BHO

Charles II: January 1679

Pages 1-63

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1679-80. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1915.

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January 1679

Jan. 1. Commissions to — Watson to be captain, to John Swale to be lieutenant to Capt. John Lee and to — Molins to be adjutant, all in Col. George Legge's regiment of foot. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 255.]
Jan. 1. Commissions to James Crow to be captain, to Daniel Perill and William Strother to be lieutenant and ensign to Capt. James Crow, to Charles Atkins to be lieutenant to Capt. Charles Lawson and to William Loraine to be ensign to Sir John Fenwick, all in Sir John Fenwick's foot regiment. Minutes. [Ibid. p. 258.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Lemuel Kingdon. Desiring him to give Capt. Wettwang a credit at Bruges for such sums not exceeding 1,000l. as he shall have occasion for, besides the 1,000l. already ordered to be paid him, to enable him to hire such vessels and make such provisions as shall be requisite for bringing over the forces. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 217.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Commission to Capt. Edward Fitzpatrick to be ensign to Sir Thomas Ogle in the Holland regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 118.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Commission to Capt. Northcoate to be major of Sir John Fenwick's foot regiment. Minute. [Ibid. p. 120.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Francis Starling and Francis Collingwood to be lieutenant and ensign of Capt. Starling's company in the Holland regiment. Minutes. [Ibid.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Commission to Wolfrane Cornewall to be ensign of Capt. Langley's foot company in the Duke of Monmouth's foot regiment. Minute. [Ibid. p. 161.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Certificate by the Duke of Monmouth that the bearer, Wingfield Wotton, ensign to the Earl of Inchiquin's company at Tangier, has been detained here by the Duke's order to look after recruits for that garrison. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 52, p. 177.]
Jan. 1. Warrant from the Duke of Monmouth to Lemuel Kingdon for payment to James Vernon of 1,296l. 15s. due to the Duke's foot regiment for their pay on account of the November muster. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 58, p. 82.]
Jan. 2.
Newhaven.
William Halsted to Williamson. Entreating him to deliver the enclosed to the King, not only for his own sake, but to rectify some abuses in the port. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 1.] Enclosed,
Statement by William Halsted, late Collector of the Customs at Meeching, alias Newhaven, to the King of the fraudulent conduct ofRose, a French Papist, who has supplanted him in his office, who has turned from Papist to Protestant and from Protestant to Papist 4 or 5 times, cheated the late farmers of customs, is said to have murdered his maid and his bastard child by her, for they have not been seen since, but her apparition was seen several times by his brother, was tried for the murder, but at the trial one swore she and the child had been seen in Virginia, so he was saved, was recommended by Col. John Russell to the Commissioners, because he was to employ him about the pier at Newhaven, though Halsted was the first to carry on the business of the pier, for the advance of the revenue and the safety of seamen, and is much out of pocket about it, and for imprest and conduct money &c., he seized gold and secured a ship at Dover to the value of 30,000l. or 40,000l., yet has been treated by William Culliford and the Commissioners of the Customs as a villain and traitor, a new custom house which he built was taken from him &c., he earnestly entreats restoration to his place. Dec. 30., 1678. [Ibid. No. 1 i.]
Jan. 2. Caveat that no pardon pass to John Dargavelle, vicar of Winsham, Somerset, condemned in the Court of Arches for getting two women with child, without notice to the Bishop of London. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 57.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
The King to the Wardens of Winchester and New Colleges and the rest of the electors for Winchester school. Requiring them at the next election to choose and admit into a scholar's place at the said school Clifford Brexton, whose father has faithfully served the late and present Kings. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 557.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Lauderdale to the Earl of Rothes, Lord Chancellor, to be communicated to the Committee for Public Affairs. Yesterday I received yours of 23 Dec. and in it the enclosed overtures, which I presented to-day to the King, who commanded me to let you know he approves well of the overtures as very proper for curbing the disorders and curing the schisms that have so long troubled that church and kingdom. If you think it fit that he write to the Privy Council and the Commissioners of the Treasury, as seems intimated in the overtures, on advertisement from you he will immediately dispatch letters to them. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 5, p. 71.] Enclosed,
The said overtures. (Printed in Wodrow, History of the Sufferings of the Church of Scotland, Vol. III., p. 11.) [3½ pages. Ibid. p. 72.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
Orders in Council for passes to Henry Nevill of Holt, Leicestershire, to travel in France, and to George Henneage and Mary, his wife, with their three children and seven servants, and to Sir Henry Bedingfield, junior, of Oxburgh, Norfolk, to travel beyond the seas. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, Nos. 2–4.]
Jan. 3. G. Rous to [William Bridgeman]. Lord Mulgrave desires a commission for Capt. Edward Fitzpatrick, a Protestant, to be ensign to Sir Thomas Ogle in the Holland regiment, to be dated the 1st instant. [Ibid. No. 5.]
Jan. 3. Notes by Williamson. Mr. Attorney. Commission for Oxon (?). Pass for Nevill. What if the Parliament were dissolved, if the King could proceed to try &c. Sir Robert Howard's papers.
N.B.—Bedloe and Oates being in the outward room of the Council Chamber, the first to ask a protection for his witnesses, the latter to give in the informations concerning the Prince of Orange &c., Mr. Bedloe having the two nights preceding sent by my chamber keeper to speak with me, I, having appointed him to come this morning, went out to him, and he acquainted me with what he had said to the King on Wednesday morning coming from church, viz., of the unfitness to have the trials of the priests printed, unless they were first executed, the intentions of some in the City to assault the prison &c., a plot under a plot &c. Several members had asked him, if he had nothing against Lord Treasurer or me. The first, he said, he knew nothing against, of me he could declare that they looked upon me as an enemy—the same he had told me once before &c.
N.B.—As I came out from speaking thus with Bedloe, Oates, having in the meantime been before the Council, chanced to come out as I came out with Bedloe following me, upon which passage it is not unlikely but this may by Oates be reflected upon &c. If so, let this for the help of memory (?) &c.
Query, of the Bishop of London, a book of Dr. Moore's Of the Increase and Growth of the Popish religion in England since 158— A number was seized of them at the Customhouse by the Bishop's order. [Ibid. No. 6.]
Jan. 3. Receipt by Walter and Richard Densley for 2l. 8s. 6d. received of Thomas Evans for wood cutting. [Ibid. No. 7.]
Jan. 3. Notes of letters to the Lords Lieutenant of Essex, Middlesex and Buckinghamshire for disbanding the Queen's, his Royal Highness' and the Duke of Albemarle's regiments of horse. [Ibid. No. 8.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Duke of Albemarle and the Earl of Oxford, Lords Lieutenant of Essex. Signifying the King's pleasure that, whereas he has thought fit that the Queen's regiment of horse commanded by the said Duke, now quartered in Essex, should forthwith be disbanded, they appoint two or more deputy lieutenants of that county, to whom these orders are to be sent, to meet the said regiment at Chelmsford on Wednesday, the 8th instant, on which day the said regiment is ordered to rendezvous there at 11 in the morning, and to see the quarters of the respective troops duly paid off and discharges given, the accounts whereof are ordered to be brought in by each captain signed by himself, the magistrates and the constables of the respective towns, and, the quarters being first discharged, they are to see that the commissioned officers, captains and field officers excepted, non-commissioned officers and soldiers be paid their arrears to the said 8 Jan. inclusive, each troop to be paid to the end of December last according to the muster rolls taken 1 November, and from that time to the said 8 Jan. according to such musters as shall be then made. The respective troopers are to lay down their arms, viz., pistols and carabines, and then go to receive what shall be due to them. The non-commissioned officers and soldiers are to be permitted to carry away with them their clothes and equipage, pistols and carabines excepted, which arms are all to be delivered back to the officer appointed by the Master of the Ordnance. Whatever non-commissioned officer or trooper brought his own horse into the service is to have liberty to take the same away with him and, where the horses have been provided by the officers, the non-commissioned officers and troopers shall either have their horses or the 8l. allowed for providing them paid down immediately in lieu of their horses at the captain's choice. Whatever other disputes shall arise between officer and soldier relating to the premises shall immediately be determined by the said deputy lieutenants, whose determination shall oblige the said officers and soldiers. All accounts being adjusted and satisfied, the said deputy lieutenants are to proceed to disband the troops of the said regiment, beginning with the youngest and taking them in order till the said regiment be disbanded. The officers and soldiers of the respective troops on the said deputy lieutenants declaring them to be disbanded are forthwith to disperse to their respective habitations and behave in all things as becomes dutiful subjects. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 115.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 9.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
Memoranda of like letters sent to the Earl of Bridgwater, Lord Lieutenant of Buckinghamshire, for disbanding Lord Gerard's regiment of horse, who are to meet at Aylesbury on Friday, the 10th, and to the Earl of Craven, Lord Lieutenant of Middlesex, for disbanding the Duke of York's regiment, who are to meet at Hampton Court on Tuesday, the 7th. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 117.]
Other copies of the above warrant and memoranda dated 4 Jan. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 54.]
Jan. [3].
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to the Earl of Peterborough. You are to order your own, the Lieut.-colonel's, the Earl of Roscommon's, the Marquess of Montrose's and Sir Edward Villiers' troops of his Royal Highness' regiment of horse to march, 7 January, to Hampton Court Green, so as to be there by 10 a.m., where they will meet the Paymaster of the Forces, who has orders to clear with the said 5 troops to the said day inclusive, as also the Commissioners appointed for disbanding. (Instructions for disbanding, in the same terms as in the warrant of the same day to the Duke of Albemarle and the Earl of Oxford, calendared ante, p. 3.) For greater expedition you are to order the respective captains of your regiment forthwith to state their accounts with the Paymaster of the Forces, that there may be no mistake or delay when they are to be paid off. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 51.]
Memoranda that the like were sent to the Duke of Albemarle to order 7 troops to rendezvous at Chelmsford on the 8th instant at 11 a.m., and to Lord Gerard to order 7 troops to rendezvous at Aylesbury on the 10th. [Ibid.]
[Jan. 3.] [The Duke of Monmouth] to the Magistrate in Chief at Croydon. As his Majesty has thought fit that the forces should be immediately disbanded, I desire that an account may be forthwith made up signed by yourself, the constable and the officer in chief commanding the troop now quartered there, of what is due to the inhabitants from the said troop to the 7th instant, and you are to send a copy thereof on the 7th to Hampton Court Green, appointed for the rendezvous of the regiment, where the money due for the quarters of the said troop shall be paid to the persons appointed by you. [Ibid. p. 52.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Sir Edward Villiers. You are to make up an account of what is due to the quarters of the troop under your command to the 7th instant, to be signed by yourself, the chief magistrate and the constable, and bring it with you on the said day to Hampton Court Green, appointed for the rendezvous of your regiment, where the persons concerned are to receive their money due for the quarters of your troop. [Ibid.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
[The Duke of Monmouth] to Henry and Sir Cecil Howard, Commissaries General of the Musters. Directing them to appoint one or more deputy commissaries to muster five troops of his Royal Highness' regiment on Hampton Court Green on the 7th instant, 7 troops of the Queen's regiment near Chelmsford on the 8th instant and 7 troops of Lord Gerard's regiment near Aylesbury on the 10th instant. The commissaries are to give an abstract of the rolls to the Paymaster of the Forces for his direction in clearing with the said troops. [Ibid.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Sir Thomas Chicheley. Informing him that he had ordered 5 troops of his Royal Highness' regiment to rendezvous on Hampton Court Green on the 7th, 7 troops of the Queen's regiment near Chelmsford on the 8th and 7 troops of Lord Gerard's regiment near Aylesbury on the 10th, that he may appoint officers to attend at the several places to receive and bring away the arms of the said troops. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 52.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Lieut. —. Ordering him with 30 men drawn out of the three troops of Grenadiers to be ready on the 6th at 3 p.m. at the upper end of St. James' Street to convey to Hampton Court the money ordered for the troops appointed to rendezvous there, and, when dismissed by the Paymaster, to return to his former quarters. [Ibid. p. 56.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to the Earl of Craven. Commanding him to give orders to his quarter-master to provide and set out quarters for 8 companies of his regiment now ordered to return from Flanders in the Tower Hamlets. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 52, p. 177.]
Jan. 3. Warrant for a congé d'élire to the Dean and Chapter of Bristol for electing a bishop to that see vacant by the translation of the late Bishop and for a letter missive to the same, recommending Dr. William Gulston. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 3.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Exeter. After reciting that John Snell, Canon Residentiary of Exeter, has besought leave to resign his canonry in order that the same may be conferred on his son, Thomas Snell, B.D., who, as the King is informed, is well deserving thereof, signifying his pleasure that they accept a surrender from the said John Snell of his canonry, and recommending in a very special manner his said son to be chosen and admitted by them into the same. [Ibid. p. 4.]
[Jan. 3?] Notes by Williamson. Have all from the judges in writing &c., otherwise no justification &c. Question is not of a narrative of the trial and what the King would think on their reporting it, but what do they think of it, on hearing it &c., and sum it up in a short report &c. So imperfect is the narrative and everybody added something &c. On the whole they agree that, even if jurymen &c., but N.B. do not go into particulars by questions with them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 715.]
Jan. 3. Notes by Williamson. The Trial of the Lords.—The judges called in, 7 and the Recorder. Query, during this prorogation &c. Lord Chief Justice.—It is agreeable, they think, with all other Courts of Law. If in ordinary causes put into process in a superior and inferior court &c. they always put it, leave (?) it in the superior. Lord Chancellor.—Suppose the K[ing] directs the Attorney to proceed in an inferior court, may he not? Lord Chief Justice.—Yes, if he command it. R[ecorder ?] Can give no opinion, but as to the practice (?) of other courts; cannot as to the jurisdiction of the House &c. Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas.—Even in that case of inferior courts, though the K[ing] should command a prosecution in that court, the party may refuse to have it proceeded on there but to have it proceeded on in the superior. Lord Chancellor.—Against the parallel. 1. The offence does not appear to be the same. 2. He so indicted in the courts below is sure that within the compass of a term or two he shall be delivered entirely, but here, if he should not be proceeded on below, there's no certainty when he would be delivered. Lord Chief Justice.—They considered (?) that too. Lord Chancellor.—Objection. The K[ing] has a prerogative to choose in what court he will proceed, it being the K[ing's] suit. Reply: Lord Chief Justice.—Can pardon the crime, not the suit &c. Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas.—If the prorogation were long, the King's Bench would bail possibly, likely, but about the trial, that doubted. Lord Chancellor.—K[ing] may keep a l[ord] in prison (?) ever as they will. Reply: Lord Chief Justice.— They judge of things in Parliament in comparison (?) and things in other lower courts. They in inferior courts have remedies in that case &c. Lord Chancellor.—Whatever the law be, it is not prudence to proceed. 1. My lords will not be present. Have several. 2. Not all the evidence. Much could be kept &c. from elsewhere. Differs in opinion of law &c. from the judges, agrees in that point of prudence &c. Lord Privy Seal.—Even in the Court of Parliament the same is the practice (?). A cause received, accusation brought in Parliament one session, has been judged in a following one &c. Earl of Essex.—Even if the prorogation were long &c. (Judges say being short.)
The same point &c. The K[ing]. The judges will speak to the legal right &c. not the conscience (?). Query: What use of them? &c. If popularity did not stop men's mouths &c.—Could see reason to doubt of Oates and Beddo (Bedloe). Judges called in. Lord Chancellor.—How they find the matter upon the evidence (if two witnesses N.B.), how far it was concluding and satisfactory to take the lives of the prisoners &c. Lord Chief Justice.—Gives a narrative &c. of what proceeded, when the day before he gave the sister a warrant to bring in witnesses. N.B.—Beddo was not positive (?) in what time of August, but peremptorily it was in August. Warned the jury and discharged two of the five, because there were not two witnesses, but the other three had two witnesses &c. and so the judge left them to the jury. Ireland pleaded that 3 Aug. he took his journey to Staffordshire, proved it by his sister and mother and a servant of Southcote that met him the 5th at St. Albans and kept him company till 16 Aug. Gifford said he saw him about three weeks in August and thought till towards 10 September. N.B.—This is all arguing. Query, a plain and simple opinion from the judges. Lord Treasurer.— Most clear, as the case stands, not to go otherwise than by Parliament. N.B.—These words "As the case stands" i.e. being prorogued, but if dissolved &c. N.B.
N.B.—If the judges silent (?), then all to be given in, written &c.
It's according to (word illegible) that they are condemned. It's not fit to be said so at this Board, lest the witnesses should be invalidated. Reply: To wait (?) to execute equally blemishes the witnesses &c. 1. Ask the judges if so far the judgment was just &c. 2. Next, if they know anything more, say it, and ask my lords' leave. Not to execute them upon it, would equally &c. (Notes about the evidence of Oates and Bedloe on the trial of the priests.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 717.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant to Anthony Dopping, D.D., of the bishopric of Kildare, now void by the death of Ambrose Jones, and, in regard of the extreme exility of the said bishopric, so that the revenues thereof are insufficient to maintain the dignity thereof, for a further grant to the said Dr. Dopping of the preceptory of Tully, co. Kildare, and also of the rectories of Emlaghbeggan, Cruisetown, Stahallmocke and Kilpatrick, which were among other things held by the late bishop, to hold the same as long as he shall continue Bishop of Kildare or till out of the forfeited lands and hereditaments mentioned in the Act of Settlement there shall be set out for the support of the said bishopric (whichever shall first happen) such a proportion of the said forfeited lands as will amount to 700l. per annum. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 297.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to the Deputy Lieutenants of Staffordshire. Whereas in pursuance of directions from the Council for disarming Popish Recusants, some arms were seized belonging to Sir Richard Ashly (Astley) of Pattishall (Patshull) in that county, it appearing by Sir Walter Wrottesley's certificate that the said Sir Richard had since taken the oaths of Allegiance and Supremacy, his Majesty has ordered that the case of pistols and sword taken from him be forthwith returned to him, which I desire you to give effectual orders for accordingly. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 218.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Thomas Holden. I am much mistaken if I did not several posts ago give you an account of the man stayed by you there and that I had communicated the matter to the Council, from whom you were to expect the necessary orders, which I find by the Clerk of the Council have been already sent you. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 256.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Bayliffs of Yarmouth. I have received yours by the officer that brought up Shea, the Irishman, and thank you for your care in this and other matters relating to his Majesty's service. You must please to continue it on all occasions. [Ibid. p. 257.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Mr. Price. You must excuse me for not earlier answering your last enclosing copies of certain papers found by you in the search you made into what you had seized of the priests. Immediately on the receipt of it I delivered it with the enclosed to the Committee of the Council appointed to pursue the further discovery of the Plot, from whom you will shortly receive necessary directions. [Ibid.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Lemuel Kingdon, Paymaster of the Forces. Instructions. He is forthwith to provide money for paying off the 5 troops of his Royal Highness' regiment to the 7th instant, who are ordered to march that day to Hampton Court Green, where he is to meet them and clear all accounts with them, except the captains and field officers, whom he is to pay at his own office. He is in the first place to discharge the accounts of the quarters, which the officers are ordered to bring with them signed by themselves, the magistrates and constables of the respective towns, and he is to pay the money due thereon to the persons employed by the magistrates of the said quarters to receive it, and, the quarters being discharged and the troops having laid down their arms, he is to clear the accounts of each troop with the officer in chief thereof to the said 7th instant inclusive.
(Similar directions for paying the 7 troops of the Queen's regiment and the 7 troops of Lord Gerard's regiment.)
He is likewise forthwith to provide money for paying Lord James Douglas' regiment in Scotland and Col. Maccarty's regiment in Ireland, in order whereunto he shall have letters directed to the Council in Scotland and to the Lord Lieutenant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 53.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation of John Aistley, M.A., to the rectory of Wolsingham, Durham, void by the resignation of the Bishop of Chichester elect. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 3.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Archbishop of Canterbury for a dispensation to the Bishop of Chichester elect for holding in commendam the twelfth prebend of Durham with the bishopric of Chichester. [Ibid. p. 4.]
Jan. 4. Notes by Williamson about the Navy. 1. Tickets of dead &c. 8,000l. 2. Yards three-quarters of a year in arrears, refused to be trusted. 3. Leopard and Antelope's men put out of wages. 4. Victuallers refuse to furnish more than 10 months for 2,770 men for the Mediterranean and but 6 w[eeks] for all near home &c. 5. A hulk at Tangier and stores for the ships there. Proposed but want money to fit her out. 6. The London lies in the dock to mend at Chatham. No money to any on credit. Sir J. Narbrough 5,000l. contingencies to answer short allowances &c. Newcastle lies on growing charge at Gravesend for want of money to pay. Victuals and stores for Jamaica 459l. 6s. 8d. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 723.]
Jan. 4. Notes by Williamson. Committee. Justices of Middlesex appear and are enjoined to repeat their search. [Ibid. p. 727.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Lauderdale to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. The Duke of Hamilton having represented to the King that he cannot have parties of the forces to quarter on those who are deficient in payment of the taxation, of which he was appointed collector, signifying his Majesty's pleasure that they cause parties to be ordered to quarter on those who owe any arrears of the said taxation, or, if that cannot be done, that they send the reason thereof to his Majesty. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 5, p. 75.]
Jan. 5. The Bishop of Exeter to Williamson. Stating that he had no exception against Mr. Chase, who, he hears, is suitor to the King for the vicarage of Yarcombe, Devon. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 10.]
Jan. 5. Notes by Williamson. Harcourt come up.—Harwich. Recall the order for bringing over the King's subjects &c. and let him have consideration for what has been done &c. Harcourt brought up from Shropshire &c. Lord Chief Justice acquaints the King with it. Bedloe called in says what kind of man he is. His name William. Is to be seen by him to-morrow at the Committee &c. About his height, 6 feet, between fat and lean. Irish Acts to be brought to Council forthwith. Mr. Solicitor's grant to be recalled and Mr. Finch to be in his place.—Duke Neuburg's letter of 24 Dec. Let his affairs of Juliers be recommended to the King's ambassadors at Nimeguen &c. and that the Duke may be included in the peace between France and Holland. What day the King came from Windsor. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 731.]
Jan. 6. Sir William Jones to William Bridgeman. Though it is not usual to pass this office in this manner but by immediate warrant to the Lord Chancellor, yet 'tis without doubt as good and may in this particular case be more convenient. I have altered the warrant to what it ought to be. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 11.]
Jan. 6. Project given in by the Brandenburg Ambassador for a peace between Sweden and Brandenburg, of which the most important article is that Sweden should cede to Brandenburg that part of Pomerania which the Elector had conquered and occupied. [5 pages. Latin. Ibid. No. 12.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to [? the Duc de Villa Hermosa]. Informing him that the King has given orders for the embarkation of the six battalions at present in garrison at Bruges, Nieuport and Ostend. [French. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 218.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to [? Sir Samuel Clarke]. I have acquainted the King with yours of 10 Jan. (N.S.), whose pleasure is that the six battalions now at Bruges, Nieuport and Ostend do forthwith embark pursuant to their former orders, as fast as vessels can be provided, without expecting to be relieved by those from Brabant, and, that there may be no obstructions from the French for marching the other 8 battalions by land, the King has spoken to the French Ambassador to write to the Marechal d'Humieres that they may pass quietly through his government without any opposition from their troops, which, I suppose, will not be refused. As soon as that permission is granted, you are to order the battalions to march and dispose of them into the two garrisons of Bruges and Ostend and embark them as soon as vessels are ready to receive them. Mr. Kingdon has orders to take care there be supplies of money sufficient to bring the forces away. Lord Ossory, desiring to recruit the regiments he commands in the service of the States out of the battalions of his Majesty's subjects, will send you some officers for that purpose, whom you are to allow to entertain as many as they shall find willing to serve under his lordship to the number of 1,000. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 219.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
Certificate by the Duke of Monmouth that he consents and desires that a dispensation for county may be sent to Catherine Hall to qualify Benjamin Calamy of that college, whom the Society is very desirous to have among their Fellows, to be chosen into the Fellowship now vacant, if the Master and Fellows think fit. [Ibid. p. 220.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
Circular letter from the Duke of Monmouth desiring, as his Majesty had thought fit that the troop of dragoons now quartered there should immediately be disbanded, that an account be forthwith signed by the person written to, the constable and the captain or officer in chief with the troop of what is due to the inhabitants for the quarters of the said troop to the 13th instant. Noted, that 13 of these were written and sent to Newbury, Thatcham and Denton, Devizes, Wantage, Hungerford and Wullfall (Wolfhall), Marlborough, Maidenhead, Henley, Thame, Staines, Witney, Banbury and Oxford. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48,p. 55.]
Jan. 6. Notes by Williamson. Harcourt appears. Is called Valentine Harcourt. Never wore a periwig in his life &c. N.B. Stammers. Is not the man; the other is a man of Gloucester; was never at Tixall. Knows not Ireland nor Evers. Has seen Lord Stafford, but not this summer. Was never at Liége in his life. Has seen St. Omer. Was not educated in Spain. Has been in Rome three years. Does not know William Harcourt. Does not know any Harcourt that dwells in London usually. Oates.—That other Harcourt is a lusty man; knows him as well as any man. Bedloe called in. Does not know this Harcourt. Mr. Siddway, a recovered apostate &c. Was in Rome in Feb., 75—6, and till June following. Cardinal Barberini carried him to a Consistory and told him they had good thoughts for England and were in hopes in a little time to reduce England to the Roman Catholic faith, and Cardinal Norfolk owned he had taken all the care he could to advance the Papist religion in England. Bedloe knows no Marshall, a priest. Secretary Coventry has a list of all the priests he knows &c. No such is in the plot that he knows of. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 735.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Sir John Talbot. He is to give orders to the 6 troops of his regiment, viz., the Colonel's, the Lieut.-colonel's, the Major's, and Captains Eyre's, Cornwall's and Halworthy's now quartered in Oxfordshire forthwith to state their accounts with their respective quarters to the 13th instant, an abstract whereof is to be immediately returned to the Duke in order to discharging the several quarters accordingly, and he is further to order the captains of his regiment forthwith to state their accounts with the Paymaster to the end of last month. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48,p. 55.]
Memoranda that the like were sent to the Earl of Feversham to order the accounts or the 6 troops of the King's regiment quartered in Berkshire and Wiltshire, viz. the Colonel's, Lieut.colonel's, Captains Pettus', Willoughby's, Leigh's and Chaffin's, and to Lieut.-colonel Hepbourne to order the accounts of the 4 troops of the Prince's regiment of dragoons quartered in Oxfordshire, viz. the Colonel's, Lieut.-colonel's, Major's and Capt. Clifford's. [Ibid.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Master and Fellows of Catherine Hall, Cambridge. Dispensing in favour of Benjamin Calamy, M.A., a member of the college, who is fitly qualified for a fellowship, but by reason of a statute of the college providing that there shall not be at the same time above two Fellows of the same county is incapable of election, with the said statute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 556.]
Jan. 8.
The Tower.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. After the lords went hence, in pursuance of the order received this day, I myself saw Lord Stafford with Nicholas Fourniers, a Dutchman that attends him in his chamber, closely locked up together without pen, ink or paper, neither are they permitted to see or have any communication with any person whatsoever according to the said order. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 13.]
Jan. 8.
Shrewsbury.
John Roche to Francis Royley. Private affairs. Sends love to his wife, Susan. [Ibid. No. 14.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master-General of the Ordnance, to cause 1,000 barrels of gunpowder to be issued from the stores and delivered into the magazine at Dublin. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 310.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation of Hugh Chase to the vicarage of Yarcombe, Devon, void by the resignation of Gamiel Chase. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 82.]
Jan. 8. Will of Matthew Watts of St. Clement Danes. [On parchment. Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case G, No. 4.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Proclamation ordering the immediate return, according to former statutes, of all subjects now in foreign seminaries for education, promising pardon to them and to their parents and guardians on their speedy return, and forbidding all subjects to reside in the said seminaries, or to send relief or maintenance to those who are there. [S.P. Dom., Various 12, p. 382.]
Jan. 8. Notes by Williamson. Spalding's and Lord Brudenell's petitions to be discharged. Query, If it may be done by the Board &c. Mr. Attorney.—Where the House of Lords commits a man, he is not discharged because the House is prorogued &c. Must consider the cause of commitment, privilege, crime. If the crime be bailable, he may be bailed; if not, he cannot. Council Table not to bail, where they do not commit. To be done by the King's Bench &c., if there is cause, if bailable. Ought to do it by law and cannot deny it. Resolved: Mr. Attorney the first day of term to signify to the court in the King's name to bail, if bailable &c. Must be done by the court, sitting the court, the Attorney-General consenting &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 739.]
Jan. 8. Notes by Williamson of the examination of Stephen Dugdale before the Council. [3 pages. Ibid. p. 743.]
Jan. 8. Memorandum by Williamson. On the information given this morning to the Committee of the Board, his Majesty being present, by Dugdale concerning the late plot, especially as to the part Lord Stafford is charged to have had in it, his Majesty appointed that the Earls of Lindsey, Salisbury, Bridgwater and Essex and Secretary Williamson and the Speaker were ordered to examine Lord Stafford thereon. To examine him only in general what he knows or has heard of the plot as to the attempt on the King or that other of introducing the Romish religion &c. without coming to any particulars of what Dugdale had charged him with, only that in general the King had received such full testimony as to him himself that nothing could be doubted, that however his Majesty had thought fit to offer him his grace and pardon, in case he should now make a full discovery of the whole, otherwise need not expect it hereafter.
The Lords accordingly made this declaration to him, but he answered, That absolutely, directly or indirectly, he knew nothing of the plot, that he would say so the last hour of his life, if he were to die upon it. Whatever others said, he must still say so. He thanked the King for his favour, but he absolutely denied (?) the King's pardon, so innocent he knew himself &c. At parting asked, If his accusers were men of quality. Had had notice of Dugdale's being examined this morning at the Board. Desired a speedy trial, a little more liberty and my lords so to represent it to the King. [Ibid. p. 747.]
[Before Jan. 9.]
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Directing them to examine the accounts of the moneys paid to the Earl of Tweeddale while one of the Commissioners of the Treasury, and, if they find he has right, as he alleges, to the pension and fee for the last half year that he served, to pay the same to him. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 5, p. 76.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Mayor of Winton. I have yours by the last post and communicated it to his Majesty in Council, from whence you will understand by the Clerk of the Council his Majesty's pleasure as to the gaoler. Your care in administering the oaths to the youth of your city is very commendable and his Majesty takes it very well from you. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 258.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Mayor of Newcastle. This morning I had communicated to me by Sir Francis Anderson a letter of the 24th past, signed by yourself and two of the aldermen, informing of two suspicious persons having been in those parts last summer. I have already communicated it to a Committee of the Lords, who will make a fit use of it and thank you for your care in this and other parts of his Majesty's service. [Ibid.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Capt. Thomas Langley. I have communicated yours of the 30th past to his Majesty, who for the future does not understand that he should be at any charge at all in bringing over soldiers of any sort, and that consequently the orders you had some years since are from henceforth to be superseded. At the same time I minded his Majesty of your disbursements on that score and shall be glad, when you have put your account into a clear and fit method, to be assisting to you in getting payment of what shall appear due to you. This you must signify to the master of the packet-boats and to the Mayor of Harwich. [Ibid. p. 259.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant from Secretary Coventry to Robert Stephens, messenger, to search all houses and shops where he shall know or suspect any books or papers to be printed, bound or stitched, especially printing houses, booksellers' shops and warehouses and bookbinders' houses and shops and to examine whether what is printing, binding or stitching there be licensed and to demand a sight of the licence and to seize upon any unlicensed books with the offenders and bring them before the Secretary or a Justice to be proceeded against according to law; and, in case he finds any unlicensed books, which he shall suspect to contain matters contrary to the doctrine or discipline of the Church of England or against the state or government, to seize such books and bring them before the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Bishop of London or one of them or before a Secretary of State to take such course for suppressing thereof as to them shall seem meet. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 54, p. 12.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter to John Stewart of Kinmachlone in life rent with remainder to John, his eldest son, and the heirs male of his body with remainders over of the lands of Easter and Wester Kinmachlone and other lands in the lordship of Strathaven and shirefdome of Banff, on the resignation of the said John Stewart, with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 5, p. 76.]
Jan. 10. Notes by Williamson. Mr. Attorney. How to search Peers' houses. Yes, a Justice may. Concerning Sir Thomas Clutterbuck, whether sufficient notice had been given him to determine his victualling contract. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 751.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Order in Council. After reciting that some proclamations have been issued, whereof no other notice has come into several parts of the kingdom that what happens to be given by the Gazette, notwithstanding the great charge for dispersing proclamations: that the Secretaries of State call before them Philip Frowde, Governor of the Post Office, and settle a method for sending all proclamations to the respective sheriffs so that the next postmaster to each sheriff be charged with the delivery of the same and send the sheriff's receipt for it. The Clerk of the Crown is also to be summoned and order given him that, as soon as proclamations pass the seal, he deliver them the next post day into the Post Office and take a receipt thereof. The messengers of the Exchequer, who have been formerly entrusted with this and have neglected it, are to be summoned and acquainted with the rule now to be established and that they desist hereafter from inter-meddling in this. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 15.]
Jan. 10.
[Received.]
— to Williamson. Though I frequent not any coffeehouse but Mr. Man's, yesterday I visited two of those conventicles and find I am as well known in them as the beggar knows his dish, so I shall not have the opportunity to discover who are the great spokesmen or the chairmen of the rota. The news of the town runs thus.—The Duke of Ormonde is to come over and Lord Ossory is gone to Ireland to be Deputy in his father's absence. Lord Belasyse is reported to have said that he will not be Colemanized out of his life.
The three condemned persons in Newgate, they say, are not likely to be executed, having potent friends at Court that daily beg on their knees for their lives.
The calling of Lord Salisbury to the Board pleases the many. It is bruited that the Lord Treasurer will resign, and they say that either Lord Salisbury or Lord Arlington shall succeed him. Lord Salisbury the people will like, he being a man of a great estate and a good husband, one who knows how to manage his own estate and consequently fit to be employed in the Treasury. The Lord Chamberlain is like to prove a darling of the people, having gained a great reputation in the opinion of the vulgar by Coleman's letters, wherein is apparanted that he is a great promoter of the Protestant religion and an instrument of making the match.
They are well pleased to hear that the army is to be disbanded and would be better pleased to see the Plot prosecuted, the condemned prisoners executed, Sir Edmund Godfrey's stranglers brought to their trial.
They fear the prosecution grows cold since the prorogation and that this coldness proceeds from the zeal and activity of a great person.
The Parliament men are gone into the country dissatisfied and the more, because they are afraid there will be a further prorogation on purpose to smother this damnable plot.
So that you see by these rumours the way to please the people must be:—1. To let the Parliament meet at the day lately appointed. 2. To execute the condemned prisoners. 3. To bring the stranglers to their trial. 4. To have a new Treasurer. 5. To disband the army. If these things be done, how long the people will be pleased the Lord above knows, for I do not. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 16.]
Jan. [10–] 20.
Amsterdam.
Henry Corneil to Williamson. Describing how on Wednesday, [11-]21 Dec., calling at a great tavern to attend a person in the exercise of his profession, he overheard the following conversation, which he took down immediately:—A. Nondum decem diebus post adventum ejus in Angliam. B. Legisti epistolam. A. Immo, post aliquot menses cuncta votis, and after a pause, veniat modo Aprilis. Non dubitandum quin regnum in aliam formam et defensorem illum hæreticorum in nihilum, and how the following evening he was assaulted on his way home by two persons, differently dressed, but much resembling those he had seen at the tavern. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Licence to Sir Mark Milbanke, high sheriff of Northumberland, to live out of that county. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 57.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the restitution of the temporalities of the bishopric of Chichester to Guy, now bishop thereof, to commence from the day of the death of the late bishop. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 5.]
Jan. 11.
Addington.
Sir John Busby to the Earl of Bridgwater. In obedience to the orders directed by your lordship to us, your deputy lieutenants, Mr. Cheyne, the elder and the younger, Mr. Stafford, Mr. Lovett and myself, on Friday, the 10th, met at Aylesbury for disbanding Lord Gerard's regiment. First we saw the quarters duly paid off and discharges given, the accounts being first adjusted and signed by the captain of each troop and the constables of every town, where any of them quartered. Next, the soldiers having laid down their pistols, holsters, carabines, swivels and pots, which were surrendered to Mr. Coniers, an officer to the Master of the Ordnance appointed to receive them, the remaining arrears due to the soldiers were by their consent paid to the captain of each troop as receiver for them. Mr. Kingdon, the paymaster, having thus discharged the quarters and arrears, we then proceeded to disband the respective troops of the regiment, beginning with the youngest, till the whole regiment of 7 troops was disbanded. No dispute or difference arose between officer and soldier. The commissioned officers were indeed exceedingly courteous and civil and the soldiers in every respect obedient to the orders for disbanding, so that we had not the least mutiny or disorder amongst them, but with shouts and acclamations they declared their willingness to serve his Majesty under their respective captains, if he should hereafter have occasion for them. I enclose an account of the sums due and paid for quarters by each troop and to whom it was paid by the consent of each town where they quartered.
Some bills of charges were brought to us from most towns where they quartered, which we referred to the captains of each troop, conceiving we had no power by our orders to require the discharge of such debts. Mr. Coniers informed us that backs, breasts and pots, as also belts and swivels, were delivered out of the Tower for the equipping of the said troops and that he had orders to have them restored, though our orders make no mention of them, which backs and breasts being at London each captain has promised shall be restored, and Mr. Coniers seems very well satisfied and told me he had a very good account of the arms delivered out to this regiment. He, hearing of a piece of ordnance and a certain number of cannon bullets that were with Mr. Fryars at Aylesbury, spoke of removing them to the Tower. I told him I thought it not fit to remove them without your knowledge and approbation. I also enclose an account of private bills due from the soldiers, though I think it is very imperfect.
With postscript by the Earl of Bridgwater, giving an extract from a letter of the 12th from Charles Cheyne, one of his deputy lieutenants. I must do right to the officers and soldiers of this brave regiment. I saw not one distempered. They were all well clad and well mounted and, I was told, well disciplined. They were proper stout men all and with all appearance of alacrity and content received the order for disbanding, which was delivered at the head of every troop by Sir John Busby, with a God save the King, and was answered with a general shout by the respective troops drawn up by the Market Place and the White Hart. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 18.] Enclosed,
Account of the private bills of the regiment and of their quarters. [Ibid. Nos. 18 i., 18 ii.]
Jan. 11. The Duke of Monmouth to Major Long. For the ease of Mendlesham and the conveniency of Capt. Benson's company of Lord Morpeth's regiment ordered to quarter there, directing that quarters be provided for part of the said company in the neighbouring town of Stowmarket. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 57.]
Memoranda of the like to add Codnam (Coddenham) and Claydon to the quarters at Debenham, Bugsdale to Thwayt and Yaxley, Scole to Diss, and Botesdale and Rickenhall to Eye, mutatis mutandis. [Ibid.]
Jan. 11. Notes by Williamson of further informations delivered in by Dugdale in writing. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 755.]
Jan. 11. Notes by Williamson about victualling in the Mediterranean. That an agreement was arrived at between Sir Thomas Clutterbuck and the present undertakers on certain terms. [Ibid. p. 759.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant for ordering the Earl of Linlithgow, the commander in chief of the forces in Scotland, to place a garrison in the Castle of Blackness, which is now repaired and finished. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 5, p. 77.]
Jan. 11 and 14.
Dublin.
Abstracts of letters. There are no proceedings against the Papists or plotters to take away the Duke of Ormonde's life nor anything done for securing the English interest except settling the militia in English hands and keeping good guards in the city and country.
The news of the prorogation of Parliament has put a very great stop to our trade and has encouraged the Irish so much that their Mass houses in the city are now as publicly frequented as our churches, which before were kept very private. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 339, No. 1.]
Jan. 12. The Duke of Monmouth to Capt. Starling, or the officer commanding in chief the battalion of the Holland regiment, late at Nieuport. Ordering him with the battalion of the Holland regiment under his command to sail to Rochester and continue there till further order and to quarter the said battalion in the said city. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 57.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Henry Howard, Commissary General of the Musters. His Majesty having thought fit for prevention of all abuses that the Mayor or other chief magistrate in Portsmouth, Harwich and Yarmouth should be present at the musters of the companies immediately as they land in those parts, you are forthwith to send orders to your deputies in those ports immediately on the arrival of any of the companies from Flanders to give notice thereof to the Mayor or other chief magistrate and take an exact muster of the said companies in his presence and to make two rolls of the said musters to be signed by the magistrate in chief and himself, one whereof is to be forthwith sent to me and the other to be delivered to the paymaster appointed for paying the said companies. [Ibid. p. 58.]
Jan. 12. Notes by Williamson. From B[aron] de V[ic] as to Fr[ance] upon Ireland, quick, what possible &c. Advice from Morlaix &c.
The victuallers to be ordered to lodge their dry provisions at Plymouth in the citadel forthwith. The King will be at the expense of removing it in and out again to the ships. Earl of Bath to have order to provide store room for them.
Query any scheme of Mr. Blathwait of French seamen &c.
Col. Legge and Sir B. de Gomme to go immediately to Portsmouth to see it put out of insult &c. by palisadoes &c. and to return immediately with an account how things stand there.
The militia of the western coasts to be warned to be in a readiness on the suddenest alarm, to repair to certain places, Hampshire to Portsmouth and Southampton, Devon to Plymouth and Torbay. Lords Lieutenant to be down in the counties the end of this month. Query how the militia was ordered of these counties '72, '73, '75 &c.
The magistrates of Dover, Rye, Portsmouth, in case any of the forces now drawing off from Flanders put in there, immediately on their coming ashore to cause an exact muster to be taken of them, the rolls to be returned up hither. The captain of each ship that brings them over to make an exact account of the numbers brought over and to return it to his Majesty. Mr. Pepys to send forthwith these directions.
Account from Brest by Williams sent on purpose. 2 ships of 126 guns, 8 of 90, 11 of 80, 14 from 40 to 70, in all 35. 24 expected from Toulon.
If the Parliament to meet—many things to be done. Nothing declared. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 763.]
[Before 13 Jan.] List of the names of all the Adventurers of the Royal African Company and of the Governor, Sub-Governor and Deputy-Governor and of the members of the Court of Assistants, with notice that the votes for Governor, Sub-Governor and Deputy-Governor are to be brought in on Monday, the 13th instant, and those for Assistants on Wednesday, the 15th instant. [Printed paper. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 19.]
Jan. 13. T. B[arnes] to [? Williamson]. As to the concerns you know, I shall be as careful about them as I can. I doubt not you have heard much of the news about the prorogation. Some say it should have been done the Saturday before and many things about it. There was much consternation in the minds of many of our friends about what the effects might be, as affairs stand. Some were of opinion all trade would be spoiled and more than that. Some talked high of their tents &c., of shutting up their shops and much more, but, since the King's speech to the Lord Mayor &c. there seems to be more satisfaction and especially since the Trained Bands are continued, but yet other rumours seem to afflict many, as that the soldiers that came out of Flanders were to be quartered about the City &c. Some fear the army will not be disbanded wholly, though others say many of them are already disbanded. Some fear the P[arliament] will not sit long, if they come. There is much talk about some Nonconformists that are banished out of Scotland and were in the River about Gravesend. Our friend Mr. Rwnswd (Hodson) was down with them and some others were with the King to beg favour for them, but, as 'tis reported, could not have it granted then, and they went also to the D[uke] of Y[ork] and, 'tis said, he promised to do what he could about it, but many talk oddly about the D[uke] of La[uderdale] about these people and his answer to them that went to him also about them.
There is also much talk about the opinion of some judges about not trying the lords and also about some other lords that are appointed to take further discoveries about the Pl[ot] &c. Some say the Lord Treasurer has laid down his staff. There is a printed paper out about the Lord Treasurer and Mr. Montagu. As yet I have not one of them. There is dispersing about this city a kind of petition to the Lord Mayor to return the thanks of many to the King for his late speech to the Lord Mayor about those things, which you have heard were well accepted by many. They also therein beg some things about the disbanding of some soldiers and that such as come from Flanders may not be brought so near the City as 'tis reported they are to be. I have not as yet one of them. As soon as I have I may send it. Some have signed this petition and others scruple at it at present. 'Tis also reported that some things have been discoursed of in the Council about the Parliament, but the result is not yet known here. Fastened on,
I sent since I saw you by the way you desired to Mr. P x q b (F(P)age) for Mr. Ebzuxd (Belman). If you received it, pray send me word. There was a printed paper in it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 20.]
Jan. 13. Note by William, Bishop of Llandaff, of his delivery to Secretary Williamson by his Majesty's special order of the following papers and receipt by the latter for them, endorsed on the last page thereof. [Ibid. No. 21.] Prefixed,
Order of the House of Lords that the Bishop of Llandaff, assisted by 5 other gentlemen, enquire into the truth of complaints made against Capt. Francis Spalding, deputy governor of Chepstow Castle, that he and the garrison neglect coming to church and receiving the Lord's Supper, for which he pleads a dispensation, and that the garrison have used the country very ill, and that an account thereof be given to the House. 4 Dec., 1678. (Printed in Lords' Journals., Vol. XIII.,p. 401.) [Ibid. No. 21 i.]
Depositions of Edward Williams, vicar of Chepstow, and 4 others on the neglect of attendance at church and of receiving the Sacrament by the said captain and garrison. Dec. 11 and 19, 1678. [Ibid. No. 21 ii.]
Deposition of Simon Crane of Chepstow and 2 others in reference to the unlawful dealings of Capt. Spalding in importing Irish cattle, and the violent conduct of him and the soldiers in preventing the seizure thereof, and in detaining the cattle of others. Dec. 18, 1678. [Ibid. No. 21 iii.]
Depositions of William Reynolds of Llancoate, co. Gloucester, and 3 others, as to the conduct of Capt. Spalding in imprisoning persons in the garrison, on unjust pretexts, breaking open their houses, taking their arms &c. Dec. 11, 16 and 19, 1678. [Ibid. No. 21 iv.]
Deposition of Thomas Griffin and 5 other soldiers of Chepstow Castle, as to the cruel and tyrannical conduct of Capt. Spalding in retaining their pay, abusing them, quartering them in the town and using their rooms for his horses, dogs and hawks, also his having men to appear on muster who never do duty, producing false musters &c. Dec. 16, 17, 19 and 20, 1678. [Ibid. No. 21 v.]
Deposition of Christopher Francis and Richard Jones of Chepstow as to the bad condition of the guns and arms in Chepstow Castle, the deceits used by Capt. Spalding in detaining the soldiers' money, entering and receiving pay for men who never appeared except at musters &c. Dec. 17, 1678. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 21 vi.]
[Jan. 13 ?] — to Williamson. The Green Ribbon men meet at Starkie's and Collen's, booksellers, within Temple Bar, and thence go to their clubs, where the ordinary discourses are, that the nation is sold to the French; that at Whitehall, they look one way and act another, that, whatever is pretended, Popery and arbitrary government is intended, that a Parliament is not to come again, if they at Whitehall can live without it and, if any be suffered to sit, it must be in effect a French Parliament or be gone, for all is governed by the Duchess of Portsmouth, the Duke of York, the Lord Treasurer, and the French ambassador, who all often meet the King at her lodgings and what is there agreed is next to be put in execution. Amongst all sorts of people besides, I find a more sober spirit; though most are filled with fears of Popery, yet they are not without some hopes that the Parliament will sit again 4 Feb. and that the King intends not to govern otherwise than by the laws or he would not disband the army, as he is now about; they hope the execution of the three condemned men will be before long and that a proclamation for calling the Parliament will come forth and that the plot is so far discovered that it cannot be smothered. They resolve meanwhile to be quiet, not willing to meddle with trade more than they must, till their fears be removed. The Lord Treasurer's two letters are printed, and all endeavours are used to make Mr. Dugdale's confession unbelievable. [Ibid. No. 22.]
[Jan. 13 ?] — to Williamson. Supposing it may be of use to you to know the rumours of the meaner sorts, I presume to acquaint you with what I lately heard touching the three condemned persons not yet executed. In several public places I heard divers debates relating to them to this effect, viz., that Ireland had petitioned the King, and suggested an illegal trial as being refused time to bring his witnesses to prove his being a considerable distance from town at the time he stands charged to be here, when, according to that discourse, he never either desired further time or mentioned to the Court his having such witnesses, till after he was convicted, and that that ought to have been done before his putting himself on his country.
This delay of execution on the score of further evidence on the condemned person's side to make him an object of his Majesty's mercy and pardon lessened the credit of the witnesses against them and tended to the destruction of the law, and, this being admitted into practice, no malefactor would ever suffer hereafter, but, granted that, had his Majesty had granted a pardon without that after examination, then could nothing have been said against it.
Great numbers of the rabble daily resorted to Newgate and the Recorder's house to know the time of execution to the putting some in fear of an outrage.
The prorogation is likewise much talked of, and some do not scruple to say as if they thought there were no reasons to be given for it, but that it was done in favour to the plotters, for, had Parliament sat six days longer, both the plot and the murder of Sir Edmund Berry Godfrey would have been fully laid open. Many good persons, who declare they bear loyal affection to his Majesty, seem on the present appearance of affairs much distracted with jealousies and fears. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 23.]
[Jan. 13 ?] Paper headed "Courant." It is reported: That 40,000 French are coming to Dunkirk and that the French King has commanded all his seamen to be ready about 10 or 12 Feb. That a proclamation will shortly come forth to command the M.P.'s to be all present 4 Feb.: that there will be a resignation of the Staff, and three Commissioners appointed for the Treasury, whereof Lords Salisbury and Essex to be two. That Mr. Oates has been granted an allowance of 10l. a week: that the King said to a nobleman, he had so much troubles on him that he could not tell which way to turn. The nobleman answered his Majesty's surest way is to save England and lose Ireland (meaning the condemned priest): that Lord Stafford, since Dugdale's discoveries, is kept a very close prisoner without pen, ink and paper: that Maddison, a barber in High Holborn, is taken and imprisoned for being guilty of a murderous design on Lord Shaftesbury: that, if things must be thus, why not an English, as well as a French, she? that, if the Treasurer he and the French she continue in favour at the meeting of the Parliament, there can be no hope of a prosperous session. If one of them be displaced, there is some likelihood, but, if both be discarded, there will without doubt be Halcyonian days: that the doctrine or advice presented to his Majesty at his return, that he should oblige his enemies, as for his friends, he was sure of them, has been very pernicious to the government; the enemies are not obliged and the friends are scarce in a capacity to secure him against his enemies; that no King of England was ever more obliged to look about him than his now Majesty on these accounts:—
1. There is an army to be disbanded, the horse already, and they all resort to this town; while money lasts, they will be loyal boys, but, when the taverns, alehouses and brothels have exhausted their pockets and their horses eaten out their heads, they will be like tinder, capable of every evil fire, be it treason or felony.
2. Parliament is prorogued and this raises great jealousies; on this, the Papists, they say, resort much to this town.
3. Persons condemned for being guilty of the plot are not yet executed. This causes many jealousies and fears. Some sober and serious persons conceive this demurrer is grounded on raggione di stato, but the generality fancy it proceeds from meditations and solicitions both of hes and shes and cry out: If those persons be not brought to condign punishment, who shall? they being, at least two of them, the very persons that should have assassinated his Majesty.
4. The 4,000 murderers are not brought to trial, most of them being in custody and witnesses sufficient to convict them.
5. Nobody is pleased. The sons of halting Loyola are mad, because they are not in the saddle; the brats of crooked Hudibras fume, because they cannot crupper the popelins; the true Protestants, the members of the Church of England, are troubled, lest these two bloody parties devour both the Church and them.
Whatsoever jars happen whilst the Parliament sits are pleasing to the Romanists, but much more when they fancy they arise by the means and endeavours of a great person.
If these Courants do you any service, I am very glad and am willing to serve you in any thing I can, but, that I may serve you the better, you must furnish me with some small pocket money. The 5l. I had of you was most employed in stopping the mouths of several duns; I bestowed on myself scarce 20s. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 24.]
[Jan. 13 ?] Paper headed "Dicunt." That the workmen for building St. Paul's are all discharged and this was done on the prorogation and that there will be no working there till the Parliament sit again. The reason, they say, is because there shall not be built such a cathedral for Popery to be exercised therein.
That the French preparations both by land and sea startle the populace, who wonder there should be a further prorogation, when such a plot is discovered here, by the discovery whereof the Catholics throughout Christendom will be concerned, they having a design to root Protestancy out of this transitory world.
That Mr. Blood's exploit at the Tower is very remarkable. He would have stolen the crown. In this he represented the Supertitionists, whose lords and patrons are now in the Tower. He bruised the crown by a fall. In this he was the representative of the Separatists, whose patrons and Moecenases were not long ago in the same place, and might have been there still, had not their stomachs come down to afford a peccavi.
That, whilst the government was looking narrowly after these latter, the former like moles gained ground above, underground. There must be a careful eye for both the said parties, for 'tis not much matter which is uppermost.
That, since the Papist lords are outed this last session, which were a great party to counterbalance the other, the Presbyterian, it will be prudence to see the latter do not grow too headstrong for the government in the Lords' House.
That it was determined in the Cabinet Council on Sunday night that it should be referred to a general Council whether the Parliament should be further prorogued or not.
That, if the three regiments of horse very lately disbanded were now in being, they should be continued.
That it is very hard that those troops that are on the Borders should be disbanded there, many being 400 miles from their own homes.
That a seal and writings are lately found relating to a spiritual Popish corporation near Wild House. These they put under some boards, but the letters and writings concerning this dagger plot were burnt.
That it is wondered the government do not look more narrowly after Popish buryings. They heretofore buried their dead in churches and churchyards. Now they bury them the Lord knows where; no Protestant must know, because they have some consecrated ground of their own. There should be an examination and search of this matter, by what power this ground is consecrated ('tis presumed they will not bury in unhallowed ground). If the ground be consecrated by our priests, then they acknowledge the King's supremacy, if by their Romish priests, then they make the Pope supreme to our Sovereign in ecclesiasticals.
That Ireland shall not die, for he says he will not be Colemanized out of his life. If he be executed, many shall follow him, that are as much in the mud, as he is in the mire.
That the Parliament shall meet 4 Feb.
That a petition is drawing up by the Lord Mayor and the citizens to the King that the Parliament may meet at the time appointed, otherwise there will be utter decay of trade, the people will be full of fears and jealousies and what not.
That on a servant maid's discovery is found a trunk or chest of papers, relating to this hellish plot, which discovers so much that there will be sufficient evidence against the lords in the Tower and others for their conviction and this is one motive to the King that the Parliament shall meet on the 4th of next month. The people are mightily pleased that the Parliament shall not be prorogued further but shall meet 4 Feb. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 25.]
[Jan. 13 ?] Paper headed "It is bruited." 1. That his Majesty resolved last Friday night in Council that the Parliament should be recalled. 2. That the Lord Treasurer must resign and is designed to be an ambassador either at the French or Spanish Court. 3. That he and the Duchess of Portsmouth are going together to France. 4. That Lord Essex and the Bishop of London are to be removed from the Council. 5. That Prance is distracted or at least pretends himself so and cries out: O! his wife and child. 6. That he refused to eat anything for 30 hours, but at last devoured a large quantity of meat and drink left with him by his keeper, who, when he came again, found not so much left as would sustain a person that had fasted 30 minutes. 7. That he confesses, unconfesses and re-confesses and that Capt. Richardson was lately sent for to Court and the Duke of York meeting him told him merrily that he heard that Prance had denied all he before confessed. Richardson answered: Let him deny what he would, they had enough for to hang him, whereon the Duke went away sorrowfully. 8. That the King is very angry with Prance for his demeanour and says he shall be hanged one of the first of the stranglers, and so shall be Coleman's second. 9. That two of the condemned persons, Pickering and Grove, may be executed, but 'tis certain that Ireland shall not die, for he is the Duchess of Portsmouth's confessor. She can do nothing without him in spirituals. She mightily wants him in point of confession, for Computatio dilata multa facit oblivisci. 10. That the Duke of Monmouth intends to set up a fourth troop in the Guards, to be made up of the officers &c. of the disbanded horse, as a reward for their service, and to serve again, when there is occasion. This is looked on as a very good expedient. 11. That one Lun has made a discovery on oath of a design of some Papists to destroy Lord Shaftesbury and some other lords and that the King has given them notice of it, to take of themselves. 13. That sending Secretary Williamson to the Tower was not for his destruction, but chastisement, that he might beware how he served two masters. 13. That the Earl of Salisbury is promised a Garter. 14. That Dugdale is a solid person and discovers great things. One of his articles against Lord Stafford is, that, they two discoursing together, his Lordship said: See, how sneakingly the Papists go to Mass; in a short time, it would be the case of the Protestants and in the meantime Dugdale might have money enough, if he would but kill the King. 15. That Dugdale discovers great things touching Ireland, the condemned priest, and admires how Bedloe should come to know so much of this Plot, being only a messenger and not privy to nor present at the Councils. 16. That two of the Courts of Westminster, the Chancery and King's Bench, are to be kept at Guildhall, because the room in the Hall is straitened by the Court (?) erected for the trial of the lords. This will please the citizens, who love to be fingering of money, and this cannot much displease the Westminsterians, they having the other two Courts. 17. That seeing the King refused 200,000l., though in great want of money, for dissolving the Parliament, there is no reason he should want it now, this same Parliament continuing. 18. That it is somewhat strange for the Commons one day to profess their care for the safety of the King's person and yet the next day to refuse to trust him with a penny. [3½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 26.]
[Jan. 13 ?] Paper headed "It is said." That the foot regiments shall not be disbanded, but be all transported to Ireland and remain there. That the French King begins to huff upon England, which causes a jealousy that he will fall out with us at last.
That Prance has lately been before the Council and has given sufficient guaranty that he will be a good boy for the future. That the cause of his distemper was from a priest that whispered to him nothing but damnation for discovering the murder of Sir Edmund Godfrey.
That a warrant of the Lord Chief Justice is issued to take Madam Craul (? Carwell) for being privy to the murder at Somerset House and that she out of zeal for her religion spat on Sir Edmund's face, as he lay dead.
That Capt. Richardson, if of any religion, is a Roman Catholic and for these ten years has permitted Popish priests to come to those condemned to die, to debauch them out in their religion.
That the three condemned persons in Newgate must be shortly executed, which will be a great satisfaction to the people, who long to see all murderers and rebels brought to condign punishment.
That Mr. Brandon Gerard is forbid the Court for getting the French she with child and that a blackamore comes sometimes betwixt her quarters.
That there will shortly be a new Secretary. Secretary Williamson has hugely lost himself amongst his friends; what friends they mean, I know not, but the Courantier is semper idem.
That it was the greatest happiness Secretary Williamson could have met with that there was an occasion given for his absence last session. That his only way to retrieve all among his fellow Protestants is to be active in putting the laws in execution against Recusants and to have a care of St. James'.
That Lord Arlington, his quondam patron and master, notwithstanding the many tempests in Parliament &c., has overcome all and no other way but by sticking to and promoting the Protestant religion.
That the sound of Tom of Lincoln is very pleasant to the people's ears. The learned say that our bishop has shown in his late treatise a great deal of learning, sound reasoning, much wit and a wonderful courage.
That the people rejoice to hear, or at least they fancy so, that the French she is declining, but much more to understand his Majesty frequents constantly of late the prayers in his Closet. [3½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 27.] (fn. 1)
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Clerk of the Crown. I have often and long called to you for a book of the present justices all over England, having daily use of it, and therefore I pray you to take order that forthwith I have such a book made for me. I desire that likewise that the names of us, the principal secretaries, may, as has been usual, be inserted in the commissions of the peace in all the counties of England, there being frequently occasion of our acting as justices all over England. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 260.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
The King to the Bailiffs of Yarmouth. After reciting that several battalions recalled from Flanders are ordered to disembark there, at whose arrival a commissary of the musters is already appointed to muster the companies as they land, signifying his pleasure that they be present at the said musters to see they be exactly taken and they are to sign with the said commissary two rolls for each company, one whereof is to sent up to the general of the forces and the other to be delivered to the paymaster appointed for paying the said companies for his directions in clearing with them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 118.]
Jan. 13. Memorandum of a like letter to the Mayor of Harwich, mutatis mutandis. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 119.]
Another copy of the letter to the Mayor of Harwich, dated 12 Jan. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 58.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Memorandum of a like letter to the Mayor of Portsmouth, reciting that one battalion of Col. Legge's regiment recalled from Flanders is ordered to disembark there. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 119.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Memorandum of a like letter to the Mayor of Dover, reciting that it might happen that some of the battalions recalled from Flanders might by stress of weather or otherwise be forced into that harbour. [Ibid.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Memorandum of a like letter, mutatis mutandis, to the Mayor of Rye. [Ibid.]
circular letter. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 28.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Bridgwater, Lord Lieutenant of Buckinghamshire. Directing him to appoint two or more deputy lieutenants to attend at Buckingham on the 17th instant for disbanding Lord Latimer's troop of the Duke of York's regiment in the same terms, mutatis mutandis, as the letter to the Duke of Albemarle and the Earl of Oxford, calendared ante, p. 3. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 59.]
Another copy thereof, dated 14 Jan. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 311.]
Jan. 13. Notes by Williamson. King declares himself fair (?) satisfied by Dugdale's testimony as to Ireland &c., withal (?) he assures the Lords think of it.
Search of Powys Castle.
Mr. Boys called in from Prance. Prance is in a good temper, will confess all, much more than yet he has said, but still doubts the King will not pardon him. Names Vernatti, whom Boys knows and his son often in Prance's company. Vernatti lives in Fetter Lane and his brother in Leather Lane. Prance says that Bradshaw said: It would be no sin to kill the Protestants no more than dogs.
Messenger was to murder the King. The money to be paid him by Lord Powys and Lord Arundel, if he 'scaped with life; if he miscarried, then it was to be paid his relations.
Parsons.—Was at Tixall 7 April and passed by again the 21st. Came thither the Saturday in Easter week. Never saw Dugdale but at Lord Aston's table waiting &c. Never saw Ireland but as he passed by Standen. It was in August or September. Never saw Grove. Ireland came on Saturday night, went away Monday morning &c. As he went down about 4 August. Never had any letter from Ireland. Dugdale called in. Knows Parsons. Makes him confess they parted at the stable door &c.
Bradshaw called in.—George. is a Papist. Knows not Adamson. Knows Mattison, not if a Papist or not. Knows Prosser. Is a Papist. Was never in company with Prosser and Mattison together. Knows Prance and looks on him as a very honest man. Never heard Earl Shaftesbury was an enemy to the Papists nor a prosecutor of them. Does not remember he was ever in any company where the Earl was ill or well spoken of. Was never at the Cross Keys tavern with Prosser or Prance. Bradshaw shown to Boys. Is known by him. Having asked Prance, why he did not discover this of himself, he answered, he was afraid to lose the Queen's custom. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 767.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Commissioners of the Navy. Informing them that his Majesty has ordered the Victuallers of the Navy forthwith to remove such dry provisions as they have at Plymouth into the citadel for their greater security, and declared to them that he would be at the charge of removing them, as well into the citadel as out again as the issues are to be made, that allowances may be made to the victuallers accordingly. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 260.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Earl of Suffolk, Lord Lieutenant of Suffolk. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that he forthwith cause an exact list to be made of what regiments of foot and troops of horse the militia of his county consists of, and the number of every troop and company and return the same to his Majesty as soon as he conveniently can. With notes of like letters to Lord Yarmouth, Lord Lieutenant of Norfolk, to the Duke of Albemarle and Lord Oxford, Lords Lieutenant of Essex, to the Earl of Winchelsea, Lord Lieutenant of Kent and Somerset, to the Earl of Dorset, Lord Lieutenant of Sussex, to Mr. Noel, Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire, to the Earl of Pembroke, Lord Lieutenant of Wiltshire, to Lord Poulett, Lord Lieutenant of Dorset, to the Duke of Albemarle, Lord Lieutenant of Devon, to the Earl of Bath, Lord Lieutenant of Cornwall, to the Earl of Craven, Lord Lieutenant of Middlesex, and to Col. Strode, Lieutenant of the Cinque Ports. [Ibid. p. 261.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Prince Rupert, Lord Lieutenant of Surrey and Berkshire. To the same effect as the letter to the Earl of Suffolk. [Ibid. p. 262.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Daniel Fleming. (Calendared in the Twelfth Report of the Historical MSS. Commission, Appendix 7, p. 153.) [Ibid. p. 262.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to the Earl of Craven. Whereas I am informed that several soldiers of your regiment neglect doing their duty and hire or employ others, sometimes strangers, to do it for them, and such as know not the use of their arms, you are to give strict orders to the captains of your regiment to oblige these soldiers to do duty everyone in his own person and that they do not permit any whatsoever to mount guard in their companies that do not belong to them; and, whereas several soldiers of the said regiment lie out of their quarters, whereby several inconveniencies may arise, you are further to order the captains to command their soldiers to lie in their quarters and to send their sergeants and corporals from time to time about their quarters to take the names of the soldiers lying out of their quarters and return the same to their captains, who are to acquaint you therewith, that they may be punished. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 60.]
Memorandum of the like to Col. Russell, dated 4 Feb. [Ibid. p. 61.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Sir Thomas Chicheley. Informing him that Lord Latimer's troop is to be disbanded at Buckingham on the 17th instant, that he may appoint an officer to receive and take charge of their arms. [Ibid.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. Desiring him to order a close wagon with horses to be furnished the bearer for the use of the paymaster of the forces for carrying money to Buckingham for paying off the troop quartered there. [Ibid.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Henry Howard, Commissary General of the Musters. Directing him to appoint a deputy commissary to muster Lord Latimer's troop at Buckingham on the 17th instant. [Ibid.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to [the Mayor of Buckingham]. Desiring an account to be forthwith stated and signed by him and the constable and the officer in chief with the troop quartered there, which is to be immediately disbanded, of what is due to the inhabitants for the quarters of the said troop till the 17th instant. [Ibid. p. 62.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Lord Latimer or the officer in chief commanding his troop. Ordering him to take the accounts of his troop and for disbanding them on the 17th. [Ibid.]
Memorandum of the like dated the 15th to Major Russell's troop at Stamford for disbanding on the 20th. [Ibid. p. 63.]
Jan. [14].
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Lieut. — Ordering him with a party drawn out of the three troops of grenadiers to be ready to convoy to Buckingham the money ordered for paying the troop quartered there. [Ibid.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Lemuel Kingdon. Directing him to provide money for paying off Lord Latimer's troop at Buckingham the 17th instant, in the same terms, mutatis mutandis, as the letter of 4 Jan., calendared ante, p. 9 [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 64.]
Memorandum of the like dated the 15th for disbanding Major Russell's troop at Stamford on the 20th. [Ibid.]
[Jan. 14.] The King to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Desiring him to appoint commissioners for disbanding Col. Justin Macarty's regiment, who are to be careful to see the quarters discharged in the first place, the accounts whereof are to be signed by the magistrate in chief of the respective towns where the companies are quartered, the constables and officers in chief with each company and, the quarters being satisfied, what shall be remaining due to each company is to be paid to the officer in chief with the company to be distributed to each officer and soldier, for all which money is ordered to be ready in the hands of John Neagle, the pay of captains and field officers and reformed officers excepted, who are to be paid by the paymaster to the forces in England; the companies to be paid to the end of December according to their November rolls and afterwards to the day of their disbanding to be paid according to a muster to be taken the same day. The Commissioners are to see the arms, viz., pikes, muskets and bandoliers delivered to the officer appointed to receive them by the Master-General of the Ordnance or his deputy. The soldiers are to be allowed to take with them all their clothes, belts and swords. Any dispute between any officer and soldier concerning any account between them or between the officers and the quarters shall be immediately determined by the Commissioners. The arms being delivered up and all accounts adjusted, the Commissioners shall forthwith disband the respective companies and then the officers and soldiers are immediately to disperse to their own abodes and behave in all things as becomes dutiful subjects. [Ibid. p. 65.]
[Jan. 14.] The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. In the same terms as the last, mutatis mutandis, for disbanding the regiment of Lord James Douglas. [Ibid. p. 66.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Lemuel Kingdon. Directing him to provide money in Ireland and Scotland for paying off Col. Justin Maccarty's and Lord James Douglas' regiments. [Ibid. p. 67.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to —. I understand that, on my letter for stating the accounts of the troop quartered there till the 13th, the inhabitants make some difficulty to give them credit any longer, supposing the troop to be actually disbanded, but, that being a mistake, you are to signify to the inhabitants that they subsist the soldiers to the day of their disbanding, which will not be long and I shall order their payment for what credit they give after the 13th, as well as of what they gave before. [Ibid.]
Jan. 14. The Duke of Monmouth to Capt. —. Directing him to disband his troop at Carlisle. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 69.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Lemuel Kingdon. Instructions. Directing him to provide money for paying off Capt. Roll's troop of the Queen's regiment, and Capt. Sydenham's of Lord Gerard's, both quartered at Carlisle, and Capt. Stanhope's troop of the Duke's regiment quartered at Alnwick. [Ibid. p. 70.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Henry Howard, Commissary General of the Musters. Directing him to appoint one or more deputy commissaries to muster the above three troops. [Ibid. p. 71.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Sir Thomas Chicheley. Informing him of the approaching disbandment of the above three troops that he may appoint an officer to receive and take charge of their arms. [Ibid. p. 72.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to [the Mayor of Carlisle]. Directing that, as soon as he has notice of the day on which the two troops there are to be disbanded, an account may be stated and signed by him, the constables and the officer in chief with each troop of what shall be due to the inhabitants for their quarters. [Ibid. p. 72.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to [the Mayor of Alnwick]. Similar letter, mutatis mutandis, to the last. [Ibid. p. 73.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Certificate by the Duke of Monmouth that Roger Parsons, ensign to the company now commanded by Henry Row, has been detained here for some time by his order for conducting of recruits for Tangier. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 52, p. 178.]
Jan. 14. Warrant to the Attorney-General for a pardon to Michael Prance of London, silversmith, in as large and ample a manner as the pardons lately granted to Titus Oates and William Bedloe. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 54, p. 13.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of Elizabeth Fortescue for a pass for her to go beyond the seas with her maidservant. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 29.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Carlisle and Edward, Viscount Morpeth, Lords Lieutenant of Cumberland. Capt. Roll's troop of the Queen's regiment of horse, and Capt. Sydenham's of Lord Gerard's regiment, now quartered at Carlisle, are to be disbanded and money is ordered to be in readiness in the hands of John Carr or Nathaniel Johnson. They are to order two deputy lieutenants to meet at Carlisle and disband the troops. (Then follow directions similar to those in the warrant to the Duke of Albemarle and the Earl of Oxford of the 3rd instant, calendared ante, p. 3.) [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 312.]
Jan. 15. Memorandum that a like letter was sent to Henry, Duke of Newcastle. Lord Lieutenant of Northumberland, for disbanding Capt. Stanhope's troop of the Duke of York's regiment, quartered at Alnwick. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 313.]
Other copies of the above letter and memorandum. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, pp. 68, 69.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a commission to Edward, Viscount Latimer, to be Lieutenant of the Isle of Purbeck, in Dorset, during the minority of John Bancks. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 313.]
Jan. 15. List of the regiments of militia foot and troops of horse, in Norfolk and the city and county of Norwich.
Sir Jacob Astley's foot regiment:—
Sir Jacob Astley, colonel; Philip Harberd, lieut.-colonel; Edmund de Grey, major; Simon Britiff, Jacob Preston, John Harberd, Robert Doughty, captains. 848 men.
Sir Christopher Calthorpe's foot regiment:—
Sir Christopher Calthorpe, colonel; — Oxburgh, lieut.colonel; Richard Godfrey, major; Francis Bell, Anthony Botteler, Thomas Hoogan, Edward Chamberlane, captains. 594 men.
Yarmouth foot regiment:—
The Colonel's company: Edmund Thaxter, major; Thomas Bransey, Richard Huntington, Thomas England, captains. 436 men.
Thomas Knyvett's foot regiment:—
Thomas Knyvett, colonel; Edmund Woodhouse, lieut.colonel; William de Grey, major; William Rant, William Cupley, John Berney, John Knyvett, captains. 727 men.
Robert Suckling's regiment:—
Robert Suckling, colonel; Sir Neville Cateline, lieut.-colonel; Thomas Gaudy, major; Anthony Freeston, William Cook, Leonard Mapes, John Ayde, captains. 607 men.
Militia in Lynn:—
John Turner and — Robinson, captains. 195 men. Total of foot, 3,407 men.
The Regiment of Horse:—
William Paston, colonel; Edward Ward, major; Sir William Doyly, Sir Thomas Garrard, Francis Guybon, John Houghton, captains. 322 men.
Norwich foot regiment:—
Sir William Adams, colonel; Robert Bendish, lieut.-colonel; Thomas Wisse, major; Augustine Briggs, Leonard Gleane, William Helwis, captains. 666 men.
[S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 144.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of John Bartlett, one of his Majesty's coachmen, praying that all further prosecution in his Majesty's name may be stopped, he having been bound with two others for Benjamin Johnson, Collector of the Hearth Money in London and Westminster, and that he may have time to pay his proportion out of his salary. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 249.]
Jan. 15. The Duke of Monmouth to Capt. Lawson or other the officer commanding the 4 companies of Sir John Fenwick's regiment, viz., his own, the colonel's, the major's and Capt. Philipson's. Ordering him to quarter the said four companies in Chichester till further order. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 57.]
Memoranda of the like letters to Capt. Northcote to quarter his own and Capt. Scroope's company in Rye, to the officer commanding Capt. Sutherland's company to march to Tenterden in Kent and quarter there, and to Capt. Strother to march to Appledore in Kent and quarter there. [Ibid.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Proclamation offering a reward of 100l. for the apprehension of Francis Evers, alias Ewrie, alias Ireland, late of Tixall, co. Stafford, a Jesuit, and of 50l. each for the apprehension of John Gaven, late of Wolverhampton, — Vavasor alias Gifford, late of Boscobel, Edward Levison, late of Wilmot, all Jesuits, and of — Broadstreet, a Popish priest, late of Horecross, all in the same county, who are guilty of the late damnable and treasonable plot for the destruction of the King's person and the subversion of his government, and charging all magistrates to use their utmost endeavours to apprehend the said offenders. [S.P. Dom., Various 12, p. 383.]
Draft thereof, endorsed as read in Council and approved. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 30.]
Jan. 15. Notes by Williamson. Kerney taken.—Ambassadors' complaint to be translated. Query how the Fr[? ench] stand as to the not taking oaths for religion.
Justices of Middlesex bring in queries (calendared post, p. 35). [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 771.]
Jan. 15. Notes by Williamson. Prance's wife. That her husband lay out four nights and, as he told her, one night at St. James', two at Boyse's. Vernatti was the person by whom she enquired out her husband when absent. Vernatti denied to know where he was, but within half an hour her husband came home &c. Does not remember to have cried and taken on to Vernatti, that he had undone her husband &c., that the neighbours reported her husband was accused for the death of Godfrey. He replied: What need you trouble yourself about the death of Godfrey ? Is not your husband gone out of town on the proclamation &c. ? About the time of Godfrey's death her husband was out late till 3 or 4. She said, Lord, Prance, why are you out so late &c. ? One night said he was with Boice and afterwards the same night with one Pinfold &c. N.B.—Denies to have known anything of Godfrey's death &c., but denies it faintly and asked why she removed her plate &c, because she knew not what people might swear &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 775.]
Jan. 16. The regiments of foot in the Cinque Ports.
The first regiment.
Col. Strode's company 150 men in Dover.
Lieut.-colonel Austin's company 116 men in Tenterden.
Major Breames' company 150 men in Dover.
Capt. Barker's company 108 men in Hastings.
Capt. Lanckester's company 108 men in Romney.
Capt. Deedes' company 72 men in Hythe.
Capt. Hall's company 108 men in Rye.
Capt. Roberd's company 72 men in Winchelsea.
Capt. Bates' company 108 men in Lydd.
Capt. — company 108 men in Pemsey (Pevensey).
Capt. — company 80 men in Foulstone (Folkestone).
Capt. Harrison's company 60 men in Seaford.
1,240 men.
The second regiment.
Col. Rooke's company 112 men in the Isle of Thanet.
Lieut.-colonel Percivall's company 110 men in Deal.
Major — company 100 men in Sandwich.
Capt. Derier's company 100 men in Sandwich.
Capt. Elstead's company 100 men in Sandwich.
Capt. — company 130 men in Feversham.
Capt. Short's company 80 men in Fordditch (Ford-wich).
Capt. Hebden's company 70 men in Brickelsea (Bright-lingsea).
802 men.
Total, 2,042 men. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 130.]
Jan. 17. List of the militia in Cambridgeshire being two troops and five companies commanded by the Earl of Suffolk, Lord Lieutenant.
One troop raised in the east side of the county and in the Isle of Ely:—
John Millecent, captain; Peter Dyamond, lieutenant; Thomas Creake, cornet; Edward Edwards, quartermaster. Two corporals, 79 privates.
One troop raised in the west side of the county and in the town of Cambridge:—
Thomas Duckett, captain; Devereux Martin, lieutenant; William Battle, cornet; Joseph Sell, quarter-master. Two corporals, 61 privates.
Number of horse in this county, 140.
One company raised in the east side of the county:—
Tyrrell Dalton, captain; Thomas Kirkby, lieutenant; Noell Farmer, ensign. 4 sergeants, 3 corporals, musketeers, 106; pikes, 74.
One company raised in the west side of the county:—
Humphrey Gardner, captain; Richard Berry, lieutenant; Thomas Cox, ensign. 4 sergeants, 3 corporals, musketeers, 128; pikes, 80.
One company raised in the town of Cambridge:—
Robert Murriell, captain; Edward Story, lieutenant; George Loosemore, ensign. 3 sergeants, 3 corporals, musketeers, 80; pikes, 64.
One company raised in the Hundred of Ely and the south of Wichford Hundred:—
Thomas Steward, captain; Nicholas Malabar, lieutenant; Ralph Tennison, ensign. 4 sergeants, 3 corporals, musketeers, 105; pikes, 47.
One company raised in Wisbech Hundred and the north of Wichford Hundred:—
Robert Swayne, captain; — Edwards, lieutenant; William King, ensign. 2 sergeants, 3 corporals, musketeers, 117; pikes, 64.
Total number of foot, 865. Total number of foot and horse, 1,005. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 141.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
Order in Council. Six queries having been lately presented by justices viz.,
1. Whether foreigners (Popish Recusants) that are and have been long settled housekeepers and are tradesmen viz., chirurgeons, tailors, periwig makers or ordinary shopkeepers, but not otherwise merchants, but certified to be merchant strangers, shall be excused from taking the oaths or finding sureties or either of them ?
2. Whether such foreigners, being certified by foreign ambassadors or ministers to be their servants, shall be excused ?
3. Whether foreigners (Popish Recusants) settled here housekeepers, but neither tradesmen, travellers or foreign ministers' servants, shall be excused ?
4. Whether native subjects, that are menial servants of foreign ministers, shall be excused ?
5. Whether married women Popish Recusants, but their husbands Protestants, shall be excused ?
6. Whether Popish Recusants, that have taken the oaths, found sureties, have appeared and are convict, shall find new sureties or be continued over ?
To which the judges answered that their opinion was the first four classes were not excused, that they found no law excusing a Femme Covert, being a Papist, from taking the oaths, though her husband be a Protestant, and that a Popish Recusant, having taken the oaths, is not bound to find new sureties unless, on a new tender of the oaths, he shall refuse to take them: his Majesty approves of the said opinion and orders the justices to conform themselves thereto. [Printed, and there is also a manuscript copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, Nos. 31, 32.]
Jan. 17.
Tangier.
Richard Senhouse to Williamson. Begging his favour to obtain for him the collection of the revenue from the crane there, if any alteration therein should happen, which he held 9 years with general satisfaction, till it was ordered to be delivered to Mr. Bowles, as the King's receiver, 2 years ago. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 33.]
Jan. 17. News from [Dumfries]. Our preacher on the hills.—The major part of the sermon is against the King and his government and the rest declares all that have taken the bond and paid the supply imposed by the Convention of Estates to be damned in hell. We had a very great conventicle near this town the latter end of Christmas and were like to have more in the town, but a troop of horse and one of dragoons were sent by the Council. The 5th instant there was a great conventicle in Fife, where a party of the King's Guard set on them and took 27 prisoners, three of whom were unknown persons which the Council have sent for. Our conventicle ministers are dismissed from this place, since the troops came, and the Presbyterians have all sworn to that interest and that they will not pay the supply, but by equivocation, finding there is a party here for raising it, they cause others to pay it in their names. In all probability the Council are like to be in earnest with the conventiclers, for the party at Annan, 12 miles off, have sent away the Provost and two Bailiffs to the Council for countenancing and going to conventicles. [Ibid. No. 34.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant to [the Mayor of Chichester]. After reciting that the companies of the colonel, major and Captains Lawson and Philipson now quartered in that town (Chichester) are to be forthwith disbanded, and that in order thereto money is appointed to be ready in the hands of — for paying them off, directing him, as soon as he have notice from the said — that he is provided to clear with the said four companies, to order an account to be stated of what is due to the inhabitants from the said four companies to the day limited for paying them off and delivered to the said — and to see that in the first place he discharge the quarters accordingly, and then that the arrears due to the respective officers and soldiers to the said day of disbanding (the pay of captains and field officers excepted) be forthwith paid to the officer in chief of each company to be distributed to those under his command, the companies to be paid to the end of December according to their November rolls and from that time to the day of disbanding according to a muster to be taken the same day, and, before the companies are cleared, he is to see that they deliver up their arms to a person appointed by the Master of the Ordnance to receive them, the soldiers to be allowed to take away all their wearing clothes and belts and swords, and, the arms being delivered up and the accounts cleared, he is to disband the said four companies and then the officers and soldiers are forthwith to disperse to their several habitations. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 74.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to the Earl of Dunbarton. Directing him to order the colonel's, major's, the grenadiers', and Capt. Murray's companies and that which was late Capt. Regan's, to march on Monday, the 27th, towards Newcastle on Tyne, according to the march prescribed and thereunto annexed, and, to continue there till further order. The officer in chief commanding the said companies is to send an officer before on every day's march to prepare the quarters against their arrival. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 75.] Annexed,
The said route showing the marches for each day. [Ibid. p. 77.]
[Jan. 17 ?] Routes showing the marches of the remaining companies of the said regiment to Morpeth, Alnwick, Wooller, Hexham and Newcastle. [Ibid. pp. 76, 77.]
Jan. 17. Notes by Williamson. Replies of the judges (calendared ante, p. 35), to the queries by the Middlesex justices.
The Pendrells &c. recommended to the justices &c. N.B.— It was done by the Board, because it appeared it had been done by the Lords' House, and for the singularity of that service, Mervin Touchett having been refused the same day &c.
Parliament prorogued to 25 Feb. A proclamation ordered. Proposed as what the King was resolved on, being but for three weeks. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 779.]
Jan. 17. Notes by Williamson. Sir William Waller informs of traitors, now going beyond seas, Fa[ther] Travers, Dr. Hanson, Kimball, Maguire, Lumsdell. Lord Lumley in France.—Called in &c. Third, further information of Dugdale. Express sent down to examine fresh men. [Ibid. p. 783.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the appointment of William Ellis to be an additional commissioner of the Revenue of Ireland, to act immediately and, on the first vacancy among the existing commissioners, to receive the salary of 300l. per annum that was received by such late commissioner. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 298.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a new commission appointing the three existing Commissioners of Appeal and William Ellis, Commissioners of Appeals, the said Ellis not to receive any salary till a vacancy occurs among the existing commissioners. [Ibid. p. 300.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
The King to Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master General of the Ordnance. Having on 29 Jan., 1677–8, appointed Col. George Legge, governor of Portsmouth, Sir Roger Manley, deputygovernor, Sir Jonas Moore, surveyor-general of the ordnance, Sir Bernard de Gomme, chief engineer, Col. James Halsall and others commissioners, for strengthening the works at Portsmouth and Gosport, and being satisfied with their proceedings thus far, yet thinking, as the works intended will require much longer time than the present juncture of affairs may admit, that the said works should be so far completed as to put the place in security against any foreign attacks, signifying his pleasure that he give instructions to the commissioners at Portsmouth to view the several works, examine the defects, and cause an estimate to be drawn of the charge of putting them into a present and necessary defence, that timely supplies of money may be ordered. For greater expedition, Sir Jonas Moore and Sir Bernard de Gomme are to repair to Portsmouth, and one of them is to continue there till the works are finished. Also the train of 24 field pieces of artillery ordered for Flanders is to be sent to Portsmouth, the platforms repaired, the guns fitted with good carriages, fire-workers sent down and such gunners' stores as he shall judge requisite or shall be reasonably desired by the governor for defence of the garrison. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 315.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Lord Chancellor of Ireland. By his Majesty's commands signifying that Mr. Bury, who has a cause depending before his Grace which requires his presence in that kingdom, is detained here on his particular service and by his command, that his Grace may take order that he be not prejudiced by his stay here. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 263.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Ensign Wotten. He is forthwith to go to Chichester and on the breaking of four companies of Sir John Fenwick's regiment, now quartered there, he is to entertain as many soldiers thereof as he shall find willing to list to serve in in the garrison of Tangier and to provide quarters for so many as he shall so entertain in the said town till further order. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 73.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Sir Thomas Chicheley. Giving him notice that Lord James Douglas' foot regiment, now quartered in Scotland, is forthwith to be disbanded, that he may appoint an officer from Berwick to be at the said disbanding to receive the arms of the regiment. [Ibid. p. 75.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Capt. Churchill or the officer commanding in chief the three companies therein mentioned. Ordering him on receipt thereof to march with his own and Captains Charles Herbert's and Fawtry's (Fortrey's) companies of his Royal Highness' foot regiment to Norwich and to continue there till further order. [Ibid. p. 78.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Sir Charles Lyttleton, colonel of his Royal Highness' foot regiment. On the landing at Yarmouth of the battalion from Malines of the said regiment, he is to order Capt. Smith's company to march to Lowestoft, the three companies mentioned in the last letter to Norwich, and Capt. Bagott with the other three companies is to continue at Yarmouth till further order. [Ibid.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Approving of the overtures calendared ante, p. 2. (Printed in Wodrow, History of the Sufferings of the Church of Scotland, Vol. III., p. 13.) [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 5, p. 78.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant for appointing commissioners for disbanding Lord James Douglas' regiment with directions how the commissioners are to proceed. [Ibid. p. 79.]
Jan.
[After the 18th.]
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrant for payment of 500l. sterling to any that shall apprehend John Welsh, of 3,000 merks to any that shall apprehend any of those preachers who are declared traitors, of 2,000 merks for any of the preachers declared fugitives or intercommuned, and of 900 merks for every of those vagrant preachers who preach in the fields. [Ibid. p. 81.]
Jan. 19.
Coleman Street, London.
Jan van Laere, secretary and agent of the King of Poland, to [Williamson]. About 10 yesterday morning came to my house a constable and other armed persons, pretending a warrant from the Lord Mayor to search for arms. I told him it was a general warrant to search in all houses of Roman Catholics, but in my case they ought to have a special order, as I was the minister of a King, which I made appear by your certificate. They answered that they cared not for that and that besides they had a special warrant to search in my house, and then, leaving a guard at the door, they searched throughout the house, and took away a gun and three swords and restored that I had by my side as a particular favour, making me promise to give it, if they came again for it.
I therefore desire you to procure justice and reparation of honour to my master, the King of Poland, in this matter. [Translation. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 35.]
Jan. 19. The information of William Brookes, sworn before Secretary Williamson. About 22 Dec., 1678, at the Marshalsea, James Netterville, a prisoner there for debt, desired me to carry two or three lines for a friend of his, who was a prisoner also, to one Pierce Butler, which he told me was only to entreat him to come to his friend, so I promised I would. He called his friend and they consulted and wrote two or three lines and gave them me and told me that, if I could procure Butler or any other of his friends to come, he should not want money whereof he should have share, so that they should be both supplied. I carried the note to the place appointed, but Butler was gone out of town in obedience to the proclamation, so I put the note in my pocket. About 10 days after, putting my hand in my pocket, I found it. It was thus:—I am here a prisoner by the name of Daniel Edmonds, committed by a J.P. for a delinquent, and therefore desire you would come to me here that I may advise with you. Dominick Kelley. A messenger came next day to know what I had done and I sent him word that Butler was gone out of town and so had it no more in my thoughts nor heard more from him.
About the 15th instant I was in Mr. Preston's coffee house, where was a paper titled, Mr. Prance's Discoveries of the Plot and Sir Edmond Berry Godfrey's murder, wherein I found two Irish priests named, one Gerald and the other Kelley. Then I called to mind the note, and thought this very Kelley, for whom I carried the note, was the man there named. I went betimes next morning to the Marshalsea to Netterville, thinking to find Kelley there, but he was gone. I asked Netterville how he got out. He told me he had got a prisoner to procure him bail. I asked him what the man was, that I carried the note for. He told me he was a priest. I asked how he or anyone could get bail for a priest. He told me he did not know he was a priest and that there were men who would be bail for anyone for money, and the priest gave them 10s. each and the fellow that procured them 5s. He himself got a copy of their committal to move by, and that the priest promised to send him 7l. but had not yet done it.
Netterville had also given me a letter and petition to Mrs. Walle, that serves the Duchess of Portsmouth, to get some money to supply his want, but I could not get an opportunity to speak with her and so had not any for him. He complained he was so much in debt in the prison that he feared being turned over to the common side. I told him money was very scarce with me, or I would have supplied him till he got some. He then took me into a corner of the yard and told me if I would be ruled by him, we should get money enough, telling me, if I would but assist in the vilifying of the testimony of Oates and Bedloe, those two rogues, we should have money enough. I did not ask how it should be done, but told him it was impossible, so he went no further.
Yesterday, being with him, thinking to get something out of him where this Kelley might be, I could not. We fell into other discourse, and I was hasting away, saying I had something to write that I was to send to Ireland by Capt. Bury. He told me, he believed he should stop Capt. Bury's journey. I told him, I hoped not. Yes, said he, but it will not be to his prejudice. Then said I, I shall not be against it and, before we could discourse further, Russell, an Irishman, came in and so we parted. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 36.]
Jan. 19. Paper headed "Aiunt." That there has been a great falling out betwixt his Royal Highness and the Lord Treasurer.
That a College of the Benedictines has been discovered in the Savoy, where 45,000 Popish books have been found, a great many writings relating to the Plot and a great many superstitious relics.
That in Pickering's lodging adjacent to this College was found in a pile of billets an Italian gun with a letter to Pickering that it was fit for his purpose and consecrated. It was most curiously inlaid with silver and ivory, estimated at 20l., and was loaded with 11 bullets. This same gun was designed for killing the King.
That Mr. Bedloe was set upon by a person as he was sitting in a house of office, near Charing Cross, who said: You do not know me. Not I, quoth Bedloe. Have you not, said the other, seen me at Somerset House? Bedloe answers, he has seen a company of rogues and could not tell whether he was one of them. Whereon this fellow took him by the cravat, intending to have strangled him or stabbed him. Bedloe instantly rose up and by his strength thrust the fellow down on his back and cried for help and presently his guard came and seized the fellow, who will give no account of himself, but is now in prison.
That the Duke of Ormonde coming over is to be Lord Treasurer.
That Mr. Bedloe on search in the City found in the house of Mr. Arthur, a merchant, abundance of letters and papers relating to the Plot.
That it was resolved in Council last Friday that Parliament should be prorogued from 4 to 25 Feb.
On sight of the anagram in last Friday's packet of Rome, my father yesterday tried what he could do on Sir Edmund Bury Godfrey's name. This he did.—Sir Edmund Bury Godfrey. Anagram, By dogs in fury murdered. [In the same hand as the papers of the 13th, calendared ante, pp. 22–26. 2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 37.]
Jan. 19. Notes by Williamson. Prorogation of Parliament. 1. Not to prorogue &c. 2. At least resolve then to have them sit— for all reasons &c. N.B.—King cannot go on with the trial. The House of Commons have the evidence in their hands. Objection. Does it to Protestants (?) daily? Reply. Yes, till the judges' opinion be known. The proclamations against priests. If we order the penalty of the laws pass on them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 787.]
Jan. 19. Notes by Williamson. 27 ships in the Straits and 27 in the Channel. Proclamation for proroguing read. Left till Wednesday on the point, if to say they shall then certainly sit. Everyone to think what to propose to be done to prepare a good humour in the Parliament.
Sir J. Narbrough to be called home, only 5 or 6 ships left for convoys &c. What instructions to him &c.
Nimeguen, 13 Jan. The preface not disliked &c.
Merchant Adventurers' petition in favour of the town of Hamburg granted.
Brunswick merchant's &c. To be shown to the Hamburg Company and the Foreign Committee to speak with him and see what he has to propose. [Ibid. p. 791.]
[Jan.?] Henry Tompkins, junior, to the King. Petition for pardon and for release on bail in the meantime. The petitioner is a baker, was married in 1668, and lived soberly with his father in St. Martin's in the Fields, till in Sept., 1674, he was sent by his father with a great sum to buy corn, that at an inn in Bristol falling into ill company he was so debauched with drink that for 10 days he was not himself, in which time the tapster persuaded him to marry Elizabeth Gagecombe, the kitchen wench, providing a licence and a parson. Having spent his money he came to himself and left the said town and woman's company and wandered about the country on foot in a desolate condition for nine months. Till now the said woman has not given him trouble, but now most violently she has prosecuted him and he is found guilty of felony within the clergy. He has been reprieved. At the foot,
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Recorder of London and particularly of the setting him at liberty on bail. In the meantime the Recorder is to take care that the sentence of burning in the hand be not put in execution. On the back,
Report of the Recorder that the petitioner was indicted for having two wives. At the trial he denied he had married either, but, the former being fully proved and that he had cohabited with her several years and did so at that time, he confessed it. The other marriage with Gagecombe was proved by witnesses and that he kept her company at Bristol and elsewhere for 10 weeks and then left her, since which he has altogether cohabited with his former wife. He was respited on his Majesty's commands and bail has since been taken for his appearance the next gaol delivery, and he has been directed to make application to his Majesty for his further pleasure, he having made some satisfaction by giving money to his second wife for the injury done her. 31 Jan., 1678[–9]. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 38.]
Another copy of the above reference, where the petitioner is called John and the second wife Edgcombe. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 249.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master General of the Ordnance, to send to Dublin 20 tons of match, 20 tons of shot, 3,000 muskets, 500 carabines, 500 pairs of pistols, 1,500 long pikes, 100 drums, 60 halberts and 3,000 collars of bandaliers, to be delivered to Francis Cuff and William Robinson, ordnance officers there, and to be paid for out of the Treasury of the Ordnance Office in Ireland. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 317.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Mayor of Dover. I have this evening received yours by express concerning the stay of Mr. Montague. His Majesty commands me to signify to you that you forthwith cause him to be conveyed up hither to appear before his Majesty in Council. (The page on which this is entered was sealed up and apparently the next letter was substituted for it.) [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 263a.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Mayor of Dover. I have received yours of this evening by express concerning your having stayed Mr. Montague, as he was passing beyond the seas, and am commanded to signify his Majesty's pleasure that you continue to make stay of him till his further pleasure be sent you. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 264.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Commission to Anthony Markham to be captain of the foot company, whereof Capt. James Graham was captain, in the regiment of Guards commanded by the Earl of Craven. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 119.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Capt. Wheeler or the officer commanding in chief a battalion of the Holland regiment. Ordering him to march the battalion under his command to Dartford and places adjacent in Kent, to quarter there till further order. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 82.]
[Jan. 20?]
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Sir T. Chicheley. Giving him notice that his Majesty had thought fit that the companies now quartered at Rochester, viz., two of Lord Alington's, two of Col. Salisbury's and two of Col. Sydney's regiment, should be disbanded, that he may send an officer to receive the arms of the said companies. [Ibid.]
[Jan. 20?]
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Henry Howard, Commissary General of the Musters. Directing him to appoint a deputy commissary to muster the six companies mentioned in the last letter. [Ibid. p. 83.]
[Jan. 20?]
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to [the Mayor of Rochester]. Desiring that an account may be made up and signed by himself, the constables and the officer in chief with each company of what is due to the inhabitants for the quarters of the said six companies. [Ibid.]
[Jan. 20?] Warrant to [the Lord Lieutenant of Kent] to appoint two or more of his deputy lieutenants to meet at Rochester on the— day of—, in order to disband the said six companies, in the same terms mutatis mutandis as in the letter to the Duke of Albemarle and the Earl of Oxford, calendared ante, p. 3. [Ibid. p. 84.]
[Jan. 20?] The Duke of Monmouth to Col. Salisbury. Directing him to order the two companies of his regiment quartered at Rochester forthwith to make up the accounts of what is due for their quarters, which are to be delivered to—, who has orders to furnish money to discharge them as also to clear with the said companies, the pay of the captains only excepted, and the accounts being adjusted the soldiers are to deliver up their arms, and the officers and soldiers are to obey the orders of — commissioned for disbanding the said companies. Noted, that the like were sent to Lord Alington and Col. Sydney. [Ibid. p. 85.]
Jan. 20. Notes by Williamson. Lord Aston.—My lord says he knows not whether Dugdale ought him or he Dugdale, whether what was due was due from Dugdale or from his tenants. From Aug., '77, finding his affairs not go well, he kept his book himself and ordered him on receiving any money for my lord he should the same day give him account of it.
Dugdale called in withdraws. N.B.—Doubted if fit to examine Dugdale and his lordship face to face, especially as to his accounts and dealings with my lord and how accounts stood between them.
Lord Aston called in.—Cannot tell what discourse passed between him and Lord Stafford this last summer in the long parlour relating to Lord Arundel of Wardour. To his knowledge he never named (?) [him] in that room. Was a dangerous thing to trust serving (?) persons. Answer. Cannot tell anything of any such words &c. Never any discourse with Lord Stafford about the Plot save since the Plot. 6 Jan., Evers went from him. No money found (?) that he knows of of Evers' &c. or Dugdale's. Ireland went away from him with Sir J. Southcote and his wife. How long there cannot say. Sometimes at Tixall, sometimes elsewhere. What correspondencies Evers and Ireland had, cannot say. Why Evers go away? Reply. About that time Lord Aston had heard there were some accusations against him &c. and so desired to have no more to do with him. Dugdale went from him 18 Nov. of his own accord. To 30 Dec. lay concealed, on account of creditors as he conceives. Believes he went away because he had chid him for the defectiveness of his accounts. Dugdale had given him warning that he would go away several years before &c.
Lord Aston to be close prisoner, at least till Lord Stafford be examined, which is to be done to-morrow morning &c. by the same committee that examined him before. Dugdale called in.— When he went away, he took no leave of his lord, but Evers persuaded him to go away and he would tell his lord that he, Dugdale, was gone on his occasions, not gone away. Evers and he first went and had the money. His lord cannot say he did take leave of him &c. (N.B.—The ingenuity, for his lord did not say it &c.) N.B.—Unlikely his lord would be put off with what Evers would pretend to him of his errand &c., unless his lord were knowing of the true cause in secret and confidence between them &c. The King declares he has received satisfaction in the point of Ireland and Grove. Grove and Ireland to be executed on Friday. Pickering nothing said of. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 795.]
Jan. 20. Notes by Williamson. Mr. Fowler called in.—Asked on oath who spoke with him in the way. Met at Coventry with Mrs. Gower and her son and one Whithall's servant. They came up together in the coach. This company fallen into by casualty. Were all of the Roman religion, as he thinks, by their keeping fasting days. Knows not Arthur, an Irish priest. At Highgate Mrs. Gower and her son took knowledge of a gardener of one Heveningham &c., but he knew him not. Is not excommunicated, that he knows of. Saw Ireland two or three times at bowls at Tixall about August last, Penkridge fair. Evers never threatened him of excommunication. Never heard of a design against the King nor of introducing the Popish religion, but as one friend would persuade another. Never knew it nor thought of it, till it was discovered. Never asked for money to carry on the design of advancing the Popish religion &c. Saw Lord Stafford last summer at Tixall on the bowling green. A begging Franciscan friar came to his house, lodged one night. Where recommended knows not. Knows not where Evers is, saw him a little before the proclamation for search (?). Never knew anything of Pickering or Grove before the Plot &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 799.]
Jan. 21. Matthew Roche to Francis Royley. Complaining that he had deferred paying the money to Mr. Dalton, for which he had orders from his brother Jack. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 39.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Lord Yarmouth. Acknowledging his letter of the 19th, enclosing the lists of his militia. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 265.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Bayliffs of Yarmouth. I have yours of the 6th in favour of your two townsmen charged with having been in a contempt against the proclamation for not going to sea on foreign voyages &c. I shall be extreme glad on all occasions to serve the Corporation or any the lowest members of it, but you must either take order that good rule and government be kept in such matters or all private as well as public safety will be hazarded and his Majesty's just authority contemned. I would not press too hard on those poor people, but it has been observed of late there is some cause for the caution I give. [Ibid.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Capt. Benson or the officer in chief commanding the three companies therein mentioned. Ordering him to march with three companies of Lord Morpeth's regiment to Brentwood in Essex and quarter there till further order. Noted, that the like was sent for three, companies of the same regiment to march to Romford. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 86.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to the Earl of Mulgrave. Whereas one of the battalions of your regiment is now ordered to quarter in Kent for the ease of the former quarters in Suffolk and the greater convenience of the companies coming thither, you are to order quarters to be provided for 4 companies only at Ipswich, 3 at Woodbridge and one at Saxmundham and at the landing of the said battalion you are to order Captains Kirke's, Collingwood's, Hildyard's and Fitzpatrick's companies to quarter at Ipswich, Captains Cornwall's, Boad's and Richardson's at Woodbridge and Capt. Manwaring's at Saxmundham. [Ibid. p. 87.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the translation of Michael Boyle, Archbishop of Dublin, to the archbishopric of Armagh, void by the death of the last archbishop. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 301.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
Order in Council, on the complaint of the King of Poland's agent of an abuse offered him by a constable pretending a warrant from the Lord Mayor to search for arms, that a copy of the complaint be sent to the Lord Mayor, who is to examine the matter and report to the Board. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 40.]
Jan. 22.
Dover.
William Stokes, Mayor of Dover, to Sir J. Williamson. I will observe your orders as to the stay of Mr. Montague; he has been treated with respect and seems satisfied, except with the guard, civil men of the town, placed in the house where he is. I dare not release him on parole, though he earnestly presses it. I enclose affidavits relating to his seizure. I have promised a reward to the two seamen that made the discovery. [Ibid. No. 41.] Enclosed,
Deposition of Francis Bastinck, clerk of the passage at Dover, Simon Conyet, postmaster, and James Lingoe, master of a packet-boat, that on the mayor's being informed on Sunday, the 19th, by 2 mariners that they were hired for a large reward to transport a gentleman by night to a French shallop that was to come into Dover Road, for his transportation beyond the seas, he sent for Bastinck, who took the other deponents to his assistance, and they, lurking near where the gentleman was to be carried off, intercepted him with another, and took them before the mayor who threatened to send them to the common gaol, whereupon one confessed himself to be Mr. Montague, late ambassador in France, and the other Baker, his servant. 22 Jan., 1679.
Deposition of John Lodwick, commissioner of the passage. He had gone with the mayor the next day to the inn where Mr. Montague was confined, who pressed the mayor to take off the guard and to take his parole, which the mayor refused. The shallop to carry him over was a hired vessel of Dover, belonging to Richard Browne, and the master of the inn had prepared it to carry Mr. Montague over. 22 Jan., 1679. [Ibid. No. 41 i.]
[Jan. 22.] Narrative of Capt. John Bury. Saturday evening, 18 Jan., James Netterville told me his friend had left him about half an hour before and was willing that the 500l. should be put into a goldsmith's hands. I asked, Had they considered how we should carry this on and had drawn up the heads of what I was to swear to? He said, No, but his friend would be with him again Wednesday and all things would be ready for me by Thursday morning. I asked, if it would be convenient I should meet this friend. He told me, Not as yet, for he was very shy and fearful of being betrayed. I said, I thought my meeting him was not material, only let him be sure to secure the money, but 500l. is not all I expect from him. I have a wife and six children and have waited a long time here almost to my utter ruin and have been very hardly dealt with. If I accomplish this, I shall lose my interest in all other parties and therefore expect he should make me a very good interest with that party. Said he, You shall have interest enough with them, and if we can but turn off this plot, there is no danger of effecting our business, for the King will believe nothing of it. Said I, I must trust you to make my interest, but I think it wisdom to come in with the beginning of the game. Never fear, said he, if we turn off this plot, we do our business and you will be made for ever. Said I, Why do you defer this till Wednesday? Said he, I did not expect you till Sunday, but, if I hear anything in the meantime, I will write to you to Mr. Brookes' lodging. I hear, said I, the Parliament is prorogued. 'Tis true, said he, and, till they meet again, we can receive no damage, but I hear the prentices are ready to rise and pull down Newgate. Said I, Then I suppose it's because the men are not executed. What else, said he, that's our great danger, that the people should run into rebellion before we accomplish our business.
I asked if he had taken an abstract, as he said he would, of what that man in the prison would swear to take off Bedloe's evidence. Not yet, said he, but we are sure enough of him and shall make Bedloe rogue enough. I asked what will he swear? Said he, He will swear that the very morning the proclamation came forth concerning Sir Edmund Berry Godfrey, Bedloe asked him if he had ever seen Sir Edmund, for, said he, if I knew but what a like man he was, I could easily get 500l. However, I am resolved to hazard my neck but I will have it, and that he would have had this man go with him to Somerset House to see the rooms and promised to get him money, if he would go with him. Said I, It is said Bedloe was out of town before the proclamation came out. Not so, said he, for this man's wife went into the country with him.
We had a great deal more discourse to encourage me to carry on this business to turn this plot to be a Protestant plot for the destruction of the Papists. When I paid the reckoning, said he, you always come to your charges, but I hope the end will pay for all.
I went Wednesday night, the 22nd, to Mr. Netterville, expecting to have had the model how they would have me swear and in what goldsmith's hands they would put the 500l., but he told me he had been put in such a fright, as he had never been before, for Oates, Bedloe, Sir William Waller and another justice were with him. They called for irons and one would have 50lbs., another 100lbs. weight put on him. Sir William began to examine him and told him he knew he could discover a great deal. He desired the rest might be put out of the room, and he confessed all to him and the other justice, both promising him pardon. What have you confessed? said I. I told them, said he, how 500l. was to be deposited in a goldsmith's hands and I had treated with a gentleman about it. I have not told your name, but I must tell them, but I thought first I must acquaint you with it. Said I, It seems you have left me in the lurch, therefore you must give me leave to play my own game, and, being you had confessed, let us now play our game as well as we can on the other side and be sure to confess whatever we know. I will immediately to Sir J. Williamson and declare the whole story. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 42.]
Jan. 22. Memorandum that a letter like that sent to the Earl of Bridgwater, calendared ante, p. 27, was sent to Robert Earl of Lindsey, Lord Lieutenant of Lincolnshire, for disbanding Major Russell's troop of the Duke of York's regiment, quartered at Stamford, on Jan. 27, Jonathan Masters to pay the money. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 314.]
Jan. 22. Sir J. Williamson to the Clerk of the Signet. Ordering him to enter a caveat that no grant pass of the estate of Nicholas Weston, of Radnish, forfeited for a burglary, without notice to Major Beckman at the Tower. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 57.]
Jan. 22. Caveat that no pardon pass for Christopher Brouncker and others, condemned at the Old Bailey for burglary, nor for Owen Hurst, escaped out of Newgate, where he was committed for the same offence, without notice to Robert Winne, of Hatton Garden. [Ibid. p. 58.]
Jan. 22. The Duke of Monmouth to Henry Howard, Commissary General of the Musters. Whereas the Paymaster to the Forces has represented that he is hindered by the rolls not being returned to his office in due time, which is occasioned by its being left to the officers to bring in their rolls to be closed at their own leisure, you are to give orders to your deputies that every time they muster any troop or company they oblige the officer in chief to deliver them all the rolls together signed by two officers of the said troop or company and that they give them notice to come to the office within the month to see their rolls closed, and you are to order your deputies within one month after the muster of any troop or company to deliver in to the Paymaster's office the parchment roll of the said troop or company signed and closed as is usual. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 87.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Samuel Pepys. I have spoken to the King about bringing over the officers' horses from Flanders, and you are to write to Capt. Wetwang to provide vessels there for transporting about 80 horses belonging to them. [Ibid. p. 88.]
Jan. 22. Warrant to Capt. William Richardson, Keeper of Newgate, to permit Elenor Ireland, widow, with her daughter, and Father Augustin de Bruxelles, chaplain to Count Egmont, ambassador extraordinary from the King of Spain, to have access to William Ireland, a condemned prisoner in Newgate, and to have conference with him in private. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 54, p. 13.]
Jan. 22. Like warrant for Father Augustin de Bruxelles to have access to John Grove, a condemned prisoner in Newgate. [Ibid.]
Jan. 22. Notes by Williamson. Lord Stafford.—Counsel and Lady to come to him. If to have a Habeas Corpus. A little liberty. Lord Bellasyse.—Physicians, apothecary &c. To be carried out. Lord Arundel.—Asks more liberty.
in the Tower. N.B.—My lord of Canterbury sent yesterday to Lord Stafford at his desire. Lords ordered to have reasonable liberty in the Tower. Not to converse with one another &c.
Mr. Montagu.—The prorogation &c.—Carlin's portmanteau embezzled by a master of a ship &c.—Doling's petition, servant to Lord Bellasyse, to be discharged. Let him bring his Habeas Corpus. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 803.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Thomas, Earl of Sussex, Lord Dacre, praying a restitution to the manor of Holbeck, barony of Barton, manor of Dacre and other lands, and to all other the lands enjoyed by Sir Thomas Fiennes, Lord Dacre, his ancestor, who being attainted of felony, though the blood were restored by Queen Elizabeth, yet some doubt has been made whether the reversion in fee expectant on the estate tail was not forfeited to the Crown, so that he cannot so freely dispose thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 250.]
Jan. 23. The Duke of Monmouth to Major Russell or the officer in chief with that troop. His Majesty having signified his pleasure to the Lord Lieutenant of Lincolnshire for disbanding your troop on the 27th instant, you are to make up the account of quarters to that day and follow the orders I lately sent you about the disbanding thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 87.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Sir T. Chicheley. Giving him notice of the disbanding of the said troop, that he might appoint some person to receive their arms. [Ibid.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Archbishop of Canterbury for a dispensation to William Gulston, D.D., Bishop-elect of Bristol, for holding in commendam with the said bishopric the rectory of Simondsbury, Dorset, and the prebend of Hurst alias Bishopshurst in the cathedral of Chichester. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 5.]
Jan. 23. Notes by Williamson. Objection. No preparations at Brest &c., so says Brisbane &c. Reply. The preparations at Brest are no more but so many ships in such a state &c. This is certain, taken upon the place and so cannot err and Mr. Brisbane possibly may not be able to learn so much &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 805.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the translation of John, Archbishop of Tuam, to the archbishopric of Dublin and the bishopric of Glandalough united thereto, void by the translation of the late archbishop to the archbishopric of Armagh, and, in regard of the exility of the said archbishopric and bishopric, for a grant of the rectory of Gallowne alias Dartree, co. Monaghan, and the prebend of Desartmore in St. Finbar's church, Cork, and the treasurership of St. Patrick's, Dublin, to the said John, Archbishop of Tuam, to be held by him in commendam with the said archbishopric and bishopric. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 302.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the translation of John, Bishop of Limerick, to the archbishopric of Tuam with the united bishopric of Anaghdown and the bishopric of Kilfenora, void by the translation of the late archbishop to the archbishopric of Dublin and for the uniting of the bishopric of Kilfenora to the said archbishopric and bishopric pro hac vice tantum. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 304.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Order in Council, on the petition of the Duke of Norfolk, who is advised by his physicians to change the air for the recovery of his health, for a pass to permit him to transport himself beyond the seas with his Duchess, Lady Elizabeth McDonald, his sister, and their children with their servants, plate &c., but he is first to give bond that none of the said children be bred up or left abroad in any popish seminaries and that he shall not go to Rome, with directions for preventing any person in orders from going under the pretext of being a servant. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 43.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Order in Council, on the petition of Shilling Terry, mariner, which set forth that in the last Dutch war he lost his own ship in a fight with two privateers, but thereby preserved a great part of the Barbados fleet and that about two months since he lost a free-made ship to his utter ruin, and prayed that the freedom of the said ship may be appropriated to a ship of the same burden, that, as a mark of the special favour of his Majesty, who has a perfect remembrance of the petitioner's gallant behaviour, a licence be prepared to permit the petitioner to appropriate the freedom of the ship he lost to another of the same burden. [Ibid. No. 44.]
[Jan. ?] Amy Potter, widow, to the King in Council. Petition for confirmation of her patent for the sole making of woollen laces, for adorning burial dresses &c. and for orders to the justices to grant her warrants to search for and seize all such lace as is made by others without her licence, as much is made and sold privately. [Ibid. No. 45.] At the side,
Reference thereof to the Committee for Trade. Annexed,
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Grant to Amy Potter of the sole licence of exercising her invention of making Flanders, colbertine, and other woollen laces, for 14 years, with permission to search on just suspicion for any laces made contrary to her licence. 4 Oct., 1678. With marginal memoranda of additions suggested, to enable her to prevent the sale of any such false lace. [Copy. Ibid. No. 45 i.]
Jan. 24. Abstract of the above petition. [Ibid. No. 46.]
Jan. 24. Notes by Williamson of answers to queries whether to dissolve Parliaments by Proclamation was sufficient, so that the Parliament need not meet to be present at the actual dissolution. [Ibid. No. 47.]
Friday evening.
[Jan. 24.]
— to [? Williamson]. I write to assure you again of what I told you this evening and to give a more particular description of the person. He is from 40 to 45 years of age, of a middle size and has a hump. He speaks French a little and Italian well and perhaps will say he is an Italian. He gives himself out as a groom hired by M. le Comte to buy English horses to take with him. To know the difference between him and the coachman of M. le Comte, the latter is one eyed and taller and stronger than the other and has had small-pox. He lodges alone with his wife and his little boy in that mews. It has been further confirmed to me this evening that it is he who is named in the last proclamation. (Suggesting how he could be seized and requesting that his name should be torn off the letter for fear of discovery.) [French. Signature torn off. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 48.]
English translation of the above. Endorsed by Williamson, "25 Jan., 78–9. Gaven, the priest." [Ibid. No. 49.]
[1679., Jan ?] Information of Evers from Jean Barth. Schibber &c.—The stables are in Northumberland (?) stables. Those of C[ount] Wal[len]stein are directly over against the great gate, a little on the right hand, near the pond &c. Lodged last night there in the stable or hay loft. Take care he slip not away backwards. Search other stables also. A little stooping, a shortish man &c. Came in a livery. [In Williamson's hand. Ibid. No. 50.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to [? Lemuel Kingdon]. I understand some difficulty is made of paying Dr. Day, who has had the care of the sick all along at Brussels and, I hear, with success and satisfaction to the officers. I placed him in that employment and promised him 10s. per diem during his attendance, which I would have you pay him, and you shall have my warrant at your return for your discharge. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 221.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Sir Maurice Eustace for an order to the Lord Lieutenant to cause a nolle prosequi to be entered on an information on pretence of his Majesty's title to the lands of Kilmackeoge, co. Dublin, granted him by the Court of Claims and since confirmed by letters patent, with directions that a nolle prosequi is to be entered for stopping all proceedings, till his Majesty on his Grace's report declare his further pleasure. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 250.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Sir John Robinson, Lieutenant of the Tower. Information having been given to the Committee of the Privy Council that Capt. Kelly, living within the Tower, holds dangerous correspondence with Popish priests and others, you are forthwith to give order for a sufficient guard to go with the bearer, William Brookes, to search the house of the said captain within the Tower and to secure all suspected persons or papers of consequence that shall be found there till further order, and you are to order that in the said search the persons employed forbear to meddle with any thing belonging to Lord Stafford, who is obliged in the said house, and you are to take care that the said Capt. Kelly attend the Council this afternoon at 4. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 88.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the royal assent to and confirmation of the election by the Dean and Chapter of Bristol of William Gulston, D.D., to be bishop of that see. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 6.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex for the delivery of the heads and quarters of William Ireland and John Grove after their execution to their respective friends or relations to be privately buried. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 54, p. 14.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Proclamation dissolving the present Parliament, which was begun 8 May, 1661, and was lately prorogued to 4 Feb. next, on account of the many inconveniencies arising from the over long continuance of the same Parliament, and declaring the King's intention to issue writs for a new one, to meet 6 March next. [S.P. Dom., Various 12, p. 384.]
Another copy thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 156.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Proclamation fixing the price of wines for the year ensuing from 1 Feb. next. [S.P. Dom., Various 12, p. 385.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 51.]
Jan. 24. Notes by Williamson. Query, if in the administration of the government of Ireland the Lord Lieutenant had a negative on all the Council.—Yarmouth bailiffs. 22 Dec. Communicated to Lord General.—Price, 21 Jan. &c. in the Committee.—Fulwell (?) 20 Jan. To inquire after that and to have him examined. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 807.]
Jan. 24. Notes by Williamson. Parliament.—The King declared he had thought of the matter of the Parliament. No hopes that this parliament would cure the distempers &c. and therefore dissolution. He had resolved it. No advice asked, because he found everybody more afraid to displease the Parliament than him. If could have an equal debate &c. would &c.
If any need of meeting to be dissolved &c. The Lords' book of 4 Car. I sent for.
Lord Chancellor. This would be rather an adjournment than a dissolution. The same will come again. [Ibid. p. 811.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Conge d'elire to the Dean and Chapter of Ross and letter missive recommending to them Alexander, Bishop of Edinburgh. [The former is in Latin. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 5, p. 82.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Simon Digby, D.D., Dean of Kildare, of the bishopric of Limerick, void by the translation of the late bishop to the archbishopric of Tuam, with a grant of the bishopric of Ardfert and Aghadoe together with the rectory of Tradery in the diocese of Killaloe to be held by him in commendam with the bishopric of Limerick. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 305.]
Jan. 25.
Dover.
William Stokes, Mayor of Dover, to Williamson. I have parted with Mr. Montague by order of Council, on his bond of 1,000l. not to depart the kingdom; he threatened me for keeping a guard on him, and has left a bill of 6l. or 7l. at his inn, which the guard drank, for the constable to pay, which I pay myself, rather than an officer should be discouraged. If the contrivers of his intended transportation escape, there will be little hope to stay others in future. I hope the two boatmen who made the discovery may be rewarded. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 52.]
Jan. 25. Memorandum by Williamson. To know of the Duke of Lauderdale the name of the seditious Scotchman seized in Northumberland, in whose hands he remains and how and by whom the Duke proposes to have him received in Scotland, whither the King has commanded him to be sent forthwith, in order to have the necessary warrants ready to go by that night's post.
Note of the Duke's reply. George Johnstone in Morpeth gaol, by Col. Strother's mittimus. A Scotch fanatic field preacher. To be delivered to the Sheriff of Berwickshire to be conveyed before the Privy Council at Edinburgh. [Ibid. No. 53.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to the Mayor, Aldermen and Freemen of Hull. Parliament being dissolved, recommending to them for one of their burgesses, Lemuel Kingdon, Paymaster to the Forces, though the letters he had formerly sent them on the same account did not have their effect. He must judge of the reality of their affections to him by their readiness to gratify him in the acceptance of a person he so earnestly concerns himself for. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 222.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to [? the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge]. Recommending his secretary, James Vernon, to be chosen by the University as one of their burgesses, and desiring he would communicate the matter to the Heads of Houses and such others as he thinks will assist him, letting them understand the concern the writer has in it. [Ibid.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
The King to Col. Strother, a deputy lieutenant and justice of Northumberland. Being informed that George Johnson alias Veatch, a notorious ringleader of the seditious field conventicles in Scotland, being outlawed in that kingdom and a fugitive in Northumberland, was lately by the care of Major Oglethorpe, major of the regiment of dragoons quartering at Morpeth, seized and that he now stands by the Colonel's warrant committed to the gaol of that town, signifying his pleasure that he forthwith on receipt thereof cause the said Johnson to be put into the hands of the said major to be by him delivered over to the Sheriff of Berwickshire, whom the King has already directed to convey the same before the Privy Council of Scotland in order to his being proceeded against according to law. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 59.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Duke of Ormonde. His Majesty having commanded me to prepare a warrant to the AttorneyGeneral of Ireland for prosecuting a title which he has been informed he has to some considerable estate now in Lord Dungannon's possession, in which he had the opinion of the Lord Chancellor and the Attorney-General on this side, he commanded me to give you this knowledge of it and to enclose a copy of the said warrant as the same was delivered to Sir Robert Howard, who is directed to give you a more particular account of his Majesty's mind and intentions in all that matter. All I know is that his Majesty told me it was a concern of his own and in a certain sense for himself. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 266.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Mayor, Burgesses and Freemen of Thetford. The Parliament being now dissolved and a new one ordered to assemble 6 March next, returning his thanks for the honour they placed on him as their representative in the last Parliament and asking to have it renewed in the succeeding election for a new one and apologizing for having hitherto been able so little to deserve the favours already received from them. [Ibid. p. 267.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Mr. Oglethorpe. His Majesty having ordered Johnson, the fugitive, to be again put into your hands by Col. Strother, I am commanded to send you that order, to be delivered to Col. Strother and, as soon as he is put into your hands, you are to cause him to be conveyed in safe custody to the Sheriff of Berwickshire, who will have orders sent him to-night to convey him to Edinburgh to answer before the Council what is charged against him. [Ibid. p. 268.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Conge d'elire to the Dean and Chapter of Edinburgh and letter missive recommending to them John, Bishop of Galloway. [The former is in Latin. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 5, pp. 83, 84.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Lauderdale to the Earl of Rothes, Lord Chancellor of Scotland. The King having to-night sent a letter to Col. Strother, whereof a copy is enclosed, commanding him to deliver George Johnstowne to the Sheriff of Berwickshire, signifying his pleasure that an order may be sent to the said sheriff to receive the said Johnstowne and with a strong guard carry him to Edinburgh, where it is his Majesty's express pleasure that the Privy Council proceed against him according to the utmost severity the law will allow, he, (to dash the groundless hopes of knaves and fools, who expect a toleration) being fully resolved to put the strictness of the law in execution. [Ibid. p. 84.] Enclosed,
The said letter, calendared ante, p. 53. [Copy. Ibid. p. 85.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
The King to the Attorney-General of Ireland. After reciting that certain lands and tenements in the towns of Dundalk and Carlingford, mentioned to be formerly granted to the late Lord Dungannon, were granted in such manner and the King so deceived therein, that the title thereto still belongs to the King, signifying his pleasure that he forthwith prosecute the recovery thereof to the King's use, and recommending to him such information and assistances as shall be communicated to him by Sir Robert Howard. [3 drafts or copies, one endorsed as received from Sir Robert Howard, Dec., 1678. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 339, Nos. 2–4.]
Jan. Promise by the King that, in case it shall be found on a legal trial that the said lands and tenements in Dundalk and Carlingford are still in his hands to dispose of, he will grant the same to Sir Robert Howard and his heirs, he or they first making themselves capable thereof by purchasing or obtaining deficiencies. [On parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case G, No. 5.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 339, No. 5.]
Jan. 26. Further notes by Williamson about the dissolution of Parliament, whether there must be a commission or not.
N.B.—To inquire about the bill of Sir J. Narbrough protested. How victualling in the Mediterranean. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 54.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to the Vice-Chancellor and Senate of the University of Cambridge. Recommending his secretary, James Vernon, to be chosen as one of their burgesses, and reminding them it is the first request he has made since his relation to them and perhaps is the only occasion, wherein they can express their affection and respect to him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 223.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to his Grace [? the Archbishop of Canterbury]. I sent Mr. Snell to acquaint you with my design to recommend to the University my secretary, Mr. Vernon, and to desire your approbation and concurrence. Had I met you at Whitehall, I should have made you the same request. He has already given the University some testimony of his faithfulness to their interests. Should you own him in a letter from yourself to any at Cambridge, it would much further his pretensions. [Ibid. p. 224.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Bayliffs of Yarmouth. I immediately showed yours of the 22nd to his Majesty. I suppose the Duke of Monmouth will long ere this have sent all necessary directions on that matter, he having been by when I read your letter to the King. Your resolving to land the men, though no commissary appeared, was very well approved of by his Majesty, who takes very well the continuance of your care in what relates to the public and his service. I shall be very glad to serve the two poor seamen in custody according to what you desire, though it will be necessary to warn them and the others to be obedient to orders, when set by the King for the safety of shipping in times of danger. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 268.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Ch. Price. Apologizing for not having acknowledged by the last post his letter with the enclosed informations against Paine, which he has lodged before the Lords of the Committee, who have directed an account thereof to be given him by the Clerk of the Council with their thanks for his care in his Majesty's service. [Ibid. p. 269.]
Jan. 28. Pass for Major Oglethorpe to come to London and to continue there till further order. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 90.]
Jan. 29. Philadelphia, Lady Wentworth, to Williamson. Requesting him to have the enclosed advertisement put into to-morrow's Gazette, divers of her many writings in the hands of a Counsellor of the Temple having miscarried at the time of the late fire during their removal and Jacob Tonson being recommended to her by divers persons. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 55.] Enclosed,
The said advertisement, offering a reward to any who should bring any of the writings lost at the late fire in the Temple to Jacob Tonson, bookseller, at the Judge's Head in Chancery Lane. [Ibid. No. 55. i.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the revocation of two patents to John, Lord Lovelace, concerning the stewardship of the manor of Woodstock, &c. and the office of Lord Warden of the bailiwick of the honour of Woodstock within the forest of Whichwood, one dated 22 Nov., 1670, and the other 19 May, 1674. [Ibid. No. 56.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Timothy Tirrell for a lease of the forest of Shotover for 49 years in reversion after two leases of the same for about 50 years to come, in regard he has been at considerable charge in improving and building on the same, at the same covenants and rents as in the former grant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 251.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Circular letter from the Duke of Monmouth. The time now drawing near for the elections to Parliament, that the same may be carried on with greater freedom, you are forthwith to send orders to the companies of your regiment quartered in any of the places, where the said elections are to be made, that on the day of election they fail not to draw out of the place and continue abroad till the election be over, provided it can be determined in one day; otherwise they are to lodge in their quarters at night and draw out again the next day, till the election be made. Noted, as sent to the Earl of Dunbarton, Sir Charles Lyttleton, the Earl of Mulgrave, Sir Charles Wheler, Sir Lionel Walden, Sir John Fenwick, Col. Stradling, Lord Morpeth, Col. Salisbury, Col. Villiers, Sir Henry Goodrick, the Earls of Oxford and Feversham, Sir John Talbot and Lieut-col. Hepburn or the officer in chief commanding the Prince's regiment of dragoons and also, mutatis mutandis, to Col. Legge, Sir Robert Holmes, Governor of the Isle of Wight, to the officer in chief commanding at Rochester and to Col. Strode, Governor of Dover. Also to Col. Legge, Governor of Portsmouth, the Earl of Bath, Governor of Plymouth, the Duke of Newcastle, Governor of Berwick, and Lord Morpeth, Governor of Carlisle, for ordering the companies in that garrison, the ordinary guard excepted, to draw out upon the works. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 89.]
Jan. 29. Notes by Williamson. Carlin's case, of a portmanteau delivered to a master of a ship and lost by delivery out to a servant of Carlin's. Query. I bring goods and deliver them with my own hands. My servant known so to be comes and takes them away. Query, if I have any remedy against the depository. I deliver to a carrier a barrel of silver and say it is a barrel of lead. The barrel is lost. Query, if I can recover a barrel of lead or of silver. Reply. Mr. Attorney says shall receive a barrel of silver as delivered, unless the depository can prove he received it with a special acceptance i.e. if it be lead, I receive it, if not, I receive it not &c. Papers in Hughes' (?) keeping of the House of Commons &c. Ordered to be called for by a clerk of the Council. In 9 bags. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 815.]
Jan. 30.
London.
Newsletter (?) to Mrs. Day at Oxford. It was Sir William Waller, who by a warrant from the Council seized Gaven in Count Wallenstein's, the Imperial ambassador's, stables in bed with his coachman and in his pockets was found the Imperial ambassador's pass, 23 Jan., 1679. He seized another yesterday as he was agreeing with the Dover coach and another on Monday.
It's said that Capt. Lane found among Lord Aston's papers a letter of Lord Stafford's, that the plot is discovered, we shall all be undone, if some extraordinary accident does not prevent it.
The Lords' trials will be deferred till the new Parliament.
It was Capt. Bury to whom the 500l. was proposed to lay the plot on the Presbyterian party. He formerly told Sir J. Williamson of it, and was ordered by him to humour it. Yesterday the Lord Chief Justice refused bail to Mr. Price and Sir F. Monnock, but Mr. Daniel Arthur is bailed.
Monday the Horse and Foot Guards were mustered in Hyde Park.
A Swedish ship, having on board the King's natural son and 50 pilots coming from Gottenburg for Brest for the French ships put in last week at Dartmouth. Mr. Henry Savile is going envoy extraordinary to France, not Mr. Smith.
On Sunday afternoon Mr. Oates preached at Wood Street and was sent to Whitehall in Lady Player's coach.
The Lords in the Tower having unitedly petitioned the Council for bail their petitions were rejected. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 57.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Duke of Albemarle. By his Majesty's command recommending it to him to favour with his interest the son of Lord Chief Justice Scroggs, who designs to stand at Maldon this next election. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 269.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Col. Russell. Directing him to order his quarter-master forthwith to set out quarters for so many of the 17 companies of his regiment that are to be about London as he can find convenience for in the parishes of St. Margaret, Westminster, St. Martin's in the Fields and Covent Garden, St. Clement Danes and part of St. Giles in inns, taverns, alehouses and victualling houses. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 48, p. 90.]
Jan. 30. The Duke of Monmouth to the Earl of Dunbarton. Directing him to order the two companies of his regiments quartered at Huntingdon to march to Ramsey and Bury, Huntingdonshire, to quarter there till further order. With memorandum that next day another order was signed for adding Whittlesea in the Isle of Wight (mistake for Ely) to those quarters. [Ibid.]
[Jan. 31.] Mary Collier to the King. Petition stating that the petitioner is a daughter of Sir Thomas Lunsford, formerly Lieutenant of the Tower, and married a citizen of London, who had all his property burnt in the late fire and dying a few years afterwards left her with a great charge of 5 small children, and praying that her son, Richard, now about 9 years old, might be admitted to the first vacant place in Sutton's Hospital in the King's gift. Noted, as dispatched on that day. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 58.]
[Jan.] Mary Collier to Sir J. Williamson. Petition, thanking him for a gift of 5l. a year ago, and begging his influence to obtain admission to Sutton's Hospital for her son Richard, now about 10 years old, to continue his education. [Ibid. No. 59.]
Jan. 31. James Vernon to [William Bridgeman]. The Lord General desires a commission for Mr. Gay to be first lieutenant of the King's troop of Grenadiers to be dated 1 Nov. last. [Ibid. No. 60.]
Jan [? 31]. James Vernon to [William Bridgeman]. The Lord General desires a commission for Capt. Lewis Billingsly to be the youngest lieutenant of the above troop, to be dated 1 Nov. last, and also commissions for Capt. Norcott (Northcote) to be major and for James Crow to be captain of the company late Major Erskine's, both in Sir John Fenwick's foot regiment, to be dated 1 January. [Ibid. No. 61.]
Jan. 31.
Berwick.
— to Andrew Forster, secretary to the Duke of Lauderdale. Asking him to tell the Duke that the town resolves to choose for members two gentlemen, whose principles are not conform to the laws; viz., Mr. Rushforth, and William Carr, a counseller, who, though he uses [? not] field conventicles, yet uses house meetings; few of the burgesses of the town, who have not borne office, have taken the oaths, Sacrament or test and they never have and, I think, never will abjure the Covenant. If these things can be put to them, there might be a good election. I hope you will be expeditious in acquainting his Grace of this. [Signature cut off. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 62.]
Jan. 31. [Sir J. Williamson] to [Viscount Yarmouth]. 'Tis expected that the writ for choosing knights of the shire in this county (Norfolk) will be executed on Monday, 10 Feb. I hope the electors will choose persons of unquestionable loyalty that will be most serviceable to the King, the Church and the country. I find the inclination of the country to be most for Sir Christopher Calthorpe and Sir Nevil Cattlyn, which agrees with my judgment, and I hope all my friends will industriously join with me therein, wherefore I desire you to use your utmost diligence to promote their election. [Ibid. No. 63.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to —. Knowing how much he is considered by the university, desiring his assistance on behalf of Mr. Vernon. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 225.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to —. Similar letter on behalf of Mr. Vernon, whom he had ordered to go down to Cambridge to solicit there his own business in person. [Ibid.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Lord Mayor. By his Majesty's command transmitting to him the enclosed complaint of the Polish agent and his Majesty's resolution in Council thereon, whereby his lordship is directed to examine the matter and to report to his Majesty and the Board. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 270.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
The King to the Governors of the Charterhouse. Signifying his pleasure that on the next vacancy there Richard Collier be admitted a child of that foundation after such as have already obtained the King's letters in that behalf. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 82.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Serjeant Thomas Street, one of the chief justices for South Wales, and to the justices for the next assizes for Herefordshire for the reprieve of Thomas Gwyn of Abercrave, Breconshire, if convicted of the death of William Aubrey, Gwyn having represented by his petition that 12 Sept. last in Brecon he was pursued in the street by the said Aubrey, who suddenly and and without the least provocation made several passes at him, on which he retreated, but at last was forced to draw in self defence and the said Aubrey, pressing violently on him, unfortunately received a wound whereof he died. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 54, p. 15.]
Jan. 31. Notes by Williamson. Navy.—The bills protested &c. — Victuals. What powers we have. 1. If the executive power to order, direct, dispose of the naval force and every part of it, i.e. to send ships. N.B. All sailing orders &c. disposing, ordering of ships to serve abroad &c. are still granted by the King and yet by our commission it is in us. 2. The consultive power of knowing, judging, representing the state &c. of the Navy &c. This is certainly in us by our commission and in none else, and so the King understands it and will discharge all this sort of duty upon us. (Mr. Pepys.) A copy of the present commission and instructions of the Admiralty &c.
Seamen.—A method for providing seamen on any occasion &c. The account required last year from all ports &c. to the Council Board.—The account given in and declared in the House of Commons' book of the state of the Navy. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 819.]
[Jan. ?] List of commissions granted in Sir J. Williamson's office from 1 Nov., 1678, till Feb. (The last is dated 20 Jan.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 411, No. 64.]
[Jan. ?] Samuel Guillym to the King. Petition for a recommendation to Solicitor-General Finch (appointed 13 Jan., 1679), for the clerkship of the patents to the Solicitor-General, which he held under Sir Francis Winnington, late Solicitor-General; since the latter became M.P., he always drew up the bills of supply which passed and some that did not pass, for which he received no consideration. [Ibid. No. 65.]
[Jan. ?] List of the Militia of Hampshire.
The Lord Lieutenant's Regiment:—
His own company, 106; Sir Thomas Badd, lieut-colonel, 85; Major Peter Bettesworth, 71; Capt. John Button, 70; Capt. John Mill, 85.—417.
Lord Annesley's Regiment:—
James, Lord Annesley, colonel, 100; Sir Richard Knight, lieut.-colonel, 80; Major Chaloner Chute, 70; Capt. Tilney, 90; Capt. William Bishop, 86; Capt. Francis Moore, 98. —519.
Sir John Norton's Regiment:—
Sir John Norton, colonel, 71; Lieut.-col. Bilson, 71; Major Dickins, 86; Capt. Farr, 76; Capt. Heighes, 91; Capt. Beele, 80.—475.
Col. Noell's Regiment:—
Wriothesley Baptist Noell, colonel, 100; Lieut.-col. St. John, 106; Major —, 96; Capt. Godfrey, 80; Capt. Pyle, 80. —456.
Sir John Mill's Regiment:—
Sir John Mill, colonel, 100; Lieut.-col. Pawlett, 72; Major Mill, 76; Capt. Knapton, 70; Capt. Bunckley, 80; —, 80.—478.
Col. Deane's Regiment:—
Col. Deane, 92; Lieut.-col. Ayliffe, 86; Major Foyle, 87; Capt. Faulkner, 94; Capt. Kingsmill, 89; Capt. Richardson, 84.—532.
Town and County of Southampton:—
Capt. Stanley, 100; Capt. Crosse, 100.—200.
City of Winchester:—
Capt. Hyde, 120.
The two troops of Horse:—
Sir Richard Knight, captain, 55; Capt. Pawlett, 78.—133.
Total number, 3,330. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 131.]
[Jan.?] List of the Militia in Dorsetshire.
Sir William Portman, Colonel of the Eastern regiment:—
Sir W. Portman's own company, 142; Lieut.-col. Buttler's 128; Major Ogden's, 134; Capt. Earle's, 86; Capt. Chaffin's, 87; Capt. Reeve's, 89; Capt. Hussey's, 93; Capt. St. Loe's, 89; Capt. Trayer's, 88; Capt. Ettrick's, 89.—1,025.
Col. Thomas Strangeway of the Western Regiment:—
Col. Strangeway's own company, 108; Lieut-col. Gould's, 104; Major Mohoone's, 103; Capt. Dabeney's, 98; Capt. Bishop's, 98; Capt. Floyer's, 98; Capt. Ironside's, 98; Capt. Fookes', 98; Capt. Larder's, 98; Capt. Gollop's, 98.—1,001.
Capt. Yarley in Weymouth and Welcome (Melcombe), 108; Capt. Orchard in Poole, 84; Capt. Alford in Lyme, 48.— 240.
Capt. Savage of the Eastern Troop, 73; Capt. Coker of the Western Troop, 72 horse.
The whole number of horse and foot in Dorsetshire and Poole is 2,411. [Ibid. p. 133.]
[Jan.?] List of the Militia of Cornwall sent to Secretary Williamson by his Majesty's command.
The Lord Lieutenant, the Earl of Bath's foot regiment:—
His own company, 182; Sir John Carew, lieut.-colonel, 145; Major Nicholas Glyn, 130; Capt. Sir Hugh Piper, 111; Capt. John Bligh, 112; Capt. Chamond Grenville, 110; Capt. Thomas Waddon, 113; Capt John Nichols, 108.— 1,011.
Eastern troop of horse commanded by Sir Jonathan Trelawney besides commissioned officers, 64.
Western troop of horse commanded by Sir Joseph Tredenham besides commissioned officers, 64. Total of both troops, 128.
Lord Arundell's foot regiment:—
His own company, 97; Lieut.-col. John Arundell, 102; Major Blewet, 94; Capt. Sawles, 95; Capt. Rashley, 68; Capt. Thomas Vivian, 82; Capt. Trevanion, 81; Capt. Francis Billett, 87; Capt. Edwards, 82; Capt. Verman, 74; total 862, and the company belonging to St. Mawes contains 72; in all, 934 common soldiers besides commission officers.
Sir William Godolphin's regiment:—
His own company, 91; Lieut.-col. William Godolphin, 83; Major Praud, 55; Capt. Billett, 69; Capt. Chinnoworth, 64; Capt. Beham, 74; Capt. Nance, 69; Capt. Veale, 70; total 575, and Capt. Pendarves' company belonging to Pendennis castle are 58.
Col. John Trelawney's foot regiment:—
His own company, 119; Lieut.-col. William Scawen, 84; Major James Bond, 85; Capt. Trelawney, 102; Capt. Trevisey, 75; Capt. John Arundell, 156; Capt. Cannock, 92; total, 713.
The militia of Plymouth consists of four companies under Major Jonathan Sparke, and Captains John Martin, Philip Lanyon and Christopher Warren of 100 men each.
Total of the Militia of Cornwall consisting of 4 regiments of foot and two troops of horse:—
Lord Lieutenant's regiment 1,011
Lord Arundell's regiment 934
Sir W. Godolphin's regiment 575
Company belonging to Pendennis 58
Col. Trelawney's regiment 713
3,291
(The men in these tables are distributed among the different parishes.) [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, pp. 147–157.]
[Jan. ?] List of the Militia of Somerset.
The Lord Lieutenant, the Earl of Winchilsea's regiment:—
His own company, 108; Lieut.-col. Horner, 102; Major Rinian, 102; Capt. Morgan, 100; Capt. Leversuch, 100; Capt. Bull, 100; Capt. Lansdowne, 90; Capt. Rich, 90.— 792.
Sir Edward Philips' regiment:—
His own company, 120; Lieut.-col. Lille, 120; Major Hoddy, 120; Capt. Poole, 110; Capt. Bonors, 113; Capt. Young, 110; Capt. Arth, 110; Capt. Eapsly (? Hippisley), 100.— 903.
Col. Stoyll's (? Stawell's) regiment:—
His own company, 120; Lieut.-col. Wyndham, 120; Major Prouse, 120; Capt. Lacy, 100; Capt. Ven, 100; Capt. Backen, 90; Capt. Borland, 90; Capt. Ligenham, 90.— 830.
Col. Berkeley's regiment:—
His own company, 120; Lieut.-col. Morgan, 120; Major Lucy, 120; Capt. Stocker, 100; Capt. Prater, 90; Capt. Newman, 90; Capt. Warman, 90; Capt. Madock, 90.— 820.
Sir Haswell Teynt's regiment:—
His own company, 120; Lieut.-col. Hawley, 120; Major Cannon, 100; Capt. Dorson, 100; Capt. Catford, 90; Capt. Drewston, 90; Capt. Gachell, 90; Capt. Geffard, 90.—800.
Total of foot, 4,145.
Lord Fitz-Hardinge's regiment of horse:—
His own troop, 60; Major Sir William Bassett, 50; Capts. Lacy, Waldren and Bull, 50 each.—260.
Total of horse and foot, 4,405. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 158.]

Footnotes

  • 1. These six papers must be earlier than 24 Jan. and probably later than 10 Jan., so they have been placed here. The last four are in the same handwriting, the same as that of the letter of the 10th, calendared ante, p. 15.