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Charles II: Miscellaneous 1679

Pages 319-363

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1679-80. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1915.

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Miscellaneous 1679

Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant of a baronetcy to Jeremia Snow of Salesbery, Hertfordshire, and the heirs male of his body, with a discharge of all services to be performed and sums to be paid in lieu thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 135.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Richard Williams, Mayor of Hereford. I have received yours of the 4th giving an account of Martin Russell, taken in the liberties of your city on suspicion of being a Popish priest. I shall acquaint his Majesty with your care and diligence next Council day, and on the resolution taken there you shall have further directions. In the meantime you will do well to let him be kept in safe custody. [Ibid. p. 138.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Another copy of the proclamation of that date, calendared ante, p. 12. [Ibid. p. 141.]
Jan. 8. Pass for the Sieur Marcoville, equerry to the Most Christian King, to embark and transport to France 15 horses for the use of his master, and six grooms and servants to attend them. [Ibid. p. 149.]
Jan. 8. Pass for the Earl of Sunderland for 16 horses, to transport them into France, with as many grooms as shall be necessary. [Ibid. p. 154.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Duke of Ormonde, Lord Steward, and the rest of the Board of Greencloth, for payment to Gervas Price, chief under-keeper of St. James' Park, of 40l. a year, in consideration of his keeping the Park gate, formerly leading into the Tilt Yard, and other duties performed by John Bagot, deceased, late keeper of the said gate. [Ibid. p. 147.]
Jan. 11. Pass for Michael Cafmeyer, and Vincislao and Antonio Walshaert, huntsmen to the King of Spain, and for Lorenzo Vanderplate and Carlos de la Pierre, their assistants, employed to carry over a pack of hounds for the use of the said King, to embark with the said hounds in the Arms of Biscay, now in the port of London, and thence to pass into Spain. [Ibid. p. 146.]
Jan. 11. Pass for Philip van Berinbrook and John Reves, the King's falconers, with two servants, being sent by his Majesty to the Prince of Orange, to pass with the hawks into Holland and to return with what hawks they shall bring over. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 146.]
Jan. 11. Pass for John Ashwell to pass beyond the seas, with memorandum that this pass was by the King's special command from the Duchess of Portsmouth. [Ibid. p. 152.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Sir Thomas Chicheley, and his heirs, of one market and three fairs at Soham, Cambridgeshire, the market on every Thursday and the fairs on 28 April, 26 Sept., and the Monday before Midsummer Day, it having been found by inquisition that such a grant would be no damage to the Crown or others or to any other neighbouring market or fair. [Ibid. p. 150.]
Jan. 16. Pass for Monsr. Maltot and Monsr. d'Aprigny, having occasion to buy some horses, to travel into such parts of England or Wales as they shall have occasion and to return to London with such horses as they shall have brought. [Ibid. p. 151.]
Jan. 17. Pass for John Trinder of Westwell, Oxfordshire, on a certificate of his physician, chirurgeon and apothecary, that by reason of an indisposition he took a journey into France and found great benefit by the change of air and, being since fallen into a relapse, he is advised to go there again and stay some time, to pass thither with Alice, his wife, and Celia, his daughter, and two servants and two horses. [Ibid.]
Jan. 17. Pass for the Chevalier de Ville Lune, gentleman of the horse to the Marquis of Louvois, to embark and transport into France 14 horses for the use of the said Marquis and six servants to attend them. [Ibid. p. 154.]
Jan. 18. Pass for Mrs. Lecally, going into the Princess of Orange's service, with Leonard Lecally, her son, and Anne Ravells, her maid servant, to go to Holland. [Ibid. p. 153.]
Jan. 23. Licence to — to transport four horses to France for his own use with two grooms and a boy. [Ibid. p. 157.]
Jan. 23. Pass to permit Peter Bileu, Hautier Nolet, and William del Ville to embark and pass into Flanders with certain household goods and baggage of the Marquis de Bourgomayne, envoyé extraordinary from the Catholic King. [Ibid. p. 158.]
Jan. 24. Another copy of the proclamation dissolving Parliament, calendared ante, p. 52. [Ibid. p. 156.]
Jan. 29. Pass for George, Earl of Northumberland, with the Sieur la Chesney, his tutor, the Sieur Sarsfield and John Rogers, his domestics, Jaques Brisac, his valet de chambre, La France, his cook, three lacqueys, the servants of the said la Chesney and Rogers, Anne Tellier and Anne Gobert, to pass beyond the seas for his education and to return. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 160.]
Feb. 3. Pass for the Countess of Shrewsbury to pass out of France into England with three servants and also for Nicholas Stubbs and Mary Lambert, two other of her servants, to pass over into France and return with her into England. [Ibid. p. 163.]
Feb. 15.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Thomas Walker to be lieutenant of Capt. Bennet's troop, and to Richard Gee to be cornet of Major Beckman's troop in Prince Rupert's regiment of dragoons. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 164, p. 1.]
Feb. 18. Pass for Edward Easton to transport 10 horses into France. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 178.]
Feb. 18.
Whitehall.
Approbation by the King of Lieut.-col. Thomas Wyndham to be a deputy lieutenant of Somerset. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 164, p. 1.]
Feb. 19.
Whitehall.
Commission to Capt. Edward Games to be lieutenant of Sir John Robinson's foot company in garrison in the Tower. Minute. [Ibid.]
Feb. 19.
Whitehall.
Commissions to John Berners to be ensign of Lieut.-col. Langley's company, and to Owen Pryce to be ensign to Capt. Congreve both in the Duke of Monmouth's foot regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
March 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant and memoranda of the warrants for disbanding the forces mentioned in the warrant and note of warrants calendared ante, pp. 92, 93. [Ibid. pp. 2–4.]
March 1.
Whitehall.
Commission to Gamaliel Capel to be cornet to Capt. Nedby in the Duke of Monmouth's regiment of horse. Minute. [Ibid. p. 6.]
March 7.
Whitehall.
Approbation by the King of Lord Bruce, Charles Leigh, Sir John Duncombe, Sir John Cotton, Sir Anthony Chester, Sir Stephen Anderson, Sir John Osborne, Sir William Palmer, Sir George Blundell, John Keeling and John Coppin to be deputy lieutenants of Bedfordshire. [Ibid. p. 5.]
March 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Henry Howard, Commissary General of the Musters, for allowing and passing on the musters Sir John Godolphin, major and cornet of the Duke of York's troop of Horse Guards, who has been given leave to go to France for the recovery of his health, and his two servants during his absence. [Ibid.]
March 19.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Henry Jeyne to be captain, to William Rhodes to be lieutenant and to Burrington Goodwin to be ensign of the company to be raised and added to the Earl of Inchiquin's foot regiment in garrison at Tangier. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 164, p. 6.]
March 31.
Whitehall.
The King to Sir Thomas Morgan, Governor of Jersey. Warrant for demolishing Mount Orgeuil Castle, as being of no use for the defence of the said island, the wood, iron and lead of the same to be carefully preserved from embezzlement and to be disposed of according to the directions left by Major Beckman with Capt. William Wynd. [Ibid.]
April 1.
Whitehall.
Commission to William Wolseley to be lieutenant of an independent company in garrison in Chepstow Castle, whereof the Marquess of Worcester is captain. [Ibid. p. 7.]
April 8.
Whitehall.
Approbation by the King of John Speke of White Lackington to be one of the deputy lieutenants for Somerset. [Ibid.]
April 22.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Capt. William Eaton to be captain of the King's own company, whereof Capt. Jeffreys was late captain, to Capt. Edward Russell to be captain of the company whereof Capt. Eaton was captain, and to Richard Cooke to be lieutenant to Capt. Sutherland, all in Col. John Russell's regiment of Guards. Minutes. [Ibid.]
April 22.
Whitehall.
Commission to Sir John Lanier to be commander in chief and governor of Jersey and of all the castles and forts there. [Ibid. p. 8.]
April 22.
Whitehall.
Commission to Sir John Lanier to be captain of an independent foot company in garrison in Jersey, whereof Sir Thomas Morgan, the late governor, was captain. Minute. [Ibid.]
April 22.
Whitehall.
Instructions for Sir John Lanier. 1. You shall on the receipt of your commission, these instructions and other necessary papers repair forthwith to Jersey and there receive into your possession from the Deputy Governor or other the officer commanding in chief, the government of the island, Castle Elizabeth and other the forts there and all the magazines, stores, arms, ammunition and habiliments of war thereto belonging.
2. On your arrival you are to expose your commission to the bailiffs and jurats, requiring their obedience to it, and, as soon as may be, inform yourself very particularly of the present state of the island, its defects and dangers, with the most effectual means to redress the one and prevent the other, and you shall return us a perfect account thereof and of whatever else you shall find of importance for the safety of the place.
3. You shall assure the magistrates and good people of the island of our particular care as well to preserve them in the full enjoyment of their civil rights and privileges as to protect them from all violence and invasion from abroad, and that accordingly we have given in charge, as we now do very especially to you, to take care that their just rights and powers in the civil government of the island remain entire according to the usual rules and customs, in supporting of which you are to be assisting to them.
4. You shall, according to the power in your commission, as often as you think fit, assemble the militia of the island, which you shall so model that by frequent disciplining and exercise they may be rendered of most use for the defence of the same.
5. You shall see that the accounts of the garrison till the end of the last muster be clearly stated, and you are to take into your care from thenceforth the paying of the garrison out of the moneys assigned for that purpose.
6. You are from Lady Day last to enter in our name on the receipt of all the revenues in the island, out of which you are to reserve so much to yourself, as will with your pay as a captain of a foot company make up 1,000l. per annum, which we intend shall be allowed you for your pay and entertainment as commander in chief and governor, and you shall employ any remainder of the said revenue in defraying the incident charges of the government.
7. You shall weekly or as often as you have opportunity advise us of all your proceedings and of whatever else you shall find relating thereto, especially of the motions of our nearest neighbours, whom you are therefore diligently to observe by the best information you can procure, and you are immediately to transmit to us anything of note that comes to your knowledge. [Over 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 164, p. 9.]
April 22.
Whitehall.
The King to Sir John Lanier. Whereas we directed Sir Thomas Morgan, the late governor, to take care that the additional forces sent for the defence of the island, should be quartered in what places he should think best in inns, victualling and other public houses and, in case there should not be sufficient room there, in private houses, we require you to observe the same rule in quartering the forces already sent and such as we shall find necessary to send for the greater security of the island, and you are to give strict orders for preventing all misdemeanours and disorders of the soldiers in their quarters and take particular care that their quarters be duly paid, and the magistrates and all other officers and subjects are required to take notice of this our pleasure. [Ibid. p. 12.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
Commission to Lord Alington to be captain of an independent foot company in the Tower, whereof Col. David Walter was captain. Minute. [Ibid. p. 9.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
Commission to Thomas Cheeke to be captain of an independent foot company in the Tower, whereof Sir John Robinson was captain. Minute. [Ibid.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Commission to Piercy Kirke to be captain of a troop of horse in the Earl of Oxford's regiment. Minute. [Ibid. p. 13.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Viscount Grandison, captain of the Yeomen of the Guard, for swearing Thomas Hewitt as corporal thereof in the room of Henry Dutton Colt. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 164, p. 13.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
Commission to Lieut.-colonel Thomas Talmish to be captain of the company whereof Capt. Herbert Price was captain in the Earl of Craven's regiment. Minute. [Ibid. p. 15.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
Commission to Capt. John Richardson to be captain of Capt. Meoles' company in the Holland regiment. Minute. [Ibid. p. 16.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Earl of Arlington, Lord Chamberlain, for swearing and admitting Henry Dutton Colt to be ensign of the Yeomen of the Guard. [Ibid. p. 13.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a commission to the Duke of Monmouth to be captain general of all the land forces in England, Wales and Berwick. [Nearly 2 pages. Ibid. p. 14.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
Commission to Francis Wyndham to be lieutenant of Capt. Peregrine Bertie's troop in the Earl of Oxford's regiment. Minute. [Ibid. p. 20.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
The King to the Duke of Newcastle, Lord Lieutenant of Northumberland and Governor of Berwick. Having received certain information of the rebellion in Scotland and being sensible how far the peace of the northern parts is concerned in the safety of Berwick and how active the rebels may be by means of the dangerous practices and secret correspondencies they hold with persons of the same disloyal principles to create new troubles by surprising or even openly attacking the said town, we desire you on the receipt hereof to give effectual orders to your deputy lieutenants for putting 500 men of the militia of Northumberland into the said town, to remain there till our further pleasure be signified. [Ibid. p. 16.]
June 11.
Whitehall.
The King to the Bishop of Durham. After reciting the last letter and that he understands that the militia of Northumberland will hardly amount to that number, requiring him on the receipt thereof to order some of his deputy lieutenants to raise and march such companies of his militia as are in the neighbourhood of Berwick to that place and put them there for its defence, till other provision be made for its safety. [Ibid. p. 17.]
June 12. List of commissions for the General's regiment of horse commanded by Col. Charles Gerard. (Printed in Dalton, English Army Lists, Vol. 1, p. 256, where "Shedham" should be "Studham.") [Ibid. p. 19.]
June 12. List of commissions in the Duke of Monmouth's foot regiment, including the 4 companies sent to Tangier. (Printed in Dalton, English Army Lists, Vol. 1, pp. 255, 256, where "Rumsey" should be "Ramsey.") [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 164, p. 20.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a commission to Lord Gerard of Brandon to be lieutenant-general of the forces in England during the Duke of Monmouth's absence. [Ibid. p. 22.]
Another similar warrant with some differences. [Ibid. p. 18.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Ordnance Commissioners for disembarking and receiving back into the ordnance stores the mortar pieces, tents, and other provisions of war directed to be shipped for Berwick and now lying at the Tower wharf. [Ibid. p. 22.]
July 9.
Windsor Castle.
The Earl of Sunderland to the Earl of Burlington. Signifying the King's approbation of Sir John Boynton to be one of the deputy lieutenants in the West Riding of Yorkshire. [Ibid. p. 23.]
[July ?] Commission to Thomas Lucy to be captain of Capt. Peregrine Bertie's troop in the Earl of Oxford's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
Aug. 21.
Windsor.
Commission to John Tonge to be captain of Major Clarke's late company in the Earl of Craven's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
Sept. 1.
Windsor.
Commissions to John Hedlam to be lieutenant and to Richard Crofts to be ensign of Capt. Lee's company in garrison at Portsmouth. Minutes. [Ibid. p. 24.]
Sept. 1.
Windsor.
Commission to Charles Churchill to be captain of Col. Buller's late company in the Duke of York's regiment commanded by Sir C. Lyttelton. Minute. [Ibid.]
Sept. 1.
Windsor.
Commissions to Stint Duncomb to be lieutenant to Capt. Whorwood and to Richard Hopton to be lieutenant and to William Ashton to be ensign to Capt. Roger Langley, all in Col. John Russell's regiment of Foot Guards. Minutes. [Ibid. pp. 24, 25.]
Sept. 1.
Windsor.
Commission to — Collingwood to be lieutenant of Capt. H. Cornwall's company, to Francis Rogers to be ensign to Capt. James Starling, to Edward Fox to be lieutenant to Capt. John Richardson and to John Meoles to be ensign to Major Boade, all in the Holland regiment. Minutes. [Ibid. pp. 26, 29.]
Sept. 8.
Windsor.
Warrant to the Ordnance Commissioners for the removal of such cannon, arms &c. from Carisbrooke Castle to Yarmouth in the Isle of Wight as Sir Robert Holmes, Governor of the island, shall think necessary for the defence of that town. [Ibid. p. 24.]
Sept. 12.
Windsor.
The King to the Duke of Monmouth. Whereas we intend to revoke your commission of Captain General, we by these presents signify the same to you and hereby require you to deliver up your commission and send it forthwith to us. [Ibid. p. 25.]
Sept. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Earl of Arlington, Lord Chamberlain, for swearing and admitting Charles Villiers as clerk of the cheque to the Yeomen of the Guard in the room of Richard Smith, deceased. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 164, p. 25.]
Sept. 25.
Whitehall.
Commission to Ralph Delaval to be captain of Sir Christopher Musgrave's late company in the King's regiment of Guards. Minute. [Ibid. p. 26.]
Sept. 25.
Whitehall.
The King to the Ordnance Commissioners. Warrant for a grant to Capt. William Wind of the office of Engineer to the Ordnance Office in reversion after Major Martin Beckman. [Ibid.]
Sept. 25.
Whitehall.
Commission to Col. John Russell to command in chief all the forces left behind for the safety and peace of the government in and about London and Westminster during the King's absence at Newmarket. [Ibid. p. 27.]
Oct. 5.
Newmarket.
Warrant for a grant to Sir Francis Leeke of the captainship of the Blockhouse of West Tilbury and of the Blockhouse near Gravesend, with the fee of 2s. per diem for the office at West Tilbury and of 20l. per annum and 4d. per diem for the office near Gravesend, to commence from Michaelmas last. [Ibid. p. 28.]
Oct. 6.
Newmarket.
Commissions to Sir Francis Leeke to be captain of an independent company in garrison in Gravesend Blockhouse and to John Baron and Thomas Wormeley to be lieutenant and ensign of that company. Minutes. [Ibid.]
Grants of denization to the following persons during 1679:—
Date. Name. Reference.
Jan. 2. Sir Gabriel Sylvius. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 134.
July 10. Manuel Lopez Perera, Andrew Alus Noguera and Rowland Gideon. Ibid. p. 274.
Sept. 1. Laurence Thompson. Ibid. p. 287.
Nov. 19. Arnold Bouchery, clerk. Ibid. p. 300.
Passes to the following persons during 1679:—
Date. Name. Place. Reference.
Jan. 1. Edward and Elizabeth, children of Sir George Penruddock. Parts beyond seas. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 133.
1679. Jan. 1. Mary Yate with Mary, her daughter, and Charles, her son, two women servants and three men servants. Parts beyond seas. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 134.
Jan. 2. Nicholas Benard, servant to the Marquis Montecucully, envoyé extraordinary from the Duke of Modena. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 132.
Jan. 2. Thomas Eyre of Eastwell, Leicestershire. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Jan. 2. Rodolpho Cremer, native of Flanders. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 135.
Jan. 3. James and John Plunket, William Morgan and Robert Barnwall. Ireland. Ibid. p. 132.
Jan. 3. Nicholas le Maire. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 133.
Jan. 3. Humphrey Traford, merchant, of Liverpool. Ireland. Ibid.
Jan. 3. Oliver Fitzharris. Ireland. Ibid. p. 136.
Jan. 4. Henry Jermyn and Judith, his wife, with two women and 12 men servants. Ibid. p. 149.
Jan. 6. Thomas Wright, Giles Thorp and James Stourton, stewards to Col. Henry Sidney employed by him for bringing back his regiment. Flanders. Ibid. p. 136.
Jan. 6. Isaac Rolas, native of France. France. Ibid.
Jan. 6. Joao Pereyra, Anna Maria Amore da Costa, Joseph de Guintren and Joao Cordazo, natives of Portugal. Portugal. Ibid. p. 137.
Jan. 6. Balthasar Barboza, native of Portugal. Portugal. Ibid.
Jan. 7. John Vivant, native of Bordeaux. Bordeaux. Ibid. p. 136.
Jan. 7. Col. Hoyle Walsh, one of the Queen's Gentlemen Ushers. Ireland. Ibid. p. 137.
Jan. 7. Charles Howard and Mary, his wife, with his son Henry and George Tettershall, his wife's father, and two servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 149.
Jan. 8. Nicholas Gambier and Thomas Morin, both Protestants. France. Ibid. p. 140.
Jan. 8. John Morpain, native of France. France. Ibid.
Jan. 8. Henry Luttrell, native of Ireland. Ireland. Ibid.
Jan. 8. Sebastian Baroso, sent to Portugal by the Queen. Portugal. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 140.
Jan. 8. Antonio de Briñey and his servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 143.
Jan. 8. Denis Donoghue, John Butler, Denis O'Brian, Philip Macker and Edmond Broy, subjects of Ireland, who have lately quitted the French service and desire to return to their native country. Ibid. p. 167.
Jan. 9. Jean Benard, a Protestant. France. Ibid. p. 140.
Jan. 9. Timothy Conell, late soldier in Lord Peterborough's regiment. Ireland. Ibid.
Jan. 9. Daniell le Royer, native of France. France. Ibid. p. 143.
Jan. 9. Matthew Pelley, servant to Capt. Hill, quarter-master to Capt. Wind's troop in Jersey. Ireland. Ibid.
Jan. 9. Eve Magenis, going to France to her husband, and Agnes Wurmes, her servant. France. Ibid. p. 144.
Jan. 9. Francis Risden and Hanath, his wife, and two servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Jan. 9. Jeremia Hagens and John Roover, his servant. Flanders. Ibid.
Jan. 9. Peter Ford, servant to Henry Arundell, going to his master in France. Ibid. p. 145.
Jan. 9. John Caryll, senior, of Harting, Sussex, with his sons, Richard Caryll and Frances his wife, Philip Caryll and Mary his wife, and Peter Caryll, with five servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Jan. 10. Gerrard Nuget, late soldier in the Duke of York's Regiment. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 144.
Jan. 10. Francis le Roy and Peter Morel, natives of Brussels and returning thither. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Jan. 11. Christopher Winteringham and Gilbert Atkinson, students of Trinity College, Cambridge. Ibid. p. 145.
Jan. 11. James Arden, servant to David Power, chirurgeon to the Queen, going beyond seas to his master. Ibid.
Jan. 11. Andrew Gallway, one of the Grooms of the Privy Chamber to the Queen. Parts beyond seas. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 146.
Jan. 11. Dame Mary Englefield and Anne, Philip, Elizabeth and Charles Englefield, her children, and one man and two women servants, and also for Henry Morgan, her nephew, and his footman. Ibid. p. 147.
[Jan. 11 ?] Anthony Kemp and Mary, his wife, and Philip, Henry and Anthony, his children, with three men and three women servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 148.
Jan. 11 (?) Anthony Finch with two servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Jan. 11. Thomas Bartlet and Catherine, his wife, with one man and one maid servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Jan. 13. Henry Hall and Frances, his wife, with four men and three women servants. Ibid. p. 150.
Jan. 17. Henry Conquest and Elizabeth, his wife, and Dorothy, their child, and Dorothy Anderton, his kinswoman, and Dorothy, her daughter, with one man and two maid servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 151.
Jan. 17. Anne Coviet and Pierre Talles, of the French nation. France. Ibid. p. 152.
Jan. 17. John Webbe of Cantford, Dorsetshire, Mary, his wife, John, his son, and Mary, his daughter, with one man and two waiting women. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Jan. 17. Richard Burgh and Constance Magennis, two of the Queen's footmen. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Jan. 17. John Cosyn, native of Brussels. Brussels. Ibid.
Jan. 18. Edward Meredith with Amos Meredith, his brother, and Margaret and Mary, his sisters. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Jan. 18. Sir John Fortescue with John and William, his sons, and Elizabeth, his daughter, with four men and two women servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 153.
Jan. 19. Henry Browne, son to Viscount Montagu, and Barbara, his wife, with two men and two maid servants. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 153.
Jan. 19. Jane Cassy, widow, William Cassy and Edward Burdet, also Mary and Jane Cassy, with a man and two maid servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Jan. 20. Sir Francis Throckmorton with two servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 154.
Jan. 21. Michael Penruddock and James, Elenor, and Michael, his children, and a man and a woman servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Jan. 21. Charles Somerset and Catherine, his wife, with Charles, Henry and Mary Somerset, their children, and Catherine and Anne Sawyer, her children, with two men and two women servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 155.
Jan. 23. Greenhill Dudley, a carpenter, Elizabeth, his wife, and four children. Portugal. Ibid.
Jan. 23. John Gibson, Richard George and John Gresan. Portugal. Ibid.
Jan. 23. Nicholas la Fountaine and Andrew le Grand, two kettle drums. France. Ibid.
Jan. 24. William Brent and John Smith. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 158.
Jan. 25. Francis du Plessy, a French Protestant. France. Ibid. p. 157.
Jan. 25. Dame Elizabeth de la Vallee. France. Ibid.
Jan. 25. Philip Walgrave of Ingerston, Essex, with two servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Jan. 25. Sir Walter Blunt, Dame Alice, his wife, and Charles and Edward, his brothers, with two men and two women servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 158.
Jan. 25. Richard, son to Sir Richard Atkins, and Benjamin Moret, his servant, with three horses. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 159.
Jan. 25. Darby Denevant, on the solicitation of Mrs. Walker, woman to the Duchess of Portsmouth. Ireland. Ibid. p. 161.
Jan. 26. Henry Somerset and two servants. Ibid. p. 157.
Jan. 28. William Allestree, John Hubbins, Samuel Free and Nicholas Manning, with his wife and a maidservant. Parts beyond seas. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 159.
Jan. 28. John Rooper and Anne and Mary, his daughters, with a man and two maid servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 161.
Jan. 28. John Thornton and his two servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Jan. 28. William Daniell and his two servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Jan. 28. William Gower and William Fleetwood, with two servants and three horses. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 162.
Jan. 29. John Paul Guillemans and Symon Fernandes, two painters. Portugal. Ibid. p. 159.
Jan. 29. John Chasse and Stephen Schutin, servants to the Comte d'Egmont. Flanders. Ibid.
Jan. 29. Thomas Duvall, of the Queen's Horse Guards. France. Ibid. p. 160.
Jan. 29. James Admyrault, native of France. France. Ibid.
Jan. 30. Servant to Sir Robert Talbor, going with medicines to the Duc de Catres (? Chartres) and the Duc de Maine. France. Ibid. p. 162.
Jan. 31. Lister Blount of Mapledurham, Oxfordshire, with his servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 163.
Feb. 1. Theodore van Wassenhove, Francis Meersman, Michael Meyre and his wife, Thomas Lion, Jean Jansis and Jean Rogers, late trumpeters to Lord Gerard's regiment. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 162.
Feb. 1. Dame Anne Dudley, widow, for the recovery of her health, with three men and three women servants. Ibid. p. 163.
Feb. 1. John Smith of Crabbet, Sussex, and two servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Feb. 3. Charles Nassoto and Anthony Depres, late trumpeters to Lord Gerard's regiment. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 164.
Feb. 4. Casimirus Kzreminski, native of Poland, having been a slave 14 years in Smyrna. Danzig. Ibid. p. 188.
Feb. 5. Charles Conde, a Protestant. France. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 164.
Feb. 6. Mary Morgan, for her health, with a maid servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Feb. 6. Mary Bellamy and Mary la Marsh, late servants to the Duchess of Portsmouth. France. Ibid. p. 166.
Feb. 6. Joseph Idoikowski, native of Poland. Poland. Ibid. p. 167.
Feb. 8. Sieur des Fontaines, native of France, with his wife. France. Ibid.
Feb. 8. Francis Guitou, native of France. France. Ibid.
Feb. 8. Martin de Beaufeu, native of France. France. Ibid.
Feb. 8. Mary Boucher and Frances Ayme, her maid, being natives of France. France. Ibid. p. 168.
Feb. 8. Thomas Keightly with Catherine, his wife, and William, his son, Mrs. Lettice Knollys and Dorothy Lester, a maidservant and also John Belson and Richard Johnson, his servant. Ibid.
Feb. 9. Juan Baupp Maes, merchant of Flanders. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 170.
Feb. 10. and 26. Augustin de Bruteley, servant to the Spanish Ambassador. Flanders. Ibid. pp. 170, 182.
Feb. 10. William Stych of Essex, with Edmund Doncaster, his servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 170.
Feb. 10. Roger Copley, with Anne, his wife, and Cecil and Winifred, his son and daughter, and three maid and one man servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 171.
Feb. 11. Geneviefue Sursault. France. Ibid.
Feb. 11. Margaret Ford to go to her husband. France. Ibid. p. 172.
Feb. 11. William Metham of Bullington, Lincolnshire, for the recovery of his health. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Feb. 13. John Wolfe, junior. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Feb. 13. Henry Titchborne, M.D., and Mary, his wife, with his maidservant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
[Feb. 13?] John Hervieu and Moyse Hervieu, natives of France and Protestants. Ibid.
Feb. 14. James Mowbray. Parts beyond seas. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 174.
Feb. 14. Edward Meredith and his brother and sisters, and John Davis, his servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Feb. 15. Roger Clinton, of the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields, bricklayer. France. Ibid. p. 175.
Feb. 15. Thomas Markham of Ollerton, Nottinghamshire, with Anne, his wife and two servants. Ibid.
Feb. 17. Joseph Falaiseau, a French gentleman. Holland. Ibid.
Feb. 18. Elizabeth Smith, widow. France. Ibid. p. 176.
Feb. 19. Herman de Wit and John Guillaume, natives of Flanders. Flanders. Ibid.
Feb. 19. Mary Hargrave and Mary Harris. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 178.
Feb. 20. Don Juan Gomez de Santecilla. Spain. Ibid. p. 176.
Feb. 21. Dorothy Blay and Edward, her child, natives of Flanders. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 178.
Feb. 21. Mary Meyer, wife of the Comte d'Egmont's trumpeter. Ibid.
Feb. 21. Anthony Coignell, belonging to the Comte d'Egmont. Flanders. Ibid.
Feb. 21. Anthony Wilden, native of Flanders. Flanders. Ibid. p. 179.
Feb. 21. David Duncan, going to Denmark to his brother, Lieut.-General James Duncan, with his servant. Ibid.
Feb. 22. Dame Mary Huddleston and Dorothy Thurmin, her servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 178.
Feb. 22. Darby Mullrean of St. Martin's in the Fields, a Protestant, with Mary Garven and Eleanor Drescall. Dunkirk or Calais. Ibid. p. 179.
Feb. 24. Giles d'Anhay, native of Flanders, footman to Comte d'Egmont. Flanders. Ibid. p. 180.
Feb. 25. Ambrose Rookwood, Elizabeth his wife, and Ambrose, John, Katherine, Frances and Charles, their children, with a man and a maid servant. Ibid. p. 174.
Feb. 25. William Peyton, with Frances, his wife, and a little child and their servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 181.
Feb. 25. John Hill, a Protestant going to France to fetch home his two sons. France. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 181.
Feb. 26. Theodore Maryn, Adam Mavele and Henry, his son, natives of Brussels, now returning thither. Ibid. pp. 182, 184.
Feb. 26. Mansueto de Neufchasteau, Mel-chior de Menin and Juan Perin, domestics of the Comte d'Egmont. Flanders. Ibid. p. 182.
Feb. 26. Julien de Bragelonne, steward to the Baron de Serainchamp, envoye extraordinary from the the Duke of Lorraine, and Sebastien Praux, his cook. Holland. Ibid. p. 183.
Feb. 27. John Reysbreek and his wife, natives of Flanders. Flanders. Ibid.
Feb. 28. Elizabeth, wife to Nicholas Plunket, and John Plunket, his son, with two servants. Ireland. Ibid. pp. 179, 181.
Feb. 28. William Colom and John Mabill. Ireland. Ibid. pp. 176, 184.
Feb. 28. Antonio van Steenstraete, native of Brussels, and his wife. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 184.
Feb. 28. Joseph Verano, domestic to the Comte d'Egmont. Flanders. Ibid. p. 186.
Feb. 28. Lewis de Costa and Michael, a blackmore servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Feb. 28. Francis Sarsfield. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 187.
Feb. 28. Richard Burke and Henrietta Maria, his wife, and John Staley, his servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 188.
Feb. 28. Judith Killegrew, wife to Dr. Killegrew, with Henry Harvey, a youth under her care, who travels for health, with her servant, and Elizabeth Clerk, servant to Mistress Mary Crane and Mistress Sarah Staniehurst, with Diana, her child. Ibid. p. 189.
Feb. 28. Robert Power. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 191.
Feb. James Hacon of Norwich and Elizabeth, his wife, and four children and two servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 176.
Feb. George Mathews and Cicely, his wife, with four servants. Ireland. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 183.
Feb. Helene Helly, native of France. France. Ibid.
Feb. Robert Power. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
[Feb. ?] Marcos Barboza, a Portuguese gentleman belonging to the Countess of Penalva. Portugal. Ibid. p. 180.
March 3. Elizabeth Widdrington and Elizabeth Munkton, her maidservant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 186.
March 3. Edmund Greene of Landneth in Cleveland, and two servants. Ibid. p. 187.
March 4. James Thompson with Margaret, his daughter. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 188.
March 6. Henry and Francis Stafford, sons, and Alethea and Anastasia Stafford, daughters of the Viscount de Stafford, with four men and two women servants. France. Ibid.
March 6. Matthias Banners, native of Brabant. Brabant. Ibid. p. 189.
March 6. Lady Holles, wife of Denzill, Lord Holles, with her servants. France. Ibid. p. 192.
March 7. Richard Wingham. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 189.
March 8. George Godfrey, merchant of Rouen. Rouen. Ibid.
March 8. Adrienne Caillerie and her daughter, natives of France. France. Ibid.
March 8. James Tuchet with Elizabeth, his wife, with three men and one woman servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. pp. 175, 190.
March 8. Col. Thomas Dungan with four servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 186.
March 10. Anthony Saretti, an Italian. France. Ibid. p. 190.
March 10. John Adderly. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
March 10. Philip and Edward Jones. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 191.
March 10. Arnoldo de la Court, native of Brussels. Flanders. Ibid. p. 192.
March 10. Frances Sheldon, maid of honour to the Queen, Richard and George Sheldon and William Smith, with four women servants to Mistress Sheldon, two men servants to Richard and George Sheldon, and one to William Smith. Ibid. p. 195.
March 11. John Southcoate with two servants, Edward and George Cary with two servants, and Mistress Constance Southcoate with two maidservants. Parts beyond seas. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 191.
March 12. M. de la Tour, secretary to the Baron de Serainchamp, with three servants of the Baron. Flanders. Ibid. p. 192.
March 12. Mary Crane and Jane Widdring-ton, servants to the Queen, with their four servants. Ibid. p. 193.
March 13. Mary, William and Elizabeth Burlye, servants to Mrs. Crane and Mrs. Widdrington, the Queen's servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
March 13. Sir Edward Carteret, servant to the Duke of York. Holland. Ibid.
March 13. Bernard Rousel. France. Ibid.
March 14. John and Thomas Strich, domestic servants of the Comte d'Egmont. Flanders. Ibid. p. 195.
March 14. Francis Brathwaite. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
March 15. Henry Lambert, native of Brabant, with his wife. Flanders. Ibid. p. 198.
March 16. Thomas Sheridan, with his two servants. Flanders. Ibid. p. 199.
March 16. John de Connick, native of Flanders. Flanders. Ibid.
March 16. Peter Hergot, native of France. France. Ibid.
March 17. Octavius Pulleyn, governor to the Hon. Robert Boyle. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 200.
March 18. Justinian Coghlan, native of Flanders. Flanders. Ibid.
March 18. Charles Donnan, native of Mons. Flanders. Ibid.
March 18. The Sieur de la Riviere, a French gentleman. France. Ibid.
March 18. Don Placido de Salgado y Aranjo, native of Spain. Flanders. Ibid.
March 18. Nicholas Bond, servant to the Duke of York, and going to him, with his servant. Holland. Ibid.
March 18. John Delatre, the Duke of York's servant, going to him with Elizabeth, his wife, and James and Isabella, his children, and his servant. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 201.
March 19. Mary and Marguerite du Bois and Susanne Crochet, with three little children, natives of France. France. Ibid. p. 202.
March 19. Susan Owens and Thomas Owens, her son, with three servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
March 21. Sir Charles Curtius, Baronet. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 203.
March 21. Edmund d'Oiely, servant to the Duke of York, going to his master, with his servant. Ibid.
March 22. John Michael Thonet, native of Germany. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 190.
March 24. William and Robert Powell, late belonging to the Duke of Monmouth's troop of Grenadiers. France. Ibid. p. 203.
March 24. Robert Fisher of Threckingham, Lincolnshire. France. Ibid. p. 204.
March 24. John Lewin and his servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
March 25. Sir Edward Smith and his two servants. Ibid.
March 25. Redman Gibbons, a Protestant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 205.
March 26. Walter Jones, employed to fetch Edward Winter from the College at St. Omer and to return with him. Ibid.
March 27. Charles Fox, servant to the Earl of Carlingford. Flanders. Ibid.
March 28. John Cavanagh and John, his son. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 206.
March 28. Hubrecht vande Water, with Susanna, his wife, and a maidservant, natives of Antwerp. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
March 28. Christopher Jues, servant to John Lewin. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
March 29. Frances Farmer and Frances, her daughter, with three servants. Ibid. p. 203.
March 29. Francis Peter with his wife and son, natives of Switzerland. Switzerland. Ibid. p. 206.
March 29. Francis Kerckham, native of Brussels. Brussels. Ibid. p. 207.
March 31. Lewis Grabu, late master of the King's music, native of France, with his wife and three small children. France. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 207.
March 31. Dame Catherine Southcoate, widow, and Abigail Fairfax, herdaughter, with Jane Mercer, her maidservant, also James Palmer, son-in-law to the said Lady Southcoate, Catherine, his wife, and Roger, his son, William Mitchell, a manservant, and John Cross, a French boy, and Margaret Shelly and Grace Gallant, maidservants. Ibid. p. 208.
March 31. John Broca, native of France. France. Ibid. p. 209.
March 31. Robert Walton. Ireland. Ibid.
March 31. Major Thomas Kent and Capt. George Trapps, with two servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
March. Francis le Cornet, footman to the Duchess of Mazarin. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 187.
March. Giles le Sacher. France. Ibid. p. 201.
[March ?] Henry Hilliard with two servants. France. Ibid. p. 202.
April 1. Mary Audeley, with her maidservant, also Elizabeth Coffyne and Mary, her daughter. Ibid. p. 207.
April 1. Francis Lingano, with his wife and five children and a maid, natives of Antwerp. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 210.
April 2. Capt. William Joly and Johanna, his wife. Ibid. p. 209.
April 2. Michael Fortun, native of Brussels, with his wife and two children. Flanders. Ibid. p. 210.
April 3. Francis Teners. Ibid.
April 3. Arnoldus Bauer and Samuel Schlichting, with David Cast-tius, their Governor, natives of Poland. Ibid.
April 3. Antonio Vanden Ende and Frances his wife, natives of Flanders. Ibid. p. 211.
April 3. Joseph Crisp and — Freeman, his companion. France. Ibid.
April 4. John Middleton and Peter, his brother, with three servants, also Thomas Gascoigne and his servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 205.
April 5. Thomas Calaghan. Ireland. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 211.
April 5. Hugh Tootell. Flanders. Ibid.
April 5. Thomas Merley and Penelope, his wife, servants to the Duke of York, with their two servants. Ibid.
April 6. Nicholas Foy, native of France. France. Ibid.
April 6. John Bayley, the Duke's poulterer, with his servant. Brussels. Ibid. p. 212.
April 7. Arabella Churchill and her two children, Montjoy Churchill, Elizabeth Peacock, Elizabeth Becher and Francis Sarsfield, with Mary Leach, a maidservant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
April 8. Andrew Simonet, servant to Mr. Eliot, page to the Duke of York. Flanders. Ibid.
April 8. John Blandford, son of Robert Blandford, the Duke of York's servant. Brussels. Ibid.
April 8. Capt. Jervis Page. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 214.
April 9. Sieur de Mailletot, with 20 horses, bought on account of the Marechal de Bellefonds and other French lords, six couple of dogs, and eight servants. France. Ibid. p. 217.
April 10. Nicholas and Judith Maubert, Susanna Lepine, Sarah Maubert, Francis, Jane, Eliza-and Mary Jurin and Adriana Meugrave, natives of France and Protestants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 214.
April 10. Capt. Brian Murphy. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
April 10. William Moustier, servant to the Earl of Castlehaven. Flanders. Ibid.
April 10. Francis Dallemagne, native of France and a Protestant. France. Ibid.
April 10. Margaret Ranville, Protestant, native of France. France. Ibid.
April 10. Martin le Grosse, native of Flanders. Flanders. Ibid.
April 10. Nicholas Desert, native of France. France. Ibid. p. 215.
April 10. John D'Onelly, Augustin Garcia and Salomon de Vervi, belonging to the Comte d'Egmont. Flanders. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 215.
April 10. Redmond Lee and Samuel Strancham, Protestants. Flanders. Ibid.
April 11. Catherine and Francis de Britto, Charles Morgan, John Clarke and Hellen Celley, servants to the late Portuguese ambassador, deceased. Ibid.
April 12. Dominick Bouge, tailor to the Duke of York and his servant. Brussels. Ibid.
April 14. John Guilta, native of Flanders with his wife and child. Flanders. Ibid. p. 217.
April 14. Francis Wyndham, equerry to the Duke of York and his servant. Holland. Ibid. p. 218.
April 14. Robert Griffith. Ireland. Ibid.
April 16. Capt. Jervis Baxter. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
April 16. Benjamin Middleton with his servant Austin, a Moor. Flanders. Ibid. p. 220.
April 21. William Massey of Pottington, Cheshire, and his servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 207.
April 21. Thomas Talbott of Longford, Salop, and Anne, his wife, with two men and four women-servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 220.
April 21. Andrew, George and Francis Boisset, natives of France. France. Ibid.
April 21. John Cocques, silversmith to the Duke of York, with two servants. Flanders. Ibid. p. 222.
April 21. George Fitzjames, cupbearer to the Duke of York, with his servant. Flanders. Ibid.
April 21. John Norris, servant to Sir Thomas Bond. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
April 22. Walter Mildmay, of Tackley, Oxfordshire. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 202.
April 22. William Monnock, his wife and Francis and Ursula, his children, with a man and a maid servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 221.
April 22. Philip Van Berinbrooke and John Reves, the King's falconers, with two servants, sent to fetch hawks out of Holland for the King and to return. Holland. Ibid. p. 222.
April 23. John Errington with John Lowery and Gilbert Errington, his servants, also Edward Widdrington and Edward Widdrington, junior, and George and Peter Forcer with their servant. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 221.
April 23. Sir Marmaduke Constable and Robert Dolman with their servant. Flanders. Ibid.
April 23. Gerard Salvino, Mary, his wife, William Salvino and Francis Smith with Gerard Salvino's man and maidservant. Ibid.
April 23. Dame Elizabeth Anderton and her maidservant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 222.
April 23. Anthony Vane, Groom of the Privy Chamber to the Queen, with Anthony, his son. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 223.
April 23. John Herne and Joane, his wife, with John, Morice and Julian, their children. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
April 24. William Harnnage of Bellzardine, Salop, and Henry, his brother. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
April 24. Edward Compton of Geersby, Lincolnshire and Richard, his brother, and Francis Mensar of the same county and Mary, his wife, with their maid-servant. Ibid.
April 24. Thomas Hume. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 224.
April 25. George Eylston of Hendred, Berkshire, with Anne, his wife. Ibid.
April 26. Francis Perkins of Ufton, Berkshire, Katherine, his wife, Mary and Dorothy, his daughters, Mary Thorold, their kinswoman, and two maidservants and two footboys. Ibid.
April 26. Augustin Belson and Augustin, his son, with their maidservant and James Hyde and Frances, his wife, with their maid servant. Ibid.
April 26. Remigio da Rocha and Manuel da Costra, belonging to the Marquis de Aronches, Ambassador extraordinary of Portugal. Portugal S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 225.
April 27. Giovanni Battista Feleberi, an Italian of Verona, with his wife and a maidservant. Verona. Ibid.
April 27. Don Gabriel de Lecandury, Secretary of the Spanish embassy, with his servant. Flanders. Ibid. pp. 226, 227.
April 28. Robert, Lord Hunsdon, with six servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 226.
April 28. Dom Antonio de Silva, a Portuguese gentleman, with his servant. Portugal. Ibid.
April 28. Francisco Viera Henriques, a Portuguese gentleman, with his sevant. Portugal. Ibid.
April 29. John vanden Hove, page to the Marquis de Burgomayne, Spanish envoyé extraordinary. Flanders. Ibid. p. 227.
April 29. Thomas, Lord Bruce, and Walter Mildmay, his friend, with four servants, going to drink of the waters of Germany. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
April 30. John, son to Richard Kent, and Major Thomas Kent, his uncle, with two servants. Montpellier. Ibid. p. 228.
April 30. Thomas Berkeley of Ravenshill, Worcestershire. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 229.
April 30. Ambrose Rookwood and Elizabeth, his wife, Ambrose, John, Katherine, Frances and Charles, his children, and Mistress Elizabeth Manson, a kinswoman, with a man and a maid servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
May 1. Ambrose Stapleton. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 230.
May 3. Samuel Argall, M.D., and Elizabeth, his wife, Elizabeth, his daughter, and a man and a maid servant. Ibid. p. 228.
May 3. John Boudet, native of France. France. Ibid. p. 231.
May 3. Capt. Hugh O'Connor. France. Ibid.
May 3. Daniel Foucoult of the Inner Temple and his footboy and John Bonenfant, a French Protestant. France. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51,p. 231.
May 5. Prince de Gavre, son to the Comte d'Egmont, with Mr. Remilly, his governor, Mr. Bassecourt, Charles van Camp and Ferdinand Albertus, belonging to him, and a footman and a trumpeter. Calais. Ibid. p. 232.
May 7. Elizabeth Byrne, wife of Capt. Charles Byrne. Flanders. Ibid.
May 7. Henry Janson, doctor of the Civil Law. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 233.
May 8. George Matthew and Cecilia, his wife, with four servants. Ireland. Ibid. p. 232.
May 8. Beatrix Baradas, a Portuguese, with two servants. Ibid. p. 234.
May 11. John Cellé and Thomas, his son, natives of France. France. Ibid. p. 235.
May 12. Peter Williamson and Mary, his wife, with their servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 239.
May 13. Frances Keightley, with two children, Thomas Keightley and Elizabeth Parr, and her maid. Ireland. Ibid. p. 235.
May 13. Bartholomew Matthew de Neve, native of Flanders. Flanders. Ibid.
May 13. Henrietta Colinet, native of France. France. Ibid.
May 13. Francisco Rodrigues Lindo and Gabriel Rodrigues Lindo, natives of Teneriffe. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 238.
May 13. Peter Guinay, native of Flanders. Flanders. Ibid.
May 13. Peter Guiraud, native of France. Holland. Ibid.
May 13. Marck Grey and Elizabeth, his wife, natives of France. France. Ibid.
May 13. Elina Carter and Ellen, her daughter. Ibid. p. 239.
May 13. Edward Carleton, going to the Duke of York. Brussels. Ibid.
May 14. Dame Joyce Cocks, relict of Sir John Cocks, of Gloucestershire, and Katherine, their daughter, with three servants, going to the Spaw. Germany. Ibid. p. 237.
May 14. James Walsingham, Master of the Duke of York's buckhounds. Flanders. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 239.
May 14. Thady Callaghan. Ireland. Ibid.
May 14. Grace, wife of Edmond Heath, going to her husband. France. Ibid.
May 14. Paul L'Espier, native of Ath, in Flanders. Ath. Ibid. p. 240.
May 14. Thomas Maxwell. France. Ibid.
May 15. Louis Duplessy, a French minister. France. Ibid.
May 15. Claude des Granges Muntran and Hester, his wife, with Catherine le Barre, his niece, and their maidservant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
May 15. Gilbert Howse and Henry Lyon. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
May 15. Anthony Brocquett, native of Flanders. Flanders. Ibid. p. 241.
May 15. Anne Laherne. Ireland. Ibid.
May 16. Sir William Gallway, formerly servant to the Duke of Gloucester. Ireland. Ibid. p. 240.
May 16. Bryan Rilly and Mary, his wife, with Hugh and Katherine, their children. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 241.
May 16. Louise de Cartieri, native of Germany, and Isabella Johnsen, her maid, native of Flanders. Holland. Ibid. p. 243.
May 17. Bennet Richards and Mary, his wife, with Lewis and Bennet, their children, and their maid. Ireland. Ibid. p. 241.
May 17. John Wyborne and Mary, his wife, with two men and one maid servant. Ibid. p. 243.
May 17. Henry Cameron, native of France. France. Ibid.
May 20. Capt. Charles Carney. France. Ibid. p. 244.
May 21. Richard Graham. Holland or Flanders. Ibid. p. 245.
May 22. Christopher Windebank. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 247.
May 23. Francois Dubois, native of Flanders. Flanders. Ibid.
May 27. Paul Bauldry, Thomas le Gagneur and Jane Le Franc, natives of France, with their servant. France. Ibid.
May 27. Edward Carleton, servant to Col. George Legg. Brussels. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 247.
May 28. Elizabeth Ingoldsby, with Susannah and Mary, her children. Ireland. Ibid. p. 248.
May 28. Mary Grosse, native of Flanders, and Ann, her daughter. Flanders. Ibid.
May 29. John Baptista Douvry, native of France. France. Ibid.
May 30. Laurence le Jeune, native of France. France. Ibid.
May 31. Joseph Rany and Charles, his son, natives of Flanders. Flanders. Ibid.
May 31. Sir John Holman. Holland. Ibid. p. 251.
June 1. Paul Fernie and Katherine, his wife and two maidservants. Holland. Ibid.
June 2. Emond Yarmouth. Flanders. Ibid.
June 2. Martin Billiard, footman to the Duchess of Mazarin. France. Ibid.
June 2. Elizabeth Chambers. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
June 2. William Deuly, of the Horse Guards, having leave to travel for his health. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 252.
June 2. Judith Dupuis and John, her son. France. Ibid.
June 2. Lady Frances Bellings, Charles and Mary Catherine, her children, with two men and two maid servants, Lady Emilia Plunket, daughter to the Countess of Fingall, and her two servants, and Richard Smith and Edward Martin. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
June 3. Cornelius Ryane. France. Ibid.
June 3. John Kernan, groom of the Great Chamber to the Queen, Edmond, his son, and Mary and Margaret, his daughters, and his maidservant. Portugal. Ibid.
June 4. Daniel Skinner. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
June 4. Philip Marchant with 12 horses and two servants. France. Ibid. p. 253.
June 6. William Robinson and Henry Roper. France. Ibid.
June 7. William Petre. Ibid.
June 7. Capt. George Barkly. Ibid.
June 9. Mary Goulding and Elizabeth Digby. Parts beyond seas. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 253.
June 10. Charles Turner, to go to the Duke of York with his servant. Ibid. p. 255.
June 10. James Grahme and his servant. Flanders. Ibid.
June 11. Patrick Bourg. Ireland. Ibid. p. 256.
June 12. Pierre la Corte, native of France. Ibid.
June 13. James Maymain, native of France. France. Ibid.
June 13. Charles Trinder of Bourton on the Water with Mary and Jane, his daughters, Elizabeth Greenwood, his niece, and a maidservant. Ibid.
June 16. James Pierce, chirurgeon to his Majesty, and Samuel Mendwell. Brussels. Ibid. p. 257.
June 16. Martin de Carbonell, native of France. France. Ibid.
June 17. Peter Paquier and Matthew Charaney, with Anne, his wife, and Susanne, his daughter, natives of France. France. Ibid.
June 17. Peter Boucher, native of France. France. Ibid.
June 17. Mary, wife of Raymond Gaches of Eastwood, Essex, clerk, with John, James, and Mary, her children. France. Ibid. p. 258.
June 18. Katherine Legge and Rose, her daughter, going to her husband. Brussels. Ibid. p. 259.
June 18. Baron de Serainchamp, envoye extraordinary from the Duke of Lorraine with five servants. Holland. Ibid.
June 19. Arthur Alexander, servant to the Earl of Peterborough. Brussels. Ibid.
June 19. James Sauterez, and Abigail, his wife, and their four sons and Judith Thomas and Magdalene, her daughter, natives of Heidelberg. Heidelberg. Ibid.
June 20. William Liani, an Italian. Italy. Ibid. p. 260.
June 20. Mary Feril. Flanders. Ibid. p. 261.
June 21. John Smith and Thomas, his brother, with Ann Fox, their maid. Holland. Ibid.
June 21. Stephen Jurevez, native of Poland. Parts beyond seas. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 263.
June 22. Ann Draper. Ibid. p. 261.
June 25. Louis Fremin, native of Geneva. Ibid.
June 25. John Belson and Amy, his wife, and Augustin, Maurice, Bridget, Catherine and Mary, his children, and Mary Keightley with Charity Wormstel and Elizabeth Smith, their servants. Ibid.
June 26. Elizabeth Dupuy and Laurence Dupuy, her son, and Mistresses Frances Wentworth, Gerrard Beverley and Frances Hoare and Esther Kidd, servant to Mrs. Dupuy. Flanders. Ibid. p. 263.
June 27. George Littleton. France. Ibid. p. 262.
June 27. Catherine Elliot, Mary Fairfax, Anne Calvert, Elizabeth Lydall, Mary Sanburne and John Hanes, servants to her Royal Highness. Brussels. Ibid.
June 27. Katherine Duddall, widow and Agatha Gilmore, her sister. Ibid. p. 264.
June 28. Thomas Gifford of Cock Street, Wolverhampton. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 262.
June 28. Mary Moore and Henry and William, her sons, and Maudlin and Mary, her daughters, with two men and one maid servants, and James and Daniel Shalck, her brothers, natives of France. France. Ibid.
June 28. Charles Cottington with two servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 263.
June 29. William Drouett, native of Flanders. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 264.
June 30. The Earl of Castlehaven, with his valet de chambre, coachman and two footmen and three women servants. Ibid. pp. 258, 263.
June 30. Edmond, son of Thomas Wyndham, groom of the Bedchamber, and Robert Fotheringham. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 264.
June 30. William Moore. Parts beyond seas. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 264.
July 2. William Renolds, servant to the Duke of York. Brussels. Ibid. p. 265.
July 2. Dr. Thomas Doughty, chaplain to the Duke of York, with his servant and James Amand, apothecary to the Duke, with his two servants. Brussels. Ibid.
July 2. George and Elizabeth Kerney, servants to the Duke of York. Brussels. Ibid.
July 2. Francis Clisset, native of France. France. Ibid.
July 2. Eleanor Birne. Flanders. Ibid.
July 2. Margaret, wife of — Shelton, Yeoman of the Poulter to his Royal Highness, with her maid and Mary Thompson and Anne Holland, laundresses to the Duchess. Ibid. p. 266.
July 3. Anne Minshall. Ibid. p. 265.
July 3. Dame Mary Somerset, and Edward, her son, Thomas Gifford of Broad Hadley, Staffordshire, Thomas Seamor of Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, John Alebin of Dagenham, Essex, and Richard Alebin and Barbara, his wife, and five womenser-vants and one manservant to Lady Somerset. Ibid. p. 266.
July 3. Lelio de la Rovere, native of Savoy, and his servant. Savoy. Ibid.
July 3. Henry, Earl of Peterborough, and Penelope, his wife, with 20 menservants and 11 womenservants. Brussels. Ibid. p. 267.
July 4. Frances, wife to Richard Farmer, and William, her son, and Frances and Mary, her daughters, with one man and two women servants. Ibid. p. 264.
July 4. Comte d'Egmont, ambassador extraordinary from Spain. Ibid. p. 267.
July 4. Anne Bradshaw. Flanders. Ibid.
July 4. James Carron and Daniel Gruyel, natives of France. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 268.
July 4. Elizabeth, wife to Matthew Amonnet, merchant in Paris. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 268.
July 4. John Browne, servant to the Duke of York. Brussels. Ibid.
July 4. John Cornice and Mary Waite. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
July 7. Major William Stewart and two servants. Holland. Ibid.
July 8. Sir Charles Yeats of Buckland, Berkshire, with three men and two women servants. Ibid.
July 9. Judith, wife of Adam Roach, now in France, going to her husband. France. Ibid. p. 269.
July 9. John Read, servant to the Duke's confectioner. Flanders. Ibid.
July 9. Capt. Richard Baggot with his servant. France. Ibid.
July 10. Jane Finch of the parish of Rushock, Worcestershire, with two maids. Ibid.
July 10. Martin Russell. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 272.
July 10. Edmund Mulleneux of Westminster, with Ann, his wife, and Mary, Edward and Robert, his children, and his maidservant. Ibid.
July 10. Francis Bedingfield of Bedingfield, Suffolk, Susanna, his wife, Richard and Henry, his sons, and Agnes and Margaret, his daughters, with two menservants. Ibid.
July 11. Penelope Blaydes with a man and a maid servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 269.
July 11. Walter Grosveneux. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 272.
July 12. Frances Curson, widow. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 274.
July 15. Capt. Henry Dutton Colt with two servants, Lieut. Norris Jepson and his footboy and Mary Watts and her servant. Holland. Ibid.
July 17. Don Emanuel de Castro, servant to Marquis de Burgomayne, Flanders. Ibid.
1679. ambassador from Spain, with his daughter Isabella and her maid.
July 18. David Saulez, marriner of Ostend. Ostend. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 275.
July 18. John Gorman and William Jenkins. France. Ibid.
July 21. James Newman. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
July 22. Robert Plumpton and Thomas Menyll, Ann Tempest and Ann Menyll with John Barker and Ann Tempest (sic) their servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
July 22. Peter, Jane, and Elizabeth Middleton and Dorothy Wytham with two men and one maid servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 276.
July 22. Col. Garrett Moore with two servants. Ireland. Ibid.
July 23. Charles Tyrell and Frances de la Cour natives of France. France. Ibid.
July 25. Capt. George Trapps. Ibid. p. 277.
July 25. Capt. John Wood. Ibid.
July 28. John Banister, one of the King's musicians in ordinary, and John, his son. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
July 30. Marck Antony de Oliver, native of the Duchy of Milan, with his servant. Ibid. p. 279.
July 30. Don Martin de Pomar and Don Diego Seliano, Spanish gentlemen, with their servant. Ibid.
July 30. Michael Tempest of Lincoln's Inn. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 280.
July 30. Mary Bryers, laundrymaid to the Duchess of York. Flanders. Ibid. p. 281.
July 31. Penelope Downes of Wardley with her maid. France. Ibid. p. 279.
July 31. Margaret Hewood and Mary Holboarne. France. Ibid. p. 280.
July 31. Richard Stephens, page of the Backstairs to the Queen, with Johanna, his wife, John his son, Mariana, Elizabeth, Jeane, Blanch and Katherine his daughters, and his servant. Portugal. Ibid.
July 31. Burley Fenn, servant to the Duke of York. Flanders. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 281.
July 31. Katherine Walgrave with two servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 282.
Aug. 1. Col. Edward Villiers with four servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 280.
Aug. 1. Anthony Mouchau, William Hurst, Thomas Mitchell and Timothy Evelling, servants to the Duke of York. Flanders. Ibid. p. 281.
Aug. 1. William Eliot, Maurice Hacket, John Rode and John Hawkins. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Aug. 4. Thomas Fraizer. Flanders. Ibid. p. 282.
Aug. 6. Thomas Hooper and Mary, his wife and Rebecca and Matthew, their children. Flanders. Ibid.
Aug. 6. Mary, wife of Leonard Wyat, one of the Duke's grooms, and Francis, her son. Flanders. Ibid.
Aug. 7. John Churchill and his wife with four men and four women servants. Flanders. Ibid.
Aug. 8. Sara Tucker with her servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Aug. 8. Alexander Donaldson, Joshua le Febvre, Anna Dasmar and Anna de la Roche, natives of France. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 283.
Aug. 8. Margaret Knightly, widow, and Joseph and Elizabeth, her children, and Elizabeth Adamas her sister. Ireland. Ibid. p. 284.
Aug. 9. Mardocheus Rodriguez, an Italian. Leghorn. Ibid. p. 283.
Aug. 9. Anthony la Fontaine, native of France. France. Ibid. p. 285.
Aug. 9. Philip Laxton. France. Ibid.
Aug. 9. Alice Dooda. France. Ibid.
Aug. 9. Marguerite Gerard and Magdalene Nielleson, natives of France. France. Ibid.
Aug. 9. Francis Gernon, Theobald Mulloy and Thomas Eustace, belonging to Count Taaffe, now in Germany. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Aug. 13. Jane, wife of Robert Moody, peruque maker, now in Holland, going to her husband. Holland. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 279.
Aug. 15. John Philips and Thomas Jackson, servants to the Earl of Peterborough. Flanders. Ibid. p. 286.
Aug. 16. Charles Graves, William Hall, Richard Robjent and William Swift. Ireland. Ibid. p. 285.
Aug. 18. Sir Edward Càrteret. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 286.
Aug. 24. John Powtrell and Mary, his wife, and William and Anne Powtrell and Mary Busby with two servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Aug. John Digby of St. Mary Savoy, merchant. Ibid. p. 281.
Sept. 4. Col. Churchill and his servant. Flanders. Ibid. p. 288.
Sept. 8. Hugh Wallis. Holland. Ibid.
Sept. 8. John Fanning and Mary, his wife, and Elinor Thimble by, her mother, with two men and two women servants. Ireland. Ibid.
Sept. 9. John Keating, late a soldier in the King of Spain's service in Flanders. Ireland. Ibid.
Sept. 20. Erasmus Stanford, son to the Duke of Neuburg's Resident. Flanders. Ibid.
Sept. 22. George and Archibald Dunbar. Holland. Ibid. p. 289.
Sept. 22. Edward Carleton. Flanders. Ibid.
Sept. 26. Sir James Poole of Poole, Cheshire. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 290.
Sept. 26. Jessie Tipper. Flanders. Ibid.
Sept. 27. William Innis. Flanders. Ibid.
Sept. 30. William Fitzgerald. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 291.
Oct. 16. Henry Gray of Pitchfield, Northumberland and Troth, his wife. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 293.
Oct. 24. Charles, Duke of Somerset, and Alexander de Rasigade, his governor, with two servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 292.
Oct. 24. John, Earl of Exeter and Anne, his wife, and John, Lord Burghley, his son, John Willoughby, and John James Gaches and Edward Child, his chaplain, with five women and 14 men servants and with necessary carriages and 30 horses. Parts beyond seas. Ibid.
Nov. 4. Frederick de Rovere, native of Savoy and his servant. Savoy. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, p. 294.
Nov. 5. Philip la Fresnie, Samuel Hancock, Daniel Cox, Symon Russell and Mary Dabbs, servants to Lord Bruce. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 295.
Dec. 5. Samuel Marshall of St. Martin's in the Fields, shoemaker. France. Ibid. p. 301.
Dec. 8. Samuel Trottman of the Inner Temple and Dorothea, his wife, and Susanna Trottman with three men and three women servants. France. Ibid. p. 303.
Dec. 16. John Liford, William Fargesson, William Moody, James Gavers and Thomas Berre, servants to the Earl of Longford. Ireland. Ibid. p. 305.
Dec. 22. John Bellingham, groom of the Privy Chamber, with his servant. France. Ibid.
Dec. 22. John Brant, servant to Lady Arundell with two coach horses for Sir John Arundell. France. Ibid.
Considerations how the Protestants or Non-Papists of Ireland may disable the Papists there both for intestine rebellion and also for assisting a French invasion as the state of parties now stands in this present year, 1679.
1. The families in Ireland of all sorts are under 225,000, whereof only about 15,000 live in houses of above one chimney, the rest in cottages or cabins built by the people themselves. 2. Of the said 15,000 rich families about 8,000 are Protestants having four times the wealth and the arms of the other 7,000 Papists besides the authority, civil and military, and the army of about 1,500 horse and 6,000 foot, with the right of living in garrisons denied the Papists. 3. The 7,000 rich families of Papists are governed and advised by about 20 of their lawyers, 30 merchants and about 50 gentlemen, who have been in foreign parts and service and have been conversant with the court of England and other courts, men of good parts and carriages and popular in their countries, whereto may be added about 50 of the most able and active churchmen, bishops, superiors of orders, vicars general &c., who all have correspondence in foreign parts. 4. Of the 210,000 cottages scarce a tenth are Protestants, so there are about 190,000 Papist families which contain 150,000 men able to bear arms, all which are governed immediately by their priests and friars, there being a priest to less than 100 of these families, so the priests can in a short time communicate any design or commands to their flocks. 5. There are about 15,000 horses in Ireland, whereof 8,000 belong to English Protestants and about 4,000 to the restored and best affected Papists. 6. The smiths' forges are about 2,600, whereof about 2,000 are Irish Papists. 7. There are arms in the King's stores and in the army for about 35,000 men and in the hands of 8,000 English Protestant families and about 8 or 10,000 more in those of the Papists, making about 43,000 with the English and 8 or 10,000 with the Irish. 8. The shipping belonging to Ireland is under 10,000 tons nor are there 1,000 seamen and sea fishermen belonging to Ireland. 9. The inspection of what goes out of and comes into Ireland viz., gunpowder, ammunition, arms and incendiary persons is now in the hands of the farmers, though properly it belongs to the Admiralty. Though these farmers are vigilant enough as to what belongs to their profit, yet they employ many Papists, who by their power of entering and searching all ships and houses endanger and discontent the Protestant party, nor is the account of these said particulars duly made by such officers. It is humbly conceived that by the due management and application of the premises, the Papists in Ireland cannot hurt the Protestants for the following reasons:— 1. It is believed that, if 20 lawyers, 30 merchants, 50 gentlemen and 50 churchmen were properly disposed of, which the civil and military power of Protestants can do in twenty-four hours, then the whole Popish party will be without conduct, nor can the ill-disposed Irish do the same to the English, as some suggest. 2. The 8,000 rich English families and 20,000 other families and 8,000 of the present army can, after the said 150 ringleaders are disposed of, in 24 hours more take away the 8 or 10,000 arms supposed to be in the hands of the Irish, for the names and dwellings of those most likely to have them are pretty well known. 3. Of the 15,000 horses in Ireland 8,000 are already in the hands of the Protestants and about 4,000 in those of the best affected Papists. If but 10,000 of the 15,000 be thoroughly secured, as seems easy, then the Protestant horse forces will be double what is possible for the Irish to have and treble what the French can bring, for 200 ships of 150 tons each will scarce bring 5,000 horses, which ships will be very obnoxious to small fireships. 4. If great care be taken of the ports, no gunpowder or arms can be brought in, and, if the 2,600 smiths were all Protestants and confiding men, no arms could be made or mended against the Protestants, and this regulation of smiths is very practicable, because they cannot work without heavy and bulky tools and materials. 5. If the inferior priests and friars were well known by their names &c., they might after the disarming be easily removed and hindered from officiating or rather from incensing and stirring up the people and, if at such a juncture the Protestant ministry, which by the right application of the Church revenues might be doubled as to real effect, shall bestir themselves, it is probable that this great number of poor Papists would not only be quiet but also be very glad to be delivered from the impositions of the priests and the hard usage of their old Popish landlords. At least 20,000 of 150,000 of them would be reduced to a serviceable temper and be made fit to some use or other in a defensive army against the French, for many thousands of them fought very well against the rebels of their own country and religion. 6. If the owners were commanded to demolish as many of the 190,000 wretched cabins as stand in uncouth desert places and rebuild them in the ancient way of tithings, whereof 10 may stand together, and if these new tithings were placed on roads, passes and near sea creeks it is believed the country must be thereby freed of thieves and Tories as well as of rebels. 7. It has been known by former experience that the statute for bringing the Papists to church was very effectual. If the same were revived and the Protestant ministers did their parts, it is probable that thousands of the children, if not the parents, would in time be weaned from Popery, nor would the parents much resist it, though they might be ashamed themselves to renounce what they had long professed. 8. Whereas there are not 25,000 unmarried marriageable Papist women in Ireland, it is plain that in five years that whole number may be easily brought into England and as many English women sent into Ireland, which being effected, the education of children, the housewifery and clothing of the Irish would become wholly English, and, when the mothers and mistresses of every family shall be an English Protestant, there is no fear but that the whole genius of the nation will be changed in a few years and made such as it ought.
We come next to show how Ireland may be defended against a far greater force than even the French can bring or raise in Ireland. When 20 lawyers, 30 merchants, 50 gentlemen and 50 churchmen are made both prisoners and hostages as aforesaid for some small time, when the whole 50,000 arms are in the hands of the Protestants and none in the Papists', when the vulgar priests are severed from their flock, when all the smiths are confiding men, when 10,000 of the choice horse are secured to the Protestants, let us proceed to our defence against the French as follows:—1. Let the present army of 1,500 horse and 6,000 foot be officered, principled, disciplined and quartered to the best advantage. 2. Let Dublin and Waterford be as well fortified as may be. 3. Let Kinsale, Limerick, Galway, Londonderry and Drogheda be repaired and furnished as such garrisons ought to be, and let not above a third or a quarter of the inhabitants be Papists and those of the best-affected and useful men. In many other places the like seclusion may not be necessary. 4. Let the Protestants, who are between 20 and 24,000 able men, be formed into a militia and completely armed and disciplined. 5. Let there be 3,000 men and 1,000 horse formed into a new sort of militia, who by dexterous application of coarse wool shall obstruct the landing of any enemy and make their march throughout the country very troublesome and defend their friends as in a strong town, to be built anywhere in a hour. 6. Let the book elsewhere mentioned be made, tending to the best method of victualling, marching and quartering an army and how to starve, straiten and incommode the enemy and be in readiness with the maps thereto belonging with the accounts of the corn and cattle elsewhere mentioned. 7. Let the contrivance be settled how 20,000 of the 150,000 Irish may be made serviceable to the Protestants as also how even the remaining 130,000 may be also of use though in a different manner, at least not dangerous. 8. Let the sea guards of Ireland consist of 60 small vessels of a peculiar build and armature manned with about 1,200 men, whereto let there be added as much shipping of other sorts as the occasion shall require. 9. Besides the fortifying of Dublin and the six other ports and perhaps as many more inland garrisons advantageously seated, beware of fortifying any more but on peculiar reasons, but rather think of demolishing several of those existing.
Conclusions. 1. Dublin, whose houses and their contents we estimate to be worth near two millions sterling, in which are 36,000 souls and above 4,000 able men ready in arms, and to which the neighbouring places can in a few hours send 2,000 more, but which is now but an open village, may be so fortified with 40,000l. expense that, having the sea to friend and 6,000 men within, it shall be able to resist an army of 30,000, a greater number than ever was known together in Ireland or than can be kept together for any time before any town in Ireland and far greater than the French can bring or the Irish can raise; the like may be said of the six other towns in their several proportions. 2. The new militia of 1,000 horse and 3,000 men can in an hour make a wall cannon proof of a mile long in the shape of any fortification whatsoever and can encamp an army of 15,000 men every night as safe as if the same were in a strong town. 3. By the above mentioned books and maps, on the landing of an enemy, it shall be visible what and how much of the country is fit to be wasted and burnt and a ready method laid down how to carry away the cattle, corn, women and children out of the said wasted places and whither to send them, and how and from whence to bring auxiliary forces and provisions to the places of action. 4. There being about 200,000 fighting men in Ireland and 600,000 more of men, women and boys fit for labour, we reserve for another place to show how the 800,000 shall feed and maintain the 50,000 fighting men, viz., 8,000 of the present army, 22,000 of the Protestant militia and 18,000 of the honest Irish. 5. If the French shall conquer Ireland, his conquest shall cost him ten times more than the whole is worth, for in 1652 the land of Ireland and all that was in it was not worth to be sold the third part of what it cost England to reduce the last rebellion begun in 1641, nor did the Crown of England for 500 years make one penny benefit of their conquest.
This we think may be done, but, if no more be done than outwardly appears at the writing of this, the Papists being 10 or 12 for one can in any one day destroy all the Protestants by assigning to each Protestant by name 12 Papists by name to murder him, doing it universally at one certain hour, which method the priests can and have, as some say, already established, whenever they can find a fitting opportunity. Moreover the French can land wherever they please and by bringing 30,000 arms and 30,000l. in money can form a greater force than any the Protestants now have in Ireland. Lastly it is observed that the vulgar Irish, on taking down their mass-houses and other small provocations, curse the King of France for delaying his coming and losing his opportunity of easily destroying the English Protestant rogues. It is not safe to trust the whole Protestant English interest of Ireland to the influence and personal interest, which any one or a few persons can have on the bulk of the Irish Papists, whom religion and the loss of estate have made implacable against the English. Moreover, if any few persons had really this interest and power, yet it is not fit trusting the whole English interest to their discretion, nor is it safe to believe such persons are either immortal or immutable. All the above contrivances are to be effected without shedding any blood, without taking away any man's goods and without abridging more than 150 men of their liberty for a very few days. Though these contrivances may pique 4 or 500 of the most discontented Papists, yet they shall beget a settlement and security to 8 or 900,000 other Papists, the interest of which great number and of 300,000 Protestants is that salus populi which this paper aims at. [4 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 339, No. 59.]
[1679 ?] An Essay on the present state and settlement of Ireland. Whoever knows the country, the story and the present state of of Ireland and considers it without partiality, must confess that what is now called the Settlement of Ireland to have been from the beginning to the end a mere scramble, where he that throws out the prizes has indeed the great prize of bounty in parting with his own to please a crowd among whom are few he knows, but the golden shower falls without any well-directed order, and is mostly gathered up by the strongest or nearest hands, while many, who need it most or deserve it best, either fail of any share or go away with what is very dear bought by the pains they take or the blows they meet with in the scuffle. The chief directors of the Settlement, floating one way or another, distracted by different colours and lights as well as equal proposals of safety and advantage given them by the different parties, at last resolved to run the boat ashore and leave the passengers to shift as they could, when once on land. They durst not shock the hopes or pretensions of any of the parties, but rather offered expedients or at least appearances of pleasing all and not only those who had pretensions in that kingdom but even many in this, who had no other besides the plea of some merits, the want of reward, or the grace of his Majesty or some persons near him. They succeeded as such counsels must, instead of pleasing all they pleased none and, aiming to have no enemy to their Settlement, they left it no friends. On these grounds were framed the Declaration and on that the Act of Settlement and on this the proceedings of Commissioners, in the course of which was maimed not only the justice due and intended to the original Adventurers and the grace promised to the Soldiers, but withal the favour proposed to those of the Irish whose innocence was evident or whose services had made amends for their guilt, the Crown was left poor, the government exhausted, the army half useless for want of pay and consequently of discipline, and all parties discontented with the Settlement.
After all this I very much doubt whether, considering the humour of our age and easiness of our government, it can be advisable to unravel what is past in this Settlement, considering the attention, boldness and steadiness of counsels necessary to a new and wise digestion of those matters, and in the meantime any Settlement of Ireland is much better than none, and the next may weary the undertakers before it be achieved. Perhaps it is not amiss for a builder to make his best of an old case rather than pull down all and build from the foundation.
It may be expected, after finding so many faults, some remedies should be proposed. What seems to press most on his Majesty, and to require the speediest applications, is the supply of the government towards the constant pay of the army as well as some satisfaction of their arrears. The way must be the increase of the revenue and diminution of the charge. Neither can be done without some particular hardships or at least complaints. Small wounds need but gentle applications, but great ones must be lanced and seared. The ordinary revenue consists of the old Crown lands, the Excise and Customs and the new quit rents. The first is small and ever wasting by gifts and grants; the second varies according to trade, which is very much governed by the opinion both at home and abroad of the steadiness and prudence of the government. However the Irish Customs and Excise may, I hope, be reckoned as unlikely to fall under 60,000l. a year, unless all cracks; and with two or three years' growth of trade may come to double that sum, but the care and improvement of this branch must be left to the Governors there.
The new quit rents I look on as the surest and most considerable part of the revenue, and that improvements may be best and most justly made on it. For this, an Act may be framed recalling all grants of quit rents reserved by the last Act and making void all that shall ever be granted in future, and, if there be any defect in the late Act on that point, for imposing the same quit rents, payable by Adventurers and Soldiers on all lands that ever were seized or forfeited, except only those of innocent Protestants and this to be paid constantly into the Exchequer, which, I am confident, will amount to 70,000l. a year. Another Act may likewise be framed imposing on all grants of lands not vested by the Act in Adventurer, Soldier, '49 officer or innocent person another yearly quit rent to the value of one full fourth part of the real value of such lands over and above the first mentioned quit rent reserved on all the new disposed lands in general, the lands to be revalued anew every 7 years, if the Governor and Council think fit. The same quit rents, consisting of one full fourth value of the true yearly value may be imposed on all houses built or to be built in towns corporate granted to the '49 officers or any others. A fourth Act may be framed for raising instead of subsidies, which are unequal and bear little proportion to the noise they make, amounting but to 15,000l., a subsidy of 6,000l. a month by a land tax for 3 years towards the maintenance of the Army and payment of their arrears, which is but 2/3rds of the least that was ever raised in Cromwell's time, which was 9,000l. a month in '58 and '59, and was not felt, though the kingdom was then in a great measure unplanted and much unpeopled to what it now is.
The land tax, the first reserved quit rents and Customs and Excise will bring in at least 200,000l. a year besides what the second quit rents from the grants and corporate towns, the ancient Crown rents, the Chimney money and other small branches of the revenue might amount to and may be reckoned on for 3 years to come, if there be resolution enough in the Crown and compliance enough, or rather due consideration in a parliament to make way for passing such Acts. I question not the passing of the first and second Acts proposed concerning the general quit rents and those on grantees in the Houses by help of the usual influence of the government on them, so they only require firmness in the King against all particular suits and complaints, that no one case on what grace or merit soever may get in to break the rule. The first thing a King should learn to say is, No, so resolutely as never to be asked twice. The third Act concerning the corporate towns will find much opposition from the '49 officers, who are strong in the Houses, but yet may possibly be compassed, and, if not, is of less moment than the others. The last, concerning the monthly assessments, will meet with opposition, but I question not may be brought about by the King's showing himself concerned in it and the Government's using their strongest application. It may be helped by a general Act of Pardon or Indemnity, nay by remitting the Chimney money for the said 3 years, which will be an exchange of 14 or 18,000l. a year for 72,000l., or the King may propose calling to his Privy Council two of the Lords and four of the Commons to be chosen by him out of 4 named by the Lords and 8 by the Commons on the last day of their Session, who shall be of the Council till the next Session, and there witness and share in the good conduct of affairs and the application of the moneys to the ends for which they are given, that is defraying the necessary charge of the Government and the Army and improving trade by employing at least 10,000l. a year either in the fisheries, the exportation of beef or in setting up linen manufactures.
As to the second point, the lessening the charge may be done in general by cutting off as far as possible all unnecessary expenses, especially all gifts, till the King's coffers grow fuller, for measures of bounty ought to be taken from plenty in the giver as well as merit in the receiver. But the great parsimony must be made out by reducing the Army to the number of officers and soldiers necessary to the support of the Government and by balancing their reduction by such a certain establishment of pay and discipline as may make a smaller number of more use than a much greater, as they now stand or rather fall. I suppose 3,000 foot consisting of 30 companies and 1,000 horse of 20 troops may be a number proportioned to the necessity of the Government, their pay 18d. a horseman and 8d. a footman. They must be divided into the most convenient quarters and garrisons and changed every half year and perform constant duty, as if they were in the field, or work at fortifications or other public works, and must be trained every week and mustered and paid every month, no captain ever suffered to quarter his men on his own lands and to lose his command if found guilty of a false muster, and every soldier found defective in his arms a month's pay. By this, 4,000 men may be of more strength than 20,000, when troops and companies are made only for those that command them, when the number of soldiers is lessened to increase that of officers, and when every captain has liberty to quarter his men on his own lands, and so the greatest part of the Army is but a number of lords and gentlemen living in the midst of their tenants, who have only the name and perhaps arms of soldiers for muster days, but for the rest of the time are hedge or plough men or labourers on their captain's lands or at least grooms and other servants in his house.
These seem the fittest remedies for the present disease of that kingdom.
For the point of calling a parliament suddenly, in my opinion the time will be when all Acts are ready that are intended to be passed that Session, so that not above a month or two at most may be calculated for the time of their sitting for, besides other inconveniences of long Sessions there, the number of Lords and Commons is so great a part of those who have any considerable estates that their own protections and those derived from them make in a manner a perfect obstruction in the whole course of justice there.
Amongst Acts to be passed next Session, I suppose one of confirming all estates settled by the Commissioners in pursuance of the former Acts will be necessary that, right or wrong, there may be a finis litium and an Act of General Pardon for the same end.
I will only add an uninterrupted pursuit of the old maxim to supply all the important vacant charges there, either civil or military, with persons of English birth and breeding, to suppress all parties that may appear in the Government, which nourish a perpetual disquiet in men's minds, which has most fatal operations on trade and riches, to own and support on all occasions what is truly a loyal, English, Protestant interest, and to make it as comprehensive as possible by bringing over to it all that can be gained by just and prudent ways, and lastly to keep a constant and severe hand in the government of a kingdom composed of three several nations, whose religion and language are different and consequently their passions and interests contrary to one another, for to think of governing that kingdom by a sweet and gentle obliging temper is to think of putting four willed horses into a coach and driving them without whip or reins.
A physician bold in his practice and daring at great cures would venture on two medicines yet stronger, one for advancing the plantation and trade and the other for securing the safety and quiet of that kingdom with much smaller standing forces than have been proposed. The first is an invitation to foreigners and to English by some large degree of liberty in matters of religion to all Protestants that are or should be inhabitants there, reserving some profits as the purchase of such liberty and confining the disposal of charges to the professors of that already established.
The other arises from the consideration that the Scots are settled together in Ulster, the Irish in Connaught and some counties of Ulster and Leinster, which made them on any sudden insurrections masters of those parts and of all scattered English in them, but the English alone want this strength. For remedy thereof an entire English plantation of the four counties of Wicklow, Kildare, Carlow and Wexford were the greatest work a wise and foreseeing Government could undertake, which being encompassed either with the sea on one side or the Barrow and Boyne almost meeting on the other, and backed by the city of Dublin at one end, which ought ever to be kept a chaste English town, would by their own militias give law to all the rest of the kingdom and safety to the English name, and in a small time grow little inferior to any part of England. (Suggestions of means for attaining this object.)
The achievement of such a design would be eternal honour to the King's reign and safety to the nation, and on the contrary nothing can be less advisable and more dangerous than to suffer the Irish to enter and plant promiscuously with the English in the county of Wicklow, which has ever been the nest of the most notorious rebellions, and is all over in a manner an invincible fastness by reason of the mountains, woods and bogs, and on all sudden accidents hangs over the very head of the city of Dublin. [Over 14 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 339, No. 60.]
A mild but searching expostulatory letter from the poor and plain-dealing farmers of the neighbouring villages to the men of Buckingham. Reproaching them with their treachery to the common interest in their late election of members to serve in Parliament, who have formerly betrayed their trusts and exposed the Kingdom to beggary, slavery and popery, and especially reprobating the private and public conduct of Sir "Timber" (i.e.) Richard Temple, with whom they have coupled a colleague only meet for them and him, who once made Buckingham a bribing present of timber to rebuild their town hall, which vanished all away by the magic art of the same devil that brought it. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 412, No. 94.] Enclosed,
"The sale of Esau's Birthright or the New Buckingham Ballad to the tune of the London Gentlewoman, or little Peggy Ramsey," an election ballad with note of those who voted for their King and Country, Protestant religion and Sir P[eter] T[yrill] and of those who voted for Lord L[atime]r and the E[arl] of D[anby] for Popery and for their Town Hall, adding that those who voted for Sir R. T[emple] his timber, chimney money and court were the same with the Lord L[atimer]'s. (Referring to the Buckingham election in Sept., 1679.) [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 412, No. 94 i.]
John Cassen and John Cooqus, silversmiths, to the King. Petition stating that they are sworn servants to the Queen and have for the best part of 15 years been working for his Majesty, the Queen and his Royal Highness, but, as their way of working is different from the London silversmiths, they are forced to employ foreign journeymen, for which the Goldsmiths' Company molest and threaten to ruin them, and therefore praying his royal protection for themselves and their journeymen and an order to the Goldsmiths' Company to give the assay and touch of their hall to the petitioners' works. [Ibid. No. 95.]
Capt. John Coghlan to the King. Petition for a positive order to the Lord Treasurer or otherwise for speedy relief, his pension of 2s. 6d. a day granted for his relieving the late King's army under Lord Hopton and Pendennis Castle to the value of near 16,000l., being 8½ years in arrear. (See Privy Council Register, Vol. XIV., p. 143.) [Ibid. No. 96.]
Ann, sister of William Ireland, lately executed as guilty of the late plot, to the King. Petition for delivery to her of such goods from her brother's chamber in Russell Street as belonged to him or herself, being clothes, books, linen &c. of small value, as she is bound to pay the whole year's rent. [Ibid. No. 97.]
Paul Rycaut, late consul at Smyrna, to the King. Petition for the commissionership of the Customs first vacant, his family having been ever loyal and having lost and been damaged in the late troubles to the value of at least 150,000l.; the petitioner at his Majesty's command having desisted from prosecuting his interest with the Turkey company for nomination as Ambassador at Constantinople and his Majesty having then declared he would have an eye on him. His Majesty lately ordered the Earl of Danby, the late Lord Treasurer, to accommodate a debt of 2,800l. due to the executors of the petitioner's father. [Ibid. No. 98.] Annexed,
Considerations in favour of Mr. Rycaut to the effect stated in the petition, adding he had served 7 years as secretary to the Ambassador at Constantinople and 11 years as consul at Smyrna. [Ibid. No. 98 i.]
Report of Viscount Latimer, Lord Treasurer, on the petition of Rycaut with the annexed papers that his father amongst other services paid 1,000l. to Sir John Mayne towards 5,000l. employed in buying arms in Holland for the Earl of Newcastle's forces, which the late King expressed in writing should be ever remembered to the advantage of himself and his family; that the late Sir William Boteler, having contributed likewise 1,000l. towards the said 5,000l., a satisfaction for the same with interest was paid by his Majesty to his son, now Sir Oliver Boteler; that on the petitioner's address for relief his Majesty appointed Sir William Morice to draw a privy seal for a blank sum to be filled up by his Majesty; and that, if his Majesty grants him the sum pretended to by him, being about 2,800l., it will set him equal with the said Sir Oliver. 1673–4, Jan. 23. At foot,
Reference to the Lord Treasurer to accommodate the matter as he shall think fit. 1674, Dec. 3. Whitehall. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 412, No. 98 ii.]
Proposal for a lease for 11 years or more from Lady Day last with reasonable covenants of the customs on all lead and coals exported (exclusive of the present grant to Lord Townshend) and for the benefit of all forfeited coast bonds touching the same at the yearly rent of the average amount of the same during 7 years from Michaelmas, 1671, there being much trouble in collecting these customs by the ordinary officers of the customs by reason of the vast number of coast bonds, many of which become forfeited by carrying the goods over sea and the many frauds endeavoured to be therein practised. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Return of Ensign Richard Bonsey on a warrant from George Vernon and White Tichbourne, deputy lieutenants for Surrey, for searching Richard Weston's house in the parish of Woking for arms. He only found one case of pistols and furniture for a horse, which Weston declared were belonging to the militia of the county, and two rapiers. [Ibid. No. 100.]
Ecclesiastical notes. All Protestants are frequently called Acatholici by the German Papists and a formal expostulation was made on it by the Protestant princes at the diet at Ratisbon in 1677, that word having been used by the Emperor in some paper of his.
Ecclesiastical peers in France are not to assist in criminal cases, where it goes to blood, but withdraw.
About the Chancellor's right to present to livings, about the servants of the clergy being privileged in a Convocation &c. [Ibid. No. 101.]
John Le Mesurier of St. Peter's Port, Guernsey, to the Committee of the Privy Council for Guernsey. Petition for a further hearing before they deliver their opinions, he having been heard last Saturday, 29 March, in a cause betwixt him and the Dean of Guernsey, and having now new and most material matter of law to offer. [S.P. Channel Islands 1, No. 95.]