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Charles II: December 1682

Pages 557-626

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1682. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1932.

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December 1682

[Dec. ?] John Guillim, late captain in the regiment of Guards, to the King. Petition, stating that, some time before his Majesty went to the Parliament at Oxford, he presented a petition for an order to the Commissioners of the Treasury to pay what was then due of the 140l. a year allowed him by his Majesty, which was accordingly ordered, yet he then received but 50l. and about three months after 50l. and since one 50l., so he was last Christmas 170l. in arrear, and, though they allow him somewhat monthly towards his subsistence, it will not contribute anything towards satisfying his debts contracted during his illness of near a year and a half, whereby he is daily in danger of being imprisoned, and praying for an order for payment of the above 170l. On the back,
1682.
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lords of the Treasury. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 103.] Annexed,
Another similar petition. [Ibid. No. 104.]
Dec. 1. Jacob d'Agar to the King. Petition, a person having died 10 days ago, of whom the petitioner is heir, to honour him with some title in order to obtain leave for him and his children to enjoy peaceably his inheritance, as Monsr. de Lortie and several others have done. [French. Ibid. No. 105.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the report of the Lord Lieutenant with the annexed petition on the reference to him of the petition of Elizabeth Legg [calendared ante, p. 526], as follows: — He remembers the grant to Sir George Carteret and Daniel O'Neill of the duty arising by the French tonnage in Ireland at the yearly rent of 200l., which grant did not answer their expectations, so that he believes some of the rent due was in arrear, and therefore the Farmers entered upon the said duty and enjoyed it and, their farm ending next Christmas, this duty will come into his Majesty's hands to be disposed of to the petitioner or otherwise as he shall think fit. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 222.]
Dec. 1. Dispensation for Edward Selwyn, high sheriff of Sussex, and Robert Pl[e]ydell, high sheriff of Gloucestershire, to be out of their respective counties. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, pp. 166, 167.]
Dec. 1. Warrant for constituting Henry, Earl of Arundel, Lord Lieutenant of Berkshire. Minute. [Ibid. p. 169; S.P. Dom., Entry Book 69, pp. 19, 20.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Sir William Turner. I send you the enclosed papers by his Majesty's command, who desires that proceedings may be had against Bell according to due course of law and, if it be needful or proper to give any directions to Twyford, that he may have them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 173.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a commission to Capt. Archibald Stewart, brother of the Earl of Moray, to be Lieut.-Governor of Stirling Castle. [2 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 456.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Commissions to the said Capt. Stewart to be lieutenant of the foot company in garrison at Stirling Castle whereof the Earl of Mar is captain. [Ibid. p. 458.]
Dec. 2. Statement about Northampton. The Mayor is elected in an assembly called the House, at which about 80 usually appear. There are a considerable number of loyal men, who have a good interest and are active, and among these some, who profess loyalty, but are apt to be violent and have thereby disgusted many and been unsuccessful in several of their undertakings. The factious party are diligent and united, but not very many. The rest are following men, but are most in number and they incline the balance as they are disposed.
At the last assizes Sir Roger Norwich was in Northampton and (the time of the election of a Mayor drawing nigh) he consulted the loyal party and had particular discourse with Mr. Sergeant, to such satisfaction that it was generally concluded he was a very fit man and would serve the King faithfully, and it was not doubted, till about a day before the election, that he would be the man. A little before the day it appeared that one or two of the aldermen had been working underhand to set up Mr. Ives, a loyal man likewise, and they so wrought the matter by the opinion of his loyalty and their pretended correspondence above that on the election day the loyal party were divided, whereby the factious party, keeping entire, though the lesser number, prevailed to choose one Atterbury. He is not factious in his nature and seems to mean well and, though he may sometimes be in danger of being misled, yet he is apt enough to be persuaded by good usage to do good things.
Sir Roger, not doubting the success, was not present at the distraction, but made it his business afterwards to endeavour a retrieve of the miscarriage. He sent in thereupon a brace of bucks and at his own charge entertained most of the assembly, at which entertainment there was so general a concurrence for surrendering the charter, the Mayor elect freely consenting, that scarce a doubt was left it would be effected at the next assembly, if no undermining contrivances should happen. The assembly was to be a few days after, about which time Mr. Griffin came from the Court to Northampton. He sent for the Mayor then in being, Mr. Willoughby, and the Deputy Recorder and intimated instructions from above. They suited not with the contrivances then settled to serve his Majesty and at the assembly the loyal party were uncertain what the King's commands were and so became again distracted and thereupon that piece of industry was likewise lost.
Not long after, but before the Mayor elect was sworn, Mr. Willoughby, being then in the commission of the peace, sent for him and required him to find sureties to appear at the next assizes and to be of good behaviour in the meantime. To prevent his imprisonment, in which case he could not be sworn, sureties were forthwith found and he afterwards took the oath as Mayor.
If gentlemen of influence and note in the country appear and encourage the Corporation and no doubts are raised what his Majesty's mind and commands are, it is more than commonly probable the government will be loyal and a good account may be given of the town. [2¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 106.]
Dec. 2.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of John Pitterson Brant, a Danish subject and master and sole owner of the Katherine of Fredrikshald in Norway, praying that his ship, seized by Mr. Man as forfeited for a fault committed 6 weeks before he bought her, whereof he was ignorant, and after he had paid 33l. alien duties, may be discharged with reparation for his charges and damages. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 223.]
Dec. 2.
London.
Newsletter to John Squier, Newcastle. Last Thursday, Prince Rupert's body being opened, three strange things were found in him. The first was a stone in his kidneys bigger than a great nut, which lay so that it would have stopped the passage of his urine, but, what is strange, there was a hole in it, through which the water passed so freely that he in his whole life was never troubled with any pain of the stone. Another was that in the skin that covers the brain there grew a bone and in his heart another. His body is embalmed and will lie some time in state, an express being sent to Germany to acquaint the Prince Elector with his death.
The quarrel of the Morocco Ambassador with the Secretary on board his Majesty's ship in his return home had like to have cost him his head, for the Emperor was so offended with him for not killing him, since he durst draw his sword against a person that bore his character, but the Ambassador, making it appear that he was prevented by the captain of the ship, was discharged from his imprisonment. The Secretary, who has been at Mecca and so made holy, is fined so much that, if he pay it, he must sell all his estate and himself. They durst not take away his life, he having seen their Prophet's tomb. After the Ambassador had given an account of his embassy, amongst other things of the treat the Duke of Albemarle gave him, the Emperor was so desirous to see the Duke that he has sent to desire he may come to him.
The truce being expired between those of Sallee and us by sea, our letters arrived here last post bring advice to several merchants, who reported yesterday on the Exchange that they had taken 12 of our Canary merchants, but this wants confirmation.
Our last Spanish letters say that that King has not yet accepted the King of England's mediation, but has writ to his Ambassador here to press the King to be a mediator for the general peace of Europe, his circumstances being such, considering how he is leagued with the House of Austria, that it would be highly unreasonable for him to make a separate treaty. These letters add that a globe of fire was seen over Gerona, which lasted half an hour and then broke with a terrible noise like the discharge of cannon intermixed with muskets.
Sir Patience Ward, who was a witness for Mr. Pilkington, I am told and believe, will be indicted for perjury.
They write from Brussels that a Spanish officer, who came lately from Madrid with particular letters of recommendation to his Excellency, was seized on by an order from Spain by the last courier, wherein was his sentence of condemnation for poisoning his wife, and was accordingly strangled the following night in the prison to avoid public scandal, he being a person of quality, whose name is therefore kept secret. [3 pages. Admiralty, Greenwich Hospital, News-letters, Original, 2, No. 63.]
Dec. 3.
Guildhall.
Henry Crispe to [Secretary Jenkins]. I had waited on you yesterday with the list of those fit to be Commissioners, but, some doubts arising, Sir George Jeffreys thought it convenient we should consult Lord Chief Justice North, whom I waited on last night. I had not an opportunity to speak with Sir George since, but this evening or to-morrow morning I intend to wait on him and come to some final resolution and then will immediately attend you with the list.
It were very much for the King's service that care should be had in the prosecution of the 6 Nov. rioters and that some of his principal counsel should manage it. His interest has suffered not a little by not trying the first riot at Guildhall and more, because there was not so much as an information against the late sheriffs themselves for the latter, so that their bail were discharged and Shute continued only on his own recognizances. You will pardon my presumption in meddling in matters not properly my business, considering they have so great an influence on this city, no man being more sensible than I of the difficulties the King's interest and friends lately laboured under here and how much care and prudence will be necessary to hinder them from falling under the like again, which if they should, they must never expect a resurrection. Sir Thomas Player, Sir Patience Ward, Mr. Hawkins and, some say, Sir Robert Clayton dined last week at a little alehouse on Snow Hill, in order to make voices for an alderman. Hawkins, as they say, manages all the Duke's money affairs. Certainly he does Sir Allen Apsley's and the Bishop of Salisbury's. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 107.]
Dec. 4.
Ashridge.
The Earl of Bridgwater to Secretary Jenkins. Requesting him to represent to his Majesty Sir Thomas Fotherley as a person proper to be one of his deputy lieutenants for Hertfordshire. He was knighted not many months since, is son of John Fotherley, a deputy lieutenant, and is a captain of a company of the Trained Bands of the county. [Ibid. No. 108.]
Dec. 4. Presentment of the Grand Jury of Middlesex to the Justices, sitting in sessions at Hicks' Hall, of their opinion that conventicles are destructive to the interest of the kingdom. They publish our divisions to princes abroad and consequently the weakness of the kingdom and will inevitably perpetuate the unhappy separation amongst us. We esteem it our duty to make an essay towards union and therefore pray this court, before this session ends, to take some effectual course that the conventicles in this county may forthwith be suppressed. [2 copies, one with 17 signatures. Ibid. Nos. 109, 110.]
Dec. 4.
Whitehall.
On the petition of John Crabb [calendared ante, p. 525] and the report of the Admiralty Commissioners, dated 28 Nov., that he is a fit object of his Majesty's bounty and the rather, because he was burnt out of all he had at the late fire in Wapping, and they propose he be allowed a pension not exceeding 50l. per annumfor his life by the Treasurer of the Navy, as other superannuated officers are paid: — approval of the said report and direction that the Admiralty Commissioners order a grant to the petitioner, during pleasure, of a yearly pension of 50l., to be paid as expressed in the report. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 223.]
Dec. 5.
Crown Court, Chancery Lane.
Edmund Warcup to Secretary Jenkins. Enclosing the presentment of the Grand Jury [calendared ante, p. 561]. We have summoned all the justices next Thursday to consider what is to be done on it. Major Parry presented the informations about Lewis and Zeale, which we sent to the Attorney-General. An elder of a Nonconformist congregation in St. Giles was indicted for words against the government. The bill was found and the jury is loyal. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 111.]
Dec. 5. Paper addressed to all Dissenters and persecuted sincere Christians, violently inveighing against the King, the Duke of York and the Court and ministry and urging an attack on them. — Now or never, or when shall it be mended? The Gospel preaching prohibited, Papistical perjured rogues plunder, the law prevented, justice abolished, our charter in contest, our privileges taken away, arbitrary policy prevails, honest men wear rags, rogues gold chains, the slaves in Argier not released, the money collected for their redemption converted to worse uses, no parliaments suffered to rectify our injustices, widows weep, orphans cry, murderers pardoned, debauchery in fashion, bastards, whores and enemies to the nation promoted to honour, Tories drive all before them, corrupted judges, bawling lawyers rail men out of their lives and estates, usurping Mayor and sheriffs forced on us, packed jurors to ruin us, &c., men plundered for serving God, their houses broken up by the worst of rogues and say it is law. Confounded be such laws and lawmakers. Chimney smoke and Exchequer ope, the Devil in a rope, the Duke a pope, Pritchard a rope, devil him choke. Noted, as found in the Churchwardens' pew in St. Giles, Cripplegate, by the sexton's maid about 8 in the evening. [5 pages. Ibid. No. 112.]
Dec. 5. Gabriel Osborne to his cousin, Major Braman, Chichester. About the sale of his land to James House. (Undated, postmark Dec. 5.) [Ibid. No. 113.]
Dec. 5. Secretary Jenkins to the Dean of Lincoln. Recommending Mr. Millington, who is represented to him as an able lawyer and a gentleman of good loyalty and affection to the Government, for the office of counsellor to him and the Chapter of Lincoln, which is now vacant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 173.]
Dec. 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Lord Dartmouth, Master General of the Ordnance, for carrying on the new fortifications at Hull, on which already some considerable progress has been made, in the same terms as the warrant of 10 Aug., 1681 [calendared in S.P. Dom., 1680–81, p. 396]. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 164, p. 85.]
Dec. 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same, after reciting that it was requisite that a train of brass ordnance be forthwith provided in readiness for the better defence of the royal person and preserving the peace in these seditious times, for causing such a train to be immediately prepared and fitted with all necessary equipage and for preparing a convenient room or rooms for an armoury in the guardhouse near St. James' Park for lodging a competent number of offensive and defensive arms as well for foot as horse, to be in readiness for the King's service and defence on any occasion, a sufficient person with an allowance of 20l.a year to be appointed storekeeper of the said armoury. [Ibid. p. 86.]
Dec. 6.
7 p.m.
Lord Chief Justice North to Secretary Jenkins. Baron Atkyns showed me this afternoon a letter from Sir Robert Atkyns expressing his thankfulness to yourself and the Attorney-General for the intimations to him of a prosecution intended against him, which he desires to avoid, and has offered, if the King shall signify his pleasure to have him resign his troublesome recordership, he will readily comply or, if the Corporation of Bristol shall make it their desire, he will give it up to them without expecting any condescension on their part to ask him pardon. But he desires (i) that his arrears be paid him, which amount not to much, (ii) that his Majesty will signify his pleasure to Mr. Attorney and the Corporation that all prosecutions against him may cease, which I think not unreasonable. He has referred himself for the manner of doing it to his brother, the Baron, with whom you may confer, when you know his Majesty's pleasure, which way he will have this done. To-morrow being postnight, the Baron desires to be instructed what he shall write and therefore I desire to know his Majesty's pleasure, if possible, to-morrow morning. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 114.]
Dec. 6. Roger L'Estrange to Secretary Jenkins. On my experience of the Stationers' ways and confederacies for dispersing libels, I am more and more confirmed that the certain way of tracing and detecting them must begin from the country, for their course is this. The first thing they do on the printing of any remarkable pamphlet is to furnish the kingdom up and down with an impression or two, before they offer at the dispersing of any here. Therefore I am persuaded that the proposals I formerly presented to you will effectually do the work. This Second Part of the Growth of Popery has been abroad in confiding hands for some time, before it was taken notice of at Whitehall. It is delivered now by tickets and there is an art in compassing discoveries of this kind, which I find people much to seek in, and, so long as the press was under my care and I was left to take my own course, I never failed of finding out any libel I looked for. I have passed some reflections on the general drift of this vile pamphlet and shall easily distinguish what parts of it are not to be touched. Ferguson was undoubtedly the author and some touches in it betray the E[arl] of S[haftesbury] had a sight of it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 115.]
Dec. 6. Sir Roger Norwich to [Secretary Jenkins]. I had waited on you myself with the enclosed case of several women, now prisoners in the county gaol of Northampton, but am not well. They are young and lying there will be a great means to debauch and ruin them and, being poor, ignorant and silly women, deluded by ill men and persuaded by them into a principle that all oaths are unlawful, they are led into this prœmunire, which I hope his Majesty's mercy will pardon. But, being informed, since I waited on you yesterday, that they have been very troublesome to their parishes and disturbed the ministers in Divine service, lest they should return to the same ways, I dare not appear any further their advocate, till they give very good surety for their good behaviour, which I hope they will. Truly I wish they had been some other way punished, as for being at a conventicle and for disturbing the minister, by fine and imprisoned, till they found sureties for their behaviour, and not on this Act of prœmunire. I hope to wait on you to-morrow or Friday. [Ibid. No. 116.]
Dec. 6. Letter desired by the Bishop of London from the King to the French Church in London. His Majesty, having been informed that the Consistory are proceeding to the election of a minister, lets them understand that Monsr. Piozet, who has for so long officiated there with great edification, would be an acceptable person to him. [Ibid. No. 117.]
Dec. 6. Account by Justice Warcup of such as stand indicted, and the bills found by the Grand Jury at the London Sessions, for printing, publishing and writing several libels and books against the King and government: — George Croome, Francis Smith, junior, Judith Jones, Robert Ferguson, the Scotch Nonconformist minister, Ralph Harbottle, Henry Carr (two indictments), David Mallett, Jane Curtis, Thomas Stringer, Lord Shaftesbury's steward, Gabriel and John Shadd, Thomas Benskins, Thomas Vyle, Elianore Smith, Elianore Smith, junior, John Starkey, bookseller at Temple Bar.
Account of such as are by informations prosecuted last Michaelmas term in the Crown Office in the King's Bench and have pleaded thereto: — Samuel Harris, Henry Carr (two informations), Thompson and his wife, Jane Curtis, Thomas Snowdon, John Kirgill, John Partridge, Richard Baldwyn. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 118.]
Dec. 6. Another copy of the first of the above accounts. [Ibid. No. 119.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Earl of Ailesbury, deputy to the Duke of Norfolk, Earl Marshal. After reciting that by order dated 9 Feb., 1662, the King for the greater dignity of the royal family directed certain particular forms of coronets to be used by them to distinguish them from others of equal title to them and that, notwithstanding, Prince Rupert, Duke of Cumberland, &c., now lately deceased, in relation to the Palatine family bore a peculiar and distinct form of coronet from that so ordered, ordaining that at the funeral of the said Prince such a form of coronet shall be used as is depicted in the margin and directing him to see this order observed and to have it registered in the College of Arms. [Drawing in margin. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 173.]
Dec. 6. Secretary Jenkins to the Earl of Plymouth. His Majesty some months since recommended a Mr. Harris to the Corporation of Droitwich. It seems he was not so fully informed of the constitution and circumstances peculiar to that Corporation as the thing required. He is content that his letter be no further pressed. I would beg you to procure the original letter to be returned to his Majesty's hands. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 174.]
Dec. 7. David Fitzgerald to the King. Yesterday I petitioned your Majesty in Council, mentioning debts contracted on your Majesty's account, for which I am now in restraint, wherefore my petition is that you will direct Secretary Jenkins either to discharge me of the debt or to enter bail for my appearance, so that I may have my liberty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 120.]
[Dec. 7.] David Fitzgerald to Secretary Jenkins. Just now I was arrested on an action of 100l., a debt contracted not on my own account but on the King's, as I mentioned yesterday in my petition. I am far from home. Had I but licence to go for Ireland some two years ago, I should have had no occasion to contract this trouble on myself, though I am satisfied to receive my own doom rather than the King should lose his cause. Never was man so abused as I have been by a parcel of bailiffs. I request you to deliver the enclosed to the King and to reason some means that I may obtain my liberty. [Ibid. No. 121.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Presentation of Henry Meriton to the rectory of Lutterworth, Leicestershire, vacant by the resignation of Francis Meeres. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 57, p. 57.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Earl of Gainsborough. I have laid before his Majesty the list of deputy lieutenants for Rutland that you left with me, who approved thereof and therefore commanded me to signify to you his pleasure that you give your commission to Baptist, Viscount Campden, Bennet, Lord Sherard, Sir Thomas Mackworth, Sir Andrew Noel, James Tryon, Christopher Brown and Richard Verney.
Postscript. — This morning Col. Richard Norton showed me a receipt of Sir Philip Honywood for 1,684l. odd. He appeals to his Majesty's memory, with whom I have not yet spoken on that subject, as to the time and place that Col. Norton was ordered to pay his money. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 175.]
Dec. 7. Secretary Jenkins to the Mayor of Bristol. On discourse this day with Baron Atkyns I find his brother, Sir Robert, if I mistake not, is inclined to surrender his recordership of Bristol, but on two conditions, (i) that all arrears of his salary be paid him, (ii) that all proceedings by way of indictment or otherwise against him now depending be forborne. His Majesty is willing that the last thing, being in his power, should be done and that the AttorneyGeneral enter his nolle prosequi, judging it worth his while by this expedient to take off the present heats and animosities that some men would foment in that loyal city under pretence of this very disagreement between the city and the Recorder, being persuaded also that you will make no difficulty to pay him his just arrears. If you entrust me with a bill for the money, I shall not call for it nor part with it, till I have a surrender of the recordership such as the Attorney-General or some other of the King's Counsel shall determine to be legal. It will be a thing becoming enough, if you in your own name and your brethren's should tell me in a few lines that, your Recorder having thus taken leave of you without giving you further trouble at law, you are willing to bury in oblivion all former differences. However, the putting an end to all prosecutions for misdemeanours as are now depending will be wholly in the King's power and I doubt not he will make use of it to prevent any blaze that may arise from a fire now stifled by his prudence. [1¼ pages. Ibid. p. 176.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Lieut.-Colonel Thomas Buchan to be lieut.colonel of the Earl of Mar's regiment and captain of a company therein, to John Balfour to be major of the said regiment and captain of a company therein and to Charles Fleeming to be captain of the company formerly commanded by Major Andrew White in the said regiment. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, pp. 459–461.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Warrants for the presentation of Andrew Guild, present minister at Kirkmichacl, to be minister at the parish church of North Berwick in the shirefdome of [Haddington] and diocese of Edinburgh, of George Meek, present minister at the church of Cultoun, to be minister at the parish church and parochin of Stratoun in the presbytery of Ayr and diocese of Glasgow and of John Auchterlony, student in divinity, to be minister at the parish church of Balmerino. [Docquets. Ibid. pp. 462–464.]
Dec. 7.
Treasury Chambers, Whitehall.
Henry Guy to the Commissioners of the Irish Revenue. Sending them a copy of the petition of Clarke and Robinson and of the Duke of Ormonde's report thereon [calendared ante, p. 535], which the Lords of the Treasury desire them to consider and to certify them forthwith of the usefulness of the office desired by the petitioners. On the back,
Report of the said Commissioners. In every port in Ireland there is and ever has been a warehouse-keeper appointed by the managers of the Customs and, where the port and trade are considerable, is added another control or check of some other officer and they conceive it not convenient that any one person should be storekeeper for the whole nation, since the work is to be performed separately in each port, yet, if his Majesty think fit to appoint the petitioner or petitioners to the office of storekeeper of the port of Dublin or any other port, with the restriction that he shall be subject to such directions as he shall receive from the Commissioners of the Customs, they have nothing to object against it. 13 Jan., 1683. Dublin. [2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 343, No. 75.]
Dec. 8. Anne Smith to Francis Smith at Rotterdam. This is the person, concerning whom I writ, when I engaged you to enquire after a vessel designed to your port, of whose loss you gave me the first advice. His occasions have now called him into your parts and, if he shall judge it to suit with his affairs to see Amsterdam, I request you give him the best assistance you can in his dispose for his time of abode there with safety. I request you treat him as my friend and with all the prudence needful, for I know not that he desires to be known either to the Earl of Shaftesbury or to Mr. Ferguson or to any of their company and therefore, if he give you a visit and desires to be private, conceal his character. His prudence will soon direct you in the conduct of this affair that you need not be under any apprehensions concerning him or his circumstances, but receive him as you would myself. Hearing he intends to see you, I have writ this to lead him to your acquaintance, who know how to consider strangers and have expressed a readiness to serve such.
[Paragraph contains deciphered text]
[Think] [this] [is] [the] I have writ at large by a friend of [M] [G[ordon]] [name] [is] [Langlangs] . By him I have sent what you last writ for and have directed him to give all to, [M.] [G[ordon]], without any other direction, they being intimate, as [M.] [V.], assures me. I have herewith sent a line to my friend. It is open for your perusal and to use it as you see cause, for I know that [(z) M.] [P.], [al[n]d] [M.] [F[erguson]] [are] [great] [accqu[a]intance]. I find the wind hold contrary and therefore shall repeat one passage. There is [a] [privivie] S[?], [seale] , [sent] [over] , [to] [be] [served] [upon] [E.] [S[haftesbury] [requiering] [his] [rer] [upon] [his] [person] [before] [his] [estate] [can] [be] [seased]. For all the rest I must refer you to my last, only I hear , our [iurys] [are] [angry] [with] [the] [book] [I] [sent] [last] [and] [[f]ather] [it] [upon] [M.] [F[erguson],] [for] [which] [and] [some] [paper] [formerlie] [published] [thay] [threaten] [to] [indite] [him] [for] [treason]. I have material more to impart, but the salutation of all friends, who rejoice to hear of your welfare and pray you may be blest and find the shadow of a great rock in this weary land for a covert, until the calamities pass over. Ever Amen.
This for Mr. Arthur at Mr. Gordon's and enclosed in it this following letter directed for Mr. Wood's friend: —
[Paragraph contains deciphered text]
[I had yours of the27 Novembel[r].] I cannot guess your reason for [go] [ing away witho[u]t tellil[n]g me,] after you had engaged me [past retreat in ane affairk[e] of] that nature [it may be the matter had been near] ended by this time. [I hardly now know what to doe or] what to say. You [can be now worse then] you are and it may be [this busines wil be my ruine.] I must crave to say I would have died upon the spot, before I would have served you so. Quos perdere vult Jupiter — I need not end the sentence. [You have taken the nearest an d surest way to your own distruction and myn to goe to place wher yt[o]unoware] when you know [t[h]at ther Shafts[bury]and such other] of that sort, so that if an angel would swear you innocent [of medling it wil not be beleeved.]
Now as to the matter of the match you know of how will the young lady look on me that could say nothing all this time. And you may be sure what you have done [in going away] will make the easiest things difficult. Then consider [I am to go to Scotland the end of the nixt moneth.] I have always ill luck. [I doe suffer for mens faults,] I mean what are so esteemed in [my unkle father and you] and am like [to be r(t)uined now for endeavoring to s[e]rve my father and you] any other [great difficulty as thogh the] match, she would yet be entertained. [I know not what len[g]th you will goe or if w[y]ouwil a[l]] stand to what shall I offer. You have once [left me in the lo[u][r]ch] for which, by your favour, no excuse can be made. You cannot blame me to take [it ill,since it doth you as much harme as me,but] however I will once more try the matter and make the proposition so [that the yo[u]ng lady(c)'s best and greatest] friend may see it take. [I shall give you advertisment] I hope [yo[u] will beleve what I shall wreit and follow my advice. I assure you I shall not advise anything without good cause and, if you leave me again in a hard lock, I cannot help it. I shall once venture. Pray let me hear soon from you. — I am yours, Mark White. 8 December.
Endorsed,
"Ann Smith's letter directed to Fr. Smith at Rotterdam with another in cipher from Mark White."
(The key to the cipher in the first letter is: 40=a, 41=b and so on to 63=z. Figures below 40 and above 63 are nils. The key to that in the second letter is: 10=a, 11=b and so on to 29=u, v or w, 30=x, 31=y, 32=z.) [2¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 122.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of Elizabeth Kinward, widow of Thomas Kinward, late his Majesty's joiner, for payment of 1,056l. 6s. 6¾d. due to him for joiner's work at Hampton Court. Whitehall and the Cockpit. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 224.]
Dec. 8.
London.
The Duke of York to the Prince of Orange. "I could not refuse the Earl of Middleton to recommend an uncle of his to you, that is major to Col. Douglas and has served long under you and, as he tells me, is the oldest major amongst the Scots. There will now be an opportunity of advancing him, his Majesty having been pleased to give to L[ieut.-] C[olonel] Bohan [Buchan] the like command in Scotland in the Earl of Mar's regiment. There is another man in your troops as good an officer as any I know and as fit as any to be a major, which is Capt. Maxwell, whom I must needs recommend to you to be advanced, and I know none fitter to be a major than he. As for news this place affords but little now, all things being very quiet and on the mending hand every day. . . ." [1½ pages. Holograph. S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 3, No. 73.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a patent conferring on Archibald Kennedy of Colzean and the heirs male of his body the dignity of a knight baronet of Scotland. [1½ pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 465.]
Dec. 9. Queries delivered to Secretary Jenkins. 1. Whether at a time, when the Dissenters in shoals transport themselves beyond sea, to the throwing up of many farms and a dearth of servants, it may not be thought reasonable to prohibit such transportations occasioned by a sullen humour. 2. Whether at this time, when the Dissenters calumniate the Government with a connivance at debaucheries, while themselves are vigorously prosecuted about matters of religion, it may not be thought reasonable to revive the proclamation against cursing and swearing and other debaucheries. 3. Whether the prosecution against Dissenters ought not to be prosecuted to excommunication for not coming to church and receiving the Sacrament, in corporations especially, thereby to incapacitate them from being elected or electors of members of Parliament. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 123.]
Dec. 9. — to Secretary Jenkins. The enclosed came from the press this morning, being reprinted a second time for pulbishing it as necessary in relation to the present proceedings at Doctors' Commons. To-day the 6 that received sentence yesterday stood on the pillory, 3 in Gracechurch Street, one at the Royal Exchange and 2 in Cheapside. The 3 had 3 bottles of canary delivered them. They filled out a glass and all 3 drank a health to his Majesty and then one to the Duke of Monmouth and then one to the Earl of Shaftesbury, and laid down the bottle and reserved the rest. He that stood in Cornhill had oranges given him, which he ate, behaving modestly. When he was taken down, there was a great shout and another at his entering into the coach and a third, when the coach went off. The two that stood in Cheapside, it's reported, had wine and cakes given them and some money, but the latter I saw not, but was present at the two former. It's reported a paper found on Cripplegate church was brought to the churchwarden and by him carried to Sir James Smith and by him ordered to be delivered to the Lord Mayor, which, 'tis said, was no less than high treason, not fit to be discoursed, and none but Jesuits or popishly affected durst write the things therein mentioned. It startles that a commission should be granted to swear the electors for aldermen, not but most will take the oaths, otherwise they shall be undone. If they carry not the aldermen for these two wards and the electing a Common Council, all is lost. Some are intended to print the oath taken by freemen and liverymen and to give some caution therein that they have a respect to the oaths they have taken and not elect such Common Council men as will give up their charter. The adjourning the grand and petty juries to meet at the Guildhall on Monday causes a suspicion that there are in deck some bills against particular persons, for these juries are fit for the purpose. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 124.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Bishop of Sarum, Chancellor of the Order of the Garter, and the Dean and Chapter of the Chapel Royal, Windsor, for admitting to the first poor knight's place void after those who have already recommendations Capt. Daniel Donn, who was captain in Sir Henry Vaughan's regiment in the late King's service and suffered frequent and tedious imprisonments for his loyalty and who after Worcester fight was most barbarously used, sequestered, decimated and often imprisoned. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 509.]
[Dec. 10.] Thomas Deane to Secretary Jenkins. Yesterday the rioters on 5[6] Nov. were brought in coaches to the places where they stood in the pillory, at each of which was assembled a numerous company of the rabble, amongst them several sturdy fellows, who appeared more than ordinarily diligent to encourage the criminals and threatened everyone that did but speak against them, saying they would be for a Monmouth and would burn the Pope for all this. They drank healths with huzzas with the wine sent them and impudently made a mock of their punishment. The 3 in Gracechurch Street began the Duke of Monmouth's health with a bottle of sack, sent, as 'tis supposed, from Bateman, the surgeon, who with some others of his gang stood in a balcony over against them at the house of Price, an upholsterer and Anabaptist preacher. None of them stood above half an hour and then went away in coaches, several of their accomplices following them and crying out the prosecution should get nothing by it. Several pieces of money were given them by unknown persons, who told them 'twas no disgrace to stand there on such an account, and the rabble that followed them seemed much encouraged by the clemency of the sentence.
Since the dinner on Snow Hill by Sir R. Clayton, Sir T. Player and Sir P. Ward, of which I was informed you had an early and full account, these three have continued their diligence to procure votes for Faringdon Ward. I have spoken with several there, who have been solicited by emissaries that used their names for an argument and applied to several mean people that inhabit the bystreets to persuade them to vote for Mr. Hawkins, using this argument, that they lately paid 200l. more taxes than ordinary, because they had not an alderman resident in their ward. There is daily great resort at their houses. Mr. Jenks and the others that scrutinized the poll come often to each of them and some others, whom the neighbours guess to be persons of quality, but, coming in hackney coaches and in the evening, 'tis hard to discover them.
Dr. Oates of late has been often at Mr. Ashurst's in St. John's Street. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 125.]
Dec. 11.
Bristol.
Thomas Eston, Mayor, and six aldermen to Secretary Jenkins. We hope our letter to you (though not in complacence to Sir Robert Atkyns, but the very truth) was so agreeable to his propositions that he cannot now find room to boggle at his resignation. The news of his inclination to surrender came hither by the same post as yours from several and was so far from being a secret that everybody immediately fell on calculation of a successor. Sir John Churchill's title soon started, as being a competitor with Sir Robert Atkyns, when he was elected, and then losing it but by four voices. His being a very good and obliging neighbour as well as a freeman and one of ourselves, his known affection to the Crown and Government and his Majesty's approbation of him to some of our Common Council since our contest with Sir R. Atkyns has made the choice unquestionable. However it is our opinion that, if his Majesty would recommend him, it may not only lay him under an obligation to the Crown but, we hope, may give his Majesty the satisfaction of a nem. con. in obedience to it, which otherwise, though to no purpose, may meet with the opposition of some of the disaffected. It will be a good means for the loyalty of Somerset, where he has so good an interest, and ours to cherish each other. [Ibid. No. 126.]
Dec. 11.
The Dartmouth, in the Downs.
Capt. George St. Lo and Lieut. Thomas Spragg to Secretary Jenkins. On Tuesday, 28 Nov., we with Capt. Botham went to Sandwich to obtain a warrant for suppressing a conventicle kept by one Learner at Deal. We offered to give the Mayor our affidavits of such unlawful assemblies, which he refused to take, or to grant his warrant without the consent of his jurats, and he accordingly ordered a hall, where we gave in our affidavits to the following effect: — On Sunday, 19 Nov., in the morning Mr. Learner with about 50 people met at Deal, where they continued singing psalms and other exercises, till we came in with others, amongst whom were two deputy constables. After we had been in some time, some of the people were for going away, but the said Learner advised them not to depart, but to stand by him, saying he had done nothing (and that their then meeting was not) contrary to law, on which words all the people in a tumultuous manner kept about him, till they had conveyed him away out of some back door or window. They met again in the afternoon and at another place on Sunday the 26th.
Notwithstanding all this the Mayor and his brethren, except one, positively refused either to grant us their warrant or give us a copy of our affidavits, to the great hindrance of the prosecution of the laws, of all which and much more we are ready to make affidavit. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 127.]
Dec. 11.
Derby House.
The Commissioners of the Admiralty to Admiral Herbert or any other the commanders of his Majesty's ships under his command. In the same words as their letter to him of 27 Nov. [calendared ante, p. 554]. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 359, p. 107.]
[Dec. 11.] James Robinson [Robertson] from prison in Edinburgh to his mother and other friends. Giving a narrative of his examination first before a committee of the Council and then before the justiciary (of which there is a full account in Wodrow, Vol. III, p. 414), with note that he, being of the age of 22 years, a countryman, coming to visit the prisoners, was heard by the soldiers to exhort them to faithfulness and constancy, was thereon committed prisoner and condemned and executed. On the back,
Note by Francis Strutt, messenger, that he found this letter with two or three more copies in the trunk of Joseph Helby at his father's house in Maulin [Malling], which trunk with his wife and children was to go to London next Tuesday, as his parents said before Alderman Foule of Maidstone. 21 July, 1683. [1½ pages. Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 128.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Earl of Bridgwater. His Majesty on your recommendation consented most readily that you give your commission to Sir Thomas Fotherley to be one of your deputy lieutenants in Hertfordshire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 176.]
Dec. 12. Brian Courthope, clerk to the Recorder, to Secretary Jenkins, Praying him to move his Majesty on this short petition and obtain a reference to-night, for execution day is to-morrow. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 129.] Enclosed,
Richard Browne (alias Deane), a condemned prisoner in Newgate, to the King. Petition for a reference to the Recorder of London and for a stay of execution, till he make a certificate of the truth of the following, viz., that the petitioner stands convicted for highway robbery in Middlesex and has made a confession immediately of his confederates not yet taken and of all he had done or known and that it is his first offence, as appears by the annexed certificate, which is known not only to the Keeper of Newgate but also to the Recorder of London. On the back, Certificate by the Keeper of Newgate to the above effect. 11 Dec. [Ibid. No. 129 i.]
Dec. 12.
Amsterdam.
R[obert] F[erguson] to [his wife]. (Printed in Ferguson, Ferguson the Plotter, p. 95.) [Ibid. No. 130.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of Anne Sheldon, widow, a dresser to the Queen, for a grant of the parsonage house at Carminster with Haydon's farm and other lands in Dorsetshire for 99 years at the yearly rent of 5l. 6s. 8d., the same having been granted by King James to Mr. Levingston at that rent, whose lease is expired; and yet the land is concealed and detained from his Majesty and the arrears of it, the petitioner being willing at her own charge and able to make out the King's title. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 224.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to George, Earl of Aberdeen, during pleasure, of the shirefship of the shirefdome of Edinburgh Principal or Midlothian, with all the privileges, &c. as the same were possessed by Charles, now Earl of Lauderdale, the lately deceased Earl of Dalhousie or any of their predecessors, shireffs of the said shirefdome. [3 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 466.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Commission to Sir Francis Ruthven to be lieutenant and to — Keath of Ludwharn to be corn t of Adam Urquhart of Meldrum's troop of horse. [Ibid. pp. 469, 470.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Protection in the new form to William Maxwell of Springkell, advocate, for one year. [Ibid. p. 471.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to Sir George Mackenzie of Rosehaugh, the King's advocate, of the office of baylie within the regality of Dalkeith and East Calder, during pleasure. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 472.]
Dec. 13.
Kington, Herefordshire.
Richard Hopton to the Duke of Beaufort. Col. Coningsby sent me the enclosed, being an abstract of the informations he formerly sent you. He desired me to give my opinion on them as to matter of law and to certify you thereof.
The charges against Georges are beyond all aggravation. They are of the highest scandal, boldest presumption and envenomed malice against his Majesty and his Royal Highness and, in my weak judgment, necessarily require nimble prosecution to justice, for, as long as the traitorous, saucy and malicious tongues of the subjects are at liberty to scandalize his Majesty, his Royal Highness and the Government, we cannot expect a well-grounded peace. Please therefore to communicate the enclosed to his Majesty's and his Royal Highness' counsel that a speedy course may be taken to punish these offenders according to law, which is not to be doubted can be defective to punish them in one degree or other. You will thereby do a considerable service towards establishing the peace of the kingdom.
The business against Colt of Leominster was not acted with that secrecy it ought, for on Tuesday sennight he had private notice of his Royal Highness' suit against him and that a writ was sent down to arrest him. He fled privately out of Herefordshire to the house of Richard Williams in Radnorshire, where he was last Sunday and Monday. A writ of Quominus out of the Court of Exchequer, directed to the sheriff of Radnorshire, is very necessary to apprehend him, if he shall continue his skulking in Radnorshire, where, I believe, he will mostly reside, for I know not of any other place, where he has interest to hide himself, unless it be at Mr. Arnold's in Monmouthshire. However, though he be not taken, yet this suit of his Royal Highness against him has, by occasioning his flight out of this county, wrought a very considerable good, for, though Capt. Gorges and Mr. Coningsby of Hampton were and are great encouragers of the Fanatic party in Leominster, yet Colt was the head of them and managed them at his pleasure and, now he has fled, the Fanatics there are left without a head and are wonderfully crestfallen and are so afraid (by their own guilty consciences) that they must abscond and shift for themselves, if prosecuted, that they now begin to face about and, as I am informed, some of them will discover considerable matters to save themselves, and in particular the present Bailiff of Leominster, who prevaricated most unexpectedly and basely from the loyal party there, sent to me yesterday to discourse me privately and has promised to be ruled by me in managing the affairs of that town, which if he does, I have greater probability than ever to effect the surrender of their charters on the terms I formerly mentioned to you. If not, I have now got copies of all their charters and have got good proof to make out several forfeitures of all of them, which I have written down, which will appear sufficient, as I conceive, to maintain a Quo warranto, if occasion should be, all which I have ready to send up to you by the first opportunity of a trusty hand, thinking it not safe to send it by post, for Mr. Colt has prevailed with the postmaster of Hereford to remove his post-office from the house of a right loyal person in Leominster to that of an arrant Fanatic and by reason thereof many letters have of late been opened or miscarried, but next Hilary term I will send you the copies of the charters and the forfeitures assigned by a safe hand. The only sticklers against his Majesty's interest in and about Leominster are Colt, Gorges and Coningsby of Hampton and, if Gorges and Coningsby were as well prosecuted as Colt now is, it would be a very great encouragement to the loyal party and a great disheartening of the Fanatic. If there be occasion for the witness to come to London, who can prove all the charges against Gorges contained in the enclosed paper, to give his Majesty's or his Royal Highness' counsel information of when and where Gorges spoke the words and of other circumstances to form an indictment for his Majesty or an action or declaration for his Royal Highness, Col. Coningsby will take course to send up the witness to London on the least intimation given him.
It would be a very great satisfaction to the loyal party here and a check to the Fanatic, if Colt, Gorges and Coningsby of Hampton were all publicly disarmed. You may perceive by the 7th article of the enclosed that Gorges was provided of horse and arms to have assisted the late Parliament against the King and that Mr. Coningsby of Hampton had muskets in his hall and others at a gunsmith's fitting for that purpose, and Colt is of their gang and has lately by colour of his being a Justice of Leominster disarmed some loyal subjects within the liberty of that borough, and yesterday I was informed that he within the last month advised some of the most dangerous Fanatics in Leominster to get themselves arms. Certainly these are sufficient grounds to have all these three persons disarmed by the Lieutenancy, which I submit to your better judgment.
I presented to you two letters, since I came out of North Wales circuit, and should be very glad to understand that they and also this came safe.
Postscript.—Since writing this I am informed that Mr. Coningsby of Hampton and Capt. Gorges intend to have a great concourse of people at Mr. Coningsby's this Christmas. What further may be their design thereby I know not, but, however this, I am sure that to have them disarmed will be for his Majesty's peace and will discourage the Fanatic party. [2¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 131.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Deputy. Warrant, the King thinking fit that the officers commanding the troop of Guards in Ireland should enjoy the privileges and take place according to the usage of the Horse Guards in England, for issuing commissions accordingly, viz., to the captain as colonel and he to take place as first colonel of Horse in that army, to the lieutenants as eldest lieut.-colonels, to the cornet as eldest major, to the quartermaster as eldest captain and to the corporals or brigadiers as eldest lieutenants. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office 1, Vol. 11, p. 131; S.P. Ireland, Entry Book 1, p. 27.]
Dec. 14.
Guildhall.
William Wagstaffe to Secretary Jenkins. This is a true copy, as I am informed by the person who keeps these records at the sessions. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 132.]
Dec. 14. Secretary Jenkins to Sir John Wyburne. Giving him notice that his ship, the Happy Return, is to continue in Longreach, where she is, till he has received on board all the stores that Lord Dartmouth, the Master of the Ordnance, intends to send him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 63, p. 56.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Mayor of Bristol. I send you Sir Robert Atkyns' surrender, which I should have sent you on Tuesday night, but that I was overwhelmed with business. I received it from his brother, Baron Atkyns, to whom I showed your letter, which he looked on as extremely civil and said he would so represent it to Sir Robert. One thing he desired might be represented to you as Sir Robert's request. It was that, as all prosecution against himself was to cease, so it might against his old friend, Sir John Knight. This request was limited to those suits and actions that were common to them both on the same account, I mean of Sir Robert's difference with the city. My answer was that my commission extended no farther than (i) to receive his resignation, (ii) to pay the money, wherein the Baron had no liberty of abatement, notwithstanding that Sir Robert had not earned what was due to him on the gaol delivery, (iii) to promise that on his Majesty's part there should be a nolle prosequi in all prosecutions had or to be had against Sir Robert. However, the Baron was earnest with me to lay this, his brother's request, before you and the worthy gentlemen that signed the late letter to me on this occasion.
Your other letter concerning Sir John Churchill I shall offer to his Majesty's consideration, before I answer it, only I must not conceal that I am very joyful you have so worthy a person in your eye. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 178.]
[Dec. ?] Margaret Aymes, Jane Stenes and Eleanor Sterman to the King. Petition, stating that, the petitioners' husbands being captives in Mackanesse [Mequinez ?] in Barbary and the King of Morocco's slaves, Sir James Leslie agreed for their redemption, but that now the said King will not release them without his Majesty's letter and that they have been there these five years, and praying his Majesty to think of some way to redeem them and to grant his letter to that effect. At the foot,
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Order in Council thereon that Secretary Jenkins prepare such a letter as is desired and that it be left in the hands of the Governor of Tangier to be sent to the Emperor of Morocco, when there shall be occasion. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 133.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Reference to Baron Gregory, who sat on the Crown side in the Northern circuit, of the petition of William Batley for a pardon on an indictment against him for hiring witnesses to invalidate the testimony of Baldron and Mowbray, sworn against him by them and found at the assizes in the city of York. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 225.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Deputy and the Council of Ireland of the petition of Gilbert Ormsby, setting forth that, his Majesty having granted the guardianship of his brother, Sir Edward Ormsby, to Dame Jane, his wife, the same will be ruinous to himself, his wife and several small children and therefore praying a reference to the Lord Lieutenant and Council to examine the truth of his allegations, with further order that all former directions in relation to the guardianship of the said Sir Edward Ormsby and the proceedings thereon be suspended, till the said report be made and his Majesty has signified his further pleasure thereon. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 225.]
Dec. 15. Leave to Capt. St. Lo to come to town from the Downs for four or five days about his private affairs. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 63, p. 56.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant, during pleasure, to William Yardley of the offices of Under-keeper of the Palace at Greenwich and of Underkeeper of the New House or White House there, near Greenwich Park, and of Surveyor and Keeper of the Gardens there with the keeping of the new-planted orchard, called the Dwarf Orchard, and of Keeper of the Wardrobe within the manor of Greenwich, with the yearly fees of 20l. for the office of Under-keeper of the said palace and of 13l. 6s. 8d. for the office of Under-keeper of the said White House and of 18l. 5s. for the said office of Keeper of the Gardens and the yearly sum of 113l. for the wages of the gardener, undergardener and mole-catcher and for weeding and providing tools, and for the office of Keeper of the said Wardrobe 8d. a day and 4d. a day for a servant and 3l. yearly for wood and coals for airing and better keeping the stuff in the said wardrobe, the said sums to be paid quarterly, the first payment to commence from Michaelmas last. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 174.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of Lieutenancy in London. Authorizing them to levy the tax for the militia, in the same terms as the letter of 6 March, 1679 [calendared in S.P. Dom., 1679–80, p. 97]. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 69, p. 15.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant of a baronetcy to George Dashwood of Hackney, Middlesex, and the heirs male of his body, with a discharge of all services or sums payable in lieu thereof in consideration of the said dignity. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 177.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting that Sir Samuel Morland has lately shown the King a plain proof by two several and distinct trials of a new invention of raising any quantity of water to any height by the help of fire alone, for a patent to him for 14 years of his said invention. [Ibid. p. 181.]
Dec. 16. Secretary Jenkins to Col. Thomas Coningsby. I have several letters from you with informations, but it was without your Christian name, quality, place of abode or address for my answers. Now, Capt. Price having this day favoured me with an address, I shall with the first conveniency give you an account of those informations. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 179.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift of the office of his Majesty's Historiographer in Scotland, vacant by the late decease of Dr. William Turner, to — Fall for his life, with a yearly pension of 40l. sterling, to be paid at Whitsunday and Mertinmes by equal portions, the first payment to be next Whitsunday. [2 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 473.]
Dec. 17,
7 p.m.
Lord Chief Justice Sir Francis North to Secretary Jenkins. Having been out of town, I returned but just now and immediately obeyed your commands in perusing the letter, which I ventured to alter in some things, which I could not think considerable, but that they demonstrate the offence to be a breach of trust in his office, from which he is to be removed. Noted, as received with the draft of a letter sent to the Lord Mayor about Sir John Shorter. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 134.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of Anne, widow and executrix of John, late Lord Frescheville, for payment of an arrear of 680l. on a pension to her husband of 152l. per annum, during the Queen's life, and that the growing pension may be duly paid for the future. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 226.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen of London. As the time for electing Common Council men draws nigh, recommending to them the putting in execution of the Act for regulating corporations, to the same effect as the letter of 17 Dec., 1679 [calendared in S.P. Dom., 1679–80, p. 312], and further informing them that he had directed commissions to be issued to the aldermen of the several wards for administering the oaths of Allegiance and Supremacy to such of the inhabitants as the said oaths ought to be administered to. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 178.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen of London. Being informed that Alderman Sir John Shorter stands convicted for having been found last July at an unlawful conventicle at Pinmakers' Hall, contrary to the late Act for suppressing such seditious meetings, with the execution of which an alderman is entrusted, and it being of notorious evil example to good subjects and an encouragement to evil doers that an open offender against the said laws should have so great a trust continued to him, recommending that proceedings be forthwith had against him in the Court of Aldermen to remove him from the place of alderman, if he may be so removed by the laws and by the usage of the City. [Ibid. p. 180.]
Dec. 18.
Windsor.
The Duke of York to the Prince of Orange. " I find by yours of the 22nd [n.s.], which I had yesterday at London, that Lord Shaftesbury was at Amsterdam and do easily believe that you will have nothing to do with such a kind of man as he, that is so very great an enemy to all our family in general as well as a particular one to me. I am told that many of the Fanatic party flock to him and no doubt to his power he will do his part to do what harm he can to us. We came from London this morning, where I do not know whether the Lord Chancellor were alive or dead, he being speechless last night. 'Tis believed that Lord Chief Justice North will succeed him, who is both able and bold as well as very loyal. We have had hitherto a very gentle winter and 'tis like to continue so. . . ." (Printed in Dalrymple, Memoirs of Great Britain and Ireland, Vol. II, Appendix, part i, p. 53.) [1¼ pages. Holograph. S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 3, No. 74.]
Dec. 19. The Bishop of London to Secretary Jenkins. Where the clergy are not taxed for church or poor or militia on consideration of their exemption for these secular affairs, it will look a little hard for them to intrude themselves, where they neither pay scot nor lot. However, I sent them last night to discourse with the Lord Mayor. More I could say and I hope you will so serve yourselves of the clergy to-day, as they may serve you to-morrow, for I must say it is the clergy that have preserved the City to the King. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 135.]
Dec. 19.
Bristol
Thomas Eston, Mayor, and six aldermen to Secretary Jenkins. We could not answer your letter, wherein we received the resignation of Sir Robert Atkyns, till this post, having no opportunity of meeting before, when, the Common Council being assembled, the resignation was recorded and Sir John Churchill nem. con. elected Recorder, which we hope will be to his Majesty's satisfaction, since he bears a character under his Royal Highness. We likewise answer the request of Baron Atkyns on behalf of Sir John Knight that, as we assured you we had no disrespect to Sir Robert further than as he disserved his Majesty and his Government here, so we have no more against Sir John and the other aldermen that joined with him in the same design and we offer it as our sense that this city can never be well settled, till Sir John and those aldermen be likewise displaced, the major part of the bench of aldermen as now being men related to and inclined to follow his dictates. Besides there lies a succession of at least seven men of the same temper to take the office of Mayoralty and consequently of aldermen, if there be no such exclusion, and we cannot but confess our weakness towards their removal, unless his Majesty direct our now Recorder to advise and join with us herein. [Ibid. No. 136.]
Dec. 19.
Amsterdam.
R[obert] F[erguson] to his wife. Thine of the 12th is come, which is all I have received since that of the 5th, and to my grief I understand by both that thy weakness continues, for, wert thou well, I should despise all that my enemies on that side are doing against me, for, as I have given no legal cause, so I am sure of the protection of this Government against their unjust wrath. 'Tis an argument they can find nothing in what I have done effectually to hurt me, seeing they are forced to charge The Second Part of the Growth of Popery and A Vindication of the Association on me, which I had no hand in nor knew anything of. I defy them to hurt me for other things, whereof I am accused, could I have a fair trial. However, I have peace in endeavouring to have done my duty, whatever punishment they think me worthy of on that score, nor do I doubt the day will come, when I shall be esteemed for it and they condemned for their foolish and malicious prosecution. When I reflect on my preservation from their rage hitherto, I look on it as an earnest that I shall live to triumph over all their indignation. Couldest thou but have that quietness in my absence that I have in being necessitated to it, I would not exchange my condition for ease and preferment, accompanied with a base neglect of my duty to God and the nation. Do not therefore by afflicting thyself afflict me more than either King or Council can. The person with whom I came hither treats me as his son as well as his friend, only I have been forced to buy two pair of sheets and to hire a bed, but all things else are provided. Since I began to write, I received a letter by a private hand of the 7th and thank thee for it and for thy care of our little concerns there. Give my true respects to Mr. Ive [?] for his many kindnesses. It is not the first time we have found him a friend in adversity, which is more than I reckon on from a brother. Tell my children that, as they behave in my absence, I shall retain for them the love and care of a father. Pray tender thyself more and want nothing that thy weak condition calls for. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 137.]
Dec. 20. Testimonial by Richard Hooke, rector, and Andrew Weston, curate, of St. George's, Southwark, that James Pringle, M.A.. has made laudable progress in the study of theology, has been known to them for the last three years, during which he has lived soberly and honestly, and that he holds nothing but what is in accordance with the doctrine and discipline of the Church of England. [Latin. Ibid. No. 138.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Mayor of Bristol. I am commissioned to tell you that the choosing of Sir John Churchill to be Recorder of Bristol will be very acceptable to his Majesty, yet he does not think fit at this time to write a letter in his behalf to the corporation, knowing what the true value of a nemine contradicente is, only he commands me to desire you and by your means to recommend it to all the loyal party to do your utmost that Sir John be chosen with the greatest possible reputation and solemnity, this being for his Majesty's service there and in the adjacent parts. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 180.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
The King to [the Lord Lieutenant]. Warrant, after reciting that some time ago Robert Fitzgerald was discharged from his command of a troop of horse in the standing army of Ireland and that the King has thought fit he should be restored on the first vacancy, for, on the first vacancy of the place of captain of a troop of horse in Ireland, conferring the same on him preferably to any other person, who may already have obtained letters or a grant in this behalf. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office 1, Vol. 11, p. 131.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting that, when the King was forced to retire into foreign parts, the eminent loyalty of Christopher, Lord Hatton of Kirby, and his faithful services to himself and his father moved him to honour him with the dignity of a viscount of England, in pursuance whereof a warrant was signed at St. Germain-enLaye 20 Sept., 1649, and that his son, Christopher, Lord Hatton, Governor of Guernsey, has always proceeded in his father's steps, in order to accomplish the foresaid royal purpose, for a grant of a viscountcy of England by the name of Viscount Hatton of Gretton, Northamptonshire, to the said Christopher, Lord Hatton, and the heirs male of his body. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 183.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant, on the surrender of a grant, dated 1 March, 1662, to Abel Daniell of the place of a falconer in ordinary, for a grant of the said place, during pleasure, to Thomas Daniell, his son, with a yearly fee of 44l., payable quarterly, the first payment to commence from Midsummer, 1676. [Ibid. p. 184.]
Dec. 21.
London.
Newsletter to John Squier, Newcastle. French letters of the 26th [n.s.] say that since the retirement of the several officers to their commands about Luxemburg orders are given for the army to be in readiness to have a general review taken of them next February, the King himself resolving to be at the head of 50,000 men, with which he will act on the river Saone, whilst the other two bodies of the like force shall be ready to march on the first orders. This gives occasion to the neighbouring princes to arm themselves, none knowing where the storm will fall. Most conjecture that the King with his forces will fall into Italy.
Yesterday his Majesty and Royal Highness returned to town. Last night there was a Council, where his Majesty gave the seal and mace to Lord Chief Justice North, but whether with the title of Lord Chancellor or Lord Keeper I cannot yet tell.
The Court of Aldermen, having received a letter from his Majesty intimating that Sir John Shorter, one of their members, stood convicted for going to unlawful conventicles and therefore ought to be suspended from sitting as alderman, appointed the Recorder and the Common Serjeant to examine the matter and report, which they did yesterday, and he is accordingly suspended.
Yesterday the Lord Mayor held a wardmoot in St. Magnus' Church for declaring an alderman for Bridge ward, where he declared the poll and said the choice fell on Mr. Deputy Daniell and Mr. Shute, both which were delivered to the Court of Aldermen, who accepted Mr. Daniell, and he was accordingly sworn.
The 18th the Content of Lyme arrived at that port in 45 days from Alicante, who speaks of the great losses the trading people of those parts have suffered by the Sallee rovers, who have taken many of their vessels, and that his Majesty's fleet under ViceAdmiral Herbert was at Leghorn taking in provisions. Other vessels arrived there speak of the badness of trade at Morlaix as to our manufactures and that there has been a great mortality by the spotted fever and smallpox.
To-day there has been a great trial of skill between both parties about the choice of Common Council men. How it will go in general is yet uncertain, but Sir Thomas Player, Col. Hatton and some others of that party in that ward are turned out.
Lord Chief Justice North is made only Lord Keeper. Who will succeed him is yet uncertain, but it is generally discoursed that it will be given either to the late Lord Chief Justice Scroggs or Sir George Jeffreys.
Two informers being brought before Sir Patience Ward last night for breaking open a Quaker's house, where an unlawful conventicle was held, were by him committed to Newgate, but, that prison being shut, they were kept in the Compter all night. [3 pages. Admiralty, Greenwich Hospital, News-letters, Original, 2, No. 64.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a patent creating Col. John Churchill Lord Churchill of Aymouth [Eyemouth], with remainder to the heirs male of his body. [2½ pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 475.]
Dec. 22.
Old Jewry.
Joseph Herne to Secretary Jenkins. Having made the best inquiry I could, I find that no sort of bullion, gold or silver, coined or uncoined, is permitted to be exported out of France and those that do it are subject to great penalties except for the East Indies, and that is granted by particular licences. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 139.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
The King to the Archbishop of Canterbury. Signifying his pleasure that he grant his dispensation to John, Bishop of Man and Sodor, to hold in commendam with the said bishopric the rectory of Prestwich and the prebend of Fridaythorp in York Cathedral, with licence of permutation of them for any other benefice or dignity of the like nature. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 83.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition, with the annexed papers, of Arthur Magenisse of Dromiller, co. Down, for a remittal of a rent of 25l. 2s. 2d. charged on his lands in Ireland by letters patent passed by surprise to Sir Hans Hamilton, with the arrears, and that he may be liable to pay only the ancient rent of 9l. per annum charged on his said lands. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 226.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the report, with the annexed petition, of the Lord Lieutenant, dated 4 Oct., on the reference to him of the Duke of Albemarle's petition [calendared in S.P. Dom., 1680–81, p. 539], which report is in the same terms, mutatis mutandis, as the report on John Myhill's petition [calendared ante, p. 499]. [1½ pages. Ibid. p. 227.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Dispensation to Anthony Rawlins, High Sheriff of Surrey, to be out of his county. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 182.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Capt. Walter Littleton to be captain, to Philip Monoux to be lieutenant and to William Cary to be cornet of the troop whereof Capt. Henry Slingsby was captain in the Earl of Oxford's regiment. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 164, p. 87.]
[Dec. 22-] 1683. Jan. 1.
Leyden.
John Vener and James Rich to Israel Hayes, English merchant, at Amsterdam. Yesterday honest Hart and Mr. Freeman stayed with us the whole day. They added two or three queries on Chudleigh and Carr and assure me from good hands there is no right understanding between the Prince of Orange and Chudleigh, of which pray tell my lord. I send the queries for brother Ferguson to look over and then send them to us. Our respects to his lordship, to our friend from Switzerland and to Sir William Waller. Do not forget to send us a sack of ducatoons. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 140.] Enclosed,
31 Queries from the Protestant coffee-house in Amsterdam to the Tory coffee-house in Rotterdam, some of which are:—Whether the King governs according to the law and his oaths taken at Breda and at his coronation and forces his wise and loyal Protestant subjects and counsellors, such as the Earls of Shaftesbury and Argyle, out of his realms and puts in their stead such pernicious counsellors as Halifax, Hyde, Conway and Jenkins; whether it is not a wonder the two brothers so long agree, they driving on two several designs, the one, having strong eyes, sees his brother's designs, yet will not see and the other, having no eyes at all, strives to see whether Monmouth and Richmond are not both in the King's heart, but dares not show it, fearing a French dish of chocolate; whether it had not been better for England, if Nan Hyde had given the dish of chocolate to her husband and not to Mrs. Denham; whether ever man read of such an ignorant Secretary of State as Conway, who is so fond of having heirs that he winks at his country lass being galanted from Lord Feversham to his clerk, Blathwayt; whether Seymour is not a proud fop to lose both King's and City's favour and hazard being hanged next Parliament and lose at present his stallion's place to Lady Conway and Harriet Hyde; whether the Prince of Orange has not great obligations to his two uncles in assisting the French King to rob him of Orange; whether Mulgrave was not as equal a match for the Lady Anne as Anne Hyde for the Duke of York; whether it will not be a scandal for an honest man to be a peer of England and whether the next House of Lords will not vote in the Papist lords again; whether Queen Elizabeth, if she saw how our King governs, would ever recommend the House of Stewart to be Kings of England; whether the time be not drawing near for a redemption from tyranny and Papist plots and that some bold Briton struck the first lucky stroke. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 140 i.]
A copy of the above letter. [Ibid. No. 141.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
The King to [the Lord Deputy]. Warrant for a grant to Edward Jones, Dean of Lismore, of the bishopric of Cloyne, void by the death of Patrick Sheridan, the late Bishop, with a grant to him of all profits and emoluments from the death of the late Bishop. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office 1, Vol. 11, p. 132.]
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
The King to [the Lord Deputy]. Warrant for the appointment of Serjeant John Lyndon to be a Justice of the Court of King's Bench in Ireland, during pleasure, in the place of Oliver Jones, deceased. [Ibid.]
[Dec. ?] Jeremy Fisher to the King. Petition for a patent for 14 years for his invention of an engine to saw wood, timber and boards.
At the foot,
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney-General. On the back, His report in favour of granting the patent. 12 Jan., 1683. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 142.]
Dec. 23. Stephen Willoughby to all charitable Christians, particularly to such as are or intend to be in Holy Orders. When I was ordained priest 7 March, 1679[–80], the Bishop of Lincoln gave me North Willingham, a living in Lincolnshire. I was forced to borrow for institution and induction. The benefice is only 16l. per annum, which could not give subsistence to me and my family and has reduced me to poverty. All this I made known to the Bishop of Lincoln at his lodging in Pall Mall more than five weeks ago, who promised to annex two small livings to the other. I sealed the grant I had of him, but his servants, understanding I had no moneys to pay for institution, would not admit me to his presence, putting me off from day to day, while I had not a penny in my pocket, nay, I sold my mare and saddle and bridle and stripped myself of all comforts and, being indebted to some, I dare not return to my own country. What makes my condition worse is my fear that the cries of my poor babe and the sorrows of her mother may be great for want of food and raiment. Now I, being a poor son of the Church, beseech you to give me some encouragement to vindicate that reverend employment of a holy priesthood from all unjust aspersions that may be raised not only against me by reason of my poverty but all my function, while I beg with shame. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 143.]
Dec. 23.
Gray's Inn.
James Harris to Secretary Jenkins. The bearer, Mr. Hastings Pitt, son of a divine in Dorset, subscribed with Mr. William Ashlocke the information enclosed in my letter to you of Friday sennight. He was importunate to be the bearer hereof to you that he might be satisfied that the said letter and information came to you. If you judge it meet to examine him on the said information and what else he can depose against the parties, you will find abundantly more than I was willing to write. If Sir Thomas Putt by his instruments, Mr. Seymour, Mr. Knott or others, has aspersed to you my life and conversation, if you vouchsafe me the import thereof, I will acquit myself suitable to a Christian Protestant loyalist. [Ibid. No. 144.]
Dec. 23.
The Gatehouse.
David Fitzgerald to the Earl of Rochester. Conceiving that the 40s. a week I have received from Mr. Squibb was by your directions, I thought myself obliged to return my humble thanks for that and all other favours. Though in my confinement I find but little pleasure, yet anything of gratuity or immediate supply is some comfort. If his Majesty were in extremity and unable to repay what I have expended to promote his interest, I would conclude it were better that I and thousands besides me should be imprisoned on the said account than that he should be in the least importuned. As I have reason to hope there is no such necessity, so I hope you will consider my condition and propose some way for my enlargement.
As for the account I delivered to Secretary Jenkins I leave it to Mr. Maryatt and, if he does not aver the particulars therein to be justly due to me, I will take content in perpetual imprisonment, but, if he satisfies you therein and says it is my just due, I hope you will the more commiserate my condition and, as my continuance here will contract more charges and troubles on me daily, I beg you to consider what imprisonment and enlargement is. [Ibid. No. 145.]
Dec. 23.
Bath.
S— H— to [the Bishop of Bath and Wells]. Our curate, Mr. White, told me he found Robert Webb of this place, who belongs to the law, holding forth to a parcel of apron men in a public house and that he said, For my part I am for the liberty of the people against the prerogative. It is not fit the prerogative and so great power should be in the Crown. The late House of Commons did very well in denying to give the King any money and forbidding the loan of any, for how many millions of the people's money hath he spent in riot and debauchery ? Several others heard this and I am told he has since been at the same kind of talk. These things are of very mischievous consequence in this corporation. Though I had rather some other had informed you against this man, he being of the same profession with me, yet, when I hear the government and governors in such a manner daily traduced, I cannot be silent. I have no prejudice either as to his person or profession. All I desire is your favourable opinion of what I have done. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 146.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for inserting in the next general pardon for poor convicts in Newgate and in the clause for transportation Mary Gilbert [as to whom see ante, p. 555]. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 54, p. 148.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Capt. St. Lo. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that he have leave to stay in town till the end of the month. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 63, p. 57.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Sir John Berry. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that he may signify the same to Sir John Wyburne, commander of the Happy Return, and to the captains of the rest of the ships under his command that they receive on board their ships such ammunition and stores for Tangier as shall be sent on board them out of the Ordnance Office. [Ibid.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Earl of Shrewsbury. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that he add Sir Charles Scrimshaw and Robert Leveson to the number of his deputy lieutenants for Staffordshire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 180.]
Dec. 23.
Castle Elizabeth.
Sir John Lanier to Secretary Jenkins. Not having any of yours this great while makes me fear my letters miscarry. Not long since the French customers on the coast of Normandy seized the moneys belonging to the stocking merchants of this island for return of their goods, which very much surprises all the inhabitants, for, if not allowed, it will be of great damage to them, for hitherto it has always been winked at in France and, if once debarred, we shall be forced to use the same rigour to the French merchants, which will break all trade and be of great prejudice to this island, that subsists for the most part by the vent of their stockings to the French. I have written to Lord Preston by the persons concerned, who are gone to Paris. According to what they act on the French coast I will take the best measures I can and give you notice. Our new powder tower now building is almost finished and the rest of our repairs both here and in St. Aubin's fort will be all done before the end of January, after which I hope the King will grant me leave to go for London. [S.P. Channel Islands 1, No. 124.]
Dec. 25.
Amsterdam.
R[obert] F[erguson] to his wife. (Printed in Ferguson, Ferguson the Plotter, p. 96.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 147.]
Dec. 25.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Aberdeen, Chancellor, and the rest of the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant, after reciting that he had thought fit to reduce 100 soldiers (10 out of every company) out of the regiment of Guard and as many out of the Earl of Mar's regiment, as also 9 horsemen out of each of the three (late independent) troops of horse, in order to the raising of a new troop to be added to the other three and all four to be formed into a regiment of horse, whereof John Graham of Claverhouse has been appointed colonel, authorizing and requiring them to issue the necessary orders to the Lieut.-General and Commander-in-Chief of the forces for such reduction of the said men and horsemen, whose daily allowance in the former establishment has been ordered to be converted into a fund towards the pay of the said new troop, to consist of 50 horsemen, besides officers. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 478.]
Dec. 25.
Whitehall.
The King to the Marquess of Queensberry, Treasurer Principal, and John Drummond of Lundin, Treasurer Deput. Warrant, after reciting the last warrant, authorizing them to convert the daily allowance of the said reduced men in the former establishment into a fund towards the pay of the said new troop. [Ibid. p. 479.] Enclosed,
Establishment for the pay of the said new troop, whereof the Earl of Balcarres is to be captain, viz., to the captain 10s. and 2 horses at 2s. each, 14s.; to the lieutenant 6s. and 2 horses at 2s. each, 10s.; to the cornet 5s. and 2 horses at 2s. each, 9s.; to the quartermaster 4s. and one horse at 2s., 6s.; 3 corporals, each 3s., 9s.; 2 trumpets, each 2s. 6d., 5s.; 50 horsemen, each 1s. 8d., 4l. 3s. 4d., extending in the whole to 6l. 16s. 4d. sterling per diem. 25 Dec. Whitehall. [Ibid. p. 480.]
Dec. 25.
Whitehall.
Commissions to John Graham of Claverhouse to be colonel of the new-formed regiment of horse and captain of a troop therein and to — Bruce of Earlshall to be capt.-lieutenant, to William Graham to be cornet and to David Graham to be quartermaster of the said John Graham of Claverhouse's troop in the said regiment. [Ibid. pp. 481–484.]
Dec. 26.
[Received.]
Five aldermen and three others of Stamford to the Hon. Charles Bertie. The Earl of Exeter, as Recorder of the borough, giving the nomination of a deputy to the corporation, on 14 Dec. the Mayor called a Common Hall, where we expected a free choice, but had only Mr. Henry Fane imposed by him on us, where himself, divers aldermen and the major part of the capital burgesses were by some active men persuaded to give their votes for him. This election being since returned to the Lord Recorder for his approbation, we are informed divers exceptions were offered against him by persons of honour and loyalty and he is therefore said to be refused by my lord as his deputy, whereon he has procured a certificate from the Mayor, many of the aldermen and the greater part of the capital burgesses (on surprise) in his vindication to Lord Exeter.
We therefore did at the election utterly detest the choice, not believing him qualified for that place, and still persevere therein, begging you to take the speediest opportunity to represent this to his Majesty or the Secretaries of State, we having been always as ready for signing an Abhorrence, which by most corporations has been tendered to his Majesty, but to our shame by our society obstructed. Noted, as received from Mr. Bertie, 26 Dec. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 148.]
Dec. 26.
Amsterdam.
[Robert Ferguson] to his wife. (Printed in Ferguson, Ferguson the Plotter, p. 97.) [Ibid. No. 149.]
Dec. 26.
London.
The Duke of York to the Prince of Orange. (Printed in Dalrymple, Memoirs of Great Britain and Ireland, Vol. II, Appendix, part i, p. 46.) [1¼ pages. Holograph. S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 3, No. 75.]
Dec. 26.
Whitehall.
Commissions to William, Lord Ross, to be captain of a troop in John Graham of Claverhouse's regiment and to Sir Mark Carse to be lieutenant, to Sir Adam Blair of Carberry to be cornet and to David Home of Woolstruther to be quartermaster of the said troop. With note that the last commission was afterwards recalled and another given to John Cleland in Jan., 1683. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, pp. 485–488.]
Dec. 27. The information of Jane Wilson and Anne Martin, her servant, of the Globe tavern, Brooke Street, Holborn. On Saturday, 16 Dec., James Pelling of St. Andrew's, Holborn, joiner, forced himself into the company of a Mr. Gaudin and another gentleman at the Globe tavern and the said Gaudin drank to the said Pelling his Majesty's health, to which he replied that he would not drink it, for the King was a fool, and Anne Martin heard Gaudin own he heard the said words spoken by Pelling. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 150.]
Dec. 27.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Adam Urquhart of Meldrum to be captain of a troop in John Graham of Claverhouse's regiment and to Sir Francis Ruthven to be lieutenant, to — to be cornet and to — to be quartermaster of the said troop. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, pp. 489–492.]
Dec. 28.
Marsh Maund, Herefordshire.
Col. Thomas Coningsby to [Secretary Jenkins]. I received yours of the 16th, which satisfied me that you had received my letters with the enclosed informations. I was fearful that against Gorges had miscarried. I received your answer and directions to proceed. I gave you notice he was to be in London, but he is lately come into these parts. He has understood something of an information against him, but knows not the substance of it. He has endeavoured to undermine me to understand what the words in the information are, but he shall never prevail nor shall he know what witnesses I intend to produce, if it be the pleasure of his Majesty or his Royal Highness, but I would desire it may be secretly carried, for Mr. Colt, having notice of a suit against him by his Royal Highness, absents himself and is sometimes in one county and then in another, but I suppose this may be prevented by having writs for several counties. If you acquaint me with what is intended against Gorges, it shall be my whole endeavour to have him seized. I can easily do it or have it done by my agents. I never heard of such vile language in my life. If it pass unpunished, it will be too great encouragement to such rebellious people as he associates with, who are all enemies to the King and Government. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 151.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Robert Steevens, messenger for the Press, to search for two volumes in quarto, lately printed in Italian under the title of Del Teatro Britanico, &c., containing many things very false and dishonourable to the Government as well as injurious to particular persons, as also for the original manuscripts and all copies, written or printed, thereof, and to seize them and keep them in safe custody, to prevent the dispersing of them, till he be acquainted with his Majesty's further pleasure therein or be otherwise directed by the courts of justice. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 54, p. 146.]
Dec. 28.
London.
Newsletter to John Squier, Newcastle. I wrote that the Lark was driven on the sands and of several seamen endeavouring to get her off. Our last letters say she is got off and now mending.
Yesterday the Duke of Grafton ran a foot race with Lord Thanet for 100 guineas each in St. James' Park, where their Majesties and Royal Highnesses were spectators. The Duke won by at least a quarter of a mile, though he gave as much odds.
Letters from the Hague of 2 Jan. [n.s.] say that the Prince of Orange has conferences very often with the ministers of the Empire, Spain and Sweden and proffers very considerable, if they will not consent to a peace with France, offering to raise 14,000 men and keep them on his own charge for the common good of the States and the whole Empire. The States have not as yet agreed to it, but have adjourned to the 5th.
Letters from Paris of the 2nd say that everyone there is in expectation what proceedings will be taken after the 15th, being the last day that King has given to the Emperor and Spaniard for their positive answer, after which day he is absolutely resolved not to have any further treaty with them, since the Spaniard has refused to accept the King of England's arbitration, whilst affairs are now almost come to an issue. The general discourse is of a war, yet some doubt it, in regard there is no certainty whether the Emperor will be able to procure a peace with the Turk, without which it will be impossible for him to manage war against both, the French King being very well provided, if things come to extremity, having three great armies on foot for executing any design he shall undertake, one being towards Savoy, the second in Lorraine and the third on the frontiers of Germany.
Our Dutch letters add that by the time the States meet again they expect what answer the King of Great Britain will give to their resolutions on the two memorials lately presented to them by Mr. Chudleigh, his envoy extraordinary, as also to conclude about equipping 24 men-of-war against the spring, the deputies of the Colleges of the Admiralty being there for that purpose.
Most of the polls not decided last week for Common Council men are now ended much as was before, but at Faringdon Within 4 loyal men put in. Those of Bishopsgate apply to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen to have reason shown why those without the gate should poll for officers within the gate. These holidays little home news stirring. [3 pages. Admiralty, Greenwich Hospital, News-letters, Original, 2, No. 65.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
Commissions to the Earl of Balcarres to be captain of the new troop to be added to John Graham of Claverhouse's regiment and to — Bruce of Clackmannan to be lieutenant, to Sir James Douglas of Kelhead to be cornet and to John Lindsay to be quartermaster of the said troop. With note that the commission to Sir James Douglas was afterwards recalled and another given to James Fletcher in Jan., 1683. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, pp. 493–496.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
Directions concerning the rank and precedency of the regiments, troops, companies and officers in Scotland. 1. The colonel of the Foot Guard to be always the first foot colonel and the regiment the first foot regiment, all other regiments or companies to take rank according to their standing.
2. All officers as well of horse as foot to take rank according to their regiment or troop, either when they march with their colours or when they are commanded out on parties.
3. The captain of the Guards of Horse to take rank as eldest colonel of horse, the lieutenant as eldest lieut.-colonel of horse, the under-lieutenant as eldest major of horse, the cornet as eldest captain of horse, the quartermaster as eldest lieutenant of horse and the brigadiers as youngest lieutenants of horse, the said troop to take always precedency of all other troops or regiments of horse.
4. As to the rank betwixt Horse and Foot all colonels of horse to command all colonels of foot and all lieut.-colonels of horse to command all lieut.-colonels of foot in the field and so downwards and all colonels of foot to command all colonels of horse and all lieut.-colonels of foot to command all lieut.-colonels of horse in garrison and so downwards, but on no pretext whatever an officer of an inferior commission can command one of a superior and in all councils of war their ranks shall be according to their command.
5. All officers of dragoons to receive command everywhere from any officer either of horse or foot of equal commission with themselves.
6. All officers under the condition of a general during their being in any garrison to obey the governor or deputy-governor thereof.
7. The eldest colonel on all occasions to command and, when none shall be on the place, the eldest lieut.-colonel and so downwards.
8. After this determination no officer to take any rank but according to this signification of our pleasure. With orders to General Thomas Dalyell, Lieut.-General and Commander-in-Chief of the forces in Scotland, to communicate the above to the various colonels and governors, &c. of garrisons, to be communicated by them to the officers under their command. [2 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 497.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
Instructions to the governors, &c. in any of the garrisons, castles or forts in Scotland for the prevention of any unnecessary waste or expense of powder, shot, &c. 1. That no commander, captain or officer cause or suffer any expense or waste of powder or shot in such castles, &c. otherwise than in fight with an enemy or for staying any vessel or for defence of any of our ships or of those of our subjects, friends or allies.
2. That no commander, &c. shall on salute from any ship discharge in answer above 3 or 5 pieces at most, those to be always of the lesser sort of ordnance, nor any at all on the arrival or departure of any person under the degree of the High Commissioner, an Admiral of a fleet or a General of an army nor on any festival entertainment whatever except on 29 May, the King's birthday, and 5 Aug., the day of Gowrie's conspiracy.
3. That no commander, &c. shall use or suffer to be used to his own private use or that of any person whatever any of the provisions or emptions of whatever kind within his charge.
4. That no commander, &c. shall dispose of any decayed or unserviceable ordnance, carriages or other stores, but that the same be accounted for to the Master of the Ordnance.
5. That every commander, &c. keep an exact journal of all guns by him fired, with the number and nature of those fired, the day and the occasion, and likewise the expense of each collar of bandoliers delivered out or expended in watch or exercise of men and of all other stores used or expended, and every 6 months return to the Master of the Ordnance the account of every monthly receipt, expense or remain of stores.
6. That they be obliged monthly to make a survey of and call out all those entrusted to account for the expense of all stores under their charge and monthly to sign the same and not on such account allow of any wasteful expense contrary to the foregoing rules, and, in case any arms or any durable provisions shall be wanting, impaired or ill-kept, that they cause the said persons or such as have the keeping of them to make them good or else be liable themselves to make satisfaction for the same, unless it appear they were impaired by time without their default.
7. That no commander, &c. issue out of any of the said castles, &c. to the disfurnishing thereof any powder or other serviceable stores on any pretended service whatever without an express warrant from the King, the High Commissioner, the Privy Council or the Lord High Admiral and the signification of the Master of the Ordnance grounded on the said warrant and, if any commander, &c. shall receive a supply from any other than the Master of the Ordnance, he give his receipt to the person, from whom he shall receive it, and forthwith advise the Master of the Ordnance of the quantity and quality of the stores, &c. received, with the places and persons from whom, and cause the same to be entered in the Gunner's Journal and charged upon account.
8. That no commander, &c. shall receive any supply for his castle, &c., till he have accounted of the expense of his stores formerly delivered to him by indenture or otherwise received or till the remain thereof be taken by order of the Master of the Ordnance, that so the same with the supply may be duly charged to him again and, in case of the death or removal of any governor, &c., timely notice thereof is to be given to the Master of the Ordnance that a remain may be taken of all ordnance, powder, &c. in any of the garrisons, &c. at the time of the death or removal of any governor, &c., as aforesaid, and that the same may be immediately charged on the succeeding governor, &c.
9. That, in case any commander, &c. be found faulty or short in their accounts, they are not to have any discharge or allowance from the Master of the Ordnance, but he is immediately to satisfy the Privy Council of their names and of the defects and faults in their accounts that such requisite course may be taken for punishment or reformation.
Ordering Lieut.-General William Drummond, Master of the Ordnance, to communicate these orders and instructions to the several governors, &c. of the castles, &c. [3½ pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 499.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
The King to Lieut.-General William Drummond, Master of the Ordnance. Warrant for taking a particular survey of all the castles, forts and garrisons. [Ibid. p. 502.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Aberdeen, Chancellor, and the Marquess of Queensberry, Treasurer. Being informed that Lord Angus is in a private place within some miles of London and having a more than ordinary concern in his education both on account of his immediate descent from the most loyal and ancient family of Douglas and of our earnest desire that, in case of his living to represent it, he may not in his younger years be corrupted with ill principles, we authorize and require you jointly to speak with his father, the Marquess of Douglas, and to know from him to whose care he has committed his son's education at so great a distance from all his relations, to the end that, if we shall not have reason to be therewith satisfied, we may order a better course to be taken in reference to his breeding, and also to call for from the said Marquess and transmit to us an account of the present condition of his estate, particularly of the debts wherewith it stands affected and of the true extent of his yearly rent, both real and casual, as also the courses, if any, set down for the discharge of those debts, wherein you are to take the assistance of some of the nearest relations of that family, for we have so great a regard not only to the standing thereof but also to its continuance in a splendid and plentiful condition that we cannot but highly concern ourself in the right management of their fortune, wherein, as well as in that of Lord Angus' education, we will signify our further pleasure after our receiving an account from you and your opinion of what is fit to be ordered thereon. [1¼ pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 503.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Alexander Bannerman of Elsick and the heirs male of his body of the dignity of a knight baronet. [1½ pages. Ibid. p. 505.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to James Nasmith of Posso, during pleasure, of the office of Master Falconer and Keeper and Provider of his Majesty's Hawks of all sorts in Scotland, with a yearly pension of 100l. sterling, whereof 80l. is to be paid him yearly out of the rents and revenues of Scotland and the remaining 20l. out of Orkney, as the same has been in use formerly to be uplifted by the King's falconers, to be paid at Whitsunday and Mertinmes by equal portions, the first payment to be next Whitsunday, out of which he is obliged to pay the fees of all under-falconers and servants and to furnish hawks for the King yearly. [2½ pages. Ibid. p. 506.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
Commission to James Murray to be lieutenant of Sir James Turner's company in the regiment of dragoons in Scotland, whereof Lieut.-General Dalyell is colonel and the said Sir James Turner major. [Ibid. p. 509.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to Roderick Davidson, servant to Sir George Mackenzie of Tarbat, Clerk Register, of the office of one of the four ordinary Macers before the Lords of Council and Session, now in his Majesty's gift through Alexander Maitland, late macer, being declared incapable of any public trust in Scotland or by the nullity of any pretended gift or reversion of the said place granted to Charles Maitland, his son, with the yearly fee of 10l. sterling out of the revenue. [2¼ pages. Ibid. p. 510.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a patent creating Sir George Kinnaird of Rossie Lord Kinnaird of Inchstuir [Inchture], with remainder to the heirs male of his body. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 512.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to John Taylor of St. Martin's in the Fields, Middlesex, of the tenement pertaining to Isobell Hunter, relict of [John ?] Thomson, tailor, burgess of Edinburgh, lying in the burgh of Edinburgh on the north side of the King's High Street at the head of the old Provost's Close, with all other lands and goods, heretable and movable, which belonged to her and now pertain to his Majesty as last heir. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 513.]
Dec. 29.
Amsterdam.
[Robert Ferguson] to his wife. (Printed in Ferguson, Ferguson the Plotter, p. 98.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 152.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Robert Wadman in fee simple of a yearly fair, to be held at Countess Court Fields or Countess Court Downs in the parish of Great Amesbury, Wiltshire, on 25 and 26 Sept., it having been found by inquisition that such grant will be no damage to the Crown or others or any other neighbouring fair. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 186.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Aberdeen, Chancellor, and the rest of the Privy Council. Warrant for admitting Sir John Lockhart of Castlehill, a Senator of the College of Justice, to be one of their number. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 513.]
Dec. 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Edward Griffin, Treasurer of the Chamber, for payment of 12l. to Gideon Royer, his Majesty's Writer, Flourisher and Embellisher, for writing, flourishing and embellishing one large skin of vellum with all the King's arms, ornaments and badges, very richly gilded and written partly in gold, as also for writing and gilding the superscription with gilded labels, being a large letter sent to the Emperor of Fez and Morocco. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 50, p. 95.]
Dec. 30.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Duke of Newcastle. As soon as I received your letter, I laid it with that of Mr. Wray before his Majesty. He was exceeding sensible of what was represented and commanded me to present it again to him, when some of the Lords of the Council should wait on him. This has not happened either last night or this night. By the next post I hope to give you a further account of this matter. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 181.]
Dec. 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Lord Dartmouth, Master General of the Ordnance, for the delivery of 3½ barrels of powder to — Hills in lieu of those, which it appears by the certificates of the Duke of Albemarle and the Earl of Craven were delivered by him and expended in the late fire at Wapping. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 164, p. 87.]
Dec. 30.
London.
Newsletter to Roger Garstell, Newcastle. Edinburgh letters of the 23rd say that Alexander Hume of Hume Castle was taken and tried there for commanding a troop of horse in that rebellion and for taking away horses from several gentlemen and employing them in that service. The proof was plain and he was convicted and proclaimed traitor and sentenced to have his arms reversed and broken before his face and he to be executed as yesterday.
The choice of Common Council men is now almost over and those who pretend to have made a scrutiny into the several wards say that the loyal party have much the better of it. According to the adjournment of the wardmoot of Bishopsgate, where Deputy Langhorne and Mr. Scute, Common Council men for the last year, stood again, they met last Thursday and went on with the poll, when the Whigs boasted they should be able to turn them out. Sir Jonathan Raymond, alderman for the Ward, after continuing the poll for some time adjourned it till 24 January.
Our East India Company have fixed up a paper declaring they will pay no money they have upon interest till 25 March next and then they will pay not only the principal but the interest and allow 5 per cent., though their bonds oblige them to give but 4.
The creditors of the Queen of Bohemia have delivered a memorial to the States of Holland desiring that, since Prince Rupert is dead, who had all her jewels, they would [intercede ?] with his Majesty to pay them their money. The States have sent a copy of it to their Ambassador here to present to his Majesty. The King of Sweden is very inclinable to a war and has an army of above 60,000 men ready to take the field.
The wits in Holland are at work, some in praise and some in dispraise of the Earl of Shaftesbury, but a person is writing a libel on him of 20 heads. The particular heads you shall have next post, and a copy of the libel, as soon as it comes from Holland.
Letters from Deal of the 29th speak of very great storms in the Downs. Several ships that went out with a southerly wind were by its change to N.W. driven back and into Dover Road. The Biscay Merchant of London was driven this morning out of Margaret Road on shore near Sandwich Bay, laden with piece goods and very rich. At the coming away of our letters she was not broken to pieces, but there were hopes, if the wind ceased, to save her. [3 pages. Admiralty, Greenwich Hospital, News-letters, Original, 2, No. 66.]
Dec. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the Marquess of Queensberry, Treasurer Principal, and John Drummond of Lundin, Treasurer Deput. Warrant, after reciting that the granting of exemptions to the Lords of Session and others from paying their proportions of the taxations and supplies granted by Parliaments and conventions has proved very prejudicial to the King's service, for taking care that all orders formerly granted for that effect be hereafter rendered ineffectual as to what yet remains unpaid and that the Senators of the College of Justice pay their proportion for the last term of the current supply ending next Whitsunday and that neither they nor any other persons liable to the payment of the new supply, whereof the first term is to commence at Mertinmes, 1683, be exempt from their just proportion of the same. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 514.]
Dec. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Aberdeen, Chancellor, Sir David Falconer of Newtoun, President, and the remanent Senators of the College of Justice. After reciting the last letter, informing them that such discharge of exemptions was so far from ordered out of any unkindness to them that, being sensible of the meanness of their salaries, he is resolved at the next meeting of the Parliament to recommend to his brother, the High Commissioner, to take care that something be done to make up any loss they may sustain by the discharge of such exemptions. [1¼ pages. Ibid. p. 515.]
Dec. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Perth, Justice General, Richard, Lord Maitland, Justice Clerk, and the remanent Lords of Justiciary. Being informed of late that such as are to be witnesses, being to be given in list to panels, are often practised, after their names are known, by the late regulations, so that it cannot be clear who will be proving witnesses, whereby the most guilty may escape, and thinking it most secure for our people to trust the previous examinations of witnesses either before or after citation to you, who of all others are the most unsuspected and indifferent, we therefore recommend to you that, if the Privy Council shall find it necessary previously to examine any, who are to be adduced witnesses, you will examine them on oath accordingly, so that our Advocate may be secure how to manage such processes. (Printed in Wodrow, Vol. III, p. 448.) [Ibid. p. 517.]
Dec. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Aberdeen, Chancellor, and the rest of the Privy Council. Warrant for admitting John Wedderburn of Gosford to be one of their number. [Ibid. p. 518.]
[Dec.] Secretary Jenkins to the Bishop of London. His Majesty, being informed that there is a vacancy of a minister's place in the French Church at London, signifies his pleasure that you should send for the elders and principal members of that congregation and recommend to them the Sieur Piozette to succeed, his Majesty being assured from good hands that he has not only approved himself an able and painful man in his function but also that he is of good affection to his Majesty and the present Government. He desires you to take care that this be done with effect and that no other pretender be admitted to fill that vacancy, for he looks on himself as concerned that foreigners, who have a liberty of using a way of public worship and discipline not altogether conform to what is established here by law, be by their ministers well principled in the duty of obedience they owe to the Government they live under and be particularly instructed that no pretence of liberty to use foreign forms and discipline might carry them to uncharitable censures of us and separations from us, which cannot be without great prejudice not only to the Reformed religion but also to the public peace. [See ante, p. 564.] [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 84.]
[Dec.] Christopher Billopp to the King. Petition for his release on bail. Passing over Covent Garden 24 Nov., when Mr. Glover and Mr. Leslie assaulted one another, he endeavoured to part them. Leslie wounding Glover, he and the petitioner were carried to the Roundhouse and then before a Justice, when the petitioner was set at liberty, nothing appearing against him. He appeared 6 Dec. instant as an evidence concerning Glover's death, endeavours being used to make him a party. The Lord Chief Justice commanded him to be committed to prison, but afterwards cleared him. Since which day, being 13 Dec. instant, he was seized and conveyed to Newgate as indicted for Glover's murder. He never had any acquaintance nor so much as exchanged a word with Glover or Leslie, before he endeavoured to part them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 153.]
[Dec. ?] Memorandum signed by John Eresby and Samuel Astie, notary public, about the convicting of Quakers for being at conventicles on Tuesday, 10 Oct., and Tuesday, 5 Dec., 1682, in Lewes before Mr. Shelley.
About the beginning of November John Eresby, clerk, and Samuel Astie went to the house of Henry Shelley, a Justice of Sussex, and he took their oaths in order to the conviction of the former conventicle and they desired of him a warrant according to the Act. He told them he could not grant it, till the parties convicted were summoned before him to show cause why it should not issue, and drew the annexed note [calendared ante, p. 526], which he signed and sealed, and told Astie to deliver a copy of it to each party concerned. Some of them appearing and others not and the rest being not cited, they requested a warrant the second time about 7 Nov., which he said he could not do, till he came from London, and also told them they must produce a neighbour or two to make oath that Jane Kidder inhabited the conventicle house, though they had formerly made oath that she had lived there two years. When Mr. Shelley came from London about 5 Dec., he was satisfied as to the house being possessed by her. They also at that time required a warrant for the former conventicle, which he denied to grant, till the preacher and the rest not cited were summoned. They insisted for a warrant more earnestly than formerly, insomuch that he gave them ill language and reproached Mr. Eresby with reading a few prayers and a homily and dismissing the people.
The 6th they found him not at home, but at last found him in Lewes, where they gave him a conviction drawn by Astie against the second conventicle and offered themselves ready to swear it and tendered him a warrant for 6 months' imprisonment of Newton, a conventicle preacher, who then lived within half a mile of Lewes and who formerly preached at St. Mary Westout in Lewes as rector there. They also desired a warrant on the first conviction, which had been so long denied. He told them he would do nothing that night, that he was not bound to know of Newton being rector or preacher there without subscription, &c., except proof was made of it, though he formerly confessed to Eresby that he knew of it.
The 7th they went to Mr. Shelley's and after an hour's waiting he told them he thought it hard they should lay all the burden on his shoulders. Then he took their oaths in order to the second conviction and told them they should have the warrant on the first conviction on the morrow. On the 8th Astie desired a warrant according to promise, which Mr. Shelley put off till the next day, when Astie went twice in the morning to Mr. Shelley's for it, which he deferred till 2 in the afternoon, when he delivered to Eresby and Astie a warrant on the first conviction, but refused to grant one on the second, till the parties were summoned.
On the 14th they went to Mr. Shelley for a warrant on the second conviction. He asked whether they had had notice and, being assured that some of them had, he could not be satisfied, for it was all insignificant, except (as he told them) the parties concerned were summoned by him, and till then he neither could nor would grant it. They both insisted for a warrant, but he told them he would not be a journeyman for idle fellows.
By Mr. Shelley's delays Henry Agates of Cuckfield made over his goods, so that only 3 or 4 pounds are returned into the Justices' hands out of 60l. imposed on Agates. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 154.]
[Dec. ?] John James Gaches, student of Christ Church, to the King. Petition for a recommendation to the Commissioners [for Ecclesiastical Preferments] for Therfield, a living in Hertfordshire, now vacant and in his Majesty's gift. Was ordered to attend the Earl of Rochester, who told him that, if he would bring a testimonial from the Bishop of Oxford, he would help him to a preferment. He has brought one not only of the Bishop but also of several eminent divines and nobles. (John Standish was appointed to Therfield in Feb., 1683.) [Ibid. No. 155.]
[Dec. ?] Warrant to Thomas Atterbury to search, apprehend and bring before Secretary Jenkins to answer to what shall be objected against him — Cr[eagh ?], a Popish priest, a native of Ireland, of whom information has been given that he is at present in or about London and who is suspected to be carrying on dangerous correspondences and other practices against the Government, and also to search his person and lodgings for all books and papers containing matters of sedition or of dangerous consequence and seize them and seal them up before witnesses and bring them to Secretary Jenkins. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 54, p. 147.]
[Dec. ?] Commission to Richard Flower to be ensign to Capt. Hugh Sutherland in the first regiment of Foot Guards. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 69, p. 17.]
[Dec. ?] The account of Sir Clement Armiger, to be delivered to Secretary Jenkins, of money received from Hackney on 15, 18, and 19 Dec., amounting to 70l. 5s. 4d. less 14l. 6s. 1d. for charges, leaving 55l. 19s. 3d., which was paid to Capt. John Hilton in 4 payments on 22, 23, 25 and 28 Dec. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 156.]
Memorandum by W[illiamson] that these bundles contain the extracts of the intelligence, received 1666, concerning the preparations, state and motions of the Dutch fleet and the advices from time to time on that subject to the two generals then in the fleet, Prince Rupert and the Duke of Albemarle, and served most fortunately to justify Lord Arlington, when the House of Commons were about to destroy him, as if the separation of the two fleets and the ill consequences of it had happened for want of intelligence in him, &c. [Ibid. No. 157.]
Note that Richard Vickris, merchant of Bristol, is indicted on the statute of 35 Elizabeth to put him on abjuring the realm on pain of death, for, if he refuses, he is to be adjudged a felon without benefit of clergy. His conscience, however, does not allow him to swear at all. [Ibid. No. 158.]
The names of the officers of the militia of Lancashire and Cheshire under the command of the Earl of Derby. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 159.]
The names of the Dissenters of the parish of St. Botolph's, Aldersgate. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 160.]
London. "England's Interest or the Great benefit to Trade by Banks or Offices of Credit in London, &c., As it hath been Considered and Agreed upon by a Committee of Aldermen and Commons, thereunto Appointed, by the Right Honourable, the Lord Mayor, Aldermen and Commons, in Common Council assembled. Being a Brief Account of the Management, Nature, Use and Advantages of the said Offices, &c." [8 pages. Printed by John Gain. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case G.]
London. Table of the rates of Insurance of the Insurance Office at the back-side of the Royal Exchange and of the ground rents settled for the security of the insured, with the names of the Trustees and of the counsel, who approved the title and settlement. [Printed by Thomas Milbourn. Ibid.]
"The Royal Oak or a Table of his Sacred Majesty's Descent, Representing under one View as well that of a line male for beyond 1,500 years from the Loins of the first Ethodius as that of more than 2,000, with the intervention of Daughters, from King Fergus I, Counting with the collaterals 109 Scots-crownedPredecessors." Delineated by J.S.C. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case G.]
Parchment covered book of Morthough Downey, containing memoranda of his will and of losses, informations, &c., the latest being that at the assizes held 2 Aug., 1682, Downey was sentenced to remain in gaol, till he found security to appear at the next assizes and to be of good behaviour in the meantime.
There is also a copy of an indenture, dated 29 April, 1682, whereby Morthough Downey binds himself to serve Tiege Downey as apprentice for 4 years from the date of his landing in Virginia or any other part of America, and a copy of the protection to him of 9 Jan., 1682 [calendared ante, p. 17]. [Ibid. No. 18.]
— to Lord —. When I waited on you, I said I feared that the severity of the laws executed on some Dissenters would prove very fatal to trade and consequently to the revenue. A Countryman about 13 years ago observed on this subject, in a discourse presented to his Majesty, after asserting the advantage obtained by this nation by manufacturing its wool and quoting some of Sir Walter Raleigh's observations presented to King James, that manufacturers of wool lie under many discouragements, not having liberty in matters of worship. Hence many transplanted themselves to Holland about 1635 to the great advantage of the Dutch and lately many others, both merchants and clothiers, were preparing to transplant themselves, had not the Indulgence been granted. He adds that the chief actors for that severity have not succeeded in either altering the nature or lessening the numbers of those they would suppress. The counsels of the clergy frequently prove very dangerous, their advice often, if not for the most part, proceeding from motives of self-interest. (Examples of the ill success of Charles V in Germany, of Philip II in the Netherlands and of three kings of France successively.)
About 13 years ago [?], on the letter and instructions sent out by the Bishop of Sarum to all the parishes of his diocese, about 80 Nonconformist clothiers in Wiltshire, being greatly alarmed (and some cited in the Bishop's court), thought of suspending their trade, till they could do it with more certainty, but on further consideration sent up 8 or 10 of themselves to represent to his Majesty and the Council the danger not only of their persons and families but of their stocks and estates, while liable to be taken up by an excommunicato capiendo, and therefore besought that they might not be blamed, if by withdrawing their stocks they endeavoured to secure their estates. They addressed themselves to the Council for Trade. Their case being read, they were examined and afterwards it was presented to his Majesty in Council and orders were given to the then Archbishop of Canterbury to write to the Bishop of Sarum to know the cause of the complaint and to command him to desist, and the clothiers ordered to proceed in their employments on the securities given them by both Secretaries of State that they should not be interrupted, on which assurance they went on with their trade. (Instances of the increase of trade caused by the Walloons leaving the Netherlands through the Duke of Alva's severity and settling in England.) Though the French Protestants, who lately came here on account of persecution, could not have the advantages the Walloons had by reason of their coming away by stealth, whereas the Walloons came hither in a body and had time to capitulate with the English for their freedom, yet we may in time feel some advantage by them also, if they have the liberty they came hither to enjoy. What disadvantage have the Dutch received by the English that went to Holland 47 years ago, as before mentioned ?
I cannot see what consistency there is in our present proceedings, that the French Protestants are encouraged to come and settle in England and the natives on the same ground and at the very same time be exposed to fly. May we not think that the Dutch, our rivals in trade, will not give as much encouragement to the English Dissenters to come there as we do to the French ? And I am informed that for the encouragement of such the States of Holland will provide them houses rent free and free them of all taxes for 3 years. I conclude with what his Majesty declared at Hampton Court. 28 Aug., 1681, that he holds himself obliged to comfort and support all such afflicted Protestants, who by reason of the severities towards them on account of their religion shall be forced to quit their native country. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 161.]
The examination of Carey Murphy (not sworn to). He was desired by Mr. Hetherington to go to Ireland with a protection procured by Lord Shaftesbury for Redmond O'Hanlon and his two brothers. Irish rebels, and to get them to come over to impeach her Majesty and his Royal Highness concerning the Popish Plot and that Lord Shaftesbury would procure their pardons and give each of them a captain's commission to raise men in Ireland on the Parliament side. Hetherington was to go over soon after with a commission to keep garrison in Ulster, as a colonel. These pardons he obtained by the intercession of Dr. Oates and Capt. Morlin, who were highly in favour with Lord Shaftesbury. After the dissolution of the Parliament Hetherington said, several being present, he was sure to see a Parliament soon without a king. The examinant was at several collections of money made for suborning witnesses to maintain the Popish Plot and impeach her Majesty and his Royal Highness. 30 Jan. last he came with George Murphy to Mr. Roberts' school at Southwark, the scrivener who writ all Hetherington's concerns. George asked him what made him keep school that day He answered he would work that day rather than any other and that George was a knave for saying King Charles was murdered, as he had his trial by due course of law and that his beheading was the best deed that ever Parliament did. Roberts told him that Lord Craven was to enter the City with 15,000 men and that the citizens, who were rather bound to obey the Lord Mayor than his Majesty, intended to oppose his entrance and that the examinant might have a horse and arms to fight against Lord Craven. About 24 Feb. last he went with Moyr and other witnesses against the Popish plotters to Lord Shaftesbury to let him know they wanted money. He replied he marvelled they should and that he spoke to all his friends to help them and that several collections were made by his order at the religious meetings for their encouragement. [1¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 162.]
King's Bench
[Prison].
Thomas Godwyn to Secretary Jenkins. Last January I sent you verses, subscribed only T.G., blunt ones, but more agreeing with the place I was confined in and my miserable usage from the under-sheriff and gaoler in Haverfordwest prison. These showing my affection to my great master and my thoughts of his continuing injuries putting me on this expression of them, I have presumed to dedicate them to his Majesty. My wishes and endeavours appearing, some hopes are admitted that a petition following with proof of the oppressions and barbarisms I have sustained by the factious Dissenters' means in and near Bristol may be examined. I am imprisoned and deprived of my benefice [St. Philip and St. Jacob] in Bristol above 6 years [in 1675] and by continued vexations and lawsuits rendered incapable of recovering my right.
Postscript. — I have one of these delivered to a gentleman, who undertook to deliver it to his Majesty last Friday, but have no account whether it be performed. [Ibid. No. 163.]
[1682
or earlier.]
Extract from a letter from Exeter. Some time ago at the Bell inn, where formerly one Holder lived, were dug up a man's bones and a night-cap with the letters I.H. on it. This was passed over and no notice taken, but, the next neighbour digging a vault near the same place, a spirit appeared to him on the stairs, bidding him not be afraid and saying that John Holder and his wife had murdered him for his money 30 years ago, that the man was dead, but she living, and that he should therefore declare it. He replied it would go for a story, but the ghost answered it would take care to verify it. This grew thus into discourse and some wives told Mrs. Holder these ill talks go from her having sent her nieces to the Barbados. Ay, said she, but I would give 20l. I could answer this as well as that. It came by degrees before the magistrates. Of two of the servants that then lived there one deposed that 30 years ago a gentleman came in with a very heavy portmantle, was unwell and borrowed a nightcap. She lent him one of her master's, marked I.H., which she believes is the same as that dug up. Her mistress sent her early next morning a-milking, whereas she would have stayed in hopes the gentleman would have given her somewhat, so she made haste home, but her mistress said he was gone a good while. Going up, she saw his boots and cloak, and one sheet missing, and the ostler said his horse was still there. When she told her master and mistress, he had the horse turned out and afterwards bought him for a stray. The cloak somebody sold for 11s., but Mr. [Holder ?] bought it again and burnt it, but the mistress told the maid, if one of the sheets were lost, she should pay for it. The other maid opposed all these particulars with many imprecations, whereupon before the people she was struck deaf, dumb and blind. Her last words, her tongue swelling in her mouth, were, Oh Mrs. Holder, Mrs. Holder ! and so fell down dead. Thereupon Mrs. Holder, not confessing, was committed, but is now at large under good bail. Endorsed by [Major Braman], "From Exeter, concerning the Spectrum there." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 164.]
[Mrs. Braman] to her brother[-in-law], Sir William Juxon. I received yours last night and enclose the receipt and, because some herbs are called by divers names, I send a leaf of each. It has done wonders in that case and I trust will answer your end. My husband would have served Sir Richard Ashfield's affair more, had it lain in his power, but it was intrigued with such obstinate and odd people that he was glad it had so good an end. Your dearness to us in your venison and in all your respects speaks your goodness and therefore can pardon that the clutter of repairing an old house would not let us show the regards we owe to so considerable a friend of yours, for it was my husband's trouble no less than mine that so dear an acquaintance of yours could not eat a dish of fish with us, but now we are just on an end of that trouble and hope that our foxes and good company will tempt you hither. If this medicine should miss, let me know, for I have another.
[Major Braman] to J. Aylf [Ayloffe ?]. Beseeching him for God's sake, for the public's sake, for his friends' sake and for the writer's sake not only to forgive Frank Jy[?] but to be reconciled and renew their friendship that the public may not suffer. Not only their ancient amity but religion, reason, the interest of the nation and the honour of their worthiest club all advocate their reconciliation. All the world knows 'tis neither lack of sense nor courage but his friendship that makes him pass by those offences. (These two letters are copies by [Major Braman] and were probably, together with the last paper, seized with his papers in July, 1683.) [Ibid. No. 165.]
Hugh Speke to —. For the last two years I have not been at her house above 3 times, but by Col. Scott's instigation, as I am confident it is, knowing it to be his hand, she has written this most impudent, malicious letter to do me a prejudice, which I doubt not they will be deceived in, when I can receive an answer from you to vindicate my innocency to my father and mother. You cannot do amiss to discourse with Mr. Swift about her, who can give you a full and satisfactory account that all she writes is a most damnable lie and that she was never worth 40l., but what she has got of Mr. Lenthall, Master of the Marshalsea, who, she said, had given 400l. for the house for her. First discourse of other affairs to her and then you may discourse of me by and by and, if you can entrust Mr. Swift, as I believe you may, you had best have him there with you and let him see the villainous letter to my father. If she owns that she sent such a letter, I intend to bring an action for 2,000l. against her and doubt not to recover very considerable damages. I would not have taken any notice, as if I knew it was Col. Scott's handwriting, but you may ask when she saw him last, by which you will find out whether he has been there lately, and then Swift may ask her when she expects to bring forth a young Marshal Lenthall and then she will glory in it. Pray enquire about this affair as soon as you can and let me have a letter from you to show my father and mother to give them full satisfaction to the contrary, though they are pretty well satisfied already. Mr. Swift may likewise write a letter to me to show to my father and mother.
The morning before the letter came to my father, I went into North Devon, where my estate is, to let two farms and did not return home till late Saturday night, when I was surprised to see such a villainous, false letter.
If she denies sending such a letter, then I am sure it is Col. Scott's. However, I am sure 'tis his hand and style, for he might easily prevail with her to do such a thing, hoping to get money for them both, but they will be much deceived. Pray take no notice, as if I think it Col. Scott's handwriting. She cannot write so much as her name. [2 pages. The beginning is missing. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 166.]
[The Earl of Clarendon] to [his daughter] the Duchess [of York]. Against her turning a Roman Catholic. (Printed in the Harleian Miscellany, Vol. III, p. 556.) (This and the last paper were seized among Hugh Speke's papers in August, 1683, and are therefore probably of 1682 or earlier.) [6¼ pages. Copy. Ibid. No. 167.]
[Lady Wemyss, relict of Sir John Wemyss of Bogie] to her cousin [Baillie of Jerviswood ?]. Our family, having many proofs of your compassion towards its distresses, entreats a new proof of your kindness. When our Parliament sat last August [1681], I presented a petition to the Commissioner and the Parliament, copies of which and of the Parliament's answer I have sent you. You will find by the answer that the Lords of the Treasury are ordained to consider how an aliment shall be provided for me. The Lords, notwithstanding, do not find themselves sufficiently authorized to settle a constant aliment on me without an express warrand from his Majesty. Therefore my friends in the Treasury have desired me to apply to him that I may obtain an order to the Treasury for an annuity during my life. This is a short deduction of my case. I must entreat you to mind the Earl of Perth of this concern of mine and to obtain from his Majesty a warrand to the Lords of the Treasury. I shall with the post send you up a warrand. I am confident, if his Majesty can be got to read the petition with the Parliament's answer, there will be no difficulty to obtain his warrand for 40l. sterling a year to me, which is a mean desire considering the great losses my husband sustained in his Majesty's service. I have been with the Earl of Perth, who has promised me all the assistance he can. I hope on my account all mistakes between Perth and you will be laid aside and you will follow my business with concern. You cannot do a greater act of charity and God will requite you for it, since I am not in any capacity to do it. (See The Acts of the Parliament of Scotland, Vol. VIII, p. 370.) Endorsed, a letter of Jerviswood's handwriting; but quœre. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 168.]
Paper in Justice Warcup's hand. In the late treasonable pamphlet, The Second Part of the Growth of Popery and Arbitrary Government, his Majesty and all his ministers and officers are termed conspirators and more vilified than in all former libels and all actions for the preservation of him and his Government rendered most infamous, whence it appears that the Fanatics persevere in their old wicked designs, which by the King's lenity were almost obliterated. Undeniable proof has been made that in most of the conventicles they contemptuously omitted to pray for his Majesty and none of the Dissenters have made any address to him or given the least assurance they will be obedient in civil matters, when they wholly disobey in ecclesiastical, which proves how implacable they are and their hatred to the royal family, wherefore 'tis conceived that a vigorous prosecution of the laws is the only remedy.
'Tis therefore proposed that all those be prosecuted, on whom bills were found Ignoramus, for all such premunires and common law offences as their actions, the papers found with them and the witnesses make them appear guilty of, which will subject them to punishments, and those fled from justice may be outlawed.
Since it appears by the said pamphlet that the party keep a journal of all public actions, perverting the truth and reserving the same for disturbance in a future Parliament, 'tis proposed that a journal be kept of all public actions with the names of substantial witnesses to prove the truth thereof, thereby to obviate the party's false and malicious misrepresentations. [See ante, pp. 537, 563.] [Ibid. No. 169.]
Query whether, A. B. offering to make oath that he was told by one speaking on his own knowledge that a certain person had sold several Dolemans and Second Parts of the Growth of Popery and entered several in his shop-book, on A. B.'s oath a warrant may be granted for searching the shop-books and lodgings of the said person and, in case any such entries be found, for securing the master of the shop and his apprentice for examination. Endorsed, "Thomas Atterbury's note, which your Honour ordered to be delivered to you in Council." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 170.]
Memorandum that [Nathaniel] Bacon's Discourse of Government was printed in two parts, the first in 1647, the other in 1651. It is now, 1682, reprinted for John Starkey, who will possibly pretend it is only an old book reprinted and an historical discourse of past times without any application to the present, whereas it appears it was dedicated to the service of a rebellion. With numerous extracts to prove the anti-monarchical purpose of the book. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 171.]
Names of the former plotters. Witnesses, Sir James Hay, James Coates, William Bird, Mrs. Yardner; Designers, Samuel Wilson, Benjamin Clarke, milliner, Dismore, baker, Whitlock, mercer, Lords Grey, Clare, Shaftesbury, Salisbury, Bedford, Capt. Aldridge; Intended to be destroyed, the King, the Duke, Lords Clarendon, Hyde, Halifax, Duras, Lauderdale, North. [Ibid. No. 172.]
Statement that in Feb., 1681[–2], a commission under the great seal was granted to the Bishops of Sarum and Bristol and 7 others to visit the church of Canford Magna, Dorset, with the chapel of Poole annexed, which are a royal peculiar. The Commissioners, finding Samuel Hardy, minister or curate of the said chapel, obnoxious to the law, decreed him to be deprived. Hardy appealed and on his petition the Lord Chancellor granted him a commission to divers doctors of the civil law, who have decreed an inhibition and citation at the said Hardy's instance, having obtained which, he has since presumed to preach in the said chapel without reading the book of Common Prayer, according to his former Nonconformity.
This commission of appeal is conceived to be irregular:—1. Because it, being a peculiar royal, is not visitable but by special commissioners appointed by his Majesty. 2. That no appeal lies from these Commissioners, but that the regular way is to supplicate his Majesty, who may or may not grant his commission of review to examine the commissioners' proceedings. [Ibid. No. 173.]
Statement. Nothing can be more grievous to good subjects nor more prejudicial to his Majesty's interest and the Government than to see so many Dissenters in honourable and profitable places in his Majesty's service, especially in and about London. By Dissenters is meant not only such as never come to church but such as come sometimes and go more frequently to conventicles, whereof there are great numbers as ill-affected as those who frequent the conventicles only, for of late the Nonconformist ministers, especially Mr. Baxter and Dr. Owen, have distinguished between total and partial, constant and occasional communion, allowing their people to keep partial and occasional communion, whence, to qualify for offices, they will receive the Holy Sacrament at the church in the morning and go in the afternoon to conventicles. Hence it is plain that receiving the Sacrament and coming to church on special occasions for legal qualifications is no true sign of loyalty or love to the Church. Wherefore it is much to be wished that none should have any place in the Custom House, Navy Office, Excise Office, &c. without a certificate that he is truly conformable to the Protestant established religion and lives in the sole communion of the Church of England.
It is also to be wished that order be taken according to law with all unlicensed schoolmasters and schoolmistresses and keepers of private academies, whereof there are great numbers in and about London, and that all the rich and loyal merchants in London, who are not free of the City, such as Sir John Mathews, of whom there are very many, be obliged to take the freedom of the City (which the fanatical never fail to do) that they may bear office there. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 174.]
A conventicler to Justice Freeman. I understand you are become a persecutor of God's people for worshipping Christ and preaching the Gospel. The Conventicle Act is quite contrary to the law of God, which nowhere allows magistrates to rob men of their goods and imprison and ruin them for errors about religion. As God has not made all men's faces alike, so he has not given all men understanding alike. Must I knock my brother's brains out, because he has but one eye and I have two? I entreat you, if you would escape everlasting torment, have no hand in disturbing the meetings of the Protestant Dissenters, who brought the King to his throne. I suppose you and the rest of the cruel Justices are so zealous in persecuting Protestants to please the Papists that those vipers may have a better opportunity to sting us to death. According to the vote of the last Parliament the persecutors of Protestant Dissenters are promoters of Popery. If you destroy the Dissenters, the Papists will afterwards pull down the Church of England men and will call you Fanatics, except you will worship their idols and their breaden gods. Sign no warrant against Protestants, lest God strike you dead in the act or smite you, as you know he did Mr. Newcombe [ob. 26 Dec., 1681] in the King's presence. I knew him these ten years and he was a hater of Protestant Dissenters, whose prayers, I believe, have kept the King from being murdered by bloody Papists. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 175.]
List of 30 places in London, where conventicles are held. Among them:—Haberdashers' Hall, Dr. Jacomb (they kept a special fast and prayed for the election of sheriffs); Pinners' Hall, where several preach, among them Bull, who lives at Newington and sometimes has a meeting there; Cordwainers' Hall, Howe preaches there; Loriners' Hall; Pewterers' Hall; Bricklayers' Hall; Embroiderers' Hall; at Mr. Bushell's house in St. Helen's preaches White, a chaplain to Oliver Cromwell; Matthew Mead, the Quaker's brother, has a meeting at Stepney and perverts the seamen; Capt. Kyffin, a very rich merchant that promoted the petition to the Common Council, keeps a great meeting in Walbrook; Fowler preaches in a conventicle not far from Dyers' Hall, where Lye preached, before it was burnt; Dr. Owen preaches in Leadenhall Street; Baxter often preaches in Fetter Lane. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 176.]
Memorandum of summonses to Nonconformist ministers. Bull, at Brewin's coffee-house near Guildhall, formerly parson of Newington; Griffith, formerly minister of the Charterhouse, at Plasterers' Hall, where he teaches (went to Tunbridge Wells last Wednesday); Howe preaches at Cordwainers' Hall (went to Oxfordshire the beginning of last week); Baxter preaches in Shoe Lane; Dr. Owen, at Pinmakers' Hall (sick at Ealing); Jacomb, at Haberdashers' Hall, the clerk of that company his brotherin-law. [Ibid. No. 177.]
Information that Sir Thomas Marsh's (fn. 1) house at Hackney is turned into a college or nursery for Nonconformists, that there are scholarships of 10l. a year for Nonconformists' sons intended to be ministers, the governor is said to be Major Dawney and near 20 are trained there as in an academy. Candles are observed in their chambers at all hours of the night. [Ibid. No. 178.]
Patrick Gilmore to the Earl of Conway at Ragley. Begging his [pardon for not waiting] on him as he came [from London]. — My wi[fe's illness] was the occasion of my haste. I shall not fail to wait on you as soon as I am off my round. Mr. Trant is out of town with [Mr.] Kingdon, so I saw neither of them. I left Mr. Magenis pretty well. I doubt you will find exchange very high to Belfast. I paid 10 per cent. If you had sent bills for 500l., when [you sent] the 150l., you might have had it, but now I [apprehend] you will not have under 9l., if so low. [Usquebaugh ?] is scarce at London. Mr. Lawry has promised [to present] Mr. Magenis with some that one of the Duke's [servants] brought out of Scotland. [Torn. Conway Papers. Ibid. No. 179.]
His Majesty's Orders for establishing order and government in his Great Chamber, Presence Chamber, Privy Chamber, Privy Galleries and Gentlemen Pensioners (addressed to Henry Savile, Vice-Chamberlain [appointed in 1677] and mentioning Prince Rupert [who died 29 Nov., 1682]). [30 pages. Copy. Ibid. No. 180.]
"A narrative of the manner, cause and occasion of my withdrawment from the society with Mr. B[elcher ?]" [by James Warner]. Giving an account of arguments with Mrs. E. and Mrs. B[elcher ?] about general redemption, Mrs. E. being of opinion that her infants deceased were saved and that the heathens were not all damned, who never heard of Christ, and Mrs. B. that all were put into a capacity of being saved by the death of Christ.
After some time a woman of Mr. Lamb's congregation being propounded for communion with us, I asked her whether she owned general redemption, that Christ died alike for all men. She answered yes and that God had a love for all men. I asked whether the church intended to receive her, if they should have satisfaction in all other points notwithstanding her holding of general redemption, which if they did, I must withdraw, though I knew the church had formerly kept out R. for this very thing alone, for, when Mr. B. told the church he would not be enquired into about general redemption, brother P., in the name of the whole church, said, We are all one to have no more to do with it. I told the church also that Mrs. B. had said the church had dealt with K[atherine] for this and no other thing, but because she owned general redemption, which was a grief to her, for she owned the same. She said it was so and that it should be considered whether the church were not too rash in that matter, but Mr. B. stopped her. I told them one charge sister K[atherine] brought against the church as a ground of her withdrawing was partiality in dealing with some for things, which others owned who were still left amongst us, and that therefore, if they should receive this person notwithstanding her judgment, they would be justly chargeable with partiality and I must withdraw, being still of the same mind the church was of formerly, and, if now they would bear this of Mrs. B., I must withdraw. Mr. B. asked what Scripture I had to withdraw for their holding of general redemption. I answered, "If I or an angel preach any other Gospel than I have preached, let him be accursed," which I applied.
They appointed two brethren to enquire of the church with Mr. Lamb about that woman and adjourned the further debate till next meeting. Mr. B. asked the church if they could have communion with his wife next Sabbath in the Supper. They answered yes, two assenting and the rest silent. Then I declared, I do (and I hope in the fear of the Lord) withdraw from this society, for they have espoused her guilt on themselves by communion with her. [7½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 181.]
List of 18 names and addresses with dates against each, from 24 August to 11 Sept. [Ibid. No. 182.]
D. B[elcher ?] to Brother Warner. I understood you were not at the Supper on my account. I fear you do not know what spirit you are of. If you have anything against me, let it be debated before the church and let me not be judged and condemned, before the matter be heard. My thoughts are that, if you were overseer of the most united church in England, you would break them in a short time. It was no small trial to my spirit and to some others, when Cattren [Catherine ?] was examined, that, when she declared against the power of nature and the freedom of will and falling away from grace and owned particular election, yet she was kept off, because she owned that Christ died for all, which the Scripture is clear in. When we shall withdraw from members and judge [them ?] and unchristian churches, before their cases are examined before some impartial judges, what can we expect, but that the Lord should declare against us, as He has against others ? One of them showed me a copy of a letter they sent about 5 years ago to Mr. Belcher's church, wherein they declared their judgment and charged them that, if they were in an error, they would endeavour to convince them, and it was never answered. Last summer at a friend's house they ran out against that society at a strange rate, that they all except one denied the Godhead of Christ and the satisfaction of His blood and several other such things, which seemed very strange to me, having been at a meeting, where they cast out one of their members for holding such principles. I wrote to one of their chief members and asked whether those things were so. He answered with great earnestness that people, supposing it came from Mr. Belcher's people, have dealt more cruelly with us than they did with those they burnt at Smithfield. They are lies and slanders. I hear them preach and pray and converse with them and, if I knew anyone amongst them that held such things, I would not have communion with them. His answer made such an impression on my spirit that I could not get it off for a considerable time. However these things are commonly discoursed, they are sins of a very high nature. I asked why they did not use some means to have a right understanding of things. He said they would willingly, if they could. The Lord might have honoured you in having a hand in bringing about such a good work, but, seeing you have rejected it, it may be brought about some other way. I would not have you think I am in the least offended at you in what respects myself, for I hope there is somewhat of zeal in it, though mixed with a great deal of weakness and corruption. (These 3 documents and also the letter of 26 February, 1683, to Mr. Warner and his letter of 24 July, 1683, are all marked W. L. and were doubtless seized, when Warner was arrested, 7 Aug., 1683.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 183.]
Dr. John Joachim Becher to the King. Petition for a pass for his friend, Abraham van Acker, a Dutchman, yet well versed in English and a firm Protestant, to go to and return from Wales, the petitioner being informed that there is a sort of mineral in both North and South Wales, the use of which is unknown to the inhabitants, that he may bring a proof of the said minerals to be tried and examined by the petitioner from the ore. [Ibid. No. 184.]
John Bradford, D.D., chaplain in ordinary to the King, to the Commissioners for Ecclesiastical Preferments [appointed 12 Aug., 1681, dissolved 26 Sept., 1684]. Petition for their favour in obtaining for him a prebend at Westminster promised him by the King, having been a King's scholar at Westminster School, which prebend will suit with his duty in the City, where he has a living. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 185.]
Ellen Carlisle to the Lords [of the Treasury]. Petition for reconsideration of her former petition, the benefit received by their former order [6 Sept., 1681, see Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. VII, p. 267] being so short of her necessities. [Ibid. No. 186.]
Elizabeth Cellier to the King. Petition, stating she was convicted for writing a book adjudged a misdemeanour and sentenced to stand on the pillory three several days, where she was so beaten and bruised that she was like to be stoned to death, and was fined 1,000l. and imprisoned till payment and that she has been a prisoner in Newgate above two years and thereby is grown sick and weak, and praying for a remission of the said fine and that she may be put into the next free Old Bailey pardon. [Ibid. No. 187.]
John de la Clide, sea-captain, to the King. Petition for immediate support, having been forced out of the protection of his natural prince, the King of France, by the violent proceeding of the Intendant against all Protestants and especially against himself for persuading his neighbours to continue constant in the faith, he being left destitute, though willing to take any employment for his Majesty's service, in which his experience may be not a little serviceable. [See ante, p. 290.] [Ibid. No. 188.]
Thomas Deane to the King. Petition for a warrant for the place of surgeon to the King's own regiment of Foot Guards on the first vacancy, being ruined in his profession by the opposition of the disaffected party, because he presented to his Majesty the address of the young men and apprentices of London in abhorrence of the late horrid association. [Ibid. No. 189.]
Similar petition, but praying for the place of surgeon to any regiment. [Ibid. No. 190.]
The Chevalier des Fontaines to the King. Petition for a gift of something for his maintenance. Has been forced to leave his country especially from his zeal for religion, which is the cause not only of his disgrace with his relations but also of the loss of all his property. He belongs to one of not the least houses in Flanders, which he can prove by Mr. Lente, the envoy of Denmark [from 1680 to 1684], to whom he has the honour of being known. [French. Ibid. No. 191.]
Stephen Dugdale to the Lords of the Treasury. Petition for the speedy payment of the balance of his bills, amounting to 200l. and upwards, for charges of bringing up witnesses from the country, as ordered by his Majesty, the Privy Council and Committees of Parliament, and for his own charges of going into the country on several trials or for something else for his relief. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 192.]
Dorothy, wife of Stephen Dugdale, to Secretary Jenkins. Petition for his favour with the Lords of the Treasury for her husband's relief. Since he promised to present his petition to the said Lords, he has been arrested and carried to the Marshalsea, where he remains. [Ibid. No. 193.]
Dr. J. Seobald Fabricius to the King. Petition for subsistence. Came over to England to spend his time in defending the English Church. Has written Meditations on the Unity of the Church and an Irenical Epistle to Scots and other Presbyterians and has now a MS. on the hereditary succession of the British Crown. Had his Majesty's letter to the late Bishop of St. Asaph [9 Aug., 1676, calendared in S.P. Dom., 1676–77, p. 270] to give him a sinecure, but the Bishop had it annexed by Parliament to his own see. Has waited 6 years and laid out all his money on expectation. [Ibid. No. 194.]
John Hewytt, student, to the King. Petition for his present relief and the settling and maintenance of him at the University. Is grandson of Dr. John Hewytt, who suffered both in estate and person for his Majesty, is desirous by his studies in the ministerial function to serve his King and country, but has not the wherewithal to go on with that study by reason of the said sufferings of his grandfather and the decease of his parents. [See S.P. Dom., 1673, p. 553.] [Ibid. No. 195.]
Capt. George Hilton to Secretary Jenkins. Petition, stating that great numbers of sectaries and disloyal persons repair to London and Westminster the better to carry out their designs against his Majesty's person and Government, for prevention of which he conceives that the putting in execution all laws made for preserving his said person, &c. will in all probability not only disappoint all such disloyal persons but also bring a considerable sum into the Exchequer, and, there being no provision in many of the said laws to reimburse the prosecutor and the petitioner intending to put all such laws into execution, praying him to advise how a third part of all sums brought into the Exchequer by reason of his prosecution of such laws as have not provided for the prosecutor's reimbursement may be allowed him towards his necessary charges. [See ante, p. 314.] [Ibid. No. 196.]
Henry Howard, burgess for Buckingham, now prisoner in the Fleet, to the Duke of York. Petition to mediate with the Duke of Buckingham to remit 1,000l. damages awarded against the petitioner in an action of Scandalum magnatum for proceedings in the election for Buckingham 3 years ago, which he is unable to pay. Has been almost 2½ years in prison. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 197.]
Sir William Jennens to the King. Petition, stating that in consideration of his services he was granted a piece of ground in St. James' Park, whereon to build a royal bagnio, to complete which he engaged himself by his Majesty's order for materials to the value of 2,000l. and spent a considerable sum in passing the grant, but his Majesty gave the same ground to the Earl of Arlington, which has run him so deeply into debt that his creditors have thrown him into the King's Bench, that he was employed in France by his Majesty's gunfounder to sell the nealed guns, for which he was to have had 500l., but was commanded to come from Paris to Oxford to give evidence against Stephen College, which journey cost him a great deal, and the persons that employed him about the guns threw him off, because his Majesty in Council commanded him to declare the lowest he was empowered to sell them for to the King in France, and that he is a half-pay captain in the Navy, but has not for three years received a penny thereof, and therefore praying an order for payment to him of so much as his Majesty may think he is really damnified and in arrear or at least so much as may discharge him from his imprisonment. [Ibid. No. 198.]
John Louis, working goldsmith, late of Paris, to the King. Petition for an order to the Goldsmiths' Company to affix their mark to his work, without which he cannot exhibit it for sale; is a Protestant refugee and the Goldsmiths' Company have encouraged him to petition for the said order. [Ibid. No. 199.]
Dame Mary Lunsford, widow of Sir Herbert Lunsford, to the King. Petition for some small pension for the support of herself and her children. On her representation to his Majesty of her miserable condition she was referred to the Lords of the Treasury for relief in November, 1681, but they have not yet taken her into their consideration. [Ibid. No. 200.]
Thomas Marshall, master cook of the Household, to the King. Petition for a grant of the place of Master Cook to the King in reversion after the present master cook [who died in 1683, see Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. VII, pp. 664, 940], which according to the method of the House belongs to him after the present master cook. Has been a sworn servant to the late and present Kings for more than 45 years and served as a lieutenant and otherwise from the setting up of the standard at Nottingham to the last fight at Worcester, and was a great sufferer by imprisonments and otherwise. [Ibid. No. 201.]
[Sir] Samuel Morland to the King. Petition for the place of a Commissioner of the Hearth Money, the petitioner being informed that his Majesty intends to dissolve the farms thereof and that the revenue shall be managed by Commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 202.]
Susannah, widow of John Peate, to the King. Petition for a pardon, having been condemned for clipping and reprieved as being pregnant, her husband having been executed for the same crime and she having four small children and being ready to lie in of another. [See ante, p. 411.] [Ibid. No. 203.]
Thomas Pilkington to the King. Petition, he being sensible of his Majesty's displeasure for several miscarriages committed by him, particularly against his Royal Highness, for forgiveness of all his offences. [Ibid. No. 204.]
David Povey to the King. Petition for an order for immediate payment to him of the guinea a week subsistence allowed him since his giving evidence against Lord Howard, the payment thereof being delayed by Hugh Jones, a sub-commissioner for that purpose. [Ibid. No. 205.]
Simon, second son of Richard Pendrell, to the King. Petition for the next place of footman to his Majesty. Has waited more than 6 months at great charge for the 25l. ordered on his Majesty's reference to be paid him by the Lords of the Treasury [in 1682, see pedigree of Richard Pendrell in Fea, The Flight of the King]. [Ibid. No. 206.]
Capt. Thomas Rowe to the King. Petition for the next King's waiter's place vacant in the London Custom House, he having served his Majesty these 20 years. [Ibid. No. 207.]
Similar petition by the same. [Ibid. No. 208.]
Francis Sandford, Lancaster Herald, and Margaret Marshall, widow, to the King. Petition, stating that the petitioner Marshall's husband and father for several years made and painted the ensigns of the two regiments of Guards and that the petitioners since their deaths have done the same, which have been always furnished out of the Wardrobe, and that the petitioner Sandford by a verbal order from his Majesty took care that the ensigns of the respective regiments should not interfere with each other, which he is ready to demonstrate by a collection of those ensigns, and praying a grant of making and painting all such ensigns, cornets, guidons, trumpet-banners or other martial ensigns as shall be furnished out of the Wardrobe, to be paid for at the usual rates. [Ibid. No. 209.]
Thomas Silver, master gunner, and the rest of the gunners belonging to Whitehall and St. James' Park to the King. Petition for a reward, his Majesty having allowed them 40l. in consideration of their pains and hazards in blowing up houses in the time of any fire, they having been lately in that service at Wapping [19–20 Nov., 1682] commanded by the Duke of Albemarle and having not yet received any of the royal bounty for this last service, as formerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 210.]
Robert Spencer, Sir Charles Wheeler and John Strode to the King. Petition, stating that, they being farmers of the 4½ per cent. on commodities of the growth of Barbados for 7 years from Christmas, 1670, at the yearly rent of 7,000l. per annum, about May, 1679, his Majesty signified that the petitioners should become accountants and have 400l. per annum allowed to each of them as salary and that the Lords of the Treasury will admit the said allowance for only the first four years and not for the last three, and therefore praying directions to the said Lords that their said salary might be allowed them. [See account stated 3 July, 1682, Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. VII, p. 514.] [Ibid. No. 211.] Annexed,
Statement of the accounts of the petitioners touching the said duty and of Col. Strode touching his farm of the Leeward Islands. [Ibid. No. 211 i.]
Richard Thurloe, agent for the garrison at Tangier, to the King and the Privy Council. Petition for directions to the Lords of the Treasury to order the Master General of the Ordnance to provide stores for the horse according to the estimate already before the Council, they wanting saddles and other necessaries, and that they may be ordered to be sent in one of his Majesty's ships that is now going. [Ibid. No. 212.]
Jane, wife of Brome Whorwood, to the King. Petition, stating that the Lord Chancellor about 6 years ago referred the difference between her and her husband to the Bishop of Oxford, who has ever since put her off with delays, so that she is reduced to the utmost extremity, and desiring him to command the Bishop to take care she may have a speedy supply, for she has not had a farthing from him, for her husband, these 9 months and what she had before for these 7 years amounted to but 200 and odd pounds, whereas her alimony was settled at 300l. per annum. [Ibid. No. 213.]
Note of proposals of Capt. Price of Hereford. Dr. Davenant, who never served the Crown, has enjoyed for divers years a Commissioner's place in the Excise. He is altogether factious, a creature of the Earl of Shaftesbury and the Duke of Monmouth, a spy for them on the actions of the King, the Council and the Court, a mortal enemy to the Duke and as deep as any in all the factious cabals.
His Majesty partly promised the Duke not to dispose without his knowledge of the next reversion of the place of either the Comptroller or the Clerk of the Greencloth.
If neither of the above places will be granted, I propose that I be given the reversion of the government of Landguard Fort after the death of Sir Roger Manley, the present governor. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 214.]
Heads for informations against Henry Vernon of Hilton, Staffordshire, a Justice. He said that, if he had been pilot of the Gloucester, he would have sunk himself rather than not have cast away the Duke.
One Barnefield complained to him against a person for treasonable and seditious words, but was discouraged by him and the thing hushed up.
Vernon tempted Sir Thomas Whitgrave to be of the association and generally encourages the Whigs and is severe to others. [Ibid. No. 215.]
"A list of such persons that upon an election of Parliament men in the county of Northampton will vote and make interest for the last members in [the] Oxford Parliament, who seem dissatisfied with the present Government and voted for excluding the Duke of York, with the value of their estates yearly." The list is headed by the Earl of Exeter and the Earl of Westminster [sic]. Among them is Sir Edward Nicholas or Nichols [who died 28 Feb., 1683]. With a list of Northamptonshire Justices, who refuse to act or take the oath or who are dead, and suggesting three persons for Justices, among them being Sir Justinian Isham [who succeeded 23 July, 1681]. [2¾ pages. Ibid. No. 216.]
Request that the Weavers' Company may suffer the Protestant strangers and those that come to make profession of the Protestant religion to set up or work at the weaving trade without molesting any that employ them, provided they have been brought up to the trade. [Ibid. No. 217.]
"Neophyte Oates" to the King. I call myself Oates, because I intend to do strange things, as he has, by mending what he has destroyed. I have been a Jesuit and can make out that whatever Oates has deposed is a lie, for he cannot tell how often a week the Jesuits teach a discipline, how often each of them washes the dishes, how often they scour them. He has never been a novice, for he does not know what be the great and what the little works of the novices.
Though I can show Oates to be a liar, I will not proceed without your command. If it will not be profitable that I should meddle in this business, I desire your Majesty will reward me by buying me apprentice to some merchant. [2¼ pages. Ibid. No. 218.]
Suggestion that an Abridgement be composed of the proceedings in Queen Mary's time for the settlement of Popery in England, consisting of the following heads. (These are extracts from Burnet, History of the Reformation, edition published in 1681, from p. 237 to p. 347.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 219.]
[1681 or 1682.] "The examen of the late Quo warrantos to several corporations of England." It puts to the question whose Quo warrantos these are, whether the King's or his ministers. It necessarily seeks for reasons to prove it no act of the King, else it must call the King to question for many acts of injustice done by his ministers in his name:—1. Because some acts of the King's ministers have the deepest character of treason. The law punishes only the ministers for treason and maintains the King can be no traitor, which imports that a traitor can be no King. 2. Because a Quo warranto to those who made him King necessarily puts the question, Quo warranto he is King, for if they had no warrant to make him King, he could be no King to make a Quo warranto. 3. Because it strives to set authority against authority, dividing the kingdom into certain desolation. All which reasons open a black box of Quo warrantos, which thus necessarily follow.
1. Quo warranto does King Charles dispose of that trust to others, which was reposed in him alone as King by his restoration and coronation ? 2. Q. w. is the Pope de facto King and God of England and King Charles only in effigy ? 3. Q. w. is the whole power of England, Scotland and Ireland put into the Duke's hands both by sea and land, as 'tis reported, and confirmed by bonfires, bottles and huzzas ? 4. Q. w. does his Majesty begin a war in maintaining an army and fortifying himself in Windsor Castle, not declaring against whom nor for what ? 5. Q. w. are so many associations of addressers and abhorrers throughout England mustered with lives and fortunes against whom and for what ? 6. Q. w. do Dissenters persecute Dissenters ? 7. Q. w. are the lords in the Tower and the priests in Newgate [transported to Scilly Feb., 1682] preserved to be living witnesses of the intended Popish massacre of England about '77, marked out to us in the Irish '41 and London's bonfire in '66 and prophesied by the Jesuits ? 8. Q. w. are Irish Papists witnesses, sons of the Irish assassinates, with so much knowledge of English Protestants as to come over and be dubbed the King's evidences and declare what was done in England better than Englishmen knew themselves ? 9. Q. w. are our late English judges such Gadburian prophets as to foresee the coming in of Popery, as he did the King's, and so admit Popish juries and evidences to meet them halfway ? 10. Since the King can do no wrong, quo warranto are his attorneys, solicitors and serjeants privileged to do wrong even to the guilt of innocent blood in the King's name ? 11. If the King can do no wrong, quo warranto does his nolle prosequi stop all justice against those that do wrong ? Endorsed, " A libel about Quo warranto." [2 pages. Ibid. No. 220.]
[1681 or 1682.] Libel addressed to Sam's coffee-house, Ludgate Hill.
Each Quo warranto doth to question bring What warrant cities had that made him King.
Woe to that man, who questions what's begot, Whether it were a German or a Scot, If the sword warrant from the cities cease, Kings may pick straws or go to gather peas, Armies made traitors kings and kings made traitors And exercised England with these matters.
Lawyers excluded kings and barred their throne, Cities invite them and call all their own.
Kings may, with half an eye, learn which to choose, Lost kingdoms how to gain or gained to lose.
—[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 421, No. 221.]
"Factum of the French and other Protestants in the Savoy." It is clear that the safety and glory of a land consists in the great number of its inhabitants. On that consideration Queen Elizabeth received those that in such great numbers were forced to forsake their country for their religion's sake and gave them churches and privileges with the free exercise of their religion. No doubt the same consideration moved the wise Prince, under whose protection we live, to invite distressed Protestants to take refuge in his kingdom, allowing us a church and maintaining our ministers in part. Several great men have after their King's example invited foreign distressed Protestants to come over and occupy their waste lands here and in Ireland. Our church is often honoured by the presence of Privy Councillors and other great officers and sometimes by the Bishop of this city, who maintains many of our proselytes. We conform to the Church of England and pay double parish duties as strangers. We do not convey abroad the estates we get here, but leave them to our children, whom we bring up in the ways of the country and who often cannot speak two words of good French. Yet people here envy us the bread we get by our labour and would compel us to return to the persecution we fled from. We are so dealt with by the Masters and Overseers of the Companies, who allege an Act in Queen Elizabeth's reign providing that such as have not served 7 years in their trades shall be obliged to certain payments, which they require of us, whereas that Act was to provide against a mischief at that time, when several set up as masters, who had never served to their trades. [3½ pages. Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case G.]
Theobald, Lord Baron of Brittas, to the King. Petition for immediate relief, stating that on addresses of the House of Lords in Ireland his Majesty had directed that a proviso should be inserted in the Act of Explanation restoring him to his whole estate, but he by a mistake, as he believes, was made a Nominee, to be restored to his mansion house and 2,000 acres only out of above 10,000 he had undoubted title to, that, he being restored to only 800 acres of the said 2,000, a pension of 100l. per annum was granted him on the Irish establishment, which was paid him only for 3 years and 50l. thereof was settled on another, so that he had only 800 acres and the said 50l. pension, which was not duly paid him, and, he having endeavoured to maintain himself out of those 800 acres, which were retrenched by the Adventurers and Soldiers, several mean, suborned persons, set on by some of Cromwell's officers, who enjoy the rest of his estate, charged him with the late pretended Popish plot in Ireland and caused him to be indicted of high treason, whereon he surrendered himself and prayed to be tried, which he could not hitherto obtain, and, having no means, he was forced to sell the said 800 acres to the utter undoing of his wife and family. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 343, No. 76.]
The whole charge on the present Farmers of the Revenue from the commencement of their farm at Dec., 1675, to the end at Dec., 1682, the total rent at 240,000l. per annum amounting for the 7 years to 1,680,000l., with discharges for the same, leaving a balance of 87,813l. odd still due from them. [2 pages. Conway Papers. Ibid. No. 77 a.]
William Morgan, Master of the Revels in Ireland, to the King. Petition, stating that, his Majesty having granted to the petitioner's uncle, John Ogilby, the office of Master of the Revels in Ireland during the lives of himself and Thomas Stanley, the petitioner with his uncle was at great charge in building a theatre and settling a company of actors at Dublin and that he has been sworn as deputy of the Revels and executed the office during his uncle's life by assignment and has been at very great charge to maintain a company of good actors, who still continue at the theatre in Dublin, and was left very much in debt by the said Ogilby [ob. Sept., 1676], and therefore praying leave to pass the patent in his own name instead of the said Stanley's name. [Ibid. No. 77 b.]
Edward Ivie to the King. Petition, stating that the petitioner gave early demonstrations of his loyalty by being concerned in the business of Penruddock and Booth and by his many sufferings and imprisonment on that account, though all his relations except his father were his enemies, as being such of his Majesty, that William Ivie, one of his brothers, prosecuted him even to death, had it not been for a pardon, as by the annexed affidavit of the person he hired to swear against him will appear, that the petitioner went to Ireland and dwelt there about 16 years past and about 3 years ago observed a conspiracy against some good subjects, carried on by the procurement of some great men designing to disturb the Government, and to prevent the same and the destruction of the Earl of Tyrone and other innocent persons came to England and, on pretence of being against the said Earl, had opportunity to observe the words and actions of the Earl of Shaftesbury and his party in London, that the petitioner was very industrious to persuade the rest of the witnesses to loyalty and testifying the truth in the said affairs, is partly known to Lord Hyde and Secretary Jenkins and several others, all which conspiracies and designs, whereof he has any knowledge, he is ready to publish, if his Majesty pleases, and that he had several sums given him by factious persons in London by the Earl of Shaftesbury's orders, which they now pretend to be debts, and threaten to arrest him as also several others, to whom he is truly indebted near 30l., borrowed while in London, and praying an order to the Attorney-General to prosecute the said William Ivie that the petitioner may be restored to his estate, which he detains under no other title than the conviction and forfeiture of the petitioner, procured by himself, and also praying that his relation of the said conspiracy and contrivance may be printed and an order in the meantime to pay him 30l. to pay his just debts contracted in the said affair, his allowance from his Majesty being but sufficient to keep him, as also his Majesty's protection. [2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Entry Book 1, p. 13.] Annexed,
The said affidavit of William Antell of Penselwood, Somerset. Was 18 years ago a prisoner for debt at Ilchester, when Peter Stone was convicted of a robbery committed on Edward Ivie and Joan Plimton, his sister, at Wells Assizes, and the said Edward Ivie was also indicted at the same assizes as an accessory and, there being no evidence against him, the deponent was, by the instigation of William Ivie, his brother, induced to swear that the said Edward told him, when he visited Stone in prison, that it was by his procurement that the said Stone had committed the said robbery, on which testimony, though false, the said Edward was found guilty as an accessory. The deponent now without any prospect of advantage declares that what he swore against the said Edward Ivie was false and that it was William Ivie's freeing the deponent from his imprisonment and the large promises of money and other advantages he made him that induced him to take the false oath against the said Edward Ivie. Soon after the said assizes he by the advice and at the expense of the said William Ivie transported himself to Tangier, where he remained 16 years, and returned to this country 2 years ago. [1½ pages. Ibid. p. 15.]
Passes to the following persons during 1682. Minutes:—
Date. Name. Place. Reference.
1682.
Jan. 5. Col. Henry Sidney with 14 servants. Holland. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 47.
Jan. 25. Thomas Tollemache with George Fairbrother, his servant. France. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 51.
Jan. 28. Mr. Verboon. Holland. Ibid.
Feb. 13. Monsieur le Grand Prieur de France, the Sieur Viliers and the Sieur Beaumont with 7 servants and 3 footboys and 8 or 10 dogs. France. Ibid. p. 63.
Feb. 18. Anne, Countess of Longford, and Lætitia, Countess of Donegall. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 66.
Mar. 11. The Marquess de Grana, Ambassador from his Imperial Majesty to the Catholic King, and Don Martin de los Rios with 10 servants. Flanders. Ibid. p. 67.
Mar. 30. Robert, Earl of Manchester, with Erby Montagu, 7 servants and 8 horses. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 70.
April 4. Sir Robert Dawes and William and John Deane with a servant. France. Ibid.
April 21. Richard, Viscount Preston, envoye extraordinary to the Most Christian King, and Sir Henry Pickering, — Downing and Philip Doughty and numerous others, gentlemen and servants. [France.] Ibid. p. 77 a.
April 22. Don Antonio de Leyva, sent by the Marquess de Grana, Governor of the Spanish Netherlands, to his Majesty, with his retinue and servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 78.
May 3. Thomas Howard, Groom of the Bedchamber, going to congratulate the Marquess de Grana on his entrance into the government of Flanders, with 3 servants and Mr. Woseley and his servant. Flanders. Ibid. p. 82.
May 3. Robert, Earl of Kingston, with Octavian Pulleyn, Edmund Hawles, Thomas Porter, John Parham, John Mackernes and George Williams, his gentlemen and servants, and 8 livery servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 93.
May 9. Manuel de Fonseca, Resident for the Spanish Low Countries, and his servant. Flanders. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 83.
May 14. Gervase Pierrepont and Lucy, his wife, and Mrs. Margaret Baranham with 3 servants. France. Ibid. p. 87.
June 5. Sir William Lytton, of Knebworth, Hertfordshire, with John Gosnall, John Halsey and another servant. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 93.
June 5. Christopher Vane, Dame Elizabeth, his wife, Gilbert Vane, his son, and Elizabeth Vane, his daughter, with 4 men and 3 women servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 95.
July 5. Francis and Sigismund, Counts de Conigseck [Königsegg], and the Earl of Kinigle [?] with Francis Hoffman, their governor, 2 valets de chambre and one page. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 103.
July 17. The Hon. Elizabeth Hervey with 4 women and 3 men servants. France. Ibid. p. 104.
July 20. Viscountess Hyde with the Countess of Thanet, her sister, and Mrs. Pilkington, Mrs. Gourdon, Mr. St. John, Mrs. Harding, a page, a clerk of the kitchen, a butler, two footmen, a coachman, postillion, helper, groom and 2 maidservants belonging to the Viscountess and Mr. Green, a page, a cook, two footmen and a maidservant belonging to Lady Thanet. France. Ibid. p. 107.
Aug. 3. James, Earl of Salisbury, Margaret, his wife, Lady Katherine and George Cecil, their children, with Dr. Le Feu[v]re[?], physician, 4 women servants, 12 men servants, 2 coachmen, 2 postillions, 2 grooms, a sumpterman, waggoners and a farrier, 2 coaches, 2 wagons and 34 horses. France. Ibid. p. 121.
Aug. 7. Charles Strode, Mary, his wife, and Jane, his daughter, and Edward Morton, his companion, with 3 servants. France. S.P. Dom. Entry Book 66, p. 122.
Aug. 8. Thomas Morgan and David and Richard Jenkins with 3 servants. France. Ibid.
Aug. 16. Thomas Porvey and William Stratford, his servant, with his coach and 2 horses. France. Ibid. p. 125.
Aug. 21. Robert, Lord Ferrers, with his lady and Robert Shirley, his son, with their retinue and servants. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 127.
Sept. 4. Edmund Walthew, M.A., Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge. Hamburg. Ibid. p. 136.
Sept. 20. Peter Fraiser, John Monroy and Robert Fotheringham. France. Ibid. p. 137.
Oct. 9. Daniel Pordie[?], to fetch back his wife. France. Ibid. p. 142.
Oct. 14. William, Viscount Charlemont, with his lady and 4 servants. France. Ibid. p. 137.
Oct. 16. The Comtesse de Soissons and the Comte de Baginasque with the Sieur de Santena, 4 waiting gentlewomen, 3 pages, the Sieurs Thuret and Dupias and numerous inferior servants. Flanders. Ibid. p. 142.
Oct. 31. Henry Villiers, son of Sir Edward Villiers, Knight Marshal to his Majesty, and Jonathan Blagrave, chaplain to the Princess of Orange, with a servant. Holland. Ibid. p. 146.
Nov. 20. Sutton Oglethorpe, Page of Honour to the King, with a servant. France. Ibid. p. 151.
Dec. 8. Marco Antonio, Prince Borghese, Signor Giovanne Antonio Fidue, Maximilian Wamberchas, Luca Antonio Gustaldi, and Giuseppe Gaiotta, Italian gentlemen, 11 servants, a cook and a footman. Parts beyond seas. Ibid. p. 172.
Dec. 20. Henry, Lord Grey of Ruthin, for his better education, with Octavian Pulleyn, his governor, and 3 servants. France. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 182.
Dec. 22. Viscountess Preston, wife of Viscount Preston, envoye extraordinary, now in France, to go to him with Edward and Katherine Graham, her children, Mrs. Heron, her waiting gentlewoman, — Digby, Fergus Graham, Thomas Deasy, Lawrence Boyle, esquires, William Taite and James Crake, gentlemen, 6 men servants and 6 women servants and 4 horses. France. Ibid. p. 185.
Newspapers for the Year.
The London Gazette, published twice a week, from No. 1682 (from Thursday, 29 Dec., 1681, to Monday, 2 Jan.) to No. 1786 (from Thursday, 28 Dec., to Monday, 1 Jan., 1683).

Footnotes

  • 1. No knight or baronet of this name occurs in books of reference.