BHO

Charles II: February 1681

Pages 152-189

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1680-1. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1921.

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February 1681

Feb. 1.
Gwersyllt.
Sir Geoffrey Shakerley to Sir Leoline Jenkins. Repeating his charges against the master gunner, who had denied the keys of the castle to him, when he had occasion to go in, saying he was a Papist and had a Pope in his belly, and refused to lie within the castle, as he had ordered him and the two other gunners to do. I hope out of Cheshire you will have two very good men to serve in Parliament, for I hear Mr. Booth will not stand. The two gentlemen spoken of are Sir Robert Leycester and Sir Philip Egerton. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 29.]
Feb. 1.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Vice-Chancellor [of the University of Oxford]. Thanking him for his letter of the day before and desiring his reflections on the King's letter to him, for the Lord Chamberlain calls to the writer often to know whether any exceptions be taken to the disposing part of it, that his lordship may take his measures betimes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 62, p. 127.]
Feb. 1. Secretary Jenkins to Sir Robert Holmes. I was commanded by his Majesty to-day in Council to recommend to your care the execution of the order of the Lords of the Admiralty in setting free the galliot taken by Carew's pretended commission. His Majesty is concerned in justice and honour to see this right done to the subjects of his allies the soonest possible, but what presses above all things is the danger we are in of being reprised on in the port of Rotterdam by Lieut.-Admiral Bastiauze, who is concerned in this galliot. His Majesty has certain notice that this affront will be done us, unless the galliot be released out of hand. He commands me further to tell you that he will not only save you harmless, but will see you reimbursed of your charges on this service and on the occasion of bringing up the pirates that seized this ship. Pray favour me with a line of what you shall have done, to the end we may show it to the Dutch ambassadors, as we have been forced to show the Order of Council to-day to them, before the post went for Holland, in order to prevent mischief there. [Ibid. p. 128.]
Feb. 1.
Whitehall.
Sir Leoline Jenkins to the Lord Lieutenant. (Calendared with some variations in the Ormonde Papers, Vol. V, p. 569.) [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 341, p. 50.]
Feb. 3. Minutes of commissions to officers to be employed in the garrison at Tangier, as follows:—
William Culliford to be captain of the company of foot, late Fitzgerald's, Charles Johnson, lieutenant to Lieut.-col. Charles Trelawney, William Berry, lieutenant to Capt. Griffith, Charles Kirk, ensign to Col. Piercy Kirk's company, John Culliford, ensign to Capt. Russell, Thomas Fuller, ensign to Lieut.-col. Charles Trelawney, all in Col. Kirke's regiment.
James Bush, quarter-master to Col. Kirk's regiment.
Jenkin Thomas, lieutenant, and Joseph Bolland, ensign, to Capt. John Giles in the Earl of Inchiquin's regiment. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 368.]
Feb. 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Henry, Marquess of Worcester, Lord Lieutenant of Bristol, to continue the Artillery Company there, and continue or renew his commissions to the officers, the said company being already allowed and approved of by him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 370.]
Feb. 3. Commission to Charles Johnson to be captain-lieutenant to a company of foot in Tangier, in Col. Piercy Kirk's regiment. Minute. [Ibid. p. 392.]
Feb. 3. Secretary Jenkins to Lord Oxon (? the Earl of Oxford or the Bishop of Oxford). Here goes a letter to Mr. Chamberlaine. Lord Chief Justice North writes it, by his Majesty's immediate command. I must beg you to convey it by such a way as for decency and privacy will be most suitable to the gentleman's desires. I shall be accountable for the messenger's journey to you. If you find on the return from him that anything from this place, particularly an address from me, will be useful to confirm him in a good purpose, I shall readily entrust myself to your hands. 'Tis a matter of some confidence, because what is deprehended to have been the method of one election will be surmised to have been the same in all. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 62, p. 129.]
Feb. 3.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury of Scotland. Warrant for ordering the cash-keeper and receiver-general of the rents and revenues to disburse on the King's account all charges and expenses needful for carrying on the processes of reduction in favour of the Duke of Lenox and Richmond ordered ante, p. 127. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 6, p. 260.]
Feb. 3.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury of Scotland. Warrant for removing the stop on the gift to Lieut.-col. Mayne, Major Oglethorpe and Capt. Cornwall of the forfeitures dated 11 May last, provided that before passing the same they give good and sufficient security for payment of their share of the 14,325l. sterling, disbursed towards the suppression of the rebellion. [Ibid. p. 262.]
Feb. 3.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury of Scotland. Two letters similar to the last in favour of John Graham of Claverhouse and Col. James Douglas. [Ibid. pp. 263, 264.]
Feb. 3.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury of Scotland. Declaring that he is resolved to secure to Bailly William Carmichael in consideration of his great pains and expenses on occasion of the employment wherein he was entrusted in Fife, the forfaulture of — Lockhart of Brokhill in Clydesdale, and the remains of the forfaulture of the deceased traitor, David Haxston of Rathillet, provided always that they to whom confirmations of debts have been granted out of the estate of Rathillet be first paid or secured, he always being obliged to pay his proportion of the 14,325l. sterling laid out towards the suppression of the late rebellion. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 6, p. 266.]
Feb. 3.
Whitehall.
Memorials of protection in the ordinary form to John Duncan, brewer, burgess of Edinburgh, and John Harris, wright, burgess of Edinburgh, for two years respectively. [Ibid. p. 267.]
[Feb. ?] Alexander, Earl of Eglintoun, to the King. Petition for pardon, having slain in a quarrel in self-defence Thomas Madox, deputy postmaster at Doncaster, he being now in York Castle, charged with his death. At the side,
Feb. 4. Affidavit by Thomas Darby of Almondbury, Yorkshire, that he was present at the quarrel and that he conceives that what harm Madox received was through his own provocation and that he got his wounds by his sudden running in on the petitioner. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 30.]
Feb. 5.
Whitehall.
Grant to Richard Annesley, B.D., of the Deanery of Exeter, void by the death of Dr. Cary. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 57, p. 35.]
Feb. 5. Secretary Jenkins to the Earl of Middleton. Herewith goes enclosed a letter to his Imperial Majesty to congratulate him on the birth of his last daughter, the Emperor having notified it by a letter which Count de Thun lately presented to the King. You will deliver it to the Emperor with the usual decency and use what further compliments you shall think fit.
Lord Conway being sworn Secretary of State last Wednesday, his Majesty commanded that I should remove into that province Lord Sunderland had charge of. Lord Conway is a very noble gentleman and will have all the care possible of you. I will solicit your revocation all I can. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 64, p. 59.]
Feb. 5.
Whitehall.
Sir Leoline Jenkins to the Lord Lieutenant. His Majesty has commanded me to send you the enclosed extract of a letter pretended to be written out of Ireland by one that honours you very much. However, the conveyance of it to his Majesty was not so fairly ordered, but the conveyer is a stranger to me.
I will let you know the proceedings in relation to the Irish witnesses last come over, which will appear in the report of the justices ordered to examine them. The depositions shall be sent you as soon as possible.
We hear from Bristol of an alarm at Youghal, as if the French had been on the coast of Ireland. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 341, p. 52.]
Feb. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Charles Henry, Earl of Bellomont, to preserve the game within 10 miles of Swarson (? Swarkeston), Derbyshire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, f. 385.]
Feb. 8.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of the Earl of Ranelagh. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 109.] Prefixed,
The said petition, reciting a grant by letters patent of 18 Dec., 1675, to the petitioner in fee simple of several houses and lands within the Corporation of Athlone and the liberties thereof, forfeited to his Majesty by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, some of which formerly belonged to George Devenish and are now in the possession of Thomas Fitz-Gerald by virtue of an extent on a statute staple of 800l. in 1629, acknowledged by the said George Devenish to Thomas Allen and since assigned to the said Fitz-Gerald, and stating that, as some doubt may arise whether the said houses and lands may not be part of the security for the arrears of the '49 officers, the petitioner, to avoid lawsuits and for the better securing of his interest, is willing to compound for the same with the Commissioners for disposing of the remaining part of the said security and to place such unsatisfied part of '49 debentures thereon as shall be agreed on between them and him, but that they are restrained by their instructions from granting any part of the said security except to persons who are in possession thereof and shall deliver the same, but they are also to observe such further instructions as shall be given them by the Lord Lieutenant, and praying that, as the petitioner has already passed the grant of the said houses and lands, and is kept out of the possession thereof by the said extent and other pretences and his Majesty has in the said letters patent promised the further assurance of the said grant and the petitioner desires only some further security of his title by compounding with the said Commissioners, that his Majesty would signify his pleasure to the Lord Lieutenant that he forthwith give a further instruction to the said Commissioners to compound and agree with the petitioner, if he shall so desire, for the said houses and lands and to grant him their certificate in order to his passing new letters patent thereon, in the same manner as they might do, were he now in the actual possession thereof. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 108.]
Feb. 8.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Sir Robert Holmes. His Majesty, being informed by Sir Richard Mason that you desire in regard of some indisposition of body to have his dispensation for your not attending this Parliament called to sit at Oxford, and consequently not to offer yourself in that island, where you would be sure to be chosen, does not expect it at your hands, but leaves you entirely to yourself. But, as he is assured you will do your utmost to bring in a good man in your place, he does in a special manner recommend it to you that you would employ all your interest to bring in Sir Thomas Littleton, one of the Commissioners of the Admiralty, to be chosen in your place, his Majesty being fully assured of his abilities and his affections. You will please take notice of the ill consequence it would be (in matter of clamour) to his Majesty's service, if this letter written by his command should come to light in any kind. I refer myself wholly to your care of it, not that I have any concern for myself, but the same tenderness you yourself and every dutiful subject has that the King does not suffer by openness and inadvertency on our part. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 62, p. 130.]
Feb. 8.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Sir Robert Holmes. Having read your letter to me in his Majesty's presence, the Lord Chancellor and the Lord President being by, I was directed to draw the enclosed letter for his Majesty's hand. He was well pleased with your resolution of obeying him. You will thereby put us out of a great apprehension we have now, lest the Dutch in rage (this ship happening to be Bastiawze's, the Lieut.-Admiral of Rotterdam) should come to counter-reprise on our ships in those ports. The ambassadors have threatened us with great earnestness, unless the speedy restoring of the galliot prevent it. [Ibid. p. 131.]
Feb. 8.
Whitehall.
The King to Sir Robert Holmes, Governor of the Isle of Wight. After reciting the Order in Council of the 30th ult. concerning the Charity of Rotterdam, calendared ante, p. 151, signifying his pleasure that he, the Vice-Admiral there, take care that the said Order, whereof a duplicate is enclosed, be put in due execution, and the said galliot hoy be forthwith set free and discharged. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 359, p. 74.]
Feb. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to John Alexander, clockmaker and burgess of Edinburgh, of the office of his Majesty's clockmaker and keeper and dresser of his clocks, watches and pendilums in Scotland, vacant by the decease of John Bartane, for his life. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 6, p. 268.]
Feb. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a prorogation of the patent granted 3 June, 1663, for 19 years to the masters of the manufactory of cards for wool and lint for a further term of 19 years after the expiration of the former term. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 269.]
Feb. 8.
Whitehall.
Sir Leoline Jenkins to the Lord Lieutenant. (Calendared in the Ormonde Papers, Vol. V, p. 574.) [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 341, p. 53.]
Feb. 9.
Whitehall.
The King to the Artillery Company. Desiring that their present officers be continued. Countersigned, "Conway." [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 31.]
Feb. 9. Herbert Aubrey to [Sir Leoline Jenkins]. I see by the printed papers concerning Mr. Robert Pye's death there are pia mendacia as well as piœ fraudes, but such gross falsities will bring the truth of the late horrid plot into question. Before the print came down, the two common newsletters had the same false account, but I will give you a faithful state of the whole business. Last Easter sessions Mr. Pye, Mr. Edward Jones and Mr. John Scudamore were ordered to tender the oaths of allegiance and supremacy to Mr. John Bodenham, who had declined to take them. They accordingly issued out warrants. The constables made return that they were abused and had stones thrown from the house at them and were threatened and sued. Before Allhollantide last, Mr. Pye met Mr. Bodenham near his own house at the Mynd and told him of his refusal to take the oaths and of the abuses done to the officers and of the obligation on himself to make the order obeyed and pressed him to give security to appear at the next Sessions, which he refusing, Mr. Pye said he would not let him go, and charged two persons of Mr. Bodenham's company to assist him to apprehend him, but they rather interposed to prevent Mr. Bodenham being taken. Mr. Pye, nevertheless, though he had nothing in his hand but a walking stick, persisted in endeavouring to take him, but he went back and, Mr. Pye eagerly pursuing, struck at him with a bill and hit him on the arm and broke his coat. Mr. Pye fell, but confessed he had no great hurt. After this Mr. Bodenham promised Mr. Pye to appear at a certain day, but did not come, and sent him word he was not obliged to keep his word with him. As Mr. Pye since informed me, Mr. Bodenham left the country on it and never saw Mr. Pye alive from that time till his death. The manner of Mr. Pye's death was this. On Saturday, 22 Jan., he came in the morning to Hereford. He was very well and cheerful. He was pretty late with some of his friends and rode home in a very cold night and sickened in a day or two. Three doctors attended him, but his fever increasing put an end to his life on the 30th. He was buried on Candlemas Day and the very person said to murder him was one of his bearers. Two of the doctors agreed that he died of a malignant fever, of which Sir William Powell, Mr. Richard Marriott and Mr. Paine of Caple died, not being four or five days sick. Dr. Fielding said his lungs were immersed in blood. This is as true an account as I can give till I send his deposition, but what relates to his sickness, death and burial is certain. This you may impart as you see cause and further that, whereas the print affirms another justice to be stabbed by a Jesuit in the same county, it is notoriously false and such unreasonable gross lies will do great harm, even to the truth of their ill actions, which are treacherous enough. [S.P. Dom. Car. II. 415, No. 32.] Annexed,
A true copy of Mr. Pye's information at the Hereford sessions 13 Jan., 1680[–1]. Giving an account of his attempt to apprehend Mr. Bodenham as above. [Ibid. No. 32 i.]
[Feb.] Short narrative of what passed between Mr. Pye and Mr. Bodenham as in the above letter, adding that about 10 days ago Mr. Pye died of a malignant fever. [Ibid. No. 32 a.]
Feb. 9.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Theobald Fitzpatrick to be ensign to Major Sir Thomas Ogle's company and to William Wheeler to be lieutenant to Capt. Henry Cornwall's company, both in the Holland regiment. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 369.]
Feb. 9.
Whitehall.
The King to the Mayor and Corporation of Ludlow. Approving of their election, in pursuance of the order in Council of 12 Jan., which required them to proceed to a new election, of William Charleton to be town clerk. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, f. 386.]
Feb. 9.
Whitehall.
On the petition of John Woodroffe, a prisoner in Northampton, for a reprieve, being convicted of stealing a saddle worth 18d., his Majesty requires the Sheriff of Northampton to respite his execution till the next Midsummer assizes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 110.]
Feb. 9.
Whitehall.
Order in Council that Secretary Jenkins prepare a letter for the King's signature to the Lord Lieutenant, signifying his pleasure that the Scotch regiment, now in Ireland, in regard of its antiquity shall have precedency in their march and duty next after the regiment of Guards there, and before all the regimental or independent companies. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 342, No. 3.]
Feb. 10.
[Received.]
Thomas Rannew to the King. The bailiff of the Hundred of Radfield, Cambridgeshire, threatens to take away my goods for 5l. 6s. 8d. for thy use for a year's rent for two thirds of my estate on the Act of Recusancy. I am no Papist, wherefore, I pray thee, relieve me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 33.]
Feb. 10.
Whitehall.
Commission to George Murray to be lieutenant to Capt. Robert Douglas' company in Tangier in the Earl of Dumbarton's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 390.]
Feb. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant of the offices of steward of all the manors, lands &c. appertaining to the Honour of Windsor and to Windsor Castle and of clerk of the constable of the said castle and clerk of the said castle to Thomas Staples and John Whitfield, both of the Middle Temple, for their lives and the life of the survivor of them, upon the surrender of the said offices by the said Staples. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, f. 387.]
Feb. 10. — to Sir Francis Radclyffe, Dilston. This day Mr. Atwood, priest, formerly convicted on Mr. Dangerfield's evidence, was brought to the King's Bench bar and received his sentence. The Duke of Monmouth goes to Chichester to-morrow or Monday to stay a fortnight there. Lady Grey's Ghost is lately handed privately from one to another. I had one to-day from Sir George Jeffreys. It lashes the Duke of Monmouth and the said lady very sore by way of apparition, a ghost with a star and a blue garter appearing often to her in her closet in Lord Grey's absence to bid her tell the Duke that ere such a day all the royal blood will be poisoned, but that he need not fear it, for he has never a drop in him. It abuses several others, but I find many Catholics have it, though hardly any besides, so I would not send it till commanded by you, for fear you might have it already. There is a song of Tony, viz., Shaftesbury, if you have it not, worth your seeing. I have them and will send them you, when commanded. I think Heraclitus may be worth your perusal. As often as I meet with it, I shall send it till forbidden. I have sent you Mr. Sheridan's case, a well-penned thing and worth your reading, by Mr. Armstrong. Sir William Waller and Sir William Poultney were this day elected at Westminster. It is credibly reported that in Salisbury they have elected better principled men than formerly and have burnt all the votes of the last parliament to show how well they were pleased with their proceedings. [Admiralty, Greenwich Hospital 1, No. 82.]
Feb. 10.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland. Having received certain information that there was lately passed in the Exchequer a gift of the ward and marriage of — Craig of Rickertoune in favour of John Cunningham of Enterkin, we very much wonder that you have suffered this to be done so contrary to our instructions of 31 May, 1676, so, believing you have forgot these instructions, we enclose a copy thereof, which we require you strictly to observe for the future, and it is our express will and pleasure that the said gift be recalled and we are resolved to sign a gift of the said ward and marriage to Sir William Purves, our Solicitor, to whom we will hereafter signify our pleasure concerning the disposal of the benefit thereof. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 6, p. 270.] Enclosed,
The said Instructions. (Calendared in S.P. Dom., 1676–77, p. 138.) [Ibid. p. 271.]
Feb. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to Sir William Purves of the ward and nonentry of the lands that pertained to Lues Craig of Riccartowne, deceased, or umquhile Thomas Craig, his father, with the marriage of — Craig of Riccartowne. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 272.]
Feb. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter to Sir George Gordon of Haddo of the lands and barony of Haddo. (The purport appears from the ratification, printed in The Acts of the Parliament of Scotland, Vol. VIII, p. 267.) [Docquet. Ibid. p. 273.]
Feb. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to John Scott of Canterland and the heirs of his body with remainders over, of the lands and barony of Canterland, excepting to Robert Graham of Morphie the fishings on the water of Northesk forenent and within the bounds of the said lands, as principal and likewise of the lands of Morphie Meikle in real warrandice, and likewise of the lands of Stone of Morphie and Smiddie lands of the same as principal and the said lands of Morphie Meikle in warrandice and of divers other lands, on the resignations of the said Scott and Graham, with a new gift and an union of the premises into a free barony and with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward. [2½ pages. Docquet. Ibid. p. 275.]
Feb. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to Walter Ker, eldest son of Andrew Ker of Littledean, and the heirs male of his body with remainders over, of the lands and barony of Littledean, otherwise called Maxtoune in the shirefdomes of Roxburgh and Berwick, on the resignation of the said Andrew Ker, with a new gift and a grant of a weekly market and two fairs yearly in the town of Nenthorne and with a change of the holding of such of the premises as formerly held ward from simple ward to taxt ward. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 277.]
Feb. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to Alexander Robertson of Strowan in life rent and to Robert Robertson, his eldest son, and the heirs male of his body, with remainders over, of the lands and barony of Strowan with two fairs yearly on the lands of Kinloch Rannoch, all in the shirefdome of Perth, on the said Alexander Robertson's resignation and also, for the good service of Robert Duncanson, one of the predecessors of the said Alexander Robertson, in taking Robert Graham, that vile traitor and murderer of James I, and for the many sufferings and services of Donald Robertson, tutor of Strowan, and of the said Alexander Robertson, as soon as he came to years, to the late King and his Majesty, for a new gift of the premises and for an erection of all the outfield, woods, glens, hills, bogs and watersides of the said barony into a free forestry to be called the Forestry of Strowan with the whole privileges belonging to a free forestry, and also for the erection of the said town and lands of Kinloch Rannoch into a free burgh of barony with a weekly market and four fairs yearly and with an union of all the premises into the barony of Strowan and with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward. [Nearly 2 pages. Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 6, p. 278.]
Feb. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the gift of the office of his Majesty's horseleech or farrier in Scotland to Bartholomew Gibson, farrier in the Abbey of Holyrood House, for his life. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 280.]
Feb. 11. Sir Francis North to Sir Leoline Jenkins. Not being able to attend at Council to-day by reason of business at Guildhall, I trouble you with a few lines on occasion of some discourse I had with Sir Robert Sawyer this morning. I had advised him to desire of the Lord Chancellor to be presented to the King, which could not be done by other hands, it being my Lord's province. When he made the request, my Lord told him he had some powerful enemies and the King seemed difficult to determine for him, and, however, the time was not proper till the other was out of place. Sir Robert referred the time and manner wholly to his lordship, who answered he would send to him. The favour I have to beg of you is that you would sound the King's inclinations to see if there be any change. I formerly spoke to the King in favour of Sir Robert and found some prejudices towards him on some former passages not fit to mention, which made me decline speaking for him now, because the King knows he is my friend and kinsman and may imagine I retain partiality towards him. Were he my enemy, if I thought him fittest for the King's service, I would prefer him and, were he my best friend, if I knew another fitter, I would not conceal it. I can undertake for him, as much as for any of the profession, that his family, his professions, his education have been always towards the King and the Church, that he is a bold man and has knowledge to give him assurance, but magistratus indicat virum and the place he is named for is of that quality that, if he behave amiss, he may be removed. I ask, if there must be a disappointment to him, I may timely know it, for I have informed him of the King's favour, of which I had intimation from yourself, and therefore I would as soon as possible give him notice that he may not expose himself by retaining vain pretensions. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 34.]
Feb. 11.
Whitehall.
Dispensation to Thomas Ward, High Sheriff of Northamptonshire, to go out of his county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, f. 386.]
Feb. 11.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of Henry Killigrew for a grant of the fines and amercements estreated into the Exchequer contained in a schedule annexed, amounting to 733l. 13s. 4d. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 113.]
Feb. 11. Secretary Jenkins to Philip Warwick. You'll receive enclosed a copy of his Majesty's letter to the King in behalf of some merchants, his subjects, that have pretensions depending in that Court. The original will be delivered you by themselves. They have desired it might be so. You have a copy and they another of the Order of Council, by which I am directed to prepare the letter. As to Alderman Jeffreys' and Mr. Lucie's affair there depending, whereof you have given a very exact account in cipher, it was laid before his Majesty at the Committee and maturely weighed here. You are to assure our excellent friend that his Majesty is constant to his first resolutions and will pursue them to the utmost. You'll have his Majesty's pleasure henceforward from Lord Conway. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 420.]
Feb. 11.
Dublin.
The Lord Lieutenant to Sir Leoline Jenkins. Expressing his satisfaction at his remove to a station that gives him title to the dispatches sent thither and to the advertisements from thence.
I have not yet received the reference on the petition of the Earl of Sussex. My report shall be as advantageous to him as the case will bear.
How far the information from Holland sent immediately to his Majesty may be true as to the informer's progress in this kingdom I know not, but his haste was very great that would not allow him time to impart something of his discovery to me. He might have been sure of protection and liberty at least. Some of those he names are like enough to be disaffected, but I take them to be crafty enough to conceal it, till the game be fairer on their side than ever I hope it will be. His observations are notorious mistakes and by his style he should be one that values himself more than others have done and that's his grievance.
The Post Office here is in the hands of the Farmers of the Revenue, which makes them masters of all merchant correspondence. Whether this be fit or no, considering that some of them traffic themselves, I know not, but I am sure the person that acts under them ought to be a man the government may entirely command and trust, especially at this time. I cannot say that he now employed is such. How far the King may or should interpose herein I cannot judge, but offer it to his consideration.
I am very well pleased my son Arran has gained a place in your friendship and esteem. I have ordered him to show you part of my letter to him concerning Lord Clare of this kingdom. [2 pages. Holograph. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 342, No. 4.]
Feb. 12.
Bristol.
Sir Richard Hart, Mayor, to Edward Cranfield. I gave you a large account last post of the behaviour of Sir Robert Atkins and Sir John Knight here. Now by the enclosed you will find how abusive the last has been and the language he gave me in open Court. The gentlemen, whose names are subscribed, will be ready to make oath thereof. His insolence is so insufferable that the peace of the city is in danger. It will be further proved that he held up his cane and shook it at me with great violence, when the sword was before me. The people would have seized him and carried him to prison, but I knew not whether his privilege of parliament, being within 40 days, might not have been disputed, so forbore, and must apply to his Majesty to redress this intolerable affront to his government. How to proceed is what I would be directed in and request you to inquire and advise what is to be done. He is very much countenanced by all the Dissenters here, but fears he shall lose it at the next election, which, I conceive, enrages him, for his own private concerns may require a shelter. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 35.] Annexed,
Narrative by Robert Yeamans and four others. Sir John Knight and Mr. Mayor talking very warmly, Sir John told him how much he had been obliged to himself, and, Mr. Mayor telling him that he had been as much obliged to him for endeavouring to make him parliament man and other kindnesses, Sir John told Mr. Mayor that he lied and was a base, ungrateful fellow, all which and many other undecent and opprobrious words were spoken by Sir John in the Tolsey 11 Feb. [Ibid. No. 35 i.]
Feb. 12.
Badminton.
The Marquess of Worcester to [Sir Leoline Jenkins]. I return you many thanks for your letter and news and shall not be wanting in my endeavours to have Sir John Floyd's place well filled, for whose death I am very sorry. I think next week to send into Herefordshire and will take care to get a true relation of Mr. Pye's death and will transmit it to you. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Feb. 12. Commissions to John Bristow to be capt.-lieutenant and to Robert Salloway to be ensign to the Earl of Mulgrave's company in the Holland regiment. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, pp. 369, 371.]
Feb. 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pardon to George Courtney, an Irishman, bred in the University of Louvain and entered into priest's orders according to the rites of the Romish Church and Divinity Moderator and Superior of the Irish Society there, who has lately embraced the reformed doctrine of the Church of England and acknowledged the King to be supreme as well in temporal as ecclesiastical affairs within his dominions and has openly received the Sacrament according to the custom of the Church of England and also has taken the oath for renouncing all foreign power and the oaths of allegiance and supremacy; of all treasons, felonies and other offences, in that he was a priest of the Church of Rome or moderator or superior as aforesaid and came into England before his conversion. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 54, p. 56.]
Feb. 12.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of William Harrington of London, mariner, Cornelius Degelder and Samuel Sowton of London, merchants, for a patent for 14 years for their invention of several tools, engines or instruments (to be wrought without diving) for the weighing or recovering of ships, guns and goods lost at sea. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 110.]
Feb. 12.
Whitehall.
The King to the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge to be communicated to the Senate. Willing and requiring them to confer the degree of D.D. by accumulation on Wolfran Stubbe, M.A., Fellow of Trinity College, who is of sufficient standing to qualify him for that degree, but, being obliged to be absent from the university, could not take his degree of B.D. at the proper time, he performing the requisite exercises or cautioning for the same. With note, that this was on the full approbation of his Grace of Canterbury. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 57, p. 35.]
Feb. 12.
Dublin.
The Lord Lieutenant to Sir Leoline Jenkins. To-day died Sir Robert Booth, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench, a very prudent judge, whose place ought to be supplied not only by the ablest man that can be found that will accept it, but with a person stedfast in the interest of the Crown and that wants not courage to manifest his principles. Such a one Lord Chief Justice Keating is, but on some private considerations he declines the advancement, and in his present station he will be no less useful. On the death of the late Lord Chief Baron I mentioned Sir William Davis as fully qualified, but some then had credit enough to prevail against what I proposed. I must persist in my recommendation of him, no man being so fit to fill the present vacancy for ability and zeal to the King and Church, for which perhaps it was that undeserved reflections were made on him. [1½ page. Holograph. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 342, No. 5.]
Feb. 13.
Christchurch.
The Earl of Clarendon to [? Sir Leoline Jenkins]. I received yours of the 10th and am very sorry if I said anything of the ill disposition of Wiltshire. I am sure I could not intend it, for I think no county can be better affected, and, if those who are in authority under his Majesty did what they ought, he would find all the elections of that county to his own wish, but, whilst he professes one thing and those commissioned by him something else, honest men know not what to do, but of this I will entertain you more particularly when I wait on you. As to the opposition I meet with in the election here, I am no more concerned than with reference to the King's service, which might have been prevented, if the Lord Chancellor had pleased, but, if he be afraid to do his duty, as I doubt he is, I know not what to say; but, had he considered the King's service, more than his own danger, he would not have disposed of some writs as he has done. I find strange practices in this county of Southampton in the matter of elections. In the two last parliaments the Lord Chancellor trusted me with conveying the writ to the sheriff, which I did and brought him an acquittance for it in three days, but, because I discharged that part so well, I suppose he would not now trust me. The borough of Christchurch is my own borough, the manor is my own and one or both of the burgesses have been always elected on the recommendation of the lords of the place, but at present Lord Shaftesbury and the Earl of Huntingdon and some other peers of their association have sent their letters to the Mayor to exclude those that served in the last parliament, whom I take to be men (Sir T. Clarges and Mr. Fulford) of good intentions to Church and State and have named two warm gentlemen of the King's Head club, Mr. Thomas Hooper, a younger son of a gentleman of a very moderate fortune, and Mr. Jo. Ayloffe, who about seven years since put a wooden shoe and a chaplet in the Speaker's chair and had been roughly handled for it, but that Sir Jo. Morton at my request excused him as a person distracted. All this mischief has happened by the Lord Chancellor's delivery of the writ to Lord Wiltshire, whereby the precept for this place was pretended by the Under-Sheriff to be sent hither ten days ago, but it is not yet delivered, and God knows when it will be, for the persons above mentioned speak of delivering it (and I know it is in their power) about ten days before the meeting of parliament. The Under-Sheriff is Richard Good, an attorney at the Swan near Clement's Inn Gate, and, except the Lord Chancellor will send for him and tell him the precept is withheld and therefore require him to put another into his Lordship's hands, I may be kept here these six weeks and I will stay here these six months, before I will yield this point, which I am sure I shall carry without offending anyone. Several gentlemen of this county have told me the King should be served, if they knew which way to do it, but they know not from whom to take their aim. They expected (I know not why) a declaration from the King and then other members would be sent to parliament, but, that not being, the world is at a gaze. The original letters from Lord Shaftesbury to this place I have in my hands and will put into yours. Last week at Sarum at an ordinary, where were present 26 gentlemen of good quality, Mr. Buckland produced authentic copies of three letters from the said lord to the people of Downton against the said Mr. Buckland, all which I will bring up with me. I am likewise promised authentic copies of the letters he has written to Southampton and Poole. On Tuesday I resolve to be at the ordinary at Sarum and undertake two very worthy men will be knights for Wiltshire, if Lord P[embroke] does not spoil all, and I think I ought to have no communication with him. I beg you will say something to the Queen for my being so long from my duty. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 37.]
Feb. 14.
Whitehall, Treasury Chambers.
Queries and proposals by the Earl of Craven about the forces. 1. How to pass the troops to the Tower, if the City oppose. 2. How to govern themselves on such an opposition and what directions shall be left in reference to the troops the King leaves behind. 3. To consider the providing of Windsor, the cannon being without carriages. 4. Archbishop's house. 5. What is to be done at Gravesend and Sheerness. 6. Not to suffer Col. Russell to sell his regiment. 2,500l. of the contingent money for two years. 7. How to lodge Lord Craven's regiment more conveniently and nearer—to be in the Mews. 8. Constable of the Tower to be there. 9. Sir William Smyth and Rycroft. [Ibid. No. 38.]
Feb. 14. The names of the Commissioners of Lieutenancy for the city of London, with notes against the names of several as "dead," "very honest" &c. [Ibid. No. 39.]
Feb. 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir George Treby, Recorder of London, and to the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex for inserting in the next general pardon for poor convicts of Newgate and for putting into the clause for transportation Philip Du Maré, seaman, now prisoner in Newgate, who has represented that he has on several occasions faithfully served in the Navy and is now condemned for a fact of which he is altogether innocent. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 54, p. 61.]
Feb. 14.
Whitehall.
Commission to — King to be lieutenant of the Earl of Dalhousie's company in the Earl of Mar's foot regiment. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 6, p. 281.]
Feb. 14.
Whitehall. Treasury Chambers.
The Lords of the Treasury to Sir Leoline Jenkins. Being informed that some letters and directions for disposing of some of the revenue of Ireland not comprised in the Civil and Military Lists there have been obtained and sent to Ireland without our knowledge, contrary to the order of 31 Jan., 1667[-8], which required that all such letters &c. to Ireland should be first communicated to the Treasury Commissioners in England, we acquaint you with the said order and desire you will see it complied with and we also desire that the returns on such letters &c. from the Lord Lieutenant may be also communicated to us before any further progress be made therein. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 342, No. 6.]
Feb. 15.
Reading.
Richard Grover to Thomas Coates. Myself and three others being together to-day, Serjeants Cowdry, Austin and others informed us that yesterday John Cope, joiner, of our town, said often in their hearing that the Duke of York is a rogue and swore he was so. We desire you to inform one of the Privy Council of it and, if thought fit, our examination on oath shall be sent you. Noted, as received from the Bishop of St. Asaph, 22 Feb. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 40.]
Feb. 15. The examination of Richard Kerby of Alveton Lodge in the parish of Alveton, Staffordshire. Deposing that Richard Parker lodged at his house for a year and a half and often employed him to carry letters for him and that he has brought him sums of money and also a wallet of writings and that a Mr. Jackson has been several times at his house and once brought a young gentleman who went by the name of Langtree and they stayed all night with Mr. Parker, and that Jackson told the informant that Mr. Parker was procurator and that Mr. Langtree came from beyond the seas either to assist him or take his place in that employment. The informant asking Mr. Langtree what was become of Mr. Evers, he answered he left him at St. Omer when he came from beyond seas. This discourse was the latter end of Sept. or Oct. last. The examinant carried a note from Mr. Parker to Mr. Southerne at Whiteladies in Staffordshire, who sent back the before mentioned wallet of writings, which he said he was glad to be shut of, for they were of great consequence and he had removed them several times when his house was searched.
Feb. 15. The examination of Richard Gifford, alias Vavasor, alias Parker. About a year and a half ago he came to Richard Kerby's house. His coming thither was for his conveniency and the security of his person. He is a Roman Catholic, but answers not whether he is a priest or Jesuit, but will leave that to further proof. He believes himself to be the person mentioned in the proclamation of 15 Jan., 1678[-9].
The letter left in Mr. Bridges' chamber Sunday, 13 Feb., by Burch, newly gone away from Mr. Kerby's service. Informing him that Mr. Kerby has done the writer wrong and that he has kept one of the priests mentioned in the proclamation a great while.
Certificate by Richard Okeover and Thomas Rudyard, justices, that the person taken at Alveton Lodge by George Bridges has owned before them that he has gone by the names of Vavasour, Gifford and Parker. [Ibid. No. 41.]
Feb. 15.
St. James' Street.
Order of Sir William Poulteney to all constables &c. to apprehend and bring before the writer or one of the justices for Middlesex Nathaniel Powell, of whom the bearer shall give them notice, to answer what is objected to him by Thomas Browne on oath for calling the Duke of York a pimp and a son of a whore and other high misdemeanors. On the back is a note that Robert Langley is bound to prosecute and of the names of the said Thomas Browne and four other witnesses. [Ibid. No. 42.]
Feb. 15.
Whitehall.
Commission to — Wingfield to be lieutenant to Capt. Elye's company in the Earl of Inchiquin's regiment in Tangier. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 390.]
Feb. 15.
Whitehall.
Commission to Samuel Atkins to be ensign to the Earl of Inchiquin's company in Tangier. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 391.]
Feb. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a presentation of John Hill to the rectory of St. Mabyn, Cornwall, ad corroborandum titulum. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 45.]
Feb. 15.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Sir John Temple, Solicitor-General of Ireland. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 111.] Prefixed,
The said petition, reciting letters of 4 Jan., 1663[-4], and letters of 8 March, 1674[-5], directing letters patent to be passed to the petitioner, his heirs and assigns, of so many lands and hereditaments in possession, reversion and remainder belonging to his Majesty in Ireland as shall amount to the yearly value of 500l., and stating that the petitioner has never passed any grant nor has received any benefit from his Majesty's intended favour, but is now informed that the lands mentioned in the annexed paper belong to his Majesty in reversion or remainder, whereof he might pass the inheritance by virtue of the said letters, without further warrant, but that, in case he should pass the said inheritance, the persons who now hold the lands in tail, by suffering recoveries after such grant, might bar such estate in reversion or remainder and he therefore now desires rather to pass a long lease of such lands to commence from the determination of the estates now in being, which he cannot do by virtue of the said former letters and therefore praying a new letter to the Lord Lieutenant for that purpose. [Ibid.] Annexed,
The said paper, stating a decree dated 3 Aug., 1663, of the Commissioners for executing the Act of Settlement, whereby certain lands in Swords, containing about 160 acres, and several other lands were adjudged as to part thereof to Mary Taylor for her life and subject thereto to John Taylor, her son, in tail male as innocent Papists, which are now enjoyed by John Taylor, son and heir of the said John Taylor, and also another decree dated 15 July, 1663, of the said Commissioners, whereby John Cannon was also adjudged an innocent Papist and restored to the manor, castle, town and lands of Mobernane and other lands in the barony of Middlethird, Tipperary, in tail male, which lands are held by Connil Cannon, his son and heir, to which lands his Majesty is entitled after the determination of the estate decreed to the said John Cannon. [Ibid. p. 112.]
Feb. 15.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of Edward Fitzgerald, alias Villiers, praying that in a grant to him of the estate of the late John Fitzgerald a clause might be inserted, granting him "all your Majesty's right, title, estate and interest either in possession, reversion or remainder or otherwise howsoever in or to the said lands, tenements or hereditaments or any of them," the same being in a former grant of the said estate to the Earl of Tyrone. With memorandum that this was, 5 March, 1680-1, referred in the same terms to the Lord Lieutenant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 113.]
[Feb. 15 ?] The Earl of Conway to Anthony Booth, Mayor of Macclesfield. Transmitting an Order in Council on the letter of the 9th instant signed by him and William Lunt, which enclosed copies of examinations concerning words spoken by Richard Web of that borough, and on the said examinations. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 56, p. 49.]
Tuesday, Feb. 15.
London.
Newsletter to Roger Garstell, Newcastle. Our Holland letters last week said they had letters of 6 Dec. from Algiers confirming former letters, viz., that the day before their magazine by accident took fire and thereby were destroyed above 400 houses and 1,600 persons.
A gentleman, who came into the Downs with the Straits fleet Saturday morning reached this city late that night. He says he came from Tangier in 13 days, where he understood that two Turks men-of-war had met with four English merchant ships, which had brought soldiers thither and were under sail for St. Ubes to load salt. The Turks took one, sunk a second, burnt a third and stranded the fourth. Some few days after the Turks met the Britannia and Segovia, two stout English merchantmen, bound from Lisbon to Venice, whom the Turks engaged and maintained a fierce and obstinate fight for six hours, during which the Turks boarded them several times and were as often beaten off with the loss of many of their men. In conclusion they left the two English ships and some of their men behind them prisoners, after which the two English ships put in at Cadiz to sell their prisoners and refit. The herring fleet, which by storm was separated from their convoy, got in at Tangier with one of their convoys, the Kingfisher, the other convoy sprang her mast and got into Cadiz.
(Giving the results of several elections.)
What may be added as to Mr. Hetherington's and Mr. Fitzgerald's hearing at Council last week is: Mr. Hetherington says he, being the complainant and his articles several days delivered into the Council before the hearing, was much surprised to find Fitzgerald appear a complainant against him and, instead of his answer to the said articles, articles against Hetherington himself, which were read and some of them sworn to by witnesses he brought, but, as to the priest that swore he instigated him to swear against her Majesty, the Duke or anyone else, he says it's utterly false, having never had any private conference with the said priest or any others on any such account, and he further says that, when the said priest and others were examined by the four justices, they were all severally asked whether any persons whatever had been tampering with them to lessen their evidence or to say more than they knew, which they all answered in the negative, so that Hetherington avers himself innocent and now injured, for which he resolves at the same Board to seek redress at another hearing and bring good proofs for the same.
Mr. Justice Levens (Levinz) took his place on the Bench last Saturday, where a rule of Court was made for the execution of Atwood, the priest. Several persons continued in bail and the presentments formerly mentioned were all material that passed in Court.
At Buckingham town the bailiff and seven burgesses have returned Sir Richard Temple and Sir Ralph Verney, against whom stood Sir Peter Terrill and Charles Blunt, who are also returned by five burgesses and the commonalty. Sir Richard and Sir Ralph consented to a poll, which finding against them, they and their friends threw it off and would not be concluded thereby. The poll in Southwark by consent is concluded and cast up. Sir Richard How had 1,622, Capt. Rich 1,616, Slingsby Bethell 1,334, and Mr. Smith 1,347. The two former are not declared, the two latter intending to have the poll compared with the parish books &c.
Singe, a newswriter and known by many epithets as Papist (yet he took the oaths), Mrs. Cellier's amanuensis in the Mealtub Plot and other notorious matters, was this day seized and sent prisoner to Newgate for treason.
The Duke of Monmouth last Saturday night was received into Chichester by torchlight and met by 400 gentlemen and the two members, who conducted them. The torches were held by 80 young men with white staves, white doublets and black velvet caps.
The Lord Mayor's fever is abated and there now appear some symptoms of his recovery. [3 pages. Admiralty, Greenwich Hospital 1, No. 83.]
Feb. 15.
Whitehall.
The King to the Duke of Rothes, Chancellor, and the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant for the admission of Lord Livingstoune to be one of their number. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 6, p. 282.]
Feb. 15. Sir Leoline Jenkins to the Lord Lieutenant. (Calendared in the Ormonde Papers, Vol. V. p. 582.) [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 341, p. 55.]
Feb. 16.
Whitehall.
Order in Council that Secretary Jenkins prepare a warrant for the King's signature, requiring Sir Thomas Jones, Justice of the King's Bench, and the Sheriff of Middlesex forthwith to order the respiting of — Atwood, a priest lately condemned in the King's Bench, till his Majesty's further pleasure be known, and that Mr. Secretary write to Mr. Justice Jones forthwith to attend his Majesty with an account of the said Atwood's trial and whether he was convicted for having a hand in the Popish plot. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 43.]
Feb. 16.
Badminton.
The Marquess of Worcester to [Sir Leoline Jenkins]. Sending up the account he desired concerning Mr. Pye, which he finds has already been sent to Whitehall and which no doubt he has seen before this.—You will find by the letter enclosing it that Herefordshire is like this time to do as it did last by the extraordinary diligence of the members of the last parliament, which has been used in almost all places and prevailed in most. I hope though in the two cities I look upon as most considerable in my lieutenancies and therefore have had the strictest eye upon, the choice will be better than it was last time. One has already chosen my son instead of Serjeant Seys and declared that, if their other member, Lord Dursley, whom I recommended last time, does not behave better this, as I thought he would have done then and his father has assured the best of them he will do now, they will never choose him more. In Bristol also I do not doubt but the loyal party will prevail and Sir John Knight and Sir Robert Atkins be laid aside, as the latter will be also in this county, where he also puts for it, but I look on the worst of the last members as much better than he. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 44.]
Feb. 16.
Whitehall.
The King to the Court of Assistants of the Artillery Company. In explanation of his letter of the 9th (calendared ante, p. 157), signifying his pleasure that all who were in any employment, trust, office or command in that company last year, should continue so for the year ensuing, and, in case of the death or incapacity of any of them, the Court of Assistants proceed to a free choice for supplying the vacancies and that the leadings in the Artillery ground be performed as they have been the last two or three years. [Copy. Ibid. No. 45.]
Feb. 16. Commissions to Sir Francis Windebank to be lieutenant to Col. George Legg's company and to Edward Crofts to be ensign to Sir Roger Strickland's company both in garrison at Portsmouth. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 371.]
Feb. 16.
Whitehall.
The King to the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge to be communicated to the Senate. Willing and requiring them to confer the degree of M.A. on Rowland Borrow, formerly a student in St. John's College, he performing the requisite exercises or cautioning for the same. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 57, p. 36.]
Feb. 16.
Whitehall.
Order in Council that Secretary Jenkins cause the style of the annexed draft of a letter intended to be sent from the Council to the Lord Lieutenant to be changed and made fit for his Majesty's signature and that it then be sent to Ireland. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 342, No. 7.] Annexed,
The said draft. Recommending as the most effectual means for the security of Ireland that the money that shall arise by the late suspension directed 9 Nov. last shall be employed in furnishing the magazines with 1,000 barrels of powder and providing a sufficient quantity of arms for the forces there. As to recruiting the army there, they are commanded to signify that his Majesty will give leave for raising the 1,000 men, as desired, in this kingdom, but they expect from his Grace and the Privy Council their advice and opinion what officers and conductors will be most necessary to be employed with a calculation of the charge of raising and transporting them to be defrayed out of the money arising from the said suspension, which is to take place from Michaelmas last, and that after providing the said powder and arms his Grace with the Privy Council's advice is to proceed with the fortifications and forts at Kinsale or such other as shall be found most requisite to be finished or repaired and that he cause a certificate of the remains of the stores and their condition in that kingdom to be transmitted to them and also send a full and clear account of the present state of the militia and how they have been furnished with arms with a list of the commissioned officers and, if he shall judge anything necessary to be done for rendering them more useful, he is to transmit a scheme thereof with the opinion of himself and the Council. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 342, No. 7 i.]
Feb. 17.
Queen's College, Oxford.
Dr. Timothy Halton, Vice-Chancellor, to Sir Leoline Jenkins. If his Majesty pleases to be received privately by the University, as he was the last time he was here, the manner was this. The Bishop of Oxford as Dean of Christ Church, received him at his entrance into his lodgings with a speech. Then the University sent to know when he will please to be waited on by them, who usually assigns the next day. Then all the Doctors and both the Proctors in their formalities attend him at the time appointed. The Vice-Chancellor in a short speech addresses his Majesty, laying down the Bedells' staves at his feet. Afterwards he is seconded by the Public Orator, who afterwards (the last time only) made an English speech to the Queen. The company have the honour to kiss the King's hand and are then dismissed. Whether you approve of this or whether any other method be prescribed, be pleased to signify to me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 46.]
[Feb.] Sir Peter Brooke to Sir Charles Hoghton. I send Cowling's examination, which signifies little, but is all I could get from him. Old Tootell fumbled and did not make out what Alexander Breres swore. He is near 90 and how we shall convey him to Lancaster I know not. I think it almost impossible. When he comes there, the judge will have but a fumbling story from him. If you return the examination, I shall transmit it with the rest. Your commands in this business shall be willingly obeyed by me. [Ibid. No. 47.] Enclosed,
Feb. 17. The examination of Thurston Cowling of Brendle, taken before Sir Peter Brooke, Justice for Lancashire. The latter end of Christmas old Hugh Tootell asked him, If the Parliament sat ? The examinant replied, He believed they were sitting. Tootell then asked, Why he thought so ? He replied because he heard Sir Charles Hoghton had written to his uncle he would be at home about Christmas Eve and afterwards wrote to one of his sisters, that his coming home was uncertain. Then the examinant prayed God that the City might not command both King and Parliament and prayed God bless the King out of the house of his enemies, for, if that be so, he is in great danger of his life. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 47 i.]
Feb. 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a commission to Robert, Earl of Ailesbury, to be Lord Lieutenant of Huntingdonshire during the absence of Edward, Earl of Sandwich, in the room of Robert, Earl of Manchester, with a clause of revocation of the patent to the Earl of Manchester, [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 376.]
Feb. 17. Warrant for Henry, Earl of Arlington, to be Lord Lieutenant of Suffolk during the minority of Henry, Duke of Grafton, in the room of James, Earl of Suffolk, with a clause of revocation of the letters patent to the Earl of Suffolk. Minute. [Ibid.]
Feb. 17. Warrant for William, Lord Alington, to be Lord Lieutenant of Cambridgeshire in the room of the Earl of Suffolk, with a clause of revocation of the letters patent to the said Earl. Minute. [Ibid. p. 377.]
Feb. 17. Warrant for a grant of a baronetcy of England to Roger Beckwith of Aldborough, Yorkshire, and the heirs male of his body, with a discharge of all services to be performed in consideration of the said dignity or sums to be paid in lieu thereof and with a particular non-obstante of the Privy Seal directing the application of the first 20,000l. that shall arise by the creation of baronets to the use of the Great Wardrobe. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, f. 387.]
Feb. 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Thomas Jones, one of the Justices of the King's Bench, and to the Sheriff of Middlesex, for the reprieve of — Atwood, a priest, lately condemned in the Court of King's Bench, and requiring the said Sir Thomas to attend the King with all speed with an account of his trial and particularly whether he was convicted of having a hand in the Popish plot. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 54, p. 57.]
Feb. 19.
Rye.
Francis Lightfoot, Collector of the Customs, to [Sir Leoline Jenkins]. About two years ago one Tedman came over from France, who refused to take the oaths of allegiance and supremacy and was put in custody. While here he ingratiated himself with the factious people here and was afterwards dismissed. Whether he took the oaths or not, I cannot tell. He has been since here two or three times and has treated the factious parties of the Mayor and Jurats and others of this town, but I never could learn his design. But now he is come down again and has declared it. He now puts in for a burgess of this place and 24 Jan. made a treat for the Mayor, Jurats and freemen, and Mr. Crouch, a very honest Jurat, being among them, has represented him to me as a most vile and horrid villain and affirms that he will, if required, make appear to his Majesty in Council what he has acquainted me with and that others will affirm the same thing. I am very weak and sick, but think myself obliged to give an account of their actions. Tedman by report has a very voluble and fluent tongue. First he acquainted them with the desperate condition of this kingdom, as he called it, by Popery and the vile counsellors of his Majesty, whom he did not a little contemn, but began with the Duke of York and declared that, unless he were made out of the way, the kingdom was in no safety and that he would with his life and fortune be for extirpating of him, all Papists and Popery and declared that his Majesty knew of this plot and countenanced it and that, though the Parliament had with all humble and dutiful addresses requested him to take away the grievances of this nation, yet they have been slighted and his Majesty had jaded this and other parliaments. Tedman being told by Mr. Crouch that the King did not throw out the bill against the Duke of York but the House of Lords, he made this vile expression, Aye, what lords were they ? The very footmen of the others were better men than those lords were. He acquainted them that all the Protestants in Ireland were disarmed and that the French King would this year have Flanders and the next year he designed for Ireland. He told them it was fit for this corporation and all others to send up half a dozen men for each burgess, well mounted, with carbine, pistols and sword to defend them from the Papists. He sent down since a man here with letters of recommendation from Sheriff Slingsby Bethell and others and has sent down since a shopkeeper of Southwark with a letter with the hands of abundance of rabble to attest his honesty. This fellow as well as Tedman are represented as Fifth Monarchy men. Mr. Crouch desiring the Mayor to secure or bind over this Tedman he slighted it and Marten, a Jurat, told Crouch he was a honester man than himself, and they were so far from reproving him that they encouraged him and, unless speedily prevented, will certainly choose him for parliament man. Thomas Turny, town clerk and Jurat here, is the principal agent and advises them, as they did last year, to call all the old freemen, who were turned out many years ago for Nonconformity by the Commissioners for regulating Corporations, and by that means they hope to carry it, insomuch that an honest gentleman is afraid to put in for a burgess. The Mayor and three Jurats join together and overpowering the rest make them signify nothing. Thomas Burdett, the Mayor, though he would take no notice of Tedman's words, 14 Dec. last maliciously and falsely swore against me, he being a Custom House officer suspended for a complaint against him, that I had spoken vile words against the Lord Mayor of London for petitioning the King when the Parliament was sitting, that I called him an insignificant fellow, made up with money but having neither wit nor honesty, and further that I said the members of the House of Commons were rogues for making an address to his Majesty to turn Sir George Jeffreys out of his employment for acting what the King commanded him and that, when he asked why I spoke such words against the Parliament, I replied, they are rogues, for they speak treason every day, intending by this the utter ruin of me and my family. He, the said Thomas Turny, Benjamin Marten and Michael Cadman, Jurats, in their cabal carried it so closely that I had not known it, had not Joseph Radford, an honest Jurat, discovered it to me. I wrote several letters to members of the House of Commons, among them one to Sir Robert Clayton, which fell into the hands of his partner, Alderman Morris, Sir Robert being absent, who went immediately to the Lord Mayor and asked him for the affidavit. He told him Sir John Darell had it. Sir Robert coming in, they three went to Sir John Darell and got him out of the House and persuaded him to put a stop to it, till they heard further from me. 20 Dec. I had a letter from the Commissioners of the Customs to inform Burdett that, unless he showed cause to the contrary the next post, they would dismiss him. He told me he would send them a petition, which he did, but he still lies under suspension. I asked why he sent up so false an affidavit against me. He asked what affidavit. I answered, that I called the members rogues and that they spoke treason every day. He answered, he never swore any such thing nor ever heard me speak such words, by which he proved himself forsworn before three witnesses. Then I said, to justify yourself and do me right, you must write to Sir John Darell to put a stop to it. He asked me what to write and I dictated him a letter, which I sent to Sir Robert Clayton, who remitted it to Sir John Darell, so my ruin was prevented. By this you may find they will stick at nothing, so that, unless some speedy course be taken to punish Tedman and his abettors and to prevent the unlawful votes of the expelled freemen, they will make choice of that villain. [3¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 48.]
Feb. 19.
[Received.]
A particular of abuses done by the Mayor's servant and nephew, Matthew White and Edward, son of Alderman Cooksey. Describing riots in the city of Worcester on the night of Thursday, 10 Feb., by the rabble who were partisans of Winnington and Herbert and assaults by them on supporters of Harris, the other candidate. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 49.]
Feb. 19. Secretary Jenkins to the Lord Chancellor. His Majesty has commanded me to signify his pleasure that the name of the Earl of Essex be left out of all the commissions of the peace wherein he has been named and also that John Trier be left out of the commission for Huntingdonshire and that you would put into the next commission for that county Lionel Walden, Lewis Eldrington, William Naylor and Charles Sheppard to be justices for Huntingdonshire. In regard that three Justices, Mr. Wood, Mr. Underwood and Sir Charles Pittfield, that lived in the Tower Hamlets, are lately dead, it is his pleasure that Abraham Baylie, Humphrey Nicholson and John Balch be put into the commission for Middlesex in their room.
Bridstock Hartford, a worthy member of the last Parliament, is already a Justice for Herefordshire. His Majesty would have him, if he be not already so, in Worcestershire also, where he has a considerable estate. [S.P. Dom, Entry Book 62, p. 131.]
Feb. 19.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. Mr. Dereham, being not only consul at Leghorn, but also his Majesty's minister in the Court of Florence, has by his residence there and the Great Duke's favour to him obtained many considerable privileges for his Majesty's subjects and hopes to obtain more and by his employment as consul has had opportunity to inform himself of the delays and disappointments his Majesty's ships have met with in the Mediterranean ports on account of quarantines, neglects of commanders, victuallers &c., of all which and of the remedies he conceives proper he has drawn up a short scheme, which he has delivered or will deliver to you, to whose consideration his Majesty refers such papers as he shall present to you concerning the premises that, when you have well weighed them, you may report your opinion, what you think fit to be done thereon. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 359, p. 75.]
Feb. 19.
Whitehall.
Sir Leoline Jenkins to the Lord Lieutenant. (Calendared in the Ormonde Papers, Vol. V, p. 584.) [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 341, p. 57.]
Feb. 19.
Dublin.
The Lord Lieutenant to Sir Leoline Jenkins. I have received yours of the 5th, 8th and 12th and with that of the 5th the extract of a letter pretended to be written by a friend of mine. Whoever writ it, is no enemy to scandalous lies, for no such number of arms is seized nor is it possible that numbers enough to make two complete companies can have been exercised near Lord Clanrickarde's house or anywhere in Ireland without the observation of some Protestant and notice given to the government. The regiment near Cullen is a fiction no less impossible, myself having several English Protestant tenants within a few miles of the place, which is on the great road to Limerick, who would give me a speedy account of so extraordinary a thing and of so great danger to themselves, nor is there any such thing as the taking of Bishop Sullivan that I have heard of, but, as it is the general practice of busy and disaffected men to raise false stories and then infer maliciously on them, so from this dream my sleepiness in the midst of so dreadful an alarm is concluded. If possible, it were good the writer of that letter from hence were known or the forger of it on that side.
But 17 of the depositions you mentioned are come, though the figure 20 be on the last, so 3 are wanting. They are put into the hands of a Committee of the Board to observe how they agree with the informations given here by the same persons and who on new or additional evidence may be fit to be secured.
The hottest and yet the most groundless alarms go out of Munster and I have reason to believe they are sent for out of England to fill sheets of printed papers and the people's heads with fearful apprehensions.
The instrument sent over, authorizing some lords to give the oaths to the members of the next House of Commons, is herewith sent signed as directed.
With yours of the 8th I received his Majesty's pleasure in favour of George Weld, a person certainly very well-affected and deserving, yet I lay before his Majesty that it is not possible he should at once well discharge the office of a Commissioner of Inspection and a captain's duty and yet they ought now more than ever to be both diligently attended. Several officers of this army on the expedition to Tangier went as volunteers, of whom some are returned to inferior commands, having carried themselves with great approbation, and to one or two I am engaged for preferment with his Majesty's permission, which I beg the rather that Mr. Weld, having a good salary, may have a little patience.
His Majesty in Council directed the suspension of one half of the pensions on the establishment to be applied to the supply of the Ordnance Office and of forts, storehouses and magazines, but he has since by more private commands required the exemption of some particular pensions as that of Mr. Hyde, Mrs. Hubblethorn and the late Lord Roche's children. The two latter need his Majesty's charity, and no man can be more desirous to serve the former than myself, yet I must remind his Majesty that no person can be in greater need of his bounty than his service is now, that these relaxations will draw incessant importunities on him, and that, if notwithstanding he will leave any freed from the general rule, my directions for it may be on his pleasure declared in Council, where the temporary retrenchment was ordered. [2½ pages. Holograph. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 342, No. 9.]
Feb. 19.
Dublin.
The Lord Lieutenant to Sir Leoline Jenkins. The lands of Seatown, containing 215 acres, Lineham's farm, 113 acres, the town and lands of Little Newtown, alias Knockmoylstown, 90 acres, a stone house and 18 tenements with 18 acres in Swords and 4 acres called Beggsland in the Campen Fields, formerly Bartholomew Russell's property, are enjoyed by the Archbishop of Dublin as part of the augmentation designed by the Act of Settlement to his bishopric, which lands are forfeited only during the life of Christopher Russell and after his death are to come to Bartholomew Russell, who, being engaged in the late plot, is fled and was required to surrender by a certain day. He having failed therein, the Archbishop desires that, if his estate become forfeited, it may be still enjoyed as part of his augmentation, which I think very reasonable, and I desire you will move his Majesty that no grant may be passed thereof but to the Archbishop and his successors. [Ibid. No. 10.]
Feb. 19.
Dublin.
Lord Granard to Lord [Conway]. Recommending Capt. Charles Murray as a person fit to be sent to Scotland for giving his lordship a constant account of transactions both public and private there and recommending that another not of the same principles be also sent, who shall not know of him. [Torn and in parts illegible. Conway papers. Ibid. No. 11.]
Feb. 19. Certificate by Thomas Taylor of lands in the baronies of Balrothery, Castleknock, Coolock and Newcastle, co. Dublin, and in the liberties of Dublin, in the baronies of Kells and Morgallion, Meath, and in the baronies of Dundalk and Louth, co. Louth, passed to the Duke of York as lands belonging to regicides by virtue of the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, giving the acreage of each parcel. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 342, No. 12.]
Another copy of the above, adding the names of the tenants to whom the said parcels were let with the terms for which they were held and the commencement of each term and with the rental of each, the total amounting to 640l. 14s. 7d. [Ibid. No. 13.]
[Feb. 20 ?] The information of Capt. Edward Le Neve. Tuesday, 8 Feb., I dined at the Bell tavern in Friday Street with the ensigns of the Trained Bands at their half-yearly feast. Sir Thomas Player and Major Peirce were there. At dinner Sir Thomas took a great deal of liberty by reflection on the Duke of York, saying that he had turned him out of being colonel of the Orange regiment and from being the leader of the Artillery Company, and that he understood they had a Court to-morrow, and that, if they would choose him their leader, he would willingly serve them and pressed it twice or thrice in several places of the room. After dinner he, the major and myself removed to a table near the fire, where Sir Thomas fell into discourse that the Earl of Feversham said he would march through the City with 20,000 men armed and would see who durst oppose him. Sir Thomas said, I hope you will all oppose him. No answer was given but from myself, who said, I would not stop him, if it were in the daytime and he had the King's commission, but in the night I would demand the word. Sir Thomas replied, Though you would not stop him, I know of 20 good men that would lay hands on him in Cheapside and stop him. I discoursed Sir Thomas further, why the Parliament would not raise money to preserve Tangier and pay his Majesty's debts. His answer was, Hang Tangier! and that we resolve to raise no money to pay the whores at Whitehall and arbitrary government, and, as the King has called us to Oxford, we know the next will be to York, but for all that we will give him no money. Sir Thomas said that the disposing of the Crown was in the Commons and as alterable as the changing of pipes between men, and taking up pipes in his hands changed them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 50.]
Feb. 20. The information of Henry Warren, ensign to Major Kensey of the Orange regiment. To the same general effect as the last about what Sir Thomas Player said about the disposal of the Crown, but that he said about Tangier, Hang Tangier! but I had rather the Parliament would raise money to secure that, than to maintain whores at Whitehall. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 51.]
[Feb. 20 ?] Fragment of another information about Sir Thomas Player's words. [Ibid. No. 52.]
Feb. 20.
Whitehall.
The King to the Fellows of Eton College. In a very especial manner recommending to them Zachary Cradock, D.D., Fellow of the said College and one of the chaplains in ordinary to the King, for election as Provost of Eton, in the place of Dr. Richard Allestree, deceased. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 46.]
Feb. 20.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of Capt. Patrick Sarsfield for payment of 108l. due to him on account of his company as captain in Col. Maccarty's regiment. [Entered twice. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, pp. 101, 115.]
Feb. 21.
Southwark.
Capt. Peter Rich to [Sir Leoline Jenkins]. The inhabitants of Southwark have importuned me to inform your Honour that the winter assizes for the last and this year have been carried from their town into the county, whereas the constant practice was to have them here both before and after the restoration. Therefore I most humbly request that his Majesty will command the judge to hold the Surrey assizes at Southwark. If it be deemed too late to direct it, I humbly petition they may have the promise of summer assizes. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 53.]
Feb. 21.
Whitehall.
Commission to John Woodcock to be ensign to Capt. Charles Mainwaring's company of foot in the Holland Regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 372.]
Feb. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Ordnance Commissioners to deliver to Capt. Thomas Rowe, captain of the company late Sir Thomas Chicheley's, 2 partizans, 53 fusees, and as many granado pouches and shells, bayonets and cartouche boxes for service in the Tower garrison. [Ibid.]
Feb. 21.
Whitehall.
Commission to James Pearse to be surgeon-general of the land forces, in place of Sackville Whittle, deceased. [Ibid.]
Feb. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Robert Stephens, messenger to the Press, to search for — Hindmarsh, bookseller at the sign of the Black Bull, Cornhill, who has publicly exposed for sale a blasphemous printed paper entituled The Presbyterian Paternoster, Creed and Ten Commandments, and to take him into custody and bring him before Secretary Jenkins to answer to what shall be objected against him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 54, p. 58.]
Feb. 21.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant to Sir William Davys, prime serjeant at law in Ireland, of the office of Chief Justice of the Court of King's Bench in Ireland, void by the death of Sir Robert Booth, to hold the same during pleasure, and also for swearing and admitting him to the Privy Council. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 503.]
Feb. 22.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of the late Earl of Plymouth's servants for payment of some debts due to them for wages and otherwise amounting to above 4,000l., according to a list annexed, out of the arrears of his pension of 4,000l. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 113.]
Feb. 22.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of Sir Edward Picks for payment to him of 800l., lent by him to the Earl of Plymouth, out of the arrears of his pension. [Ibid. p. 114.]
Feb. 22. Sir Leoline Jenkins to the Lord Lieutenant. (Calendared in the Ormonde Papers, Vol. V, p. 589.) [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 341, p. 58.]
Feb. 22.
Rathfarnham.
[Adam] Loftus to Lord Conway. Congratulating him on his new employment.—If ever I was ambitious of any title of honour, you were the first that proposed it to me and by your recommendation to the late Treasurer I had been successful, had not the revolutions of times and persons been so extraordinary. Last summer I revived my pretensions and had the Duke's assurance that the King had granted my request and that I might depend on it, whenever I pleased, but then you may remember on what a sudden the Duke went for Scotland and in what confusion affairs have been since. You once patronized this design. I hope your present station will not make you less kind. I had not been so eager, but that I see letters every post of Irish honours granted, as lately to Lord Wotton and a younger son of Lord Anglesey. By the assurance I had from the Duke you see in what posture I was, when he went for Scotland. I know you will not be displeased in effecting this proposal, if another friend of yours may be obliged, who in his way may forward this design, I mean your friend Progers, to whom I engage myself to present with 500 guineas on the accomplishment. [Torn. Conway papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 342, No. 14.]
Feb. 22.
Raphoe.
John Nisbite to Secretary Gascoyne, Dublin Castle. The enclosed, being causes of humiliation composed by a late meeting of Presbyterian preachers at St. Johnstown in the county of Donegal and ordered to be published and Thursday, the 17th instant, appointed for a general fast and abstinence from labour, was sent me by James Alexander, preacher at Convoy, a little village belonging to me. As the motives tend to possess the people with repentance for forgetting or annihilating that wicked Solemn League and Covenant, and their petitions to that purpose cannot imply anything but the renewal thereof, I conceived it my duty as a justice to send you the same, desiring that the Lord Lieutenant may be acquainted therewith. [Ibid. No. 15.] Enclosed,
The said Causes of Humiliation.
I. Sins.—1. The atheism and blasphemy openly avowed in many places of these nations. 2. Horrid apostasy and perjury in breaking our solemn and personal engagements, covenants and vows to the living God. 3. Our defection and backsliding from our former faithfulness and zeal for the blessed work of reformation. 4. Unparalleled profanity, particularly the crying sins of swearing, Sabbath breaking, uncleanness, drunkenness, covetousness and oppression. 5. Our stupidity under all the threatenings of woe and desolation imminent and the lamentable security and unfruitfulness among the best.
II. Judgments.—1. The mystery of iniquity and hellish popery prevailing and the readiness of many through their ignorance and indifferency in the matters of God to embrace it. 2. The great danger we are and have been in of a bloody massacre by the Anti-Christian party. 3. The dangerous condition of the Protestants over all Europe, especially in Great Britain, France and Ireland.
III. Petitions.—1. We are humbly to beg that the Lord would grant repentance and pardon to all ranks for all those abominations we stand guilty of. 2. That He would oppose and stop the inundation of Popery, idolatry and superstition that overflows these lands. 3. That He would revive the work of the reformation and the hearts of His people. 4. That He would preserve the King and his people from the bloody counsels, plots and conspiracies of Papists. 5. That He would continue pure Gospel ordinances among us and bless them. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 342, No. 15 i.]
Feb. 23. Nathaniel Thompson to the King. Petition for licence to publish a weekly account of news and remarkable accidents (not meddling with matters of State) and likewise of such projections, mathematical and others, as shall be invented or projected by any of the King's subjects. He formerly published an Intelligence of domestic news, wherein he disabused loyal subjects and discovered the notorious falsehoods published by disaffected persons, which he discontinued in obedience to the proclamation, but, though since the last sessions the same disaffected persons have revived weekly their intelligences and other newsbooks to inflame the people, he has refrained to renew his said intelligence without the King's leave. Noted by Sir L. Jenkins as delivered to him 23 Feb. by Mr. Sheridan from his Majesty, but without any order on it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 54.]
Feb. 23. Notes of the desires of the Earl of Winchilsea. The government of Tangier. The government of Dover and the Cinque Ports, or the embassy to Spain. Whereas his Majesty about seven years since promised him 3,000l., which he has not yet moved, and that the now ebbness of his Treasury may not afford it, that his Majesty, in case his lordship marry, will settle 1,000l. a year jointure on her. [Ibid. No. 55.]
Feb. 23.
Whitehall.
Commission to Thomas Sisum to be surgeon to the Earl of Oxford's regiment of Horse Guards. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 374.]
Feb. 23. The King to Nicholas Johnson, Paymaster-General of the Guards and Garrisons. On the report of the Ordnance Commissioners, 2s. a day was allowed to Thomas Silver, master gunner, and 6d. each to eleven other gunners for extraordinary attendance on six pieces of cannon placed in St. James's Park, which was paid to 31 July last. He is to certify the amount due from that day to 1 March next and afterwards to send debentures for the said allowance quarterly, so long as the guns continue in the park, that warrants for payment may be issued from the contingent moneys for the guards and garrisons. [Ibid. p. 378.]
Feb. 23.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Conway to the Earl of Bridgwater. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that Sir Harbottle Grimston and Silius Titus be no longer continued deputy lieutenants for Hertfordshire and that Thomas Docrwra of Potheridge, Ralph Freeman, Col. Richard Gouldstone and Edward Chester be appointed deputy lieutenants of that county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 56, p. 49.]
Feb. 23.
Whitehall.
The King to the Warden and other the Electors of New College and of Winchester College. Willing and requiring them to choose Giles Thistlethwhaite, a scholar of Winchester College, for New College at the next election. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 57, p. 36.]
Feb. 24. Secretary Jenkins to the Lord Chancellor. I am commanded by his Majesty to signify his pleasure that Sir Humphrey Briggs, Philip Prince and Thomas Barton, who are in the commission of the peace for Shropshire, be left out at the next renewing of it, and also to inquire after your health, his Majesty being very desirous to speak with you at his private lodgings, as soon as you can come abroad. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 62, p. 132.]
Feb. 25.
Winchester.
Sir Francis North to Sir Leoline Jenkins. Capt. Manwaring, an eminent officer in the garrison of Portsmouth, resented the affronting speech of a mean fellow so far as to kill him. The coroner's inquest found it murder and bound over the witnesses to the assizes, who preferred a bill of murder to the Grand Jury, which is returned Billa vera. The person not being apprehended, I made strict examination how he came to escape. The coroner pretended that he went to Capt. Harris, deputy governor in Col. Legge's absence, and demanded of him to secure and yield up to justice Capt. Manwaring. He gave charge to the town major and told the coroner he was secure and should be forthcoming, but he is escaped and great observation is made that the soldiers pretend to be exempt from the civil magistrate. I said what I thought fitting and gave strict charge that all care should be taken for apprehending the offender. I think it imports the King's service extremely that this man should be apprehended and justice done. I know not the particular fact, not having heard the evidence, but his flight argues guilt and is a great scandal to the government of that town. Methinks officers of a garrison should be men of that sedate temper as not to incur extravagancies that may bring such evil consequences to the King and themselves and they should value their own honour so far above an idle word of a plebeian, that they should take no more notice of it than of the barking of a dog. It is brave to kill an enemy in battle, but base to kill any man that cannot defend himself. If a pardon should be attempted, I hope you will desire his Majesty to be well informed before he permits any such applications, which use not to be till after the trial. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 56.]
Feb. 25.
Stutton near Ipswich.
Thomas Smyth to the Bishop of London. I find myself obliged to beg your favour in my vindication to the King from an aspersion on me in several printed pamphlets concerning an address, which they say was made by me to the knights of the shire for Suffolk at the last election. I never saw that or any other address nor was privy to the contriving of it nor so much as heard of it till after it was read, nor did I know the person who read and delivered it, till yesterday I find it was a Mr. Persivall, an attorney, who lately lived at Newmarket and now at London. All that I was concerned in at that election was that, as the sheriff was about to make the return, I went into the Court and finding my name in the indenture I was desired to sign and seal to it, which done, as I was withdrawing, I was requested by several gentlemen and principal freeholders to give Sir Samuel Barnardiston their thanks for his services in former parliaments, which I did in the words in the enclosed paper. I have served his Majesty in many commissions in this county ever since his restoration and for some years in Essex and, I hope, I have performed it with duty and integrity. Had my principles now been otherwise, I must have discovered a great deal of impudence so publicly to declare them, for besides my former recordership I have lately been elected and sworn recorder of another borough in this county and it would be the greatest affliction to me to lie under his Majesty's displeasure for a crime I never did nor thought of committing. I therefore pray you to be instrumental in preventing so great a misfortune on me. [Ibid. No. 57.] Enclosed,
The said paper. The gentlemen and freeholders present have commanded me to make their acknowledgements for your services to them. If a constant asserting of the interest of the Crown and the true Protestant interest, which are like Hippocrates' twins and must live and die together, and is the true English interest, can merit an esteem, you have justly entitled yourself to it. [Ibid. No. 57 i.]
Feb. 25.
Whitehall.
Commission to Oliver Nicholas to be lieut.-colonel and captain in the room of John Churchill in the Duke of York's foot regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 375.]
Feb. 25.
Whitehall.
Commission to Thomas Badd to be captain of the Duke of York's company at Portsmouth, whereof Oliver Nicholas was captain. Minute. [Ibid.]
Feb. 25.
Whitehall.
The King to [the Trustees of the Charterhouse]. Warrant for admitting to the next pensioner's place that shall become void and in the King's disposal, after such as have already obtained letters for the like places, Thomas Awbrey, who served the late King as quarter-master of horse to the end of the late civil war and has since served in the regiment of Horse Guards and in the late new raised forces, till they were disbanded, and is now aged and incapable of any employment. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 531.]
Feb. 25.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Sir James Butler. His Majesty knowing that the Middlesex Justices are at this time asembled at their sessions, is willing to close with the opportunity to speak with them. He has therefore commanded me to signify to you, being in the chair, that you are to give notice to as many of them as you can speak with or conveniently send to that it is his pleasure they should attend him in Council at 3 o'clock this afternoon. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 62, p. 134.]
Feb. 25.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. Warrant, after reciting that he had been informed by the Ambassadors of the States General that a Dutch man-of-war belonging to the province of Zealand convoying merchant ships of that nation from Spain homewards had been cast away not far from Dartmouth, and that the said ambassadors had desired permission that those who shall be sent by the Admiralty of Zealand may have full liberty, exclusive of all others, to fish for and carry home the tackle, cannon and whatsoever else belonging to the said ship may be recovered; for giving full and effectual orders to the Vice-Admirals and others it may concern not only to suffer those sent by the Admiralty of Zealand to fish for and recover what they can of the said tackle &c., but also to afford all reasonable assistance towards executing their commission, and further for giving order, that those employed by the said Admiralty be freely permitted to embark and carry home whatsoever of the premises shall be recovered. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 359, p. 76.]
Feb. 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant for apprehending with his papers Edward Fitzharris, against whom information has been given that he on the 23rd instant uttered several dangerous and treasonable words with intent to publish them in writing thereby to promote a rebellion, and for bringing him and them before Secretary Jenkins to answer to what shall be laid to his charge. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 54, p. 64.]
Feb. 26. Newsletter to Francis Pye, postmaster at Morpeth. Last Wednesday the King communicated to the Council the speech he intended to make at the opening of the Parliament. The substance, 'tis said, is that he has been always ready to comply with his former parliaments in anything they could desire, mentioning several of them, but, when he saw the difficulties on the point of succession grow too high, he declared to them again and again that he was resolved not to suffer the succession to be quite put out of the legal course of descent yet, to free them from their fears and jealousies and to avoid all further difference, he gave them as much power as they could desire not only for securing the Protestant religion and the peace depending thereon, but also to make an impartial enquiry into the Plot and all such designs as may be of ill consequence, that the confederates may be brought to speedy justice &c., and, if the Parliament had had any manner of inclination and their unreasonableness and unnecessary desire to fall on such extraordinary and illegal ways to serve the Protestant religion and quell their jealousies &c., but, seeing they continued in the way they entered and nothing could prevail to take them off from meddling with the succession, which obliged him first to prorogue and then dissolve them, hoping now to find them a little more serene and moderate than the former and take notice of his former resolution, which he so often repeated, concerning the succession. As to the privileges of both houses, he is willing to adjourn the matter and, if with due regard to his prerogative, he will concur with them herein. For Tangier he had so amply opened himself by laying open the state of the place in his speeches in the last Parliament and therefore to them, and how ready to comply with anything they shall judge conducing to the security of the Protestant interest and the nation, and, though this be the principle he now must insist on, and therefore he must desire them to take the matter into a speedy consideration and enable him to take some more effectual way for the preservation of the Protestant interest. Without a supply 'tis impossible to secure things and, as to his brother, he will not (if the Parliament desire it) permit him to come near him so long as he lives and, as he has studied to preserve peace during his life, so he will, if possible, leave us in peace when he dies.
What has been so talked of about turning the Earls of Suffolk, Manchester and Macclesfield out of all their affairs at Court, his Majesty last week began to put in execution and ordered a commission constituting the Earl of Arlington Lord Lieutenant of Suffolk in the room of the Earl of Suffolk.
The King intends to go to Burford 11 March to the horse racing and will continue there till the Parliament meet. It's said the Duke of York will meet him there and accompany him to Oxford and thence pass into Ireland.
Last Friday the judges attended the King, when he commanded them to put the laws in execution against all Papists, not to suffer the rich to oppress the poor, not for any person to have more arms in his house than what is lawful and to try all the priests but suspend execution, till they have given his Majesty an account of the circumstances.
Whether the Council have occasioned any alteration in the King's speech I cannot certainly tell yet, but since there were some great doings in Council, some say about the parliament sitting at Oxford and that now it cannot be altered.
The King has sold the Mews for 30,000l.
His Majesty is about raising 2,000 foot and is now naming the officers. They are to strengthen the forces in Ireland. [2 pages. Admiralty, Greenwich Hospital 1, No. 84.]
Feb. 26.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland. Having considered what in your letter of the 17th to the Earl of Moray you desired him to communicate to us concerning our letters of the 3rd instant in reference to the forfeitures granted to John Graham of Claverhouse and to Lieut.-col. Maine and the others concerned with him, we now let you know that what we signified in our said letters was on mature deliberation, judging it reasonable that the said donators be authorized to enter into the possession of the said forfeitures as therein mentioned and we are the more confirmed in this opinion that you say all the forfeitures will be declared before the end of the next summer session. If so, the delay of the payment of their shares of the charge of the suppression of the rebellion for so short a time is not considerable and therefore it is our express pleasure that you remove the stop on the gifts of the said forfeitures and that you cause the same to be passed in the Exchequer at their very next meeting after the receipt of this. As to what you have represented concerning Claverhouse, particularly in reference to the commission granted by you to him for uplifting and sequestrating not only the rents &c. belonging to Freuch but of all other rebels in Wigtonshire who have been in that rebellion (whereof you say he has made no account as yet), we have spoke to him about it, and he positively asserts that, while he was in Scotland, he received not a farthing on that account and that, if anything has since been recovered by his agents, he believes it to be so inconsiderable, as it will not much exceed the necessary charges. However, we expect he shall meet with no worse usage from you than others to whom we have granted the like commissions. As to what you write concerning Col. James Douglas, we are so fully convinced of his loyalty and so satisfied with his good services in defeating the rebels that at the signing of the two letters in favour of the persons already mentioned we signed also another in his favour, which we now again require you to make effectual to him, that this signature also may pass without any delay. [1½ page. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 6, p. 283.]
Feb. 26.
Dublin.
The Earl of Longford to Sir Leoline Jenkins. Sending a short but very exact scheme of all the useful stores of arms and ammunition in his charge.—If this does not satisfy the Council, I shall send transcripts of the accounts of stores prepared for the Commissioners of Accounts from the time of Sir T. Chicheley's being Master of the Ordnance here, for, till he put the office into a method, all matters relating to the Ordnance were in confusion, no account of the stores having been passed while Lord MountAlexander and Sir Robert Byron were Masters and the storehouse in Dublin, where was the chief magazine, having been accidentally burnt in Lord Berkeley's time, the storekeeper was furnished with an excuse for not giving any account of the remains of stores, the principal whereof, he alleged, were then consumed as well as his vouchers, so our first account must commence from Sir T. Chicheley's entering on that employment, which is now ready for the Commissioners of Accounts to 25 March last and the account to 25 March next is also preparing. Since I have served in this station, no survey has been taken of the stores, which was occasioned by want of money for the persons to be employed, the Lord Lieutenant finding no room for it out of the Concordatum money, by reason of the extraordinaries here for the discoveries of the plot, but I hope in a month or two he will send some to take an exact account of all that remains, and then I shall pass my accounts yearly.
Because we have frequent alarms from Munster and complaints of their defenceless condition, by the Lord Lieutenant's command I have to-night directed the storekeeper at Cork to furnish the militia officers of that county and Kerry with what arms and ammunition they desire, and to let them have them on good security for payment in six months and this rule we shall observe throughout the whole kingdom, as far as the arms last sent out of England will furnish them. Since the beginning of June twelvemonth 100 barrels of powder have been lodged in the storehouse at Cork with a proportionable quantity of arms for the militia of that province, yet they have not since offered to buy one barrel of powder and only Capt. Brodrick contracted for as many arms as came to 35l., for payment of which he gave security, and neglecting to make satisfaction was sued to a judgment, which has not yet prevailed with him to discharge that inconsiderable debt.
In all our stores here we have neither armour for horse nor tents, both of which are so necessary in time of action that I recommend you to represent to his Majesty our want of both. [2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 342, No. 16.] Enclosed,
List of the serviceable arms, ammunition &c. in Ireland on 28 Feb., 1680–1, and an account of the arms and ammunition sent from England in 1678 with the quantities sold to the militia to 28 Feb., 1680–1. [Printed. Ibid. No. 16 i.]
Feb. 27.
Whitehall.
Declaration by the King that neither of the Secretaries of State move him on behalf of any person whatsoever for any preferment in the Church or any favour or dispensation in either of the Universities without having first communicated both the person and the thing desired to the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Bishop of London for the time being or one of them and without having the opinion and attestation of them or one of them in the case, and that, if at any time the King be moved in like manner by any other person, neither of the Secretaries of State present any warrant for the King's signature, till the said Archbishop and Bishop or one of them shall have given their or his opinion and attestation as aforesaid and that the same be entered not only in the offices of both the Secretaries of State but also in the Signet Office. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 58.]
Other copies of the above declaration. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 48, and S.P. Dom., Entry Book 57, p. 41.]
Feb. 27. Pass for Thomas St. John, servant to Henry Savile, Envoye Extraordinary to France, to pass to his said master in France and to return. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 51, f. 388.]
Feb. 27.
Ross, co. Cork.
Extract of a letter. About a dozen rogues very well armed do some mischiefs in and near the mountains between this and Kerry. They came lately to a castle in the woods by Dunmanway and did some small hurt to the people adjoining but could not enter the castle. I was then with the Commissioners of Array in Cork. When the alarm came, they immediately hastened me to the place, where I found the thing nothing to what I expected, and gave the Lord Lieutenant and Council an account of it, and hope ere long to give them a good account of the persons that did it.
Some people in these parts are very much afraid of the Irishes rising, but I can see no reason for it, nor could they do any great hurt, for, as the militia is now, they would drive as many more Irish as are in this county into the sea. I believe there is no danger of them, unless they have French or other foreigners with them. Pray let the Primate know so much and that I shall be very careful to give him an account of everything that happens in these parts, but I do not think to trouble him with every small robbery or other frivolous thing here. I do not wonder this last report was so early at Dublin, for at Cork it was as hot as if an army had besieged the castle. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 342, No. 17.]
Feb. 28. Memorial of the Earl of Craven that the commission should be under the great seal, nothing less being safe for a commander in chief, nor of force to oblige the field officers to yield the obedience necessary during the King's absence; that the civil magistrates have no deference for any not of the Council, and the Council consider little any not of their own body. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 59.]
Feb. 28. Mr. Granger to Sir Leoline Jenkins. I have been since my landing somewhat violently taken with a fever. On Friday and Saturday I was at your house, but missed the opportunity of your presence. Waiting too long being something hazardous, I beseech you to give me a particular time to-morrow or so, when I shall attend. Capt. Richardson is under some indisposition of health and sessions time also, so that I am left to myself. I have now been over some 13 days and long to be dispatched back again. I enclose the very address, which Capt. Richardson forgot to present when he first acquainted you with my landing. [Ibid. No. 60.]
Feb. 28.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of Elizabeth Willson that a stop may be taken off from a pension of 200l. granted for 8 years determined 29 Sept., 1680, and the continuance of it for a further number of years. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 114.]
Feb. 28.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Sir William Waller. I am commanded by his Majesty to let you know he would have you attend him to-morrow morning at 9 in the Council Chamber and that you use your best endeavours to bring Mr. Everard and Mr. Smyth to attend at the same time and place. I have no means but by your care and favour to find them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 62, p. 133.]
Feb. 28.
Dublin.
John, Archbishop of Dublin, to the Earl of Arran. Requesting him to move Secretary Jenkins to present the Lord Lieutenant's letter to the King in order to procure a letter securing to the see of Dublin for ever the lands of Seatown, now held by the Archbishop by way of custodium during the life of Bartholomew Russell, the remainder being in Bartholomew Russell, his grandchild, who, having fled on a discovery of a late plot in England, these lands will be forfeited to his Majesty. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 342, No. 18.]
Feb. 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant of a baronetcy of Ireland to Standish Hartstonge and his heirs male of his body, with a discharge of services to be performed or payments to be made in lieu thereof. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 504.]
[Feb ?] Ann, wife of Edward Fitzharris, now prisoner in the Gatehouse, to the King. Petition that her husband may be released on bail or at least allowed to visit her with a keeper during her lying in, and that in the meantime she may have free access to him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 415, No. 61.]
[Feb ?] Lieut. John Pym to the King. Petition stating that he had had the honour to bring his Majesty ashore at the Isle of Scilly, who, on account of his sufferings and services, at the restoration made him a lieutenant under Sir Arthur Gore and being, immediately after his disbanding, made lieutenant to Capt. Henry Jones, he was in the last three engagements against the Dutch, where he was wounded and one of his sons slain by his side and two more were slain in the King's service in Flanders, and that, the company being commanded back to Ireland, it was sold over the petitioner's head and was then commanded for Tangier, where he was wounded in three places and lost the use of his left hand and, having leave to come to England to recover his strength, was brought by Lord Arran to kiss the King's hand and praying a grant of the company now at Tangier, which was Capt. Edward Courtney's, who died in Italy. (Charleton was appointed to this company 30 March, 1681. See post, p. 226.) [Ibid. No. 62.] Annexed,
Lieut. Pym's memorandum to Lord Fitz-Hardinge, setting out at length his sufferings and services. [Ibid. No. 62 i.]