the end of the Oster Bank, but this knoll was known to none of our pilots before. [Ibid. No. 226i.]
May 27. Col. J. Hamilton to Lord [Arlington]. Thursday, the 23rd, under sail off the North Foreland. Early in the morning came up with the fleet, Mr. Moore, and the ammunition ships, with very great satisfaction to Prince Rupert, not one thing being forgotten of all he desired, for which he extremely applauds the care and punctuality of the Master of the Ordnance. At 4 p.m. we are just come to anchor, Schonveldt bearing E.N.E. between 5 and 6 leagues of us, wind S.W. and by S. At 3 the Pearl came up with us, which had been sent a cruising. The commander assures us that at 7 this morning he saw the enemy, 80 sail in all, riding in Schonveldt. This intelligence cannot err, for we see them now from the maintopmast head, and 6 frigates, of which the Pearl is one, and two ketches are sent to observe their motion. 12 at night. The Pearl brings word the enemy is under sail, their starboard tacks on board, standing for the south end of the Schonveldt. Friday morning, 8 o'clock, wind S. and by W. We are under sail and stand S.E. and by E. to get into our posture, which is the French in the middle, the Red squadron to windward, and the Blue to leeward of them. When we are formed thus we shall bear down in a front on the enemy, our pilots assuring there is water enough for our greatest ships, which if so, we have all the advantage that in reason we can expect. They are now told 92 great and small under sail standing our course, their starboard tacks on board, and bear between 3 and 4 leagues E.N.E. of us. Some here are of opinion they will go further in towards Flushing, in which case it is resolved to set upon them with a squadron of frigates and fireships, the names and order of which are in the paper enclosed. Friday, 3 p.m., at anchor on the edges of the Oster Bank, Ostend bearing 5 or 6 leagues south-easterly of us. Where we ride is a great question among the learned, but the most general opinion is that I have set down, the Dutch fleet bearing the nearest end on the Rane east southerly, the furthest end E.N.E. northerly. About 1 we were becalmed, and about 3 the wind came to the east. Now it is come southward of east, and in the prospect that we shall have it fair to-morrow morning it is resolved to get in order very early and fall upon them in the same manner it was intended to-day. Tuesday 27th, 6 or 7 a.m., wind S. and by W. The continued storm since Saturday morning till last night made me incapable of being so exact for that time. I can only assure you that besides the St. Michael losing an anchor, the Mary Rose being driven from hers and one of the hospital ships being by the like accident driven to near the enemy I can hear of no other damage. Mons. d'Estrées had his foremast cracked but it is mended again, and a fireship of his has been on board one of that squadron, where she lost her bowsprit and afterwards pitched her foremasts and her maintopmast by the board. We ride still in the same place with little or no wind but abundance of rain and so dark we cannot see at any distance. About 4 this morning it was less hazy and then 8 or 10 of the Dutch were under sail, some believing they stood in for the Wielings, and others that they stood out to seaward. On a particular in the last foreign advices from England that six companies were to go from the Brill on board the enemy's fleet and their being so intent to defend Zealand as the only place we have designed to attack, I find Prince Rupert of opinion that Helvoetsluys and that part may lie very open to us, and therefore, if on a council of the flag officers it is thought impracticable to attack the enemy as it was designed, I believe we shall endeavour something very suddenly on t'other place. Whether this has altered since I spoke with him you will know by his own dispatch. 9 a.m. The wind now comes to the S.E. and with such a fog and rain together that we cannot see one ship of the enemy. Friday morning came the Sovereign, Victory, and Diamond with one fireship, the two former as ill manned as when I left them, which I am sure was too ill to serve. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II, 335, No. 227.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
Pass for Jaques Van Layer, merchant of Middleburg, who intends to settle in England, pursuant to the King's declaration of 12 June, to transport himself with his family and estate to any part of the kingdom and settle where he pleases. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 231.]
May 27. Minutes of the business of the Board. [3¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 126.]
May 27.
Chatham Ropeyard.
John Owen to the Navy Commissioners. Requesting a supply of hemp, as what there is there will be wrought out in 14 days at furthest, and they will not then be able to employ their hands any longer. [Ibid. No. 127.]
May 27.
Sheerness.
John Rudd and S. Hunter to the same. As the last of the ships is gone from thence, requesting leave for four or five days to come to London, and promising to leave somebody to look after anything that may happen in their absence. [Ibid. No. 128.]
May 27.
Sheerness.
John Shish to the Navy Commissioners. Informing them of the arrival last night of the Guinea at the Buoy of the Nore by Prince Rupert's orders to be cleaned and refitted, with an account of her defects. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 129.]
May 27.
The Guinea, at the Buoy of Nore.
Capt. Thomas Trafford to the same. To the same effect as the last, with request for their assistance that he may be speedily dispatched, and to know what provisions will be ordered him, and enclosing a note of his remaining provisions. [Ibid. No. 130.] Enclosed,
The said note. [Ibid. No. 130 I.]
May 27.
The Essex ketch, Harwich.
Capt. Seth Thurston to the same. Very early this morning we spied a sail off Orford Ness, which we stood off to. When we came up with him, he proved to be a ketch from the Holland coast belonging to Prince Rupert. He informed me that the Holland fleet of about 150 sail, small and great, as he says, rode off the Wielings. He was bound to the fleet with provisions for the Prince, but could not gain them by reason of his falling in the Holland fleet. There is also a fireship, which reports he was at anchor amongst them, and was forced to leave his anchor and cable behind. The commander of the ketch told me he saw another fleet about 3 or 4 leagues to windward of them, which is supposed to be ours. Yesterday the Swiftsure sailed out of Aldeburgh Bay towards the Holland coast, only she and her ketch. She will be a very good sailer, as we judged by our ketch. [Ibid. No. 131.]
May 27.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to Lord [Arlington]. Last week I received yours of the 12th. I am very glad to find his Majesty has ordered three frigates for the guard of these coasts. 'Twill be of great security to this kingdom and of advantage to the trade of England. I still hear every post of the Dutch privateers, about six in number, which now lie on the coast of Munster, but whenever they espy any of our frigates they shift away from them. The 1,400l. in Mr. Taylor's hands will be ready money. Those who informed me of the other sum in Corker's are somewhat mistaken, for I am now told it will prove little above 600l. As soon as I can fix the certainty of the sum I shall rectify the error, and inform you, that the order to receive it may be mended. I am very glad his Majesty lets this money be employed on some public account. The first work I shall see done will be the cleansing of Kinsale Harbour, which will make it very commodious for his Majesty's ships on all occasions, and be of great benefit to the town. I shall use my utmost endeavours to accommodate the Duchess of Cleveland, and that as speedily as may be with a proportion of lands of equal value with those of that part of the Park his Majesty designed to have given her. The letter on behalf of Col. Hamilton I have received, and find that some (if I mistake not) of the particulars therein mentioned are already granted, and that since my coming hither. However I have referred it (as I do in all such cases) to his Majesty's counsel, from whom when I have such a return as may inform me, I shall be ready to serve Mr. Hamilton in all he can justly pretend to. We have lately taken a notorious person, Francis Bodkin, captain of the ship wherein Jackson and Gallagher, the two condemned men at Cork, served. He was taken with them, and being the principal man, would undoubtedly have received the like condemnation had he not escaped. There are grounds to suspect some more considerable persons were engaged in setting out that ship. I have ordered him to be kept close prisoner, and hope by comparing his examinations with the discovery the two condemned men have offered to make, we may learn the truth. Sir A. Forbes told me his Majesty consented to making Sir G. Rawdon a Privy Councillor. I fear the letter has miscarried, not being yet come. [3 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 176.]
[1673 ?]
[May ?]
Thomas Blood to the King. Petition praying for a grant of 1,400l., a concealment found out by the petitioner in Ireland of money paid into the Treasurer's hands, but not disposed of as yet by any order, which the petitioner conceives belongs not to Lord Ranelagh's grant, because it was not any arrear unpaid in, but money undisposed of but concealed by the late treasurer. [Ibid. No. 177.]
May 28.
[Received.]
The Weavers' Company of London to the King and Privy Council. Petition on behalf of themselves and all other English weavers stating the great discouragement of the petitioners by the frequent importation of foreign wrought silks, ribbons, laces, &c., by which some thousands of them have been forced to forsake their callings, and that though during the past eight years the consumption of such commodities has greatly increased, not one-fourth of the handicraftsmen here have been or are now employed as heretofore, and without speedy redress it is feared the very art will be lost to these kingdoms as is demonstrated by the annexed particulars; that, pursuant to the address of both Houses of Parliament, the Privy Council, 18 April last, ordered the Attorney-General to prepare a proclamation, which was accordingly prepared and presented, but has not yet been published, and praying that it be published forthwith, its main scope being only the revival of some old laws against the importation of foreign ribbons, laces, &c., mentioned in 3 Edw. IV, and 19 Henry VII, and a further declaration of his Majesty's pleasure touching the wearing of English manufactures, and the discountenance of the use of foreign ones. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 228.] Annexed,
Printed paper offering reasons in support of the petition. [Ibid. No. 228 I.]
Draft of the said proclamation. [Ibid. No. 228 II.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
Rules and directions as to the precedency of the several regiments and their officers. First as to the Foot. The Regiment of Guards to take place of all other regiments, and the Colonel to be always reckoned and to take place as the first foot colonel. The Coldstream regiment to take place immediately afterwards, then the Admiral's, the Holland, Col. Hamilton's, the Duke of Buckingham's, Lord le Power's, Sir W. Lockhart's, the Earl of Northampton's, the Earl of Ogle's, the Earl of Carlisle's, the Earl of Peterborough's, the Marquis of Worcester's, the Earl of Mulgrave's, the Duke of Albemarle's, Lord Vaughan's, and so all other regiments and colonels to take place according to the antiquity of the regiment. Second as to the Horse. The three troops of Guards to take place before all others. The captains to take rank as eldest colonels, the lieutenants as eldest majors, the under lieutenants as youngest majors, and the cornets as eldest captains of horse. The King's regiment of Horse to take place immediately after the Guards, and its colonel to have precedency immediately after the captains of the Guards, and before all other colonels of Horse, all other colonels to take rank according to the antiquity of the regiment. Third, the colonel of the eldest regiment to command on all occasions, and when there shall be no colonel on the place, then the lieutenant colonel of the eldest regiment, and when no lieutenant colonel, the major, and so down to the captains and other inferior officers. Fourth, all officers below the rank of general, shall, during their stay in any garrison, obey the governor of the same or his deputies. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 229, and S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 63.]
May 28. Discharge to Sir Thomas Bond of 750,000 livres, amounting to 56,250l., received in France for his Majesty, and to pay him 600l. without account for his services therein. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 339.]
May 28. Warrant for the trustees for sale of fee-farm rents to contract with Major Nicholas Bayly for the purchase of fee-farm rents of 262l. 8s. 5d. per annum at 8 years' purchase with directions to the officers of the Exchequer to draw orders for 2,050l. 7s. 7d. to Bayly out of the moneys arising by sale of fee-farm rents, to be satisfied by levying tallies for the money due from him on the said contract. [Ibid.]
May 28. Warrant to pay to Thomas Welsh 1,200l., to be levied on William Prettyman on his account as late receiver of the first fruits. [Ibid.]
May 28. Minutes of the business of the Board. [3½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 132.]
May 28.
The Prince, off Schoon Veldt.
Sir E. Spragg to the Navy Commissioners. Requesting that the bills due to Thomas Locke, his pilot, for piloting the Warspite, may be paid to his wife, Mary Locke, as he desires. [Ibid. No. 133.]
May 28.
Woolwich.
Phineas Pett to the same. I received yours of last night from Deptford, and shall go there to-day, and see your directions left with Mr. Shish for the works to be done to the colliers coming here to be fitted, and, as soon as they come, shall make all possible dispatch therein, and measure those that have not been measured. The demand enclosed in the Surveyor's letter on Monday for supply of this yard for the dispatch of the works in hand, I desire may be timely taken care of. As all our caulking work is now over for the present, except you will have us do anything to the colliers, I think it expedient that as many caulkers as we can spare may have leave to go to their homes for a fortnight or till they are remanded back on the coming in of more work with tickets to keep them from the press, that so his Majesty may not be burdened with the charge of their wages. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 134.]
May 28.
The Thomas and William collier, at the lower end of Redriff.
Capt. Amos Beare to the Navy Commissioners. In obedience to yours of yesterday I came from Woolwich after daylight and met Capt. Perriman at Redriff, and have observed his directions. The ships there are sailed, and I hope this afternoon's tide to carry away five or six more. I attend here for the purpose, and am at work to set them to rights, that they may sail when afloat. Some five weeks ago I did not discharge 20 watermen I had by your procurement, but gave them leave to go to work for their families, which I did to lessen the charge, and because I had not employment for them, and told them they must be at an hour's call. Some of the Masters of the Hall tell me, that if you will write them but two lines for those men to return to Woolwich I shall have them presently, so I beg you to write for them, or else to send me more money. [Ibid. No. 135.]
May 28.
The Swiftsure, near Aldeburgh.
Capt. Richard Rooth to the same. In pursuance of his Highness' commands of the 21st, sent me the 22nd by Capt. Hayward of the Royal Sovereign, for my speedy repair to the fleet, which was then going over for the coasts of Zealand (not having an opportunity before), I set sail out of Harwich the 24th, and anchored in Hollesley Bay till next morning, and then fell down to Aldeburgh, where I stopped, the weather being very gusty and stormy, till the next morning, and then weighed and stood over, the wind W.S.W. About 6 yesterday morning we saw a fleet at anchor, which we judged to be ours, riding off West Capell. It was very hazy and foggy so that we could not well descry or number them, but they reached from S.S.E. to E. in length. Standing in we espied a hoy at anchor to leeward of us, the wind S.W. and by S. We bore up, which he seeing, cut and set sail. However in a short time I came up with him, whom I found to be a water carrier belonging to the Vice-Admiral, Jean de Leiftdee. He informed me the fleet to windward (sic) was theirs, whereupon I stood off N.W. and by N., and about one in the afternoon met Capt. Wright in the Kitchen come from Harwich with a packet for his Highness. About 3, it being hazy weather, we saw two great Dutch men-of-war. One we judged to be of about 70 and the other of about 40 guns. Not being able to weather them I thought good to bear up round to our larboard tack to take my lieutenant and men out of the galliot prize, and so kept away large for the better fitting our ship, but, when it cleared up, we found not only those two ships but several others to windward and astern, and the body of their fleet to leeward, whereupon, by the general advice of all, it was concluded that we should stand away to draw these two further off, before we engaged, for our ship, as I have often informed you, is not half manned as she should be, or I could wish. We sailed much better than they, and stayed for the Kitchen, which hardly escaped. They retook the galliot as she drove, I having taken out all their men, and with their boats took the ketch that attended this ship, it being little wind, and she much to leeward of them. We stood over all night, and I, not knowing where to find the fleet, thought good to stop here, and to send to Harwich, where Capt. Wright goes for intelligence and to get a boat, he being forced to cut away his own, and my yawl that was sent on board him. So soon as I can be justly informed where to find the fleet, I will hasten all that possibly may be to repair to them. I shall be at great loss for want of a ketch or smack to attend this ship, and therefore desire you would appoint one, being forced likewise to cast off my longboat, and having now but one boat. This true relation of my proceedings and happy securing this ship from the midst of so many enemies, which, next to God's Providence, I attribute to her excellent sailing, for about 8 at night, we lying by for the Kitchen yacht, they tacked and stood away to their own coasts, and we held on our course N.W., I thought it my duty to signify to you. The master of the galliot, whom with his men, being 15 more, I have sent to Harwich, reports that their fleet consists of near 70 sail, whereof about 50 have 60 guns, the rest between 50 and 30. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 136.]
May 28. Certificate by R. Mayors of the measurements and tonnage of six ships. [Ibid. No. 137.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury and Exchequer in Scotland. After reciting a grant of 2 Dec. 1672 to Sir John Nicholson of Nicolson, of a new imposition on tobacco, declaring that all tobacco, whether prize or other, brought into Scotland since that date shall be liable to the payment thereof, and empowering the said Sir John, his heirs and assigns, and their collectors, to exact the same, and to seize all imported tobacco, which has not paid that imposition, with directions to all collectors or tacksmen of the customs and all waiters appointed by them to assist Sir John and those appointed by him to exact that imposition. [2½ pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 180.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
Commission to Adam Rae, first captain of the militia regiment of foot raised by the City of Edinburgh, to be major thereof, that post being now vacant by reason of Sir Andrew Ramsey, junior, of Abbotshall, being beyond sea. [Ibid. p. 183.]
May 28.
Chapel Izod.
The Lord Lieutenant to the Earl of Arlington. Recommending the bearer, Lord Mount-Alexander, as one of the most ingenuous young men in the kingdom, who comes of a good family, and his Lordship knows his father was always in the interest of the Crown, being himself a man of worth and consideration. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 178.]
May 28.
Lisburn.
Lieut. Lancelot Bolton to Viscount Conway. I send you the account concerning Monsr. Britton. I drew the troop together and informed them what strict orders would issue on our removal to continue us to our colours and duty, and desired them to consult their own affairs. I find none at present ready to go off except Mr. King, but all will attend the colours to Tredath (Drogheda) As to grazing for the troops coming in our place, there will be grass enough with Castle Robin. My cornet tells me you have appointed the charge thereof to him, and I advised him to appoint Mr. Ricaby to look after it, and I would leave a note signed by me and another by Lieut. Keeting, wherein we charge 40 horse of each troop to answer the rent, each man paying for his summer's grass 12s. 6d. beginning at 1 May, and he proceed accordingly with these troops, beginning from the time we go. Last post I received your letter directing the settling of quarters and stating of debts, in order to which we meet Mr. Doherty to-day. One thing directed is to cast up the total of each troop's debts, which is to be stopped out of the 3 months' pay due 31 March last, and is to be sent down and paid to every respective inhabitant. This return, I suppose, will be very prejudicial to your troop, there not being above five men of whom we can certify, the rest either owing nothing or not appearing to us, and the debts of some of those we certify exceeding a twelvemonth's pay, and some less, but all being more than the 3 months' pay assigned to that use, so, if the total of the debts be deducted in the Treasury how will their three months' pay answer their landlords without entering on the pay of others, who have all along lived out of debt. I desire you to give directions concerning your armour. Monday Mr. Huncks sets forward. I remind you how we shall have a little money at coming into our new quarters. [Conway Papers. 1½ page. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 179.]
May 28.
Lisburn.
Monsr. Le Roy to [Viscount Conway]. Informing him that in consequence of the change in the Army he had thought it expedient, with his lordship's permission, to retire, his pay being insufficient for his maintenance, though with great regret, considering the long time he has served. [Conway Papers. French. Ibid. No. 180.]
[May 29.]
The Royal Charles, near the Oster Bank.
Prince Rupert to the King. I have ordered Capt. Baron to draw a relation, such as at present can be made. I shall only say we engaged the enemy where we could not bear them down for want of sea room, else you would have had a better account of them. As it is, you will find their losses will not be easily mended. Ours are not so, and I hope we shall send in not above two ships, the Resolution and Cambridge. The rest we shall fit here. The French behaved as well as could be expected. The truth is, if their fireships had had more skill and ours as much bravery, both their admirals had been burnt. Monsr. Valbell was a great help in getting off the Cambridge, which escaped only by the bravery of her captain. The greatest want will be men, without which I fear I shall not be able to disfurnish our ships for to land anywhere. The Sovereign was not able to do anything for want of seamen, and truly I must complain to you of this ship which proves so crank-sided that we were not able to use our lower tier of guns, though there was but little wind, so that, if there be any likelihood of an engagement again, I shall be forced to change her. Her decks also are made so rounding that to bring her guns to a level most of the coils must be taken out, yet we did as well as we could, and I hope your Majesty will be satisfied that there was as much caution had of the sands and as much done to an enemy as strong and rather better seamen than we as could be expected without some extraordinary fortune had attended us, and thus shall leave all to your favourable construction. [Holograph. 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 230.]
May 29.
1 p.m. The Royal Charles off the Oster Bank, 7 leagues from East Capel.
Prince Rupert to the Earl of Arlington. Wind S.S.W. I give you an account of our action of yesterday, the 28th. The 27th it was resolved at a Council of War on board here by all the flag officers, to attack the enemy riding at anchor in a line between the Rand and the Stone Bank, the foul weather here before having given us leisure and opportunity to sound all those sands. Accordingly a squadron was then ordered out of several divisions of the fleet, whereof the eldest captain was to command each party, consisting in all of 35 frigates and 13 fireships, besides small craft to sound before them, as by the enclosed list appears. About 8 yesterday morning, they drew out of their squadrons, and sailed towards the enemy, wind S.S.W. and by noon engaged their van commanded by young Tromp. We were forced to engage sooner than I intended, to prevent the enemy getting the wind. That squadron commanded by Tromp we forced to give way, who went as far as the sands would give them leave. Then the squadron commanded by De Ruyter fell to the share of the French, who behaved themselves very bravely, and Sir E. Spragg, who maintained the fight with so much courage and resolution, that the whole body gave way, and had it not been for fear of the shoals, we had driven them into their doors (I mean harbours). On this I judged it fit to stand a little off, night approaching, and to anchor here, where I now ride without touching ground with any ship.
The enemy have had a considerable loss, both as to many men slain and many ships disabled, and some destroyed. Our losses are very inconsiderable, only two of our ships being disabled, which I shall send home to refit; we have lost but very few seamen; as to officers Capt. Fowles, Capt. Worden, and Capt. Finch are killed; I have not yet any certainty of more. Col. Hamilton has his leg shot off.
As I desired in my last your kindness to importune the providing and dispatching away of all provisions for the fleet, so I must now renew the same, that you will move the King and his Royal Highness to order good store of fishes for masts and topmasts also to be in a readiness, and also that victuals of all sorts may be immediately shipped and lie in a readiness, till I send word whither to bring them, which I shall suddenly do. As for men, here are the Sovereign and Victory in a very sad condition for want of them, and also several other ships, so that 'tis absolutely necessary to hasten away 1,000 at least. I hear Capt. Narborough is arrived. I hope his sailors will recruit us, and also that himself and ships will be fitted and sent to me. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 231.]
May 29. "His Highness Prince Rupert's letter to the Earl of Arlington." This is a cento of the two preceding letters, a good deal edited, and omitting the concluding paragraph of the last letter, and adding:— All the officers and common men generally behaved very well, of which I shall send particulars when better informed. In my squadron more especially Capt. Legge, Sir J. Holmes, Capt. Wetwang, Capt. Storey, Sir R. Strickland and Sir William Reeves. The first took a ship, and the latter brought up a fireship and laid himself off to leeward of Trump, and, if the captain of the fireship had done his duty, Trump had been certainly burnt, notwithstanding which Storey and Wetwang so belaboured him that Reeves cleared himself from the crowd of the enemy. (Printed in the London Gazette, No. 786.) [Printed. 2 copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, Nos. 232, 233.]
May 29.
The Royal Charles, about 7 leagues off Ostend.
Capt. Richard Haddock to the Navy Commissioners. Yesterday the 28th, which was the first opportunity of fine weather, about noon we attacked the Dutch fleet in Schoon Veldt, buoying the Oyster Bank and Stone Bank with our smacks and ketches to prevent our running aground in the battle. The Dutch, consisting of 74 or 76 men-of-war, and 20 fireships, as we are informed by some prisoners, took our assault very handsomely. We engaged from noon till dark. The major part of the time we had the wind of them, and tacked several times one upon the other for fear of the leeward shoals off West Cappel. What damage we have done them we know not, only we know that we disabled several of their ships and made them give way for us. One ship of theirs was taken, and I think afterwards sunk, part of whose men were saved by Capt. Legge. On our part none of our ships miscarried, but several are shattered in masts, rigging, sails, and hull. I judge the Cambridge is disabled and must come in to be repaired. We shall want fishes for masts, some spare topmasts, boats and powder and shot. The Dutch fleet anchored at 10 last night in Schoon Veldt, and we came out again the same way we went in, though somewhat more northerly, and had not 6 fathoms water coming out on the Ooster Bank. We ride off Ostend, but two leagues farther off than we did yesterday. Here is complaint of want of men on all hands. Particularly the Sovereign and Victory came out of the river not half manned as they should be, and to man them out of the fleet now will but disable other ships. A thousand good seamen are wanting to complete us, when least. The Resolution, Rupert, and several others of that rate will want masts, though for present service they may be patched up, besides fourth-rates, and 'twere necessary they were prepared against the ships may be sent in for their quicker dispatch. We have lost several captains, viz. those of the Lyon, Sweepstakes, and York (and the Dunkirk, as reported). The captain of the Henrietta is mortally wounded, and it's reported the captain of the Dreadnought is killed also. Of this I am not certain, and wish it may prove untrue. We have now very bad weather, wind at S.W. blowing hard. I am glad we are out of the Schoon Veldt. I believe we shall not attack the Dutch in that narrow hole again. The quantity of men slain I doubt will amount to 4 in (sic ? or) 500; more wounded though not loss of member. The wind blows so hard I cannot give you a just account of our loss. Our ship in sailing and working proves admirable well, but is tender with a sail. When we fought yesterday our lower ports were sometimes in the water, which proved disadvantageous to us, and we could not do that effectual service we intended. Pray let the cables I formerly wrote to you for this ship and the St. Michael be forwarded. Our constant road being the open sea will wear our ground tackle apace. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 138.]
May 29.
Woolwich.
Richard Brereton to the Navy Commissioners. Requesting their pleasure concerning several colliers lately come whose masters say they are hired into the service and want provisions for their men, as he has received no order about them. [Ibid. No. 139.]
May 29.
Harwich.
Richard Pecke to Sir J. Smyth. The Elizabeth hoy, attendant on the Triumph, was bound out of Rye Bay by Capt. William Davis' order to fill water at Dover, and by the way met two privateers, one of 7 guns and 33 men, and the other of 9 and 40, which came from De Ruyter to discover our fleet. We fought them three-quarters of an hour, and at length they boarded and overpowered us with men, and wounded three of our men, and carried us away to Flushing, where we left the wounded. We came into England the 25th, and are returning to our ship, the Triumph. We were taken the 11th, and very hardly used by them. I am setting forward to appear to you, for all that ever I had was in that vessel, and I, a young man, just begun the world. [Ibid. No. 140.]
May 29.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner Deane to the same. The 100l. for the Forest work I hear nothing of as yet. If it does not come speedily, all that work and carriage ceases, which hitherto is managed by my promise of payment, rather than that the loss of the work should proceed for so small a sum, which I pray may be hastened down. The Centurion and Dragon are still at Spithead. The sides of the Reserve are now birthed up, and the upper deck laid. All possible dispatch shall be given to the remaining work. Enclosed are copies of some former contracts, and that of William Oxford now for 470 trees, which are very good and a fit bargain. When Mr. Benson comes, I shall agree for Lord Lumley's goods as desired. Our poor men have been with me to hear the result of their petition for their pay. They are in a distressed condition, and pray relief. The taxes are about, and they vow they have not wherewith to defray them, and to save the little goods they have left, and what to say I cannot tell, and to keep the officers from distraining for the chimney money and other taxes is not in my power, so they once more pray the Board's moving his Royal Highness for their relief. I formerly acquainted the Board, that, except the Straits fleet come here or some other ships to employ our men, we might discharge some men to ease our growing charge, but as yet have had no answer, and now, hearing the Straits fleet is gone by, I move it again, if money can be had to discharge them, or else to buy provision to keep them employed as well as we can. The yacht shall accompany the first man-of-war that comes to the Downs, which is very hazardous to come alone without a gun, small or great. Mr. Beverley, our smith, tells me he has put on board a vessel of Bredhempson iron and coals for the service here, and that there is an embargo on the vessel in the River, and desires that on the master's application he may be released. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 141.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
Order in Council. Whereas the difference between Humphrey Sidney, of Leghorn, and John Gold, of London, merchants, concerning a debt alleged to be due to Gold from Sidney was by consent, the 23rd instant, referred to Thomas Northwait and John Jolliffe as arbitrators, with John Buckworth as umpire, and security was to be given by the parties for the performance of the award, in pursuance whereof a draft of the said order was prepared by the Clerk of the Council and presented to the Board, the 28th instant, and it was ordered thereon that the counsel on both sides should so agree the same that it might pass, or otherwise that either party should give in exceptions thereto, and both parties appearing by counsel this day, and it appearing that Gold was not satisfied with the said draft, it was ordered that the whole matter be dismissed this Board, and that this Board advise his Majesty that no letter or instruction be given to Sir John Finch to intermeddle therein. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 234.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
Order in Council that Lord Arlington direct that the following be printed in the next Gazette, viz.:—Whereas a pamphlet is lately published, intituled, Mr. Baxter baptized in Blood, containing a horrible murder committed by four Anabaptists on the person of Mr. Josiah Baxter near Boston in New England, the whole matter, having been inquired into, and examined at the Council Board, is found altogether false and fictitious. [Ibid. No. 235.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
Robert Yard to Williamson. News of the loss of St. Helena, the retirement of Lord Clifford and the appointment of Sir T. Osborne &c. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 10, where in line 4 "vessel sent for Brasile" should be "sent from," and in line 10 "Perwick" should be "Perwich.") [3 pages. Ibid. No. 236.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
J. Richards to Williamson. It is so many ways confirmed, as well from all the coast of Kent, &c., as by the master of the packetboat that arrived yesterday from Flanders that there was great shooting heard off at sea all Wednesday and some yesterday morning that nobody doubts but the fleets have engaged. With what success is not yet known, but expected very impatiently, there being not the least advice yet of any particular. On Tuesday afternoon our fleet was left off the Wielings, a league or somewhat more from the Dutch, ours in good condition and much superior in number and strength as was then judged. Sir B. Gascon is ordered to take his leave and come away, the delays he meets with being interpreted a denial, and new measures are taking for a match for his Royal Highness. The taking of St. Helena by three Dutch men-of-war after a dispute of at least 10 days is confirmed by a larger narrative, which there is not time to transcribe to-night. [Ibid. No. 237.]
May 30.
noon. The Royal Charles, at anchor on the Oster Bank, about 6 leagues from East Capell.
Hartgill Baron to Williamson. Wind W.S.W. I send this account of a battle between us and the Dutch, in which I shall give you the naked truth. I being on the quarter deck with my master the Prince, and having no concerns at all as to the sword made it my whole business to observe the action. (Account of the Council of War as in Prince Rupert's letter calendared ante p. 309). Accordingly about 9 on the 28th the commanded ships and the fleet sailed towards the enemy, where they were now loose under some little sail, wind W.S.W., and by noon his Highness with the Red Squadron attacked with great briskness and resolution the right wing of the Dutch fleet, which in a very short time gave way. Then the White and Blue Squadron got up and engaged the left wing, in which the English and French behaved very bravely, so that the enemy's whole fleet gave way, and was cut asunder by his Highness' attack, one part whereof was driven by the Red, and the other by the White and Blue Squadron. In short, by 4 or 5, could the Dutch have crept through the sands into their doors they had certainly done it, but, as creatures driven to bay become desperate, so the enemy, being beaten into a pound, or rather a pond, through that necessity took new resolution for one brush more, before they would bid us good night, but they were so close chased, that doubtless their fleet has had a great loss. One ship of 58 guns and another of 70 were in our custody, but so battered that we suppose they sank in the night. 11 more were seen to go off disabled. Young Tromp's squadron fell under the hands of the Red squadron of his Highness, and was so well entertained that Tromp three times shifted his ship, the last being also disabled by shooting his mainmast off by the deck. De Ruyter's squadron the White and Blue took under their care, and doubtless, had we had sea room and daylight they had been far better beaten. We chased so far that we came to 5 fathom water. By this time, night being come, 'twas high time to bear off, and now his Highness, who is a great judge of time and men, sailed with the whole fleet in great order, and anchored 5 or 6 leagues from East Capell, where we now are; the enemy (that part of their fleet that swims) being at anchor just by their port behind their old and accustomed refuge, the banks and sands. The French, amongst their other great achievements, took a great ship of the Flemings, and in her an Englishman, now a prisoner here, who told me that in that ship 100 men were slain. By that it may be guessed how the rest of the fleet fared. Our loss is very inconsiderable, for neither English nor French have lost one ship, and but one, the Cambridge, is disabled, which will be refitted in a few days. As to officers, we have lost three or four captains, Captains Fowles, Worden, and Finch. None of the captains of the first or second rates is touched nor any flag officer. Lord Ossory, who is now Rear-Admiral of the Blue, did like the other persons of honour in this action. Col. James Hamilton, who now has Col. Fitzgerald's regiment, lost his leg, but we hope is out of danger. The loss of our common seamen is likewise very inconsiderable. I hope the Dutch, who this day twelvemonth a little surprised us at Sole Bay, are now requited by an open attack at their doors. The Prince this summer by his great conduct and to his eternal glory has effected two great actions never before attempted; the first, when the Dutch the end of last April appeared on our coasts, he, impatient at that affront, though in a very weak condition, turned out with the fleet through the Narrows to the Buoy of the Middle Ground, and the wind contrary, which drove the Flemings home, and now fought the Dutch fleet in Schonveldt, beating them into their own doors, and in both actions carried all the ships off with (without) touching ground. About 6 or 7 at night this last fight his Highness might certainly have taken Tromp and another flag, had not his great care of the fleet's safety and greater care in his conduct given a stop to his courage. This alone saved Tromp. Were not the Prince my master, I could say much more, that is, of his great temper in the whole action, and when night came his greater conduct in such a fog as then fell, and not one ship that touched. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 238.]
French translation of the above. [Ibid. No. 239.]
May 30.
The Royal Prince.
Sir C. Lyttelton to Lord [Arlington]. About 1 p.m. on the 28th the sign was given for the forlorn hope, consisting of 36 sail besides fireships, according to the order of battle resolved on the day before at the Council of War, to draw out of their several divisions and attack the enemy, which, though they observed, was not done in that order, for, before they came all into the van of the fleet, the enemy being drawn all into a line under sail and in great order to fight us, the French, which made the body of our fleet, began to engage them, and so all the forlorn hope were joined to the Red Squadron, which engaged some time after the French. Then one of the Blue Squadron, a great way ahead of his Admiral's flag, began to fire, but it was a good while after that before the Admiral of the Blue fired a gun, both because he thought he was too far off to do much service and that he would not press in till he had given the French, who were in the body of the fleet, [time] to come up and complete the line, and besides, had he fallen in with the enemy's rear, his squadron, which was both ahead and astern of him, was so small, the enemy might have tacked on him, as they did after with most of their fleet, and got the wind and cut him off from the rest of our fleet. But, when he came up with them, he pressed the ships he engaged, which were the Zealand squadron and with whom was Brancard (Bankaert), so hard, that they did not stand long, and pursued them till De Ruyter, who was in the body of their fleet, tacked upon us and got the weather gage, whereupon Sir E. Spragg tacked too, and got the wind again, and then it was with the Cambridge alone he passed the broadsides of De Ruyter and almost all their fleet having no other ship with him, and that within less than musket shot. Here the Cambridge had all her masts disabled (as the Royal Prince's topmast yard was in the beginning of the engagement), upon which she made a weft, and Sir E. Spragg sent to him that he would stand by him though alone, as he generously made good. They were very hotly pressed by Tromp and seven good ships with him which came in fresh upon them besides a fireship just ready to lay the Cambridge aboard, and I doubt not had done so, if Sir Edward had not sent his boat to join with the Cambridge's boats, who were going to cut off the fireship's boat, which they seeing them resolved to do, fired their ship before they were fast. About this time the Guernsey came to the assistance of the Cambridge, and Sir Edward ordered him to tow her away, which I think he did, but all would not have served [her] turn, had not Tromp's mainmast come by the board by a shot from this ship. (He had changed his ship once before.) Upon which he stood off a little after and the rest that were with him. I shall not presume to give any account of the rest of the fleet, because I presume you will have it from those who were engaged with them, and what I write is but what I saw. Sir Edward has very nobly deserved the favour his Majesty does him, and I assure you by the conversation I have had with him I find him to be your humble servant, and you have a very good servant of him, and I cannot but do him the right to tell you. He has written to Sir J. Werden the condition of the fleet and particularly the want of 3,000 seamen, which he does with all the freedom in the world protest to me he finds the fleet stands in so great need of, that it's in no fit condition to engage again before they are recruited with [them], and by the computation I have made by discourse with the several captains I really think he demands but what is necessary. I hope the reason you are like to receive no better an account of the enemy's fleet from the success of this battle may proceed from the ill working of our ships, they being in so great fear of the sands, for we were in a foot less than 5 fathom with this ship. The battle lasted till 10, when the enemy went off within the Schonveldt, where they were when we first came up with them, and anchored there, and our fleet anchored without it in sight one of another. There has been a great slaughter among the officers of the regiment of his Royal Highness, but the weather has been so bad all yesterday and to-day that I have not been able to get a perfect account of them, which I shall send his Royal Highness as soon as I can, and in the mean time must presume to say that I think they lose their lives very unusefully, and certainly, if there be service intended for them ashore, they might have been better husbanded, for no land officer above a corporal does or can signify anything a shipboard above the rate of a private soldier, but his Majesty's commands must be obeyed. [3½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 240.]
May 30. Inland advices received that day:—Plymouth, 27 May.—To-day sailed the Adventure with about 20 merchantmen from Morlaix and other ports of France. To-morrow the Straits fleet will sail with their convoy to the Downs. Pendennis, 26 May.—The master of the Laurel from Barbados, arrived here some days ago, says he came out with two others, and, after they had been five days at sea, they met a Dutch caper, which took the Exchange of London, bound from Guinea. Two vessels have arrived from Virginia, which came out in company of 24 sail, but were separated by bad weather. They say the fleet that went out hence was safely arrived there, except the Providence of this place, which fell into the hands of a Dutch caper. Portsmouth, 29 May.—The Straits fleet is passed by for the Downs. Deal, 29 May.—List of ships in the Downs. Aldeburgh, 28 May.—The Swiftsure, which went last Monday out of this bay, is come back again through contrary winds. Bridlington, 26 May.—Friday last sailed northwards about 20 light colliers without convoy, and Saturday passed southward about 80 laden colliers with the Deptford ketch and a dogger with pressed men. Kinsale, 20 May.—Last night came in the Richmond and a merchantman of this place. The latter had been taken by a Dutch caper, but was saved by the timely coming of the Richmond. Harwich, 29 May, 2 p.m.—Yesterday and this morning has been heard the noise of great guns. At Southwold and all the ports hereabouts they have likewise heard them, so we are in great expectation of some considerable news from sea. Falmouth, 23 May.—Yesterday came in the Flowerpot and the William, both of Plymouth, from Virginia. They came out about five weeks ago with 23 more, but were separated by bad weather a few days after they were at sea. They have had a good crop of tobacco this year. The Providence was taken outward bound. Portsmouth, 27 May.—No news. Harwich, 27 May.—Three packet-boats are come in, but bring no news of the fleet. Lynn, 26 May.—To-day arrived 40 laden colliers, convoyed by the Deptford ketch. They met no privateers on the coast. Aldeburgh, 26 May.—Yesterday came in the Swiftsure, which weighed this afternoon and stood off to sea, in search of our fleet. Southwold, 26 May.—By the Hawk fireship, which anchored about 12 to-day, we have account, that they, sailing from the Buoy of the Nore last Friday in search of the fleet, about 10 on Saturday spied a fleet to windward at the Wildens Sands at anchor, the wind S.W. and the weather foggy, and within two leagues to leeward another fleet. The fireship stood in among them, and anchored within half cannon shot of them, and rode there three hours, but when the weather began to clear they found them to be Dutch, in all 70 sail, on which they immediately cut, and stood away and so came hither. Hull, 26 May.—Last Friday 50 light colliers passed by Flamborough Head, convoyed by the Portsmouth pink. Yarmouth, 26 May.—This afternoon arrived a ketch, which attends on the Royal Charles. She left the fleet about 2 yesterday morning, and reports they have had very bad weather since they were on that coast. As he came through our fleet he saw one ship that had lost her foremast, head, and bowsprit. The Dutch fleet then lay off the Wielings, about 4 leagues from the shore, and our fleet a league further in sight of them. Newcastle, 24 May.—Yesterday came in 40 light colliers. The laden fleet, 150 sail in all, will venture out without convoy. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 241.]
May 30. Commission to Sir Ralph Wharton to be major in the Earl of Northampton's regiment and captain of a company therein, in place of George Markham. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 64.]
May 30. Commission to Sir John Godolphin to be cornet and captain of the Duke of York's troop of Guards whereof Lewis, Lord Duras, Baron of Holdenby, is captain and colonel. [Ibid.]
May 30. Warrant for a patent to Thomas Togood for the sole exercise of his invention of a more easy and ready way of cleansing the streets and carrying away the dirt. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 230.]
May 30. Minutes of the business of the Board. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 142.]
May 30.
Woolwich.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. I enclose a demand for a present supply of things without which we cannot dispatch the colliers. I remind you of our need of a supply of the provisions mentioned in the demand sent up last Monday, which we chiefly want for the new shallops, whose work otherwise will be obstructed. There are two spare keel pieces in Deptford Yard. I desire your order forthwith to the officers there that they may be sent down to us. Next Thursday we intend to launch the Swallow. She is every way equal to a new ship. I thought it my duty to acquaint you with the time, supposing it might be your inclinations to see her go into the water. Pray hasten your particular order to the carver to send down our carved work, which we greatly want. Your letters of the 26th speak of bowsprits and masts supposed to be in these stores belonging to Justice Wood and Sir William Warren, about which I have discoursed with the storekeeper and find no such thing of theirs is here, nor have they served many such goods lately, wherefore I judge they were mistaken and might mean some other of the yards. [Ibid. No. 143.] Enclosed,
Phineas Pett and John Burgess to the same. Demanding balks and spars for the dispatch of the platforms, storerooms, and breadrooms of the colliers fitting there, and also a supply of the demand sent up last Monday. [Ibid. No. 143 I.]
May 30.
Sheerness.
Lieut. Robert Thomson to the same. The two smacks ordered here being out of victualling I have ordered (the Governor being absent) one of them up to know your commands for to revictual. I thought it necessary to spare but one at a time lest any packets should come in the meantime. [Ibid. No. 144.]
May 30.
The Guinea, at Sheerness.
Capt. Thomas Trafford to the same. I received your letter the 28th, and am now come to anchor at Sheerness, and, according to your commands, shall make what dispatch I can for refitting the ship. At sight of your letter, I forthwith sent up our purser to hasten our provision. I enclose the boatswain's demands, for Capt. Piles left no order with me nor any one else I can hear of, so I desire your order to be supplied out of the king's stores. [Ibid. No. 145.] Enclosed,
The said demand. [Ibid. No. 145 I.]
May 30.
The Golden Hand, Sheerness.
Capt. William Mather to the same. We are now in sailing posture, waiting only for orders. Since you allow no more than 30 men for our complement, we must be contented. [Ibid. No. 146.]
May 30.
The Hatton ketch, in the Downs.
Capt. Isaac White to the same. I received yours of the 27th the 28th at 7 at night, and the wind blowing hard at S.S.W. and S.W. could not send ashore till to-day. I have showed the commander of the Fortune flyboat your order for seeing him safe to Portsmouth, and shall set sail thither the first wind that presents. There are some five vessels more bound for Portsmouth and Poole, whose masters have been with me, and I have promised them all the assistance I can. I beg your pardon for moving you for a supply of 10 more men to make my complement 30. I spoke with a master of a packet-boat that came from Nieuport yesterday morning, that gives an account that on Wednesday the guns were heard there much for three hours, and they think some part of the fleets may be engaged. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 147.]
May 30.
Dublin.
The Lord Lieutenant and Council to the Earl of Arlington. His Majesty having by his letter of 31 Aug. last to the Lord Lieutenant taken notice of some violences he heard were offered to the people of Galway, we have examined the matter and give the following account of it. 9 Aug. last a petition was presented and an order made on it (calendared S.P. Dom., MaySept. 1672, p. 502), to which the persons therein complained of answered, and the petitioners replied, complaining of several additional alleged grievances, to which the defendants rejoined, and 10 March last another petition was presented by the said ancient natives and freemen of the town desiring a commission to examine witnesses concerning what was complained of, which was granted, except only as to the criminal matters whereof some of the defendants were accused, as to which it was thought fit they should produce their witnesses viva voce at this Board by whom the matters complained of were to be heard the 9th instant. The defendants, however, took out no such commission but, 5 April, preferred another petition for leave to withdraw their complaint. This being opposed by the defendants who desired to clear themselves by a public hearing, and his Majesty having by his said letter taken notice of the petitioners' complaint, we thought ourselves obliged to examine the truth thereof, and resolved to hear the matter on the day formerly appointed. That day the petitioners produced no witnesses, nor any other proof of any of the matters complained of, although Patrick French, their agent in preferring the petition, was present, and upon examination of several persons present at the assembly, wherein they pretended to have suffered the injuries complained of, we did not find any such violences were offered them or any such words spoken by any of the defendants, as are mentioned in the petition, but it plainly appeared that the petitioners, being the ancient natives, freemen and inhabitants, then enjoyed their freedoms as fully and peaceably without any disturbance as any others, and that on the said day of election, there being a very great crowd about the Tholsel, so that the Mayor was forced to stand in the streets and could not enter, the Governor was desired both by some of the ancient natives and freemen and by some of the new inhabitants to send a guard only to clear the passage for such as had right to enter and vote, and that the said ancient natives and freemen had the like liberty of entering and voting as the rest of the freemen, and amongst others Laurence Deane (in the said petition alleged to have been very much abused by the soldiers) declared before us that he did not perceive any particular injury or violence offered to any of the ancient freemen more than to others, and that the same was only such as was necessary for clearing the passage into the Tholsel from the multitude, and that, though he had a blow from one of the soldiers, yet he did not believe it was particularly directed to him, and did not observe any distinction was made by the soldiers between the old and the new inhabitants, whereupon we declared the said complaint to have been, for anything appearing to us, both false and groundless, and that the present Mayor, Sir Oliver St. George, and the other persons complained of, who personally appeared at this Board to clear themselves, were very much injured by the said petition, and therefore we dismissed them from further attendance concerning the said complaints against them. This being the true state of the matter, wherein the said ancient natives pretend to have so much suffered and to have had such violences done to them as to have given his Majesty the trouble of being acquainted therewith, we have thought fit to give you this account. [2½ pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 181.]
May 31.
Ballymartyr.
The Earl of Orrery to [Viscount Conway]. I see by your letter of the 27th the cause why his Majesty's first orders and my repeated applications to his Excellency on them for the pardon of the two condemned pirates, Jackson and Gallagher, did not hitherto take [effect]. [The rest of the letter is so torn as to be unintelligble. Conway Papers. Ibid. No. 182.]
May 31.
The Royal Charles, at anchor 6 leagues off East Capell.
Prince Rupert to Williamson. I received yours by Mr. Lynch, and have ordered my secretary to send you an account of the fight, which I presume will come to your hands before this can. I have also given the King of France an account, and committed it to Monsr. d'Estrées. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 242.]
May 31.
Near the Oyster Bank.
Prince Rupert to the Earl of Arlington. I have sent this bearer, because you and the Council should be informed of the whole, so that all things may be the better adjusted to his Majesty's content. Whatever you do, lose no time to send recruits as desired. I am now changing my ship, which proves a mere table, ships water with the least breath of wind, and in great gales her topsails may overset her. [Holograph. Ibid. No. 243.]
May 31.
Victualling Office, London.
Josiah Child and T. Papillon to the Navy Commissioners. In answer to yours of the 28th, to give you our reasons at large why we cannot be of the persuasion you are of touching the prices of the water-cask would be too tedious at present, and therefore that neither you nor we may at this time be diverted from the more important affairs under our management, we shall not add to what we have formerly written, but only to that particular you note we were silent in, we say, that our water-cask delivered this year, whatever epithets have been given them, which cannot be worse than they had last year, yet those were as good as ever were used and were so proved both by survey and experience,— these we think are as good, whereof if you have any doubt, we shall be willing to stand to such an indifferent survey as his Majesty appointed to be the rule in such cases. Concerning the victualling vessels and their dispatch, we have no more to say than what we wrote in our last, save that we could have loaded three times their number and burden, if there had been so many ready, since the first came on to load. We do not understand the last part of your letter touching 6,000 tons of shipping, and suppose there may be some error in transcribing. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 148.]
May 31.
Sheerness.
John Daniell to the Navy Commissioners. The Guinea and Drake came in here yesterday with orders from his Royal Highness to be fitted forthwith, and this morning the Little Spragg with the like order, but as yet we have not received the least order from you either to the shipwright to go in hand with them, or to me to supply his demands, only the captain of the Guinea received a letter from you mentioning an order already sent, but it is not yet come to our hands. The last deals sent hither I had laid within the fort with the best care I could, but I find them too obvious to pilferers to think they will be safe there, we having the boatswain of the yard's constant attendance here, but not a labourer under his command whereby their security may be furthered, for which and the above mentioned particulars I hope your speedy consideration. [Ibid. No. 149.]
May 31.
Sheerness.
John Rudd to the same. Informing them of the arrival of the three ships mentioned in the last, and that their order for refitting them had come only that day. [Ibid. No. 150.]
May 31.
The Monmouth, in the Downs.
Capt. Robert Robinson to the same. Last night we anchored in Dover Road, so put in the merchantmen before us, it being night, and this morning came in with the rest of the men-of-war and fireships, except the Fairfax, which came in in the night amongst the merchantmen, who are all sailed through this tide, and I am very glad of it for their security. We could not get all our provisions from Plymouth, so I have ordered the purser to make it up from Dover, and have also ordered the London Merchant and Algier one month's provision. I have yours of the 27th and an order of the same date from his Royal Highness for our going to Portsmouth with the Bristol, London Merchant and Algier, and leave to come to London, but have had another order of the 28th to continue here with the said ships till further command, so my coming to London is spoiled, but I hope in good time I shall have leave, having no mean occasion for it. The Bristol wants a pinnace, and has my yawl for the present. The Cambridge's pinnace is ashore here, and I advise that an order may be sent for his receiving her, and for us to have our yawl again. [Ibid. No. 151.]
May 31.
The Levant Merchant, in the Downs.
Capt. Richard Minors to the same. We anchored here this morning. I took no provisions in at Plymouth. Capt. Robinson has sent to Dover for a month's provisions for us. We want two anchors and a cable. [Ibid. No. 152.]
May 31.
Portsmouth.
Estimate by St. John Steventon of the wages, and the harbour victuals expended for the week ending that day, the former amounting to 381l. 10s. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 153.]
May 31. Certificate by Capt. Thomas Trafford and Richard Aylwin, purser, that the bearer, John Whitney, has served as master chirurgeon of the Guinea from 9 June, 1672, to the above date. [Ibid. No. 154.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Being informed by our Commissioner at his return of the way agreed on by you for disposing of a number of the outed ministers to certain churches in the West, and being well satisfied with it, it is our pleasure that it be prosecuted, and that all such of them as have delayed to give obedience to it be forthwith cited before you, and required to repair to the said respective parishes, and to abide confined there, with the liberty of preaching in the parish kirks, and receiving their share of the stipends thereto belonging, conform to the said Act.
And, if any of them be still unwilling to accept of that favour on the terms on which it is granted, you shall not at all further press them to it, but shall instead require them either to give sufficient assurance of their forbearing conventicles, and going to church, and their peaceable and orderly living where they now reside, or that they each shall choose for themselves any of those parishes in the diocese of Glasgow contained either in the former or later Acts of Indulgence for the places of their abode and confinement with liberty of preaching there in the parish kirks of those respective parishes, and, if they will not choose for themselves, then you are to choose for them, and appoint to each of them one of those parishes for their residence and confinement, as you shall think fit, requiring them positively to repair to the places so appointed them within a certain day, under the pain of a more severe restraint which we require you to inflict.
You shall likewise summon before you all the other outed ministers to whom no particular parishes were assigned by the said Act, and command them in the same manner either to give assurance of their orderly living where they are or each to choose one of these same parishes wherein they may abide under confinement, or else to go to such as you shall choose for them, under the same penalty.
And, because we are informed that some of them are displeased with the late Indulgence, you shall secure them from the fears of any more of that kind, and let them know that, if, after the lenity towards them, they shall continue refractory, we will employ our utmost power for securing the peace of the church and kingdom from their seditious practices.
And for preserving peace and order within the diocese of Glasgow we require and authorise you to give a commission to the Duke of Hamilton, the Earls of Linlithgow, Dumfries, and Dundonald, and the President of the Session or any two of them, empowering them to put in execution the laws and Acts of Council concerning Church matters, and to make constant inquiry from time to time of what disorders have been or may be committed in any parish therein, whether those planted with regular ministers, or those supplied by the Indulgence, punishing the delinquents of all sorts according to the laws, and to call to account the sheriffs, bailies, justices, and magistrates within the said diocese, who have been or shall be negligent in executing the power given them by law against conventicles, deserting parish churches, irregular baptisms and marriages &c., with power likewise to them to give such orders to our guards of horse and foot quartered near those parts as they shall judge necessary for executing this commission and for the peace of that country, with an allowance to them for a clerk and other servants and such other incident charges as they shall find necessary, and you are to call for a particular account of their diligence from time to time, and transmit the same to us. [Nearly 3 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 185.]
May 31.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to the Earl of Arlington. By a letter from Lord Clanricarde I am informed of a Virginia ship lately taken by the Dutch and afterwards recovered by her own men. For the particulars I refer you to his lordship's relation, which being just come, I have not yet taken advice whether this ship be prize, though in my own opinion I think she cannot be, for, though I know that, if a ship in possession of the enemy 24 hours be retaken by a King's ship, she is accounted prize, yet this being recovered by her own men, who were in the nature of servants to the owner, I conceive the property of the goods will not be altered, it being but the rallying of men after a rout and so recovering a lost battle. Nevertheless I shall inquire from some of the most knowing here, and in case she belongs either to the King or Duke, I will give order to secure her for their use. I have received advice from Galway that six Virginia ships are arrived there and one at Innisboffin. They say their number was 25 when they set out, and that they resolved to make their rendezvous at Galway, and stay there till they could have a convoy. Being scattered at sea by storms and foul weather only six are as yet come in. Where they are being insecure, I have ordered the Norwich and Richmond, now near Cork and Kinsale, to go about to them and see them safe in Kinsale harbour, which is the best defended of any in this kingdom, where I intend them to stay, till we hear of some convoys out of England, which I suppose they have written for by some letters I have now sent away to Sir T. Chicheley. [2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 183.] Enclosed,
The Earl of Clanricarde to the Lord Lieutenant. Last night I had advice of a Virginia ship laden with tobacco, bound for England, taken by the Dutch, and about a month in their possession. They put five Hollanders into her, and left only two of her crew with them to sail her into Holland. These two noble souls, watching their time, killed one of the Dutchmen, secured three in the cabin, and the fifth yielded to their mercy, with whose assistance they made this land, and brought the ship safe into Innisboffin, an island of mine in this province. I am not yet acquainted with her name or other particulars, but by the next shall be able to give you a more exact account, for I have ordered her to be brought to Galway, to secure his Royal Highness' interest in her, and I shall take care that the brave Englishmen be made much of. 27 May. Portumna. Copy. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 183i.]
Capt. G. Lesone to the Lord Lieutenant. Here are come in last Saturday six ships and one is put into Boffin from Virginia bound for London, except two for Bristol, as appears by the enclosed paper. When they came out they were 25 and resolved to make their rendezvous here, till they could have a convoy, but about 700 leagues off they were separated by a great fog, and none of the rest are heard of yet. The masters have desired me to supplicate you for a convoy, the rather by reason their lading is very considerable, and that they are in no security at all here, and, if they should miscarry, his Majesty would lose a considerable sum. They further humbly beg the convoy may be hastened, as their long stay here would eat out their profit. Not far from Virginia they met with intelligence at sea, that 17 or 18 Dutch privateers are suddenly expected, and that they intended to attempt something on Virginia. They acquaint you of this, that his Majesty may have notice of it, they being the first intelligence that can come. The enclosed letters were brought by Capt. Isack from the Governor of Virginia, and though other directions the within is to his Majesty, and, for fear his stay here should be too long, he thought it most advantageous to send them to you to be transmitted in your packet. I hear a small ship of the same fleet was taken on this coast, but by an exploit has freed herself and put in near Boffin. 27 May. Galway. [1½ page. Copy. Ibid. No. 183ii.] Enclosed,
The said paper giving the names and other particulars of the said seven ships. [Ibid. No. 183 III.]
May. Warrant for a pardon to Robert Halford of Barton Street, co. Gloucester, for killing Edward Selwyn. [Draft. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 244.]
May.
Whitehall.
Pass for the ship Experiment of London, manned with English officers and foreign seamen and laden with English goods, to proceed to the plantations with the first convoy, as though she were wholly manned with English. [Ibid. No. 245.]
May. List of correspondents to be written to on the several days of the week, probably being the persons to whom Williamson's Written News was sent. [Ibid. No. 246.]
May. Certificate by Edward Bachelor of his being sent to sea on certain days in May 1673, to give notice of news, and carry packets to vessels at sea, returning on one occassion to Rye. [Ibid. No. 247.]
May.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Dorset, Lord Lieutenant of Sussex. Directing him to use his utmost endeavours to discover persons transporting combed wool to France, and to search for and seize all such wool as is probably designed to be transported, and to apprehend the owners thereof, if they cannot give a sufficient account of the same. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 109.]
May. The King to Sir William Lockhart. In pursuance of the Order in Council of 2 May, calendared ante p. 198, directing him to press for the speedy restitution of the goods of certain merchants shipped on board the St. Peter of Hamburg. [Ibid.]
May.
Whitehall.
The King to [Lord Treasurer Clifford]. Directing that 2,000l. should be allowed to the Earl of Anglesey in his accounts as late Vice-Treasurer and Treasurer at War of Ireland, which was paid by him to Theobald, Earl of Carlingford, in obedience to two warrants dated 3 Dec. 1663 and 3 May 1664. [Ibid. f. 110.]
Copy thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 184.]
May.
Whitehall.
The King to the Bishop of Chichester. Directing him to grant to Philip Briscoe, his predecessor's secretary, another life in his patent for the Register's Office at Lewes, which was promised him by the late bishop, but prevented by his death. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 110.]
May. Commission to Theodore Russell to be major of the Marquis of Worcester's regiment, and captain of a company therein, vice David Dannyn. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 61.]
May. Commission to William Lassells to be lieutenant to Capt. George Lassells in the Duke of Albemarle's regiment. Minute. [Ibid. f. 62.]
May. Commission to Jonathan Lagden to be lieutenant to Major Beade (Boade) in the Earl of Peterborough's regiment. Minute. [Ibid. f. 63 and f. 69.]
May. Commission to — Jesmond to be ensign to Sir Charles Berkley in the Marquis of Worcester's regiment. Minute. [Ibid. f. 63.]
[May ?] Commission to — Carpenter to be ensign to Capt. Cornwall's company in the same regiment. Minute. [Ibid. f. 64.]
May.
Whitehall.
Pass for the Unicorn, belonging to William Innes, merchant, of London, now laden with coal and other lawful goods, and with Dutch prisoners, at Newcastle, to return to Holland, Nicholas Reve, the King's agent in Holland, having procured a pass in June last from Prince Rupert, then acting as Lord High Admiral, to come from Holland with English prisoners and goods, and return with Dutch prisoners and goods. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 202.]
May. Warrant for the admission of Robert Killigrew, one of the Pages of Honour, into the full enjoyment of the place of — Berkeley, a late Page. [S.P. Dom., Entry Books, 21, p. 122, and 40, p. 39.]
May. Warrant to Viscount Fauconberg, captain of the Band of Pensioners, to swear in—as Clerk of the Cheque to the Band after the decease of Thomas Wynne or other avoidance of the office. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 40.]
May. Warrant appointing John Lamott Honeywood gamekeeper for 10 miles about Markshall, in the county of Essex. [Ibid. p. 41.]
[May ?] Emanuel Jones to the King. Petition to be inserted in the next general pardon for Newgate without proviso, and so saved from an untimely death. He was apprehended 7 years ago for having on a stolen coat, and sent to the Gatehouse. After a year there without trial, he was sent to Newgate and transported to Virginia for 5 years. He returned and served on board the Victory, under the Earl of Ossory, in the last engagement with the Dutch, but was again seized and sentenced to die for the aforesaid fact, unless his Majesty extend his favour, the Recorder refusing to liberate him on the late gracious act. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 335, No. 248.]
May.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Chief Justice of the King's Bench and the Recorder of London to insert Emanuel Jones in the next general pardon, and for his reprieve in the meantime. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 47.]
May. Grant to Col. Edward Villiers and his son, Sir Edward, of the office of Knight Marshal of the Household and Marshal of the Marshalsea, in reversion after Sir Edmond Wyndham. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 340.]
May. Grant to Sir Charles Scarburgh of the office of Physician in Ordinary to the King, void by the death of Dr. Timothy Clerke, with 100l. per annum. [Ibid. No. 341.]
May. Creation of an office of general Comptroll and Inspection of the accounts of all sums to arise from impositions on proceedings at law, and a constitution of Sir Robert Atkins, junior, as Comptroller, Fabian Phillips as Deputy Comptroller, Thomas Pocock as Entering Clerk, and Francis Cressett as Messenger thereof. [Ibid. No. 342.]
May. Grant to Robert Killigrew, Page of Honour, of the yearly pension of 120l. [Ibid.]
May. Warrant to pay to the Earl of Anglesea, Keeper of the Privy Seal, 4l. per day in lieu of the ancient allowance of 16 dishes of meat. [Ibid. No. 343.]
May. Warrant to pay to the Earl of Arlington 10,000l., without account, for secret service. [Ibid.]
May. Henry Loader, John Stacey, George Body, John Mason, and the rest of the creditors of the Navy to the Navy Commissioners. Petition, stating that the petitioners in 1670 and 1671 served into the stores several naval provisions, amounting to a considerable sum, as appears by bills signed by their Honours, for which the petitioners were promised ready money, but, notwithstanding their constant supplication for payment, the only satisfaction they could receive was orders on the Customs to be paid about December, 1671, but his Majesty was constrained to stop that current, which should have supplied the petitioners, to their great damage, and praying that their Honours would intercede for them to such persons or in such a way as they shall think fit, that they may receive their moneys with interest. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 155.]
May. Tender by Elizabeth Elzy of Woodbridge, Suffolk, to Commissioner Beach of the blocks therein mentioned. [Ibid. No. 156.]
[May.] Note by Sir T. Allin of the price of new iron and woodbound cask as it may be bought in the market. [Ibid. No. 157.]
May. Copy of the above by W. Hewer, with note the victuallers' water-cask are generally old, retrimmed, and much inferior to their beer-cask, whereas those to be bought are new, Hamburg stuff cask. The victuallers' cask ofttimes broken stuff at the chin, &c., so forced to be shaken at twice using. [Ibid. No. 158.]
May.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Commanding him to confer on Capt. Thomas Cullen the first vacant captaincy of foot in the Irish army in consideration of his fidelity and good services, and also directing him to look upon Capt. Edward FitzGerald as a person specially recommended to his care and favour. [Noted "Lord Ranelagh." Draft. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 333, No. 185.]
[May ?] List of 12 warrants for payment of moneys to the Earl of Arlington, chiefly for secret services, from Jan. 1663 to May 1673. [Ibid., No. 249.]
[May ?] Ann Noble, of Wapping, to the King. Petition stating that her late husband, John Noble, during the late war with the Dutch, when ships could not be built in England, built one in Sweden, manned it with Swedes, and imported large quantities of naval stores, much needed at that juncture; that the said ship, called the Fame, was employed last summer in his Majesty's service, in which her husband died, and for which a considerable sum is due to the petitioner, and that, by reason of the embargo, she cannot be employed nor sold, and incurs great charges, and therefore requesting a protection for her to proceed on a voyage, being manned with English officers and foreign sailors. [Ibid. No. 250.] Annexed,
i. Deposition by John Noble before Sir William Bolton, Lord Mayor, and the Court of Aldermen as to the building of his ship, the Fame, and that she belongs entirely to the King's subjects, is now in port, and is bound on a voyage to the Mediterranean. London, 25 Oct., 1667. [Ibid. No. 250 i.]
ii. Draft of a pass permitting the said ship to sail to the foreign plantations with the first convoy and to return. Whitehall. May, 1673. [Ibid. No. 250 ii.]
Duplicate of the above petition. [Ibid. No. 251.]
[May ?]
Whitehall.
Pass for Garret Burges of Rotterdam,— who pursuant to the King's declaration of 12 June last, took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy at Newcastle on Tyne, 17 June, and has returned to Rotterdam to bring over his family and goods and settle to England,— to return to England on board his dogger, the St. Peter of Rotterdam, and to land and settle in Newcastle or any other place, with some other families who also intend to lay hold of the said declaration. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 213.]
[May ?] Warrant to Sir Robert Long for payment to Hester Hodges, servant to the late Queen Mother, of the sum of 200l. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 40.]
[May ?] Warrant to — to elect two sons of Sir Anthony St. Leger into some of the vacancies in the Charter House. [Ibid. p. 42.]
[May ?] List of the jurymen for the Navy Office ground, 12 in number, each from a different ward. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 345, No. 159.]