BHO

Charles II: July 1682

Pages 279-321

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1682. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1932.

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July 1682

July 1.
Lord Bulkeley's in Anglesey.
Capt. Thomas Nedham and others to Col. Werden. The Cheshire muster-master being dead, recommending Cornet Stringer for the place. Sir G. Shakerley has enclosed this to Sir L. Jenkins unsealed, that you may peruse it and deliver it at your discretion. With note by Lord Bulkeley joining in the request. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 129.] Enclosed,
July 1.
Lord Bulkeley's in Anglesey.
Sir Geoffrey Shakerley to Secretary Jenkins. Recommending Cornet Stringer. [Ibid. No. 129 I.]
July 1.
Berkswell.
Sir S. Marow to Francis Charlton. Thanking him for becoming his bail in the suit with Sir John Knightley.—I doubt our success will not be much better in the King's Bench than it has been in the Common Pleas, but, if we can suspend the suit till a parliament be summoned, I hope the cause may yet be retrieved. However, I am very sensible of my obligation to you and your son, and, if either will call here, when you go into Shropshire, it will be esteemed an additional favour. [Ibid. No. 130.]
July 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the lieutenant of the forest of Needwood and to the ranger and his deputy for a restraint on the said forest for the present year and that no deer be killed but by the King's warrant that shall mention this restraint (except out of each ward a brace of deer to the Borderers and only half fees to the officers of Old Forest), and that no pack of hounds be permitted to hunt in the body of the said forest in any summer before 1 Aug., and all persons having liberty to hunt are to give reasonable notice each time they are to hunt and care shall be taken to appoint them proper places to hunt in, and all persons having liberty to hunt, if they lose their deer, that deer shall be taken as to them, as if they had killed him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 108.]
July 3.
Vale Royal.
T. C[holmondeley] to Col. Werden. Recommending honest Jack Stringer to be muster-master. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 131.]
July 3.
Chester.
— to —. I thank you for yours of the 29th. The papers I disposed of to four of our honest aldermen. The London Whigs, who were at our fair last week, with several of our citizens of the same stamp, were treated by our Mayor at a venison feast last Friday. I send the enclosed (the newsletter of 23 June, calendared ante, p. 261) to let you see what base (I hope false) intelligence comes to our coffee-houses. I have marked the paragraph, which alone you need trouble to read. The woman, to whom it is directed, knows not the writer's name, but Thomas Robinson, her neighbour, a Whig, procured it for her. I suspect it comes from Giles Hancock at the Golden Cock in Cannon Street, for the same news except that paragraph came then to another coffee-house here and commonly comes and from the said person. We are beginning here to make our interest for an honest Mayor for next year, though the election be not till 13 Oct., and hope to succeed. [Ibid. No. 132.]
July 3. Notes by Secretary Jenkins. At the opening of the Common Hall the Lord Mayor or Mr. Recorder by his command is to let the Commons know the irregularities of the last poll, in that they would not suffer the question for confirmation to be put nor suffer a poll for it, and that he insists on his right and therefore expects they should begin again and confirm the sheriff he has chosen, if they expect he should join with them in the choice of another sheriff.
Then the Lord Mayor is to withdraw and leave the Common Hall to proceed as they can agree, but, if they do not agree with him in confirming Mr. North, he is to disagree with them and declare in the Court of Aldermen and likewise in the Common Hall that he disagrees and the Court of Aldermen is to join him in the disagreement, and then to dissolve the Common Hall, telling them he will take into consideration what is further to be done.
That the Lord Mayor direct the Common Serjeant, the Town [Clerk] and also the Comptroller and Secondaries to take, manage and report the poll and that he declare that the sheriffs have no part in taking it, only, where there is cause to keep the peace, they are to be assisting. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 133.]
Similar notes by Secretary Jenkins. [Ibid. No. 134.]
July 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant to George Legg, Master General of the Ordnance, to deliver to Sir Josiah Child, governor of the East India Company, or his order, 250 barrels of gunpowder, to be exported as the said Company shall direct, they paying the value thereof in saltpetre or ready money. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 427.]
July 4. Sir James Hay to Secretary Jenkins. Apologizing that his necessities should make him thus troublesome, enclosing a state of his condition to be presented to Lord Hyde and begging him to aid him to induce his lordship to consider his wants. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 135.] Probably enclosed,
Petition of Sir James Hay of Smithfield in Scotland, baronet, to Viscount Hyde. His father and grandfather were made baronets by the late King, with 500l. a year in lands, which during his minority were disposed of by the King, and his uncle, the now Earl of Morton, conveying him beyond seas, has seized his estate. Being in debt and intending to go beyond seas he discovered a hellish conspiracy, of which he informed the King, and spent on his discoveries the money which would have made his fortune elsewhere. Has suffered by the false aspersions on him in the second and third parts of No Protestant Plot. Is ill and in great poverty and distress. Has received only a small supply from Mr. Taylor. Prays more effectual relief, or else will have to retire beyond seas. [Ibid. No. 135 I.]
July 4, 5, 6. List of persons sent to on these days, probably to canvass them at the election for sheriffs. [Ibid. No. 136.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Wells. Recommending John Yeadle, M.A., chaplain to Viscount Fitz-Hardinge, to be chosen into the first canon residentiary's place that shall become void next after those who have already obtained letters for the like dignity. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 73.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of George Sawyers, late Page of Honour to the Queen, praying that, her Majesty having granted him the manor of Chertsey for 31 years, whereof the coppices of Fanngrove and Knolegrove are parcel, in which his Majesty is interested for 16 years, and there being payable out of it to his Majesty 19 loads of hay and 16 quarters of oats, his Majesty will grant him the said coppices for the said 16 years and discharge the payment of the hay and oats during her Majesty's life, he releasing 525l. due to him on a pension granted him as Page of Honour. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 181.]
July 4,
9 p.m.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Conway to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that they give order for fitting out with all possible speed the frigate intended for the transportation of Lord Culpeper to Virginia. They are to cause their secretary to attend the Committee of Trade next Thursday to give them an account thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 56, p. 61.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a patent for 14 years to William Marbury for new inventions of making salt and draining and drawing water out of brine pits discovered by John Du Son, who, being an alien and not capable of taking a patent, has besought that it might be granted to the said Marbury, with a proviso for revocation thereof by order signed by six or more of the Privy Council, should it appear that it is inconvenient or prejudicial to the King's service and the good of his kingdoms or any abuse be discovered therein or that the said inventions are not new. [Nearly 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 102.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Duke of Newcastle. I thought I had given you an account of his Majesty's pleasure touching Sir Willoughby Hickman, when I sent you that instrument of surrender that the town of Nottingham may, if they please, make use of, but, being then in great haste, I did it not, for which I most humbly beg your pardon. It was multiplicity of business that put that affair quite out of my head. His Majesty approves of Sir Willoughby, since you recommend him, to be one of your deputy lieutenants.
Mr. Chichester Wray's letter to you has been read and debated on before his Majesty. I am commanded to thank you and to desire you to let him know his care and vigilance is well taken by his Majesty. I was further commanded to put his letter to you into the Attorney-General's hands to see what course may best be taken for the King's service. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 98.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Col. John Strode, Lieutenant of Dover Castle, for swearing and admitting Henry Selby of the Inner Temple, who has been granted the office of Steward of the Court of Chancery of the Cinque Ports, void by the death of Sir Thomas Hard[r]es, serjeant at law. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 359, p. 97.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting that notwithstanding former divers good laws and orders still in full force, the inhabitants and broken men in the Highlands and Isles being accustomed to liberty and licentiousness on occasion of the late troubles and by reason that during the same the said laws have not been put in execution, still sorn, steal and oppress and commit other insolences and disorders and especially within the shires of Caithness, Sutherland, Ross, Inverness, Cromarty, Nairne, Elgin, Bamff, Aberdeen, Kincardine, Forfar, Perth, Stirling, Dumbarton, Argyle and Tarbett and other adjacent shires to the high contempt of authority and to the great prejudice of good and peaceable subjects, for a commission to the officers of State for the time being and 66 others therein named conjunctly and severally to pursue, apprehend, imprison and present to justice all persons in the said shires guilty or suspected to be guilty of theft, robberies, depredations, sorning, exacting of blackmail, communing with intercommuned persons, harbouring and resetting of outlaws and fugitives, hounding out or ratihabiting thieves, robbers, murderers, sorners or others guilty of the said crimes, with various powers for quieting the Highlands and Isles and securing the peace of the same. [Over 8 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 255.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting that the shirefship of Roxburgh is now fallen into his Majesty's hands by the decease of Robert, Earl of Roxburgh, late shireff, and that his Majesty is mindful of the loyalty and good service of the said late Earl and his predecessors, and that he lost his life by shipwreck in attending the Duke of Albany in his voyage for Scotland, for a gift to Robert, now Earl of Roxburgh, of the said office during pleasure and, in respect that the said Earl is yet within the years of pupilarity and so cannot exercise the said office himself, nominating William Ker of Mainhouse, uncle to the said Earl and one of his tutors, deput in the said office till the said Earl shall attain the age of 14. [Over 2 pages. Ibid. p. 264.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to James, Lord Doun, of the office of shirefship within the shires of Elgin and Forres during pleasure. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 266.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Deputy of Ireland. Warrant for giving order to the Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench to take bail from Theobald, Lord Brittas, in order to his trial in due course of law, he being in the meantime enlarged from his present restraint, the King having seen a letter dated 26 June from the Lord Deputy and the Council of Ireland to the Lord Lieutenant setting forth the state of his case at large. [S.P. Ireland, Entry Book 1, p. 23.]
July 6. Sir James Hay to Secretary Jenkins. For want of money I am bid provide myself with other lodgings and I must then lie in prison or the streets. My long and faithful services brought me into these calamities, or I am like to be and do not deserve relief, whilst all others for the like service are considered. I humbly request you to implore his Majesty on my behalf and to urge Lord Hyde's consideration on my petition that either some small and certain provision may be ordered me for present subsistence or, if his Majesty apprehends me burdensome and now not serviceable, I am very willing to withdraw beyond seas, a small sum being ordered me to bear my charges. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 137.]
July 6. List of 10 persons that accompanied the sheriffs to speak with the Lord Mayor, as they said to give him an account of the poll. [Ibid. No. 138.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of Ferdinando Huddleston, praying to be made conservator of the river Blyth in Northumberland with the customs and duties of it for 31 years, at the rent it was granted before, he being at his own charge to remove all the obstructions which hinder ships of burthen passing and to make it navigable. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 182.]
July 7. The Mayor and corporation of Northampton to the King. Petition for approbation of their election of Henry, Earl of Peterborough, as their Recorder. Signed by William Else, Mayor, and many other inhabitants. Endorsed, "His lordship was recommended by the King upon a former petition occasioned by his Majesty refusing the Lord Montague." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 139.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
Reference to the officers of the Board of Greencloth of the petition of Lady Talbor, relict of Sir Robert Talbor, for an order to the Greencloth for payment of 500l. or thereabouts, arrears due to her husband at his death for board wages as physician to his Majesty. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 183.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a letter rehabilitating Archibald, late Lord Lorne, eldest son, and the other sons and the daughters of the late Earl of Argyle and their posterity to their name and fame and to being capable of enjoying honours, lands, moveables &c. as fully as any other subjects, notwithstanding the sentence of forfeiture pronounced against the said late Earl and the dishabilitation therein contained, wherewith his Majesty hereby dispenses, and requiring the Lyon King at Arms to grant them anew the simple coat of arms of the name of Campbell. [3 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 267.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Deputy. Warrant for a commission to Sir Thomas Newcomen during pleasure to be major-general of the foot of the army in Ireland in the room of Roger, Earl of Orrery, deceased. [Over 1 page. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 11, p. 75.]
[July 8 ?] Richard Kinsey, citizen and vintner of London, in behalf of the widow of Robert Tichbourne, a prisoner in the Tower, deceased, to the King. Petition for leave to bury him in Mercers' Chapel by his relations, the petitioner engaging he shall be buried privately in the night. The petitioner in 1650 was condemned to be drawn, hanged and quartered for his loyalty and was saved by Tichbourne alone, who also endeavoured to preserve his brother's life, who was executed for being in Penruddock's business. (See Luttrell's Diary, Vol. I, p. 204.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 140.]
July 8.
Windsor.
Warrant prepared by Mr. Lock to the Earl of Mulgrave, colonel of the Holland regiment, for Sir John Berry's company to relieve that of Capt. Cornwallis, which is to be transported to Hull. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 433.]
July 8.
Windsor.
Similar order to Lord Noel, governor of Portsmouth, to receive Sir John Berry's company and then permit that of Capt. Cornwallis to go to Hull. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Reference of the petition of John and Susan Peate for a pardon for clipping, Susan having concealed others and being willing to discover them and John being detained in prison but not prosecuted and no proof against him, to Sir George Jeffreys, Chief Justice of Chester, who is to examine whether they can make such discoveries as he judges may be for his Majesty's service and represent the same to his Majesty with his opinion whether he thinks them objects of mercy. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 183.]
July 9. The Bishop of Oxford to Secretary Jenkins. I trouble you with the enclosed paper, showing the subjects of our Friday Act, which will give you occasion to let our superiors know the bent of this place. You, that watch all occasions to be kind in your representations of us, will take the advantage of little ones. The performance was exceedingly well and I hope the remaining part of the Act will not disgrace the beginning. [S.P. Dom., Car, II. 419, No. 141.]
July 9.
Windsor.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Col. Cary Dillon, showing that he is still unsatisfied his deficiency of 1,200l. per annum and praying that, having had no benefit of the letter of 29 Jan., 1673–4, for a grant of such forfeited lands in Ireland as he should find out, he may renew the same and pass letters patent in England in part of the said 1,200l. per annum of certain lands forfeited in Ireland. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 196.]
July 10. Secretary Jenkins to Lord Hyde. A Portuguese going for France and being charged with very rich presents from the Queen of Portugal to her relations there, was robbed in the Downs by those of the same ship's crew that carried him. Two of the thieves were lately hanged at Dover, and some of the goods (toilets, as I take it, and such things) were found where they had hid or pawned them. These goods, being about 100l. value, are at the request of the Portuguese envoye brought up by the Serjeant of the Admiralty of Dover to this port in order to be delivered to him. The Commissioners of the Customs will not suffer them to be landed without an order from your lordship and your Board, which I desire may be put into the hands of this bearer, who has charge of the goods. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 99.]
July 11.
Windsor.
The Earl of Conway to Secretary Jenkins. I could not communicate yours of the 9th and 10th with Lord Preston's letter and the Gazette à la main to his Majesty till this morning, though yesterday I attended punctually at the hours appointed. On both I have nothing more to say from his Majesty than that he is very well pleased with the intention of Lord Hyde and the rest who, you say, design to dine with the Lord Mayor next Thursday, before which time his Majesty will be at Whitehall, but he desires you all to proceed with your intention of dining in London. I reminded him of calling a Council and told him there was a necessity of it for the dispatch of Lord Culpeper. His answer was, he should be in London time enough to give order about it there.
I return Lord Preston's letter and send two material letters received this morning from Mr. Pooly with some other papers relating to those affairs, which you will communicate to Lords Halifax and Hyde, and keep them for me till I come. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 142.]
July 11.
Staunton.
Robert, Lord Ferrers, to Secretary Jenkins. The gentlemen who wait on you and are part of the corporation of Derby and represent the whole, had a full account from me of the free invitation you gave them to accept your service. They will on your directions from time to time attend your leisure and, were it not impertinent to beg you to be a favourable mediator for them, I might renew my request. They have followed your directions to the gentleman I sent to wait on you on their behalf, but, if anything else be necessary, they'll be at hand to beg your instructions. They will, I hope, in a little time see a happy issue of their loyal intentions and I hope the favour his Majesty will show to so much loyalty will be of excellent example to other corporations. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 143.]
July 11.
Windsor Castle.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of John Ball for a grant of his Majesty's right to the reversion of all the lands in Gloucestershire, lately belonging to Sir William Doyley, extended on his Majesty's behalf, whereof he had a mortgage for 6,000l., without which he must lose that debt to the ruin of himself and family. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 179.]
July 11.
London.
Newsletter to John Squier, Newcastle. Giving Flanders news in the same words as in the London Gazette, No. 1737, from "the French proceed with great rigour" to "the end of next month." —The Abbé de Belto, brother to the Count de Soye, is made Bishop of Bruges and has received his patent from Spain and his orders from Rome.
Letters from Edinburgh of the 4th say that some of the sweet singers were brought in thither by some of the companies of the city and that a Committee of the Council sat to know how they should dispose of them, but were come to no resolution. Several of the Commissioners of the royal burghs were arrived there, who met and read their commissions, but proceeded to no other business. Two letters from his Majesty to the Council were arrived. The purport of one was to restore the Duke of Hamilton to all his rights and royalties and the other was to hasten the town of Edinburgh in completing their companies with all expedition.
Mr. Pulteney, having some time since married in France a great heiress, since his coming to England was challenged by a Mr. Hayward, who pretended to be contracted to the woman. Pulteney refused his challenge, but last Sunday night, meeting near St. James' Square, they both drew. Pulteney killed Hayward and is since fled.
Our French letters arrived to-day say that the Dauphiness is not brought to bed, but is hourly expected.
The Elector of Brandenburg's Minister at the Hague has given in a memorial to the States General representing how advantageous it would be for Europe to bring the Emperor and his allies into a treaty of peace and that the King of France has now a powerful army on foot, which if he should employ against the Emperor, the Turks being resolved to join with the malcontents and invade Hungary, no man can foresee the calamities which will be brought on the Emperor's allies. This memorial was referred to a committee, who gave a great many reasons for a war with France, but, when these letters came away, a report was spread that a truce was made between the Emperor and France for several years and most of the knowing men believe it to be true. [3 pages. Admiralty, Greenwich Hospital 2, No. 39.]
July 12.
Windsor.
The Earl of Conway to Secretary Jenkins. This is only to reconvey the enclosed papers, which I communicated this morning to his Majesty, who told me he expects a Council to-morrow morning at Whitehall and will meet at your office an hour before. He sups to-night at Lady Portsmouth's and will be in his coach to-morrow by 6. I wish I knew whether you would give us leave to return hither on Saturday. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 144.]
July 12.
London.
Sir John Moore to Secretary Jenkins. He communicated his letter about the complaint of several indigent officers' widows, that they had not been paid their pensions for some years by the Justices of London and Middlesex, to the Justices at the last quarter sessions for London, where on perusal of 14 Car. II., c. 9, that empowers the raising of money for relief of poor officers and soldiers, it was found that that Act was to continue but to the end of the first session of the next parliament, so that the authority for raising these moneys expired two or three years ago, and of this opinion is not only the present Recorder but also Sir George Jeffreys, the late one, and divers of the judges.
Postscript by Sir George Treby.—I am fully informed that the above resolution was declared in the London sessions two or three years since and the very reading of the statute will convince that we cannot now levy money on this account. Were it possible, every man of us would do it, in relief of these miserable and meritorious people. [Ibid. No. 145.]
July 12. The deposition on oath of James Hughes of the parish of Llanvetherin, Monmouthshire. On the Friday before the parliament met at Oxford he heard John Arnold at his house utter the following words:—That he was going for Oxford to represent his country and, if any harm happened to any of the members of the House of Commons, it must be a Papist that does it, and he that says that the Duke of York, the Marquess of Worcester, Lord Halifax, Sir Leoline Jenkins and two or three more noblemen were good men, was a Papist and no good subject and did not love the Commons of England and he spoke slightly of the Duke of York and advised all to stab and kill all that would say that any of those men were good men and that they should not go for any warrant to question them for saying so, but destroy them presently. Immediately after John Arnold, Edward Turberville and servants, all being double armed, went on their journey for Oxford. [Ibid. No. 146.]
[1682 ? July ?] Instances of Mr. Arnold's favouring Dissenters. At the general sessions at Monmouth about two years ago he discouraged the prosecution of a Fanatic preacher taken at a conventicle and reflected on John Franklyn, the prosecutor. At a funeral about last Christmas he boasted of the favours he had done them, inveighing against their prosecutors and speaking affectionately of them. He highly favoured Seedles, a Dissenter, accused at a general sessions at Monmouth for treasonable words. He promotes with all industry the induction of Tyler into the usher's place of the free school of Monmouth, who publicly discoursed against the Liturgy of the Church of England, and exclaimed against his Majesty for not consenting to repealing the penal laws against Recusants and not passing the Exclusion Act. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 147.]
July 12,
6 p.m.
Secretary Jenkins to the Lord Mayor. His Majesty intending to be here to-morrow forenoon, intends to hold a Council and to have you and the aldermen and the present sheriffs to attend on him there. Of this I am commanded to give you notice and by your favour to the aldermen and sheriffs. We expect his Majesty here early to-morrow. The hour appointed for your lordship is 10. If his Majesty be hindered by bad weather, you shall have notice. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 105.]
July 12. Secretary Jenkins to the Lord Mayor. On this prospect of your coming to Whitehall to-morrow several great lords, as the Duke of Ormonde, the Earls of Ailesbury and Halifax, Viscount Hyde and others, are resolved to follow you home and dine with you. This I thought myself bound to advertize you of, for I perceive their lordships to be resolved not to fail you to-morrow at dinner. [Ibid. p. 106.]
July 12.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant for a gift appointing James Gordon, writer in Edinburgh, to be one of the four ordinary macers before the Lords of Council and Session for his life, in the place of John Wauchop, deceased. [2 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 270.]
July 12.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant for a gift to Archibald Ker of the escheat of James Riddell, merchant burgess of Edinburgh. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 272.]
July 12.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant for a remission in favour of Andrew Hunter, eldest son of James Hunter, in Auchinbainzie, of the slaughter of— Kirko in Peiltoun, provided that before the expeding of this remission the said Andrew Hunter produce a letter of slaines from the said Kirko's nearest of kin or otherwise give sufficient assythment. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 273.]
July 12.
Windsor Castle.
Memorials of protections in the ordinary form to Sir William Ruthven of Dunglasse and to William Couper, indweller in the Cannongate, for two years respectively. [Ibid.]
July 13.
London.
Sir John Moore to Secretary Jenkins. I received yours of the 12th about 8 last night at the sessions house in the Old Bailey. I could not then answer it. I shall not fail to attend his Majesty to-day at Whitehall with the aldermen and sheriffs, who were all summoned last night.
It is a busy time with us this week. Last Monday were sessions all day at the Guildhall, on Tuesday was a Court of Aldermen, yesterday the Old Bailey sessions began, where they are continued to-day, and, if we cannot end them, we must adjourn till Saturday or Monday, in regard to-morrow is like to be a hot day at Guildhall.
I further take notice of some noble lords that designed to honour me with their company to-day at dinner, but my house is filled with workmen yesterday and to-day and it may be tomorrow before they have done, appointed last week by the Grocers' Company to set up a statue, while I was absent at the Old Bailey sessions, so I crave you to desire these honourable persons to spare me this week and take their conveniency any other time after.
In truth I am very feverish, was blooded last Tuesday and almost spent with hurry of business at home and abroad and the heats in the people, so I do not expect the lords to-day. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 148.]
July 13. Jean de l'Estrille de la Clide, formerly captain of a French frigate, and Isaac his brother, who is newly arrived here, to the King. Petition requesting him to ask of the King of France permission for them to leave France, to have the liberty of selling their property and also to remove their families out of the miseries they are in, since it is forbidden to leave France under pain of the galleys. [French. Ibid. No. 149.]
July 13. The information on oath of Michael Brown of Wisbech in the Isle of Ely, taken at Stratford Bridge, Herefordshire. About three weeks before the sitting of the parliament at Oxford he several times heard Thomas Conyngesby of Hampton Court, Herefordshire, say in his own house that every member of parliament would come very nobly attended to Oxford with good horses and arms, and he asked the deponent to lend him his pistols and said he would furnish his servants with arms of his own, which would do good execution, if the King should bring his Guards to disturb them. A letter afterwards came, as the informant believes, by post from Oxford to Hampton Court directed to Ferdinando Gorges, Conyngesby's father-in-law, which his daughter opened and said it was her husband's handwriting and read it to the deponent. The purport was to acquaint his father-in-law that, instead of sitting like a free parliament, he thought they sat more like a company of slaves in a garrison and that the King was come to Oxford with all his red coats, but that he thought that, if ever the said Guards were routed, it would be before the then parliament went from Oxford, the said Conyngesby then declaring before John Dutton Colt that the King's Guards were the greatest grievance of the nation, to all which Colt seemed to the deponent to consent.
In the said letter Conyngesby further wrote that he thought to confront the said Guards then at Oxford; there would be in eight or ten days several gentlemen and farmers to the number of 2,000, at their own costs and charges to assist the parliament, if need be, and that he thought that every parliament man, one with another, had five followers or servants, no worse fitted with horses and arms than their masters.
A short time after the Oxford parliament was dissolved there was a private cabal at Hampton Court, appointed by Col. John Birch, who failed to appear, but there were at it the said Conyngesby, Sir Edward Harley, Paul Foley of Stoke Edith and John Dutton Colt, and at dinner they discoursed concerning Lord Scudamore, how timorous he was the morning Lord Shaftesbury visited him at his lodgings at Oxford, after the King had dissolved the parliament, where all or most of the knights and burgesses of Herefordshire were present to wait on the Earl of Shaftesbury, who told them, as they said, that he thought them all gentlemen of interest in their county and that it now behoved them to make haste every man to his own home and to acquaint all poor countrymen what a sad condition they were in, if they did not stand up for such a parliament as this was, who had so vigorously stood up for them with their lives and fortunes, and he further said that he thought there would be something to do in England before another parliament sat and that those members, though dissolved, should take on them the peace and government of their several counties and he hoped to see them all commission officers, then nominating Lord Scudamore, Col. Birch and Sir Edward Harley for colonels and the said Thomas Conyngesby, Paul Foley and John Dutton Colt for captains. On this discourse Lord Scudamore asked the Earl from whom he should have his commission, who answered, From those that had power to do it. Thereupon Lord Scudamore said he would never fight against the laws of the land and the said lord then told the said Earl that, though he had given his vote against the Duke of York in the two last parliaments, yet, if he should lose the King, he would never lift up his hand against his brother. On this answer, the said Conyngesby, Harley, Foley and Colt discoursed that Lord Scudamore was a person of a poor or low spirit or words to that effect.
Conyngesby at his return from Oxford after the dissolution of the parliament, railed against the King and Queen and said that the Duke of York, the Marquess of Worcester, Lord Halifax, the Lord Chancellor, Sir L. Jenkins, Lord Hyde, Mr. Seymour and others had given the King evil counsel and that he thought it would not be long before the King was necessitated to call another parliament, which he hoped would be quick enough for the King and his pocky cavaliers the next time they sat, being well assured the King should repent of his frequent dissolving of parliaments, but the next parliament, he said he was sure, would not be so served.
Some time after the dissolution of the last parliament the said Harley, Conyngesby, Foley and Colt being at Hampton Court, Sir Edward Harley openly said he thought this nation had already suffered so much slavery and injustice by being tyrannized over by those great persons his Majesty entrusted, and declared there was not, as he believed, one Lord Lieutenant or militia officer in England but was a damned Papist, naming the Marquess of Worcester, the Earl of Peterborough and several others, and further said that, if the last parliament had been so fortunate as to have sat but three months, they would have reformed all officers in all public employments in England, which words the said Conyngesby, Foley and Colt unanimously approved of and they further said that, if they had but so much as dreamt of so sudden a dissolution of the late parliament, they would have been better provided, for they were sure that the hearts and hands of all the countrymen in England would have presently assisted them.
About last March Col. Birch and John Dutton Colt met at Hampton Court, where they railed against the King and government and then they were private together and the said Conyngesby then desired the informant not to tell any person who were there.
Since the dissolution of the last parliament he has heard by and from Mistress Anne Conyngesby, widow, that the said Ferdinando Gorges said that the Marquess of Worcester was a giver of evil counsel to the King and that we should never be happy in England till the King was made a St. John Baptist and we had his head in a charger. [4 pages. 2 copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, Nos. 150, 151.]
[July 13.] Order in Council, on information that the late riots in the election of sheriffs arose from irregular proceedings at the Council Hall, that the Lord Mayor be directed to preserve the ancient customs of the city and that at the Assembly next Friday (14 July) all proceedings be begun anew and carried on in the usual manner, as they should have been on 24 June last. (This is a draft of the order in the Privy Council Register, Vol. 69, p. 531.) [Ibid. No. 152.]
[July 13.] Note of the King's order to visit the Lord Mayor to desire him to meet according to his adjournment on Friday and to begin the poll for sheriffs anew, to stand upon his negative and to follow his Majesty's last orders in all other things. [Ibid. No. 153.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
The King to the Bishop of Sarum, Chancellor of the Order of the Garter, and the Dean and Chapter of the Chapel Royal, Windsor. Signifying his pleasure that they admit Rowland Dolbin, who served as lieutenant in one or two ships in the late Dutch war, where by a great shot part of both his calves were shot away, to the first poor knight's place of Windsor that shall become void after such as have already obtained grants for the like places. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 74.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Approval by his Majesty of the report of the Lords of the Treasury on the reference to them of the petition of Thomas Preston, calendared ante, p. 218, finding that the petitioner had been very instrumental and industrious about discovering Sir Thomas Preston's estate and that the present value of so much thereof as is already recovered amounts to 768l. 8s. 8d. per annum, out of which issues a fee farm rent of 190l. 13s. 4d. per annum, which being deducted, the remainder is 575l. 15s. 4d. per annum and offering their opinion that the petitioner, if his Majesty think fit, may have a lease granted him of what is already recovered for seven years from Pentecost last at the yearly rent of 400l., the lessee to pay the fee farm rent without defalcation for the same out of the rent reserved, and direction that a lease on the terms and for the number of years mentioned therein be forthwith passed to the petitioner. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 200.]
July 13. Secretary Jenkins to Sir Lionel Walden. Having received a command to speak with you about a business of special importance to the King's service, I must entreat you to come up to London as soon as you conveniently can and to call upon me. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 100.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant, on a surrender to be made by Sir John Clayton, of letters patent of 25 Oct., 1669, and 23 Jan., 1677, for erecting and maintaining several lighthouses, to Henry Bowyer, his heirs and assigns, to continue one lighthouse erected at St. Nicholas Gatt in Little Yarmouth, Suffolk, and to erect another there so as to make it a double lighthouse, with power towards the maintenance thereof to receive one halfpenny per ton for English ships and one penny per ton for foreign bottoms passing by that way for each voyage, with directions to the officers of the Customs to collect the said duty and with a proviso for cesser in case the said intended grant be prejudicial and not of public benefit. With note that this bill was stopped. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 359, p. 98.]
July 14. Lord Culpeper to the King. Petition expressing his amazement and dejection at the resentment his Majesty expressed yesterday, being far from having any design to displease him, and declaring his readiness to perform his commands by depositing half of what he received and assigning the other on moneys justly due to him from his Majesty, and that he is ready to-morrow or with all possible haste to repair to Virginia, and therefore imploring his Majesty's pardon and that he may not receive such public demonstration of his disfavour, but that he may proceed in his voyage to Virginia. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 154.]
July 14. Notes by Secretary Jenkins. If any should come to the Lord Mayor to desire to poll for N[orth] he is to tell them he is declared sheriff already and therefore they are not to poll for it. He is to give directions to all the clerks to answer in the same manner. All our friends are to poll for Mr. Box singly. [Ibid. No. 155.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Philip Macshane O'Reilly for a pension towards the support of himself and his numerous family, his grandfather having lost an estate of between 700l. and 800l. per annum for his constant adhering to his Majesty's interest in the late times of usurpation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 198.]
July 15.
Tower.
Thomas Cheek to [Secretary Jenkins]. The King has given me leave to go into the country for two months, so that, if you get my order signed, you may sign the time the day before, which I cannot as yet resolve by reason of indisposition. I go to my house, Pirgo, 12 miles from London. For these three years I never lay a night out of the Tower but four nights to wait on the Duke at Newmarket. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 156.]
[July ?] Licence to Thomas Cheek, Lieutenant of the Tower, to be absent for one month and for the admission of Thomas Hawley, gentleman porter of the Tower, to take charge during Cheek's absence of the prisoners delivered over to him by indenture when possession of the Tower was given to Lord Alington as constable and to the said Lieutenant, who is to give an account of the prisoners, as occasion requires, to a Secretary of State. [2 drafts. Ibid. Nos. 157, 158.]
[July ?] Similar licence. Hawley is to have a careful eye over all the prisoners and is to render frequent accounts of them and of all occurrences there to Lord Alington, who is to report to the King or a Secretary of State. [Draft. Ibid. No. 159.]
July 15. Thomas Forrest to —. In Tree v. Edwards withdrawing his caveat and consenting to the delivery of the deed out of court according to the order to Mr. Barnard, the plaintiff's solicitor. [Ibid. No. 160.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting that, in obedience to an Order in Council of 29 June last on the petition of Francis Aumonet and John Pidgou (Pigou), French Protestants, that the Attorney-General should report whether the grant by them desired of the sole use of their invention of draped milled stockings might be made effectually in law, he had reported that it seemed to him that the said manufacture had not hitherto been wrought in England but that those used here had been imported from France and that, if so, it is an invention now first brought over and that therefore he is of opinion that a grant of the sole working thereof in England might be granted by law: for a special licence to Francis Aumonet, Claud Hays and Daniel du Thay for the sole use of their said invention for 14 years. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 105.]
July 15.
London.
Newsletter. Yesterday there was a very great appearance at the Common Hall. About 11 the Lord Mayor came up the hustings, where the Order in Council of 13 July (printed in the London Gazette, No. 1738 and ante, p. 292) was read. Then an Act of Parliament for regulating the King's Privy Council was offered by Mr. Jenkins (? Jenks). The dispute about reading or not reading it lasted about an hour, when it was absolutely denied to be read. Then the question after some debate was put by the Lord Mayor's order by the common crier thus, So many of you as will have Dudley North confirmed sheriff, hold up your hands. I believe near 1,000 were held up for confirmation. Then the Lord Mayor retired and left the court to the sheriffs, who put up North, Papillon, Dubois and Box. Papillon and Dubois had the most hands and so the sheriffs said. With this account they went to the Lord Mayor, who after some short stay came on the hustings and then the common crier put this question, So many of you as have confirmed Dudley North sheriff, hold up your hands, of which I dare aver there were about 1,500, which the Lord Mayor seeing declared he saw him confirmed and he should be sheriff. The sheriffs entered their protest with a salvo jure as to the proceedings of this day and, notwithstanding what the Lord Mayor had said, the sheriffs came down and adjourned the court till 4 in the afternoon and declared they should then poll for all four. At 4 they met, but the Lord Mayor went on the hustings and declared that North was chosen by him and confirmed by the Hall and that he adjourned the court till 8 in the morning to-day, when they were to meet to poll for one sheriff out of the three in nomination, which was accordingly done by the Lord Mayor's party, but the sheriffs proceeded to poll for all four. The delegates about the business of Mrs. Hide and Mr. Emerton met to-day and, there not being a quorum, adjourned sine die, so there can be no meeting till next term. About 5 the sheriffs shut up their book and after casting them up came on the hustings and declared Papillon to have 2,087 votes, Dubois 2,081, North 107 and Box 171, so that the two former were declared duly elected by the present sheriffs. At 7 the Lord Mayor came up to the Court of Aldermen, where he stayed some small time, and then came on the hustings and declared that by his book North and Box were chosen, but after his departure the sheriffs proclaimed the two former. [1½ page. Admiralty, Greenwich Hospital 2, No. 40.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a new commission and letters patent not only ratifying the commission dated 1 May last in favour of William, Marquess of Queensberry, to be High Treasurer of Scotland, but also anew constituting the said Marquess, during pleasure, Principal and Sole Treasurer, Comptroller, Collector and Treasurer of the new augmentation within the said kingdom and Receiver General of all the rents &c. payable to his Majesty either for himself or as Prince and Steward of Scotland. [6 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 274.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a commission constituting Sir George Gordon of Haddo, Lord Chancellor, the Marquess of Atholl, Lord Privy Seal, the Earl of Moray, Secretary of State, the Earls of Linlithgow, Strathmore, Perth, Southesk and Tweeddale, Sir David Falconer of Newtoun, President of the College of Justice, Sir George Mackenzie of Tarbett, Lord Register, Sir George Mackenzie of Rosehaugh, Lord Advocate, Richard Maitland of Duddop, Lord Justice Clerk, Sir James Foulis of Collintoun, a Senator of the College of Justice, John Drummond of Lundin, Master-General of the Ordnance, and Sir William Purves, his Majesty's Solicitor, Commissioners of the Exchequer of Scotland for giving their concurrence and assistance to the Principal Treasurer and the Treasurer Deput with the powers therein mentioned. [Over 4 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 280.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Instructions to the Marquess of Queensberry, Principal Treasurer, to be observed in the management of the revenue and other affairs falling under his office.
1. You are to peruse all former instructions from us or our father to any former Treasurers or Commissioners of the Treasury and put the same with all Acts of Treasury and Exchequer to full and vigorous execution so far as they are not altered by these instructions.
2. You shall take all possible ways for discovery of all concealed or embezzled rents, duties and casualties belonging to the Crown and pursue for the same as you shall find proper.
3. You are to take particular care that no assignments or localities on any part of the revenue or casualties be granted by gift, pension or otherwise and, if any such have been granted, you are by the advice of our Advocate to reduce the same according to law.
4. You are likewise to take special care that no signature or gift be passed, wherein are any lands, few duties or other casualties, whether property or superiority, belonging to the Crown and, if any such be granted, you are to endeavour to reduce the same.
5. You are to allow no signatures to be passed of lands bearing the change from ward to taxt ward except in favour of such as deserve some particular mark of our favour, and even as to those you are to proceed according to the rules and rates mentioned in the former instructions to the Treasury Commissioners.
6. You are to pass no signatures till all bygone dues and casualties due from the lands contained therein be paid and to take care, where any signatures pass on resignation, apprising or adjudication, that the persons to whom they are granted as well as the lands therein contained shall be liable for payment of those bygone casualties and that the signature contain a special clause to that purpose, except where the same contains a de novo damus and passes under our hand.
7. You are to pass no signature bearing change of the holding or de novo damus but such as are passed under our hand and docquetted by our Secretary.
8. You are to take particular trial if any charter, tack or gift has been passed to our prejudice bearing any part of our revenue, patrimony or casualty, whereby the same is any way diminished, and to insist for reducing thereof, wherein you are to require the advice and assistance of our Advocate and Solicitor.
9. You shall pay no fee, pension or precept to any person due preceding the term of Whitsunday, 1682.
10. You shall make exact trial of what is resting to us of the taxation granted in 1665 or any former taxations and of all debts due to us on any account and take all effectual methods for uplifting the same.
11. You are to take care that no gift pass containing the survivancy or reversion of any office, trust or casualty belonging to us, except the same be actually vacant, and, if any such gift be passed, you are to pursue for reduction of the same.
12. You shall pursue for and uplift all non-entry duties due to us and particularly you shall exact those non-entry duties, which fall in our hands on account of resignations made in our hands or our Exchequer, whereon infeftments are not timeously exped, and for the better discovery thereof you are to take care that all resignations hereafter to be made in Exchequer be recorded.
13. You shall take care that all seizures and forfeitures of goods either prohibited or embezzled without entry or short entered or otherwise legally confiscate be compted for and brought in to you.
14. You are allowed to stop the passing in Exchequer of any signature, gift, pension or precept, albeit the same be passed under our hand, if you shall find any reasonable objection thereagainst, till you acquaint us therewith and receive our further pleasure.
15. To give particular accounts of his proceedings. [3 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 284.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Instructions to the Marquess of Queensberry, Principal Treasurer, to be observed by him in the management of the revenue and other affairs of the Treasury and Exchequer.
1. You are to pay to the officers of State and the other persons contained in the two lists of fees and pensions of this date the fees and pensions contained in these two signed lists at the terms and in manner therein mentioned and you are to pay no other fees or pensions to any other person on any account whatever, but such as we shall order under our hand.
2. If any of the persons, to whom these fees and pensions are payable, be debtors to us, you are to retain the pension or fee or such part thereof as shall satisfy the debt.
3. You shall by the advice of the Exchequer emit a proclamation commanding the shireffs and their deputs to send you from time to time an exact list of all the ward vassals who shall decease in their respective shires within two months after their decease, bearing also the names of the nearest heirs to the deceased and their age and if they be married, likewise commanding them to send you in an exact list of all the valuations of the lands in their respective shires with the names of all the lands and the names of the heritors thereof and that the report thereof be subscribed by the shireff and his deput and by the collector and clerk bearing an attestation of the true proportion which the valued rent has with the true payable rent and those that shall be remiss or unfaithful in their report shall be suspended from their offices and otherwise proceeded against.
4. You shall pursue before our Exchequer or any other competent judges all the keepers and possessors of our castles, houses, parks, forests &c., as well those who have heretable as temporary rights, and examine those rights and reduce and improve the same so far as they may be reduced in law and you are to take particular information of the present condition of those castles &c. and of the rents and profits thereof and how the same are applied and take trial anent the cutting of our woods and in all those affairs you shall prosecute such actions as shall be requisite for our advantage, wherein you are to require the assistance of our Advocate and Solicitor.
5. You are to require all shireffs and others, who are liable to compt yearly in Exchequer, that they punctually clear their accompts and make their Æques yearly in July according to the Act and you are to proceed against all as shall not then make them and not only oblige them to pay the unlaws contained in the Act, before they receive their Æques, but also on their being denounced declare their places vacant so that on your report we may supply them otherwayes.
6. You are in the uplifting of the supply granted by the Convention and Parliament to allow of no defalcation or abatement whatever to the officers and servants of the Mint nor to any other person except only to the ordinary Lords of Session and you are to exact the same from all other persons for the term of Whitsunday last as to the part thereof then payable and in time coming, notwithstanding any gift or exemption heretofore granted and this you are to intimate to the collectors of the said supply.
7. You shall make exact trial of all abuses and irregularities that have crept into the Exchequer amongst the servants and other officers employed about that court and by the advice of the Exchequer reform the same and return to us such rules as you by such advice shall find proper to that end.
8. You shall exactly revise the last Establishment of the forces in Scotland with our instructions thereanent to the muster-masters or others and the Articles of War and everything else relating to our forces and you are by advice of our Exchequer to put the same in punctual execution and take particular notice that the muster rolls be complete and by all means discover any frauds or abuses therein.
9. You shall cause pay the standing forces according to the said Establishment and our former instructions and conform to the muster rolls only and no otherwise but by special warrant under our hand.
10. You are to receive from the governor of Edinburgh Castle and his deputs the keys and custody of the honours of that kingdom and of all other furniture and plenishing belonging to us therein and keep the same for our use.
11. You shall likewise receive from them the keys and custody of all the cash and money belonging to us in the said castle and number and receive the same by an exact account and report to us what the same extends to.
12. You shall take an exact account of all magazines and stores in that kingdom and report to us a particular account thereof and specially you are to take care that all our arms and ammunition that has been given out to the country be returned back to our magazines and you are to receive all bonds granted therefor and put them to execution till the same be returned.
13. You shall pay Lord Castlehill 100l. sterling in satisfaction of all bygone pensions which he can pretend to preceding Mertinmes last.
14. (To advise with the Commissioners of the Exchequer.)
15. You shall require the assistance of the officers of State and the judges and of the Register and Advocate in all these affairs and you are to require the Clerk of Register to make exact enquiry in all the registers and records of the kingdom as to everything that may concern the revenue and the improvement thereof and to make the said registers and records forthcoming to you.
16. You are to communicate these instructions to the Commissioners of the Exchequer. [4 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 287.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Marquess of Queensberry, High Treasurer, for payment at Whitsunday and Mertinmes by equal portions of the fees and pensions underwritten to the officers of State and others actually in the King's service contained in the following list with another list of pensions of this date and for payment of no other persons whatever without a special warrant under the King's hand, beginning the first term's payment at Whitsunday, 1682, for the term preceding and so forth termly during pleasure. [Ibid. p. 291.] Annexed,
The said list, amounting to a total of 14,774l. 18s. 9d. sterling. [Over 2 pages. Ibid. p. 292.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same, after reciting the warrant of 29 April last restricting all pensions to 300l. per annum (calendared ante, p. 186) and that the King having further considered the condition of the revenue and the many burdens and pensions affecting the same, for payment (besides the fees and pensions payable to the officers of State and others contained in another list of the same date) in future of only the pensions contained in the following list and no others without special warrant under the King's hand beginning the first terms payment thereof at Whitsunday, 1682, for the half year preceding and so forth termly thereafter during pleasure. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 294.] Annexed,
The said list, amounting to 10,308l. 12s. sterling. Among the pensions is one of 40l. to the children of Mr. Gregory, mathematician. [Over 2 pages. Ibid. p. 295.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
The King to Sir George Gordon of Haddo, Chancellor, and the rest of the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant for admitting Sir David Falconer of Newtoun, President of the College of Justice, to the Privy Council. [Ibid. p. 298.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
The King to the Marquess of Queensberry, Treasurer Principal, Charles Maitland of Halton, Treasurer Deput, and the remanent Lords and others of the Exchequer of Scotland. Warrant, after reciting that some ground near Holyrood House, formerly belonging to the Bishop and Dean of Edinburgh is now taken in to be part of the garden of the said palace, for causing the said ground to be surveyed and for establishing the yearly rent thereof by an Act of Exchequer and for payment thereof to the said Bishop and Dean now and in time coming. [Ibid. p. 298.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for payment to Hugh Wallace, writer to the Signet, of 100l. sterling besides the expenses of his journey hither and of his return to Edinburgh. [Ibid. p. 299.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting it is reasonable that an allowance be settled for defraying the charge of several necessaries in the office of the Earl of Moray, Secretary of State, for the payment to any having the said Secretary's order of 100l. sterling as the yearly allowance from Mertinmes, 1680, to Mertinmes, 1681, and of 50l. sterling as the half year's allowance from Mertinmes, 1681, to Whitsunday, 1682, and so forth for payment of 50l. sterling at the end of every half year, till the same be discharged by a writing under the King's hand. [Ibid. p. 300.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to Edward Ruthven, grandchild to the long since deceased Earl of Forth and Branford (Brentford), during pleasure, of a yearly pension of 60l. sterling to be paid at Whitsunday and Mertinmes by equal portions, the first payment to be at Whitsunday, 1682. [Ibid. p. 301.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to Col. William Sinclair of a yearly pension of 50l. sterling to be paid at Whitsunday and Mertinmes by equal portions, the first payment to be at Whitsunday, 1682. [Ibid. p. 302.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Deputy. Whereas the highway from Dublin to Chapel Izard through the Phoenix Park has been found very inconvenient for the said park and that, while it continues therein, the deer cannot be preserved, but daily in great numbers trespass on the adjoining lands, whereby many of them are lost and destroyed, and whereas the greatest part of the lands on the south side of the said highway that are now enclosed within the park does not belong to us and 64 acres of the residue that belongs to us have been set apart to be granted to the new Hospital now building thereon, so that our land on the south side of the said highway besides the said 64 acres contains but a small quantity in several parcels, and whereas we have thought fit for the better security of the park and the preservation of the deer that the said highway and the lands on the south side thereof be excluded out of the park and that a wall should be made on the north of the said highway from the park gate next Chapel Izard and whereas Sir John Temple, Solicitor-General of Ireland, having lands adjoining the said park and the lands that will be left out of it on building the said wall and having for many years sustained much damage by the deer, has proposed at his own charge to build the said wall from the park entrance next Dublin to Chapel Izard and to finish it in one year from 1 May last, leaving out of the park a parcel of land adjoining the town of Chapel Izard on the north of the highway, as was lately designed by a Committee of the Council in Ireland on view of the place, the said wall containing in length 527 perches, which at 3s. 9d. a perch (the lowest rate for which anyone offered to build it) amounts to about 800l. (sic), besides the charge of digging the foundation and making the gates, in consideration whereof he desired to have 200l. paid him by concordatum in one year's time and also a grant of the said parcel of land that shall be left out of the park on the north of the highway next to Chapel Izard and also of what else belongs to us that is now within the park and will be left out when the wall is built and that neither the house of Chapel Izard nor the appurtenances thereof nor the bleaching yard there nor the mills or weirs of Kilmainham or the wash house there nor the said 64 acres be contained in the said grant and that the gatekeepers' lodges at Dublin and Chapel Izard gates be also excepted out of such grant, unless either of them be found inconvenient for the gates as they shall be placed in the new wall and that in such case, if he may have those lodges, he will build new lodges, where the gates shall be set and where they shall be more convenient, and in lieu of the gatekeeper's lodge on the road to Kilmainham he will build a new lodge at the Phoenix, where a gate will be necessary, and whereas the Lord Lieutenant and Council by their order of 26 April last, finding the said proposal to be the best offer for building the said wall, have agreed thereto and have ordered William Robinson, surveyor of our buildings there, to set out the said wall and to take care the same be well built and that the land to be left out on the north of the highway near Chapel Izard does not exceed five acres and whereas in pursuance of the said agreement the wall is already begun by Sir John Temple, but a grant cannot be passed to him according to the said agreement without our letters, we referred the consideration thereof to the Lords of the Treasury here, who have nothing to object against the said draft letter; we hereby authorize and require you in consideration of the charge of the said Sir John Temple over and above the said 200l. to cause effectual letters patent to be forthwith passed of the said lands not exceeding five acres that will be left out of the said park on the north of the highway near Chapel Izard and also of all the lands and hereditaments belonging to us and now enclosed in the said park on the south side of the highway and of all other lands and hereditaments now belonging to us that are within the park and on making the said wall will be excluded, except our house at Chapel Izard and its appurtenances and the bleaching yard and the mills and weirs of Kilmainham and the washhouse there and the 64 acres set apart for the new Hospital and reserving also the use of the said gatekeepers' lodges at Dublin and Chapel Izard gates till new lodges be built in more convenient places to the said Sir John Temple in fee-simple under the rent of 1s. per annum. And whereas some of the lands intended to be granted to Sir John Temple cannot be particularly described nor the exact quantity known so as to be expressed in such grant till the said wall be made, we signify our pleasure that after passing the said letters patent and after the said wall be finished, you cause an exact survey to be made of what belongs to us that shall then be left out of the said park and is now enclosed therein and that thereupon you cause new letters patent thereof to be passed to the said Sir John Temple in fee simple according to such survey under the said rent of 1s. per annum. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 11, p. 76.]
July 16. Notes by Secretary Jenkins. To consider whether the King can continue this Lord Mayor for another year. Such things have been done by the Usurpers, query whether by the legislative or the ordinary powers. Query, at what time the Kings declared their pleasure, whether before the election or Michaelmas Day or before their swearing at the Exchequer.
Query, whether any Lord Mayor has on being presented been refused by the Lord Chancellor, the Constable of the Tower or the King.
The Tories of the neighbouring counties are, and ought to be, very sparing in their discourses of the Quo warranto. There will be designs to draw speeches from them in order to subject them to challenges.
Mr. Booth not to be Custos Rotulorum and Sir Thomas Allein to be sent into Ireland. Send there to turn out Allein's son.
To consult the Bishop of Peterborough about Dr. Conant of All Saints, Northampton; Mr. Collins if possible to succeed him.
Higham Ferrars about the 40 acres of meadow and the 100l. a year to the poor. (Names of persons fit to be sheriffsthere next year.) Henry Longville of Cosgrave to be Justice for Northampton,
Lord Arlington has Mr. Lovell for his deputy steward of the King's Courts of the manor of Higham Ferrars. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 161.]
July 17.
Rust Hall near Tunbridge Wells.
Henry Hills to John Cooke at Secretary Jenkins' office. My present distemper of the stone and gravel forced me to Tunbridge Wells sooner than I intended; pardon me therefore giving you this trouble. I find here Lord Russell, Mr. Herbert and a great many more, Nonconformist ministers and others, citizens of London, too many to trouble you with the names of, and some of them the same persons that blew up the rebellion, as Mr. Griffith, Dr. Ansloe, Mr. Meade &c., who appear now as zealous as they were then in suggesting to the people fears and jealousies of Popery and arbitrary government, printed papers being daily sent them, which speak evil of our present governors, one of which was called the Rights of the City, or to that effect, being one sheet in folio, at the end of which was printed the name of J. Johnson. I only heard it read on the walks by a gentleman, who, 'tis said, is a servant to Lord Russell and brought it from London with many more, as I hear, but could not see them; Mr. Herbert saying publicly on the walks that I would betray them, being formerly made King's printer by the Earl of Danby for some such service.
In case there be occasion to speak with John Starkey, I am informed by one that had him by the hand as he came lately to the Wells, he is at Bromley at a friend's house. If it may be serviceable, I am of opinion I can know the house. [Ibid. No. 162.]
July 17.
Whitehall.
Declaration of the King's pleasure that all doctors of the civil law, proctors, registers and other officers of the Court of Arches and other ecclesiastical Courts and of the Court of Admiralty be exempted from bearing the office of Constable or any other ward office or any parish office in their wards and parishes in like manner as serjeants at law, attorneys or any other officers of any of the temporal Courts at Westminster are exempted by law, privilege or prescription, and declaration or his further pleasure not to debar any doctors of the civil law, proctors or other officers of the said Courts, who keep house in any parish in the city of London and pay scot and lot and are assessed or any ways taxed by the Common Council men or otherwise from giving their votes for the election of Common Council men and all ward and parish officers in their respective wards and parishes, but that they may give their votes in such elections, this pleasure to be signified to the Lord Mayor and the Aldermen and their deputies. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 104.]
Monday,
July 17. London.
The Lord Lieutenant to Secretary Jenkins. Enclosing a draft letter in favour of Mr. Evans of co. Limerick, giving him leave to enclose certain lands that are his own in that county into parks and granting him free warren in them. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 343, No. 33.]
July 18,
8 o'clock. Windsor.
The Earl of Conway to Secretary Jenkins. I received yours about 6 and went with it immediately to his Majesty, who was walking in the Park, Lord Halifax with him. He commanded me write to you that he does not think Mr. Box offers any reasonable excuse, being he is elected by the major part sheriff according to the laws and customs of the City. What the other party would have been we know not nor can take notice of. But, because Mr. Box has scruples which his Majesty is desirous to satisfy, he conceives Lord Hyde, Lord Chief Justice North and yourself, when you have advised together, are the fittest persons to give him satisfaction, and this he desires you to do with all possible expedition and he will make good whatever you undertake.
He desires you to have all possible care of the Lord Mayor. He looks on the actions against him as inconsiderable and approves of your conduct in appointing one to take all the trouble and charge of them from him and desires you to assure him and such as shall be concerned that he will always do so.
Lord Hyde went hence to London before your letter arrived, but I hope what I have written will be sufficient to engage him and all of you to persuade Mr. Box to hold his shrivealty.
His Majesty has ordered the Council to be put off next Thursday at Hampton Court and to meet there Thursday sennight. I have returned you the three letters signed by his Majesty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 163.]
July 18. Henry Crispe, Common Serjeant, to Secretary Jenkins. Nothing considerable passed in our court, except a petition delivered by Mr. Ellis requiring the Lord Mayor to call out Papillon and Dubois, the sheriffs by them chosen, and to require them to seal their bonds or fine according to the Act of Common Council. There being no hands to it, they were ordered to withdraw and, having signed it, came in again and received for answer that the Lord Mayor would consider of it. They insisted he should appoint a time when they should come for their answer, but he said he would take his own time, and they departed peaceably, though there were many hundreds of people in the Hall.
Seventeen writs are brought against the Lord Mayor by the persons enclosed. I hope you will be pleased that Mr. Box may have all possible encouragement to come and sign his bond cheerfully the next court and that the sheriffs may account for the riots committed after my lord had dismissed the Court last Saturday. [Misdated June 18, but endorsed July 18. Ibid. No. 164.]
July 18. John Ellis and 14 others to the Lord Mayor. Petition, of which the purport sufficiently appears from the last letter. [Ibid, No. 165.]
[July ?] Memorandum that Mr. Box's scruple is that no man can undertake an office to which he is not duly elected and that is controverted and so becomes doubtful, without blemishing his honesty and reputation and endangering his safety. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 166.]
July 18.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Moray to Sir George Gordon of Haddo, Lord High Chancellor of Scotland. His Majesty having lately received a letter from the King of Denmark in favour of his subjects, John Jebson and John Peterson, citizens of Sonderburg, who had two ships taken from them by some Scotch subjects during the late Dutch war, I am now commanded by him to let you know that, though he does not use to interpose with his ministers or his judicatures in the matter of administering justice to his own subjects, yet, being so solicited in the concern of foreigners, he has thought to transmit to you the copy of the said letter, that you may know the pretensions of the said two citizens and may take care they have such a dispatch of their business as is most consistent with law and justice. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 302.]
July 19.
The Tower.
Capt. Thomas Cheeke to Secretary Jenkins. Last Friday Jordan, a Tower warder, whom I have suspended waiting for disobeying orders and for being a very notorious Whig, got amongst some ill-affected citizens near Guildhall and told them the Lord Mayor was but the City's servant and had no power to dissolve or adjourn the court. One of the clerks of the Ordnance, who heard him, told him it ill became him to talk so undutifully of the government, when he wore the King's cloth and ate his bread. I can produce the man that heard the words. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 167.]
July 20. John Ellis and 72 others to the Lord Mayor and the Court of Aldermen. Petition, to the same effect as that of 18 July, calendared ante, p. 304, the unexpected answer to which, that his lordship would consider of it, as it imports a delay of the citizens' right demanded, so it gives encouragement to several reports, as if there is an intention to cause some other persons not elected to the said office to be sworn. [Ibid. No. 168.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Lord [Finch]. When the Morocco ambassador had his last audience of the King, he asked that the captain of the Woolwich that is to carry him might have orders, if, when he comes to Tangier, he desires it, to carry him, his equipage and goods beyond Tangier to any port he should name as more convenient to land in, in order to go a straighter and shorter way to meet his master, wherever he shall happen to be. His reason was that he hears that that Emperor is now in the field and marched against Algiers. His Majesty, being desirous to gratify him in that as well as in other things, desires that Capt. Holden have your orders to that effect. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 63, p. 47.]
Memorandum that the like letter was written to the captain of the Woolwich by the Ambassador himself. [Ibid.]
July 20.
Windsor.
Approbation by the King of the election of Henry, Earl of Peterborough, to be Recorder of Northampton. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 110.]
July 21.
Windsor.
Further reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the report of the Lord Lieutenant, dated 20 July, on the reference to him of Col. Cary Dillon's petition, calendared ante, p. 286, finding that it appeared that he was deficient 1,200l. per annum of what by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation should have been satisfied to him and that, notwithstanding the letter of 29 Jan., 1673–4 (calendared in S.P. Dom., 1673–75, p. 123), he is still deficient in the said 1,200l. per annum, having waited till the Duke of York was first satisfied for his reprizals, so that, the length of time he has wanted his Majesty's grace intended him and his dutiful submission to his Highness being first reprized being now further arguments to recommend the petitioner's case, he conceives his Majesty may fitly renew his said letter and that the annexed draft is proper for his signature for that purpose. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 198.]
July 21.
Windsor.
Acceptance by the King of the surrender of the charter of the borough of Derby with directions that the said charter and this instrument be kept in the Petty Bag Office for ever and that the surrender be not enrolled till the King has declared his further pleasure. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 109.] Prefixed,
The said surrender, July 11, 1682. [Ibid.]
July 21.
Windsor.
Warrant for a grant to Sir William Craven and Edwin Wyatt and their heirs of two fairs for buying and selling horses and all other cattle at Wakefield, Yorkshire, one on the third Tuesday in August and the two following days and the other on the Tuesday after Palm Sunday and the next day, it being found by inquisition that such grant will be no damage to the King or others or to any neighbouring fairs. [Ibid. p. 111.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Caesar Beaulieu, minister of the French congregation at Ipswich. His Majesty, being satisfied with the account the Bishop of London has given of your loyalty and adherence to the Church of England, has given him his allowance to recall you from the low station where you are to attend his lordship, who has you already in his care and hopes ere long to let you see some good effects of it. Before you remove, your own discretion will lead you to take leave with all thanks and due respect both of the magistrates there and of your own flock and you may assure them that the Bishop of London will take care to appoint the fittest person for abilities and discretion that he can get to succeed you. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 76.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of Benjamin Cranmer, showing that he had been at great charge in convicting at the last Hertford assizes William Barfoot, Jeremy Swift, William Bennet, Joseph Lenard and William Howard of Ware on the Act requiring 20l. for every month's absence from public service and praying a grant of his Majesty's part of the fines to enable him to undergo the further charge they endeavour to put him to by writs of error. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 199.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Lord Finch. Capt. St. Lo, commander of the Dartmouth, by his letter of the 10th says he had provisions on board for six weeks. It is his Majesty's pleasure that you and your Board issue orders to the Navy Commissioners that the said provisions be completed to four months. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 63, p. 48.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Capt. St. Lo. Informing him that the above letter had been written. [Ibid.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Sir John Berry. His Majesty having been moved on his letter of the 14th, signifying his pleasure that the Falcon, as soon as she is ready, sail from Longreach to the Hope and that the Henrietta, now at Chatham, do the same as soon as she is ready. [Ibid. p. 49.]
July 22.
Windsor Castle.
Establishment for the pay of the two companies of granadiers in Scotland.
The pay of the company to be added to the regiment of Foot Guards.
The captain 8s., two lieutenants 8s., three serjeants 4s. 6d., three corporals 3s., two drummers 2s., 60 granadiers 1l. 10s.; total, 2l. 15s. 6d. sterling per diem.
The pay of the company to be added to the Earl of Mar's regiment.
(The same as the above, only that each granadier getting only 5d. instead of 6d. the total comes to 2l. 10s. 6d. sterling per diem.) [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 303.]
July 22.
Windsor Castle.
The King to the Marquess of Queensberry, Treasurer Principal, and Charles Maitland of Halton, Treasurer Deput. Requiring them to appoint lodgings in the palace of Holyrood House for the Earl of Linlithgow, colonel of the regiment of Guard. [Ibid. p. 304.]
July 22.
Windsor Castle.
The King to the Duke of Hamilton, heritable keeper of Holyrood House. Warrant for taking care that the Earl of Linlithgow be settled in the lodgings appointed for him there. [Ibid.]
July 22.
Windsor Castle.
The King to the Marquess of Queensberry, Treasurer Principal. Warrant for allowing in future musters of the regiment of Guards four servants to the colonel, three to the lieut.-colonel, two to the major, two to every captain and one to every lieutenant and ensign and for taking a strict and exact account of the officers and for putting severely the articles of war in execution against any of them found guilty of false or short musters. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 305.]
July 22.
Windsor Castle.
Similar warrant with regard to the Earl of Mar's regiment. [Ibid. p. 306.]
July 22.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant to the Marquess of Queensberry, Treasurer Principal, and Charles Maitland of Halton, Treasurer Deput, after reciting that Sir William Paterson, one of the clerks of the Privy Council, was ordered last March by the Duke of Albany and York to repair to Newmarket and thence hither about some matters relating to the King's and his service and that it is reasonable he should have some allowance for his pains and charges, for payment to him of 150l. sterling out of the escheats of James Gray of Wariestoune, Alexander Blair, merchant in Edinburgh, and James Baily, merchant there. [Ibid. p. 307.]
July 22.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant to the same for payment to Thomas Gordon, writer to the Signet, in consideration of some pains and expenses he has lately been at in the King's service, of 100l. sterling out of the escheats mentioned in the last warrant. [Ibid. p. 308.]
July 22.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to Sir George Nicolson of Kemnay, one of the Senators of the College of Justice, in life rent, and to Thomas Nicolson, his eldest son, and the heirs male of his body with remainders over of the lands and barony of Kemnay in the shirefdome of Aberdeen, on the resignation of Alexander Strachan of Glenkindie, with a new gift. Docquet. [Ibid. p. 309.]
July 22.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant for a tack to James Stewart, Shireff of Bute, his heirs and assigns of the assize herring of the west seas of Scotland from Pentland Firth to the Mull of Galloway and where the sea flows within the Clyde for — years following his entry thereon, which is thereby declared to have begun on 1 July, 1682, the same being at his Majesty's disposal by a doom of forfeiture pronounced against Archibald, Earl of Argyle, at the tack duty of 2,000l. Scots yearly at Whitsunday, beginning the first yearly payment at Whitsunday, 1683. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 310.]
July 22.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant for a gift to Sir John Drummond of Machanie, his heirs and assigns, of several tenements of land within the city of Edinburgh with all debts, sums of money and others whatsoever which belonged to the deceased John, alias Haunce, Wallace, factor in Campveer, now fallen in his Majesty's hands by reason of the said John Wallace being born a bastard and having no heir to succeed him. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 311.]
July 22.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant to the Marquess of Queensberry, Treasurer Principal, and Charles Maitland of Halton, Treasurer Deput, for payment to Capt. Charles Straton of the 100l. sterling and his expenses ordered to be paid him by warrant of 25 Aug. last (calendared in the last volume, p. 419), he having as yet received no part thereof. [Ibid. p. 312.]
July 22.
Windsor Castle.
Warrants for presentations in favour of William Cabreath, minister at Marboth, and of John Ensly, minister at Hopkirk, to the kirks of Jedburgh and Oxnam respectively. [Docquets. Ibid. pp. 313, 314.]
July 22.
Dublin.
Sir John Temple to—. Thanking him for his letter and for the trouble he designs to take about the passing of the writer's letter concerning the Park land, which was sent over by the Attorney-General to the Lord Lieutenant.
A draft letter was lately sent over by the Lord Deputy for renewing the charter of the butchers in Dublin. They have, I believe, nobody there to look after it and have desired me to take care of it, so, if you take the trouble of taking it out and either sending it or bringing it over with you, I will see that they shall both pay you what you lay out and make you some acknowledgement. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 343, No. 34.]
July 23.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Chichester Philips for relief, showing that his grandfather discovered to the late King that the Society of London of the New Plantation in Ulster had broken their covenants with him and prosecuted the same so far that the Society was fined in 60,000l., in the prosecution whereof having spent all his personal estate and endangered even his real estate, he bequeathed to his second son, the petitioner's father, what had been expended by him on the said account. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 196.]
July 24. William Lewis to Secretary Jenkins. I am heartily sorry you should receive any distaste in the business of Mrs. Fitzh[arri]s. Sir Edward misunderstood me, if he said I told him I came from you. I beg you would assist me to be reimbursed a small sum I have disbursed most necessarily in the King's service, viz., that of Mr. Bolron's business cost me 7l., Mr. Zeale I kept about 14 weeks on my own account, Mrs. Bloe with Mrs. Fitzh[arri]s' business cost me so much as I am really ashamed to mention, for I was forced to hold correspondence about them at least 8 months and I was made believe she could be serviceable. Besides, I believe no porter trotted more for hire than I did about that business. Some days it cost me 8s. and I had nothing towards it but my allowance at the rate others have, viz., 30s. a week, and that was drawn back, when I was sick, when I had most need. To help to discharge the charges of 10 weeks' sickness, I have borrowed of Col. Rich, Mr. Squibb and others, which has put me so far behind that I dare not show my head abroad. I suppose you know I had no allowance from his Majesty for at least six months, in which time it cost me a great deal of money in serving the King. I am now at a nonplus for want of some, yet am resolved not to move for any on that score, lest my endeavours should be misconstrued by the event not answering expectations, but they that catch fish must catch frogs, as it has been my case too often to my cost. [Over1 page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 169.]
July 24.
Windsor.
The King to Richard, Lord Arundel, governor of Pendennis Castle. He is to disband the company of foot under his command, with the master gunner and 8 other gunners, by 31 July, from which time the charge of them and of fire and candle for the garrison is retrenched. The arms are to be delivered by inventory to Lieut.-col. Hooke, and the soldiers to have discharges and passes to return where they desire. The Treasury Commissioners have sent moneys to Thomas Starsmore and Giles Draper to pay off the 2 sergeants at 15d. a day, the 3 corporals and one drum at 10d. and the soldiers on the place, not exceeding 44, at 6d. each, the master gunner at 20d. and the other gunners at 10d. each, from 13 Sept., 1678, to 31 July, 1682, from which time no commissioned officers or their servants are to be paid; he is therefore to admit the said Starsmore and Draper to pay off the said non-commissioned officers, soldiers &c. at the rates aforesaid in pursuance of the musters to be now taken. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 428.] Annexed,
Instructions to Thomas Starsmore and Giles Draper to muster the company at Pendennis Castle, audit the pay accounts, pay the arrears due to them at the reduced rate, taking care that their debts for diet &c. are duly satisfied, and send the account and the receipts for pay to Charles Fox, paymaster general of the land forces. Windsor, July 24, 1682. [Ibid. p. 429.]
July 24.
Windsor.
Commission to Capt. Samuel Scudamore to be captain of the company whereof David Le Gross was captain, in the Duke of York's regiment under Sir Charles Lyttelton. [Ibid. p. 433.]
July 24.
Windsor.
Reference to the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Bishop of London of the petition of Guy, Bishop of Chichester, for a letter to the Dean and Chapter of Chichester, requiring them to confirm such concurrent leases as he shall grant, where the present tenants shall refuse to renew according to custom on reasonable terms, who are to report what may be fit for his Majesty to do in order to the petitioner's justification, in case they cannot compose the difference, which they are directed to endeavour in the best manner. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 184.]
July 24.
Windsor.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of Jervas Pierce, serjeant of his Majesty's trumpeters, and of the rest of the said trumpeters for an order for payment of their liveries for 1676, amounting to 1,367l. 2s. 3d., and also directions for payment of his own livery for 1679, amounting to 74l. 14s. 3d., the rest of the trumpeters having received the greatest part of theirs. [Ibid. p. 201.]
July 24.
Windsor.
Warrant for a patent for 14 years to George Hager and his assigns for his new way of making paper by sizing all sorts of white, blue, purple and other coloured papers and paste boards in the mortar, whereby the sizing is totally intermixed and incorporated in the mass, whereas in the way now practised the sizing is received but artificially, with a proviso for the revocation thereof by order signed by 6 or more of the Privy Council, if it shall appear that it is inconvenient or prejudicial to the King's service and the good of the kingdom or any abuse is therein discovered or that the said invention is not a new invention. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 112.]
July 24.
London.
The Lord Lieutenant to [Secretary Jenkins]. Enclosing a draft letter for the reversion of the office of customer and collector of the ports of Londonderry and Strangford to Henry Lumley, and desiring him to offer it to his Majesty's signature as his humble recommendation. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 343, No. 35.]
July 24.
Windsor.
The King to the Lord Deputy. Warrant for a grant of the office of one of the serjeants at law to John Lyndon. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 11, p. 81.]
July 24.
Windsor.
The King to the Lord Deputy. Warrant, after reciting that certain lands therein mentioned in co. Carlow have been settled upon him by the Duke of Ormonde, which have for some years been enclosed in a park called Sherwood Park, but that no licence has yet been obtained for making the said park, for a grant to him and his heirs of licence to hold the said lands so enclosed in a park for deer and other beasts of venery and that the said park be called Sherwood Park, with a grant of free park and free warren in the said lands. [Ibid.]
July 25. Opinion of the Attorney-General as to the Lord Mayor's answer and other matters, viz., that the former should be:—The Court has considered of your petitions and will take care that such persons shall take the office of sheriffs on them as are duly elected according to the law and the ancient customs of this City, and in this and all other things this Court and myself will endeavour to maintain the rights and privileges of the Chair and of the whole City, and, wherein you think that we do otherwise, the law must judge between us.
If they appear in great numbers to receive their answer or at any other time to petition, that the Lord Mayor command the multitude to depart and cause proclamation to be made accordingly and signify that, if some few of them appear only, he will give them his answer and, in the other case, receive their petition; otherwise, not.
That the Lord Mayor hold no courts, in case there be not a quorum of aldermen that are well-affected, as he is, to his Majesty and the government. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 170.]
July 25.
Windsor.
Reference to the Earl of Arlington, Lord Chamberlain of the Household, of the petition of Dr. Edward Warner, showing that he was sworn and admitted physician in ordinary to his Majesty in Aug., 1660, but without fee, to come in with fee on the first vacancy and, having received no benefit thereof, praying that his Majesty would take his age and low condition into consideration. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 184.]
July 25.
Windsor.
Reference of the petition of Sir William Stapleton, governor of the Leeward Islands, for his Majesty's right to what shall be forfeited by the misdemeanours committed by an interloper, the Providence, George Nanton master, seized and carried into St. Christopher by Capt. Billop, commander of the Deptford ketch, for firing at the ketch, killing one and wounding others of her men on no other provocation but firing a gun to require the obedience due to his Majesty's colours, to the Lords of the Treasury in order to the granting his request and they are also to consider of some provision to be made out of the same forfeiture to the captain of the Deptford ketch in reward of his good service in asserting the respect due to his Majesty's flag and seizing the interloping ship. [Ibid. p. 185.]
July 25. Secretary Jenkins to Lord Bulkeley. The two addresses you sent up from cos. Anglesea and Carnarvon were presented by the Lord President of Wales to his Majesty, who received them graciously and ordered me to have a care they should be printed, which is done.
I could not sooner give you a satisfactory account of that part of your command relating to yourself and your noble family, because I conceived it to be the meaning of your letter that I should at a seasonable time and by word of mouth endeavour to remove all prejudices (if any were entertained) that might work with his Majesty to have other than a very good opinion of yourself and your family. I could not express myself in more proper words than those that your letter put into my mouth, but his Majesty's answer was: "Let Lord Bulkeley do well for his part; his family has deserved well of the Crown; let him know from me that I expect he should use his utmost endeavour to keep those gentlemen of quality and those families that showed themselves rightly affected to the government in my father's time and on my return in the same good dispositions they were in in those very ill times, and I shall very readily believe all good things of Lord B's affection to me, when it appears to the world that the gentry of quality that are related to him are of the same principles and resolution that they were of, when it pleased God to restore me. I am sure my cause is still the same and my affection for them that stick to me is entire and unchangeable." In the close he commanded me to commend him kindly to you. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 102.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Moray to Sir George Gordon of Haddo, Lord High Chancellor, and the Marquess of Queensberry, Lord Treasurer. Referring to them the memorial presented a few days ago to his Majesty on behalf of the Earl of Tweeddale claiming relief from his Majesty of the sum of 3,565l. 9s. 8d. sterling, for which he had given bond to the Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 315.]
July 26. Dr. Matthew Fowler to his brother, Dr. William Bell, vicar of St. Sepulchre's, London. I remember that, when Oliver usurped the dominion, the loyal gentry used to meet at horse races and cock matches, under colour whereof they drove on some design, which made Oliver forbid all such meetings.
Our Whigs are of late much given to such kind of sports and I wish a watchful eye were on them to observe their motions. I was yesterday amongst a knot of loyal gentlemen, it being our bowling day, where the discourse was that the Duke of Monmouth intended to come into Staffordshire and Cheshire and to be at Wallasey horse race, which will be very shortly. I am very apprehensive of danger by his coming, for the lower parts of Staffordshire, Cheshire and Lancashire are very rotten and full of potent Whigs and malcontents. In Staffordshire there is Mr. Offley, who promised to treat the Duke at the expense of 500l., Mr. Leveson, Capt. Sneyd, Sir Edward Bowyer, with many others. In Cheshire there are the Earl of Macclesfield and his son, Brandon, Col. Whitley, Sir Robert Cotton, Sir Thomas Maynwaring, Mr. Booth, Lord Delamere's eldest son, and generally, except a few persons, the whole country is disloyal. Neither is Lancashire in a much better condition, having the Earl of Derby for their Lord Lieutenant. We have a Lord Lieutenant and his son also, of whom I must not write. Now, this disloyal party lying so close together and the Duke of Monmouth coming amongst them, how suddenly may they start out into a considerable rebellion, if the trained bands be not presently on their guard and some small party of the King's Life Guard ready to attend them and watch their motion? Preventive physic is the safest, for, if this party should gather to a considerable head, Chester and all these North West parts would be quickly in their possession and, besides the mischief they would do to particular persons, his Majesty will be forced to draw down a considerable party of his Guards to suppress them and this will infallibly minister occasion to the Whigs at London to rise and play their pranks. This advice is not to be despised; Sir Thomas Vernon will acquaint his friends at Court with it, and I know you are not without some correspondents there, to whom I would have you impart these matters, that his Majesty may prevent the danger, before it be too late. I think you believe me at 65 to be no vain fellow nor apt to be afraid, where no cause of fear is, but with an enemy it is better to play the fore than the after game. The Whigs, finding their cause and party daily declining in London, will endeavour what they can to buoy it up again by raising some considerable tumults in the country and I conceive no parts are at this day so proper, on which to erect a stage of rebellion, as Lancashire, Cheshire and Staffordshire. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 171.]
July 26.
Windsor.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of John and George Hilton, John Collingwood and Gabriel Shaad, praying his Majesty to order the present of 500l. he promised them for their encouragement in suppressing seditious conventicles about London, they having expended already near 400l. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 186.]
July 26.
Windsor.
Reference to Sir Job Charlton, Justice of the Court of Common Pleas, of the petition of Thomas Baites for a reprieve, showing that he was found guilty of stealing a box of silk by the evidence of a woman of very little credit, on which he is sentenced to die. [Ibid. p. 201.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Lord Finch. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that he and the Board issue orders for furnishing the Dartmouth with an additional supply to make up her present stores 40 rounds of powder with other stores proportionable. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 63, p. 49.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
Pass for William Finkenbeck to go to Denmark for hawks for his Majesty's use and to return with them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 114.]
July 27. Account of tallies to be struck for Thomas Price, Midsummer quarter, 1681, as patentee or assignee, amounting to 258l. 8s. 8d. and for several other persons amounting to 302l. 3s. 9d., with receipt dated 27 July, 1682, to Thomas Price for 2 guineas. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419. No. 172.]
July 27.
Windsor.
Warrant for a dispensation to William Levet, D.D., Principal of Magdalen Hall, rector of Husband Bosworth in Leicestershire and vicar of Flower (Floore) in Northamptonshire, who is going beyond seas as chaplain to Viscountess Hyde, to be absent from the said Hall and the said rectory and vicarage, he providing able and sufficient curates to discharge the duties thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 75.]
July 27.
Hampton Court.
Warrant for a new charter to the borough of Derby with a privilege to the Mayor to carry a white staff and to have the mace carried before him on all public occasions, and a proviso that butchers that are foreigners shall not expose their meat to sale before 12 in the market on the market day, being the usual time of ringing the market bell, and that at sunset they pack up. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 114.]
July 27.
Hampton Court.
Warrant for a grant to Richard Powell of the Inner Temple of the office of the King's attorney of Glamorganshire in the room of Richard Seys of Lincoln's Inn during pleasure. [Ibid. p. 118.]
July 27.
London.
Newsletter to John Squier, Newcastle. Brussels, 28 July (n.s.). His Excellency is returned from Flanders entirely satisfied with the proceedings of those States, who have given 22,000 rasions (rations) a day for the next year, which amounts to a vast sum and is 100l. a day more than was given to the Prince of Parma and is a very extraordinary sum, considering their losses. He has been likewise at Ostend and Nieuport to see the forwardness of those works and has given orders for advancing them with all possible diligence. He has ordered a great sluice to be made at Nieuport after the manner of that at Ostend, whereby all vessels from the sea may pass from thence to Bruges as those from Ostend, and 500 men are daily at work on it. They are likewise making a great bastion to command the river and that sluice and likewise making a new bridge over that river by the quay.
Holland letters arrived to-day bring an account that the Imperial army of 30,000 men is now ready to march, but whether against the Turks into Hungary or towards the Rhine is not yet known, the Turks refusing to confirm the truce but on the following conditions, that the malcontents of Hungary shall have free exercise of their religion and be restored to all their estates, that the Emperor shall raze the fortifications of Leopoldstadt and that the Turkish empire shall extend as far as the river Layse (? Leitha). If the Emperor will not agree to these conditions, he then offers that, if the Emperor will give him 4 millions of money, he will ratify the truce for 20 years.
To-day the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen met at the Guildhall, where a great number of citizens were attending, who delivered to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen another paper much like the two former, desiring that Court to send for Papillon and Dubois to appear and give in bond to hold sheriffs, being duly elected by the commons of the City. After some stay they were called in and received the following answer from the Recorder: The Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen have considered your paper and the Lord Mayor will maintain the prerogative of the Chair and the liberties and privileges of the citizens as by law established, and will take care they shall have two sheriffs for the ensuing year, on which the discontented party began to crowd into the hall and began several disputes and would not take that for an answer, and the Lord Mayor told them he would act according to law and, if they were aggrieved, they might try it that way, on which they were more exasperated and made great noise, which the Lord Mayor taking notice of rose from his chair and said, I command you in the King's name immediately to withdraw and make no more disturbance, after which Sheriff Shute went to them and told them what the Lord Mayor had said and so they departed much dissatisfied. [3 pages. Admiralty, Greenwich Hospital 2, No. 41.]
July 29. John Cooke to Secretary Jenkins. My countrymen (Alderman Hall at least) are come to town this evening, having brought their Abhorrence under the seal of the corporation [of Nottingham] and also a power desiring and enabling the Earl of Halifax and you to receive their charter and lay it at his Majesty's feet. But the charter itself seemed too cumbersome for them to carry and therefore it is to come by the carrier, which will not be till the end of next week. In which regard they beg your pardon that they do not wait on you to-morrow at Windsor, which by your permission they will do this day sennight, when their charter comes, and then present that and their Abhorrence together. I thought it necessary to give this account that you might not impute their non-appearance to-morrow to any undutifulness or neglect. You will please make their excuse to the Earl of Halifax, in case he should expect their attendance. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 173.]
July 29.
Windsor.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of Lieut. John Martin for relief, having faithfully served in France, Flanders, Holland and for two years in Tangier, where he received several wounds, and, having long languished in sickness and poverty, being now ready to perish for want. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 191.]
July 29.
Windsor.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of Robert and William Bridges, referred 26 Oct., 1680, to the Lord Lieutenant (calendared in S.P. Dom., 1680–81, p. 69), with the Lord Lieutenant's report and the other annexed reports and papers, which report was that he conceived them very deserving of his Majesty's favour and that he had referred the case to the Commissioners of Accounts and his Majesty's Counsel, whose opinion he transmits and with which he fully agrees, viz., that they certify the state of the matter to be as follows:—After reciting the contract with Robert and William Bridges as set forth in the letter of 31 Aug., 1677, calendared in S.P. Dom., 1677–78, p. 322, that the said principal sum of 36,565l. 4s. has been repaid to them by the Vice-Treasurer's assigning the monthly payments specified in the said contract to them out of the monthly payments of 20,000l. a month payable on the same days from the Farmers of the Revenue, part of which has been paid them by the Farmers at Dublin and part thereof by assignments on their collectors in the country, but not all of it exactly on the days agreed on by the said contract; that the 12d. in the pound allowed to the petitioners for interest and exchange out of the pay of the Military List for the 18 months next ensuing 29 Sept., 1677, amounted to 10,969l. 11s. 5d., which has been all received by them except about 200l.; that the petitioners now demand interest from his Majesty for such of their money as was not repaid them exactly at the days agreed on by their contract and also an allowance for such of their money as was paid them by assignments in the country and not at Dublin; concerning which demands they find the Farmers chiefly concerned, for the 2,031l. 8s. a month payable by the contract to the petitioners was to be paid out of the 20,000l. a month payable at the same days by the Farmers, who were on failure of payment of their rent at the days whereon it was payable to forfeit one month's interest of their 60,000l. advance money, so that, if any interest be due to the petitioners for such failure, it was occasioned by the Farmers' default, who are liable to a greater forfeiture for their failure of payment, and further the Farmers' rent is by their contract payable at the Exchequer in Dublin and there is only provision therein made that the Lord Lieutenant, as he should find it consistent with his Majesty's service, should direct the Vice-Treasurer to assign such moneys as the Farmers should have in the outports and other places remote from Dublin to such officers of the army or others as the Lord Lieutenant should think fit for payment of the Military and Civil Lists and in this case they do not find that the Farmers had any warrant to pay any part of this money to the petitioners in the country, so that, if his Majesty should think fit that any allowance be made the petitioners for their not being repaid exactly on the days and at the place agreed on by their contract, they are of opinion that such allowance ought to be made them by the Farmers, by whose default only it happened that their whole money was not paid them at Dublin and on the several days agreed on, which were the same days whereon the Farmers' rent was payable. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 191.]
July 29. Secretary Jenkins to the Earl of Carlisle. His Majesty approves of your choice of Sir William Pennington and Mr. Andrew Huddleston to be deputy lieutenants for Cumberland and of Mr. William Sandford of Askham for Westmorland. Being informed of the good affection of Sir Christopher Philipson, he will be well satisfied if you give him your commission as you intend. His extraordinary application to other affairs was the cause that he came not sooner to a resolution on your letter.
I beg you to favour me with a perfect list not only of your deputy lieutenants in those counties but of the Justices as they shall be found to be in the respective counties these approaching assizes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 100.]
July 29.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Peter Shakerley. I will show your letter of the 26th to the Master of the Ordnance and discourse with him on the subject of it, being willing to do your father any good office in my power. [Ibid. p. 101.]
[July 29 ?] Memorandum of a letter to Edward Carne of Cowbridge about a packet found at the posthouse there to be franked L. Jenkins and directed to Lewis Thomas of Sutton. [Ibid.]
July 30. Thomas, Lord Culpeper, to the King. Petition, stating that having had the misfortune to lie under his Majesty's displeasure about his late transaction with the Master of the Rolls, he at first offered all he could then possibly do, and, having since with great difficulty at last become master of the whole money received by him, he immediately last Tuesday desired Lord Hyde to acquaint his Majesty therewith and that he was ready to dispose of the money as he should think fit, and that last Friday Lord Hyde told him his Majesty expected that he should not only deposit the said money but also deliver up a note from the Master of the Rolls, which it is not in his power to do, it being in the hands of Mr. Kent on his being sworn into one of the Six Clerks' places, which he now holds as his freehold in his own right without the least trust whatever for the petitioner, and therefore hoping his Majesty will restore him to his favour and not retain any further displeasure against him for not doing what is out of his power. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 174.]
July 30.
Liverpool.
Richard Windall, Mayor, to Secretary Jenkins. By the Earl of Derby's command the enclosed recommendation is sent up with an English copy. They were hid by John Dowling in a private back building. He confesses he was prisoner in the Gatehouse and was liberated on bail. He designed for Ireland, but was forced back by contrary winds. His discourse on ship board gave suspicion that his errand was extraordinary. Sir Charles de Vic, a passenger in the ship and a commander in the army in Ireland, gave information and by his means the said writings were found. Dowling's endeavour to conceal the said papers makes him seem guilty and the hands and seals of such and so many persons not common and the reasons for his relief not very seasonable. Moreover, he not having a discharge from the Keeper of the Gatehouse and refusing to take the oath of Supremacy, I have secured him till your pleasure concerning him be signified. [Ibid. No. 175.] Enclosed,
Recommendation of the said Dowling to all Roman Catholics, stating that he had been kept in irons in the Gatehouse from 10 Sept., 1678, till 26 Feb. following, when he was bailed, being accused of no crime except professing the Roman Catholic religion and being suspected about a certain account book, which, though it was thought to belong to Lord Belasyse, really belonged to Col. Tuchett, and because he had been a servant to Lord Belasyse, adding that they had been told that he had been offered 50l. if he should turn informer, which he utterly rejected. 16 July, 1681. With numerous signatures and seals, among which are those of Lords Abergavenny, Carlingford and Fermoy, Garrett Moore, Charles and John Tasburgh, John Stonor and Herbert, Ma. and James Tuchett. [Latin. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 175 i.]
July 31.
Windsor.
Commission to Wriothesley Baptista Noel to be deputy governor of Gosport, under Edward, Lord Noel of Tichfield, lord lieutenant of Hampshire and governor of Portsmouth, and the lieut.governor of Portsmouth. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 431.]
July 31.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Thomas Jenkins to be lieutenant to a company of trained bands for Folkestone, to Thomas Ellferick to be lieutenant of Seaford, to Philip Lovitt to be lieutenant and to John Hide to be captain of Hastings, to Edward Millward to be captain of Pevensey and to Richard Browne to be ensign and Edward Martyne lieutenant at Winchelsea. Minutes. [Ibid. p. 432.]
July 31.
Windsor.
Warrant, after reciting that the Mayor, sheriff, bailiffs and burgesses of Haverford West had by their petition represented that for many hundred years past they had been an ancient corporation under several charters under the yearly fee farm rent of 26l. 12s. 4½d., yet lately William Williams procured a Quo warranto against them for the liberties recited pretending a title thereto under some grant from the late King to the city of London, and that they apprehend that the said Williams may design to oppose them and to avoid the said fee farm rent, having already occasioned several sums to be expended to the great impoverishment of the corporation, and therefore prayed an order that all further proceedings on the said Quo warranto might be discharged, a reference thereof to the Attorney-General and his report dated 25 July, that the franchises claimed by Haverford West were granted them 9 Jac. and that they have enjoyed them ever since and that the prosecutor claims under a patent granted in trust for the city of London about 4 Car. I, but that he finds no enjoyment pursuant thereto, so that he sees no reason why the prosecution should be continued in his Majesty's name, which may be stopped by a nolle prosequi: for entering a nolle prosequi on the said Quo warranto accordingly. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 119.]
[July ?] The Mayor and Corporation of Haverford West to the King. Petition, the purport of which sufficiently appears from the above warrant. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 176.]
July 31.
Windsor.
The King to the Lord Deputy. Warrant for giving leave to Sir Thomas Nugent by beat of drum to raise in Ireland 400 volunteers for completing the Irish regiment in the service of the King of Spain in the Low Countries and for giving all necessary orders that he may transport them from any port of Ireland to the Low Countries. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 11, p. 82.]
July 31.
Windsor.
The King to the Lord Deputy. Warrant for a grant to George Evans, junior, and his heirs of a licence to impark 500 or a greater or lesser number of acres of the lands of Caherassey and Fanningstown in the barony of Coshma, co. Limerick, into one or more parks for deer and other beasts of venery and likewise to impark 500 or a greater or lesser number of acres of the lands of Coppercullin and Murroe, alias Burchtown, in the barony of Owneybeg in the said county into one or more parks for deer and other beasts of venery, with a grant of free warren in all the said premises. [Ibid. p. 90.]
July. Order to Thomas Hawley, gentleman porter of the Tower, after reciting that order had been given for one of the captains of the King's own regiment of Foot Guards to do a week's duty with his company in the Tower according to the orders of Lord Alington, Constable, or in his absence of the Lieutenant, to be relieved at the week's end by another captain and his company and so on week by week, to admit such reliefs and for him, in case both the Constable and the Lieutenant should be absent, to deliver the keys of the Tower to the captain who shall be on duty there and to observe the said captain's orders. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 177.]
[July.] John Hayward to the King. Petition stating that the Morocco ambassador presented a petition in his favour for a landwaiter's place in the port of London, for which his Majesty gave his orders to the Lords of the Treasury and they (23 June, 1682, see Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. VII, p. 506) to the Commissioners of the Customs to instal him, who answered there were 40 to be preferred before him, and therefore praying a special warrant for a landwaiter's place on the first vacancy with leave for a deputy to officiate in his absence, he being to go to Fez, an immediate servant to the ambassador. [Ibid. No. 178.]
[1682 ? July ?]
Friday morning.
Viscount Hyde to Secretary Jenkins. I received this letter after 12 p.m. with directions that you should send it to M. de Croissy to be delivered and that it should have gone with the post last night. I would be glad you would try if it might not yet overtake the packet-boat at Dover and please at Windsor let me know what you do before you speak to the King. Do not speak of it to the ambassador here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 419, No. 179.]
[July ?] Maurice Flyn to the King. Petition for the next lieutenant's or cornet's place in the horse at Tangiers, where he served as aid major till the present governor, on the death of Mr. White, the town major, thought fit to unite the offices of town major and aid major, and to confer both on Lieut. Davis. On his petition last May (calendared ante, p. 223) he was ordered to wait the next vacancy, but it was supplied by Mr. la Rue. [Ibid. No. 180.]
[1682, July ?] An account of the differences amongst the Justices of Northumberland at Midsummer sessions after the dissolution of the Oxford parliament about addressing his Majesty.
The Duke of Newcastle wrote to the Justices and Deputy Lieutenants desiring a general concurrence in the same form as in Nottinghamshire, viz., from the Lord Lieutenant, deputy lieutenants, Justices, militia officers, clergy and freeholders. His letters were so slighted that some of the party said he had nothing to do with it. Then Sir Richard Stote proposed we might agree in our chambers about the wording of an address. Sir John Fenwick for his party said he would do nothing but in open court and would not sign anything but what the Grand Jury approved of, so presented them with one, which was approved of, and the one we presented was returned by one of the Grand Jury, a great Whig, to the clerk of the peace, bidding him write Ignoramus on it. Then, to prevent disputes, all of us would have signed Sir John's address, only with the addition of the words " in the due course of descent" but the Whig jury would not allow it, so we thought ourselves too much imposed on to set our hands to it.
We gave his Grace this account and proceeded with our address according to his directions and made considerable progress before the assizes without any public summons, intending then to complete it. A great many freeholders were discouraged by threats and by an indictment found by the Grand Jury against several that took subscriptions, to effect which several loyal persons summoned on the Grand Jury were struck out and others put in. But the indictment was quashed that time twelvemonth and the address graciously received by his Majesty, with above 800 hands to it, the Whigs generally refusing to sign it. With the names of the Justices that signed the first address, dated 13 July, 1681, and of the Justices on the Grand Jury that found the indictment. (Both addresses are printed in the London Gazette, Nos. 1637, 1649.) [Ibid. No. 181.]