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Charles II: January 1683

Pages 1-38

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1683 January-June. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1933.

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January 1683

Jan. 1. Resolution of the Committee appointed by the Common Council of Norwich to what should be inserted in the new charter, present, Robert Bendish, Sheriff Stebbing, Alderman William Helwys, John Atkinson, John Chapman, John Melchior and William Elwin, that a letter be sent to Lord William Paston to the following effect:—Whereas we are informed that your Lordship said that, if you were at the request of the body of this city propounded to his Majesty to be Recorder, you would accept thereof, in answer thereto we offer these reasons: 1. The election of a Recorder here has been beyond the memory of man by the Common Council and it will be looked on as a great infringement of the privileges of this city, if that office be executed by a deputy, most of the former Recorders having been of great learning in the law, who accepted the place as a probable step to places of eminent judicature, not having any regard to the very inconsiderable salary, not exceeding 10l. per annum. 2. The alteration will gratify the disaffected and disoblige the friends to the government and discourage any learned person to embrace the office of steward to serve under a deputy Recorder. 3. It is conceived that the main reason for nominating persons of eminence and nobility in some corporations has been in factious towns, among which we hope we shall not be reckoned.
Being informed that applications have been made for inscribing several persons in the charter to hold offices not named in any of the charters hitherto granted to this city but vested in the Court of Aldermen or the Common Council or both, viz., the Governors of the great Hospital, the Upper Chamberlain and several other officers, as to the Governors of the Hospital it is by the charter of foundation of Henry VIII. and of confirmation of Edward VI. settled in the Court of Aldermen, and as to the Chamberlain and all other under officers they have always been in the election of the said Court or the Common Council or both. If we be deprived of or restrained in the so long enjoyed right of election to such offices, it may discourage other corporations to follow our good example in the surrender of their charters and justify the arguments of the opposers of the surrender of our charter.
It is not thought agreeable to our privileges to name in the charter a reversioner to the town clerk's place.
It is desired that these our conceptions may obtain a favourable construction, it not being our intention to derogate from what shall tend to the safety of the government, the honour of our Lord Lieutenant and your Lordship, the benefit of the city and the satisfaction of the loyal citizens of this ancient city.
Alderman Salter fully assented to the substance of these reasons, but could not sign, being necessitated to be out of town to-day. [1½ pages. Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 1.]
[Jan. 1 ?] The majority of the Committee for the charter to the Earl of Yarmouth, Lord Lieutenant of Norfolk and Norwich, and Lord William Paston. Petition, showing that the petitioners relied on the King's declaration at the surrender of the charter and their Lordships' promises that no diminution of their ancient privileges and franchises was intended by such surrender but rather an augmentation thereof, yet find that lately some attempts have been made to infringe the privileges of the Court of Aldermen or Common Council to insert in the new charter persons to hold offices never held but by such as were elected by the said Court or the Common Council, and beseeching them to consider the evil consequences that may arise from such proceedings, being different from such instructions as by Act of Common Council were agreed to be laid before their Lordships, to which instructions the petitioners adhere. [Copy. Ibid. No. 2.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Commission to Richard Browne to be brigadier and lieutenant of the Queen's troop of Horse. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 164, p. 87.]
Jan. 2. Secretary Jenkins to Lord Finch. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure to him and his Board that the necessary orders be issued that the Dartmouth, Capt. St. Lo commander, be forthwith cleaned and fitted with all necessary stores, provision and ammunition, being designed to cruise on the Barbary coast. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 63, p. 58.]
Jan. 3.
Berwick.
John Luck, Mayor, to the Duke of Newcastle. I received your letter of the 27th intimating your having information that great numbers of Scotch fugitives, which daily increase, are taking up their abode here. Had you given me a hint of the informers, I should have unmasked their malice against me. Only three families have lately come, one a gentleman born here, whom I have seen in church, another came for his children's education and is now at Edinburgh, pursuing some matter of his own, so, were he a fugitive, he durst not appear in their judicatories, and the third is a lady, niece to the Earl of Queensberry and the Duke of Hamilton, who visited her in his return from Court. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 3.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Earl of Peterborough. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that Sir Charles Shugborow and Sir Matthew Dudley be added to the number of his deputy lieutenants for Northamptonshire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 181.]
Jan. 4.
Chichester.
The information of Mary Baker. (To the same effect as the next information). [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 4.]
Jan. 4.
Chichester.
The information of Elizabeth Wicker. Last St. Stephen's Day Lambert Barnard, junior, Woodnet Robert Miles' servant, and Robert Whitcher being at the White Horse outside the West Gate, Whitcher began the Duke of Monmouth's health, which he and Woodnet drank and both wished confusion and damnation to the King and the Duke of York and repeated the words several times and would have forced her to drink the same with them, and afterwards went to the chamber door of Francis Porter, a soldier quartered there, and endeavoured to break it open and afterwards struck him. [Copy. Ibid. No. 5.]
Jan. 4. Secretary Jenkins to Sheriff North. Having known the relation of the bearer at Hythe, for which I served in Parliament, I cannot deny her these few lines to desire your mercy to her brother that is in gaol among the late rioters of the city. I intercede not for him, if his case be not as this maid tells it, viz., that he was but a looker-on and that he neither did nor intended any mischief, but that he is, as his relations are, well affected to the government. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 182.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen of London. Whereas we are informed that conventicles and unlawful assemblies are frequently held in the common halls of several of the City Companies and it is matter of great scandal to our good subjects that those places, which were designed at first for public and laudable uses, should be at this time employed to serve seditious and evil designs, besides that it cannot but give us offence in a very sensible manner that any of our subjects, who as bodies corporate have had their being by the mere grace and bounty of ourself and our predecessors, should suffer those halls which they hold no otherwise than by charters and privilege derived from the Crown, to become the places where our laws are publicly affronted and those particularly that are of the greatest importance for the security of the Protestant religion and the peace and quiet of the kingdom, we therefore earnestly recommend that the Master and Wardens of all the said companies be speedily convened before you and straitly enjoined not to suffer any conventicles or unlawful meetings to be had for the future in any of the halls of the respective companies, and you are to give us a speedy account of what you shall have done therein to the end that such as shall not forthwith obey may be prosecuted according to law, and we likewise further require you to take care that the laws be duly put in execution in your several districts for the effectual suppressing of all conventicles and unlawful assemblies. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 187.]
Jan. 4. Dispensation to Thomas Legh, High Sheriff of the county palatine of Lancaster, to be out of his county. Minute. [Ibid. p. 189.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Deputy of Ireland. We have seen a letter signed by you and the Council dated 24 Nov. last with the Attorney General's report and opinion in the case of Lord Brittas, who was indicted on account of the Popish plot, but has not been further proceeded against. The said Attorney General having declared that the said lord may be relieved according to law, if we would grant him a pardon, and a nolle prosequi might be entered in his indictment and his bail discharged, we refer it to you and the Council to examine whether it be true, as has been represented, that several commoners in Ireland have been tried and acquitted notwithstanding the evidence against them for the same plot given by the men who have deposed and are intended to be witnesses against the said lord. You are further to enquire whether it be probable that the said lord, had he been a commoner and tried by the same juries, who, we are told, are all Protestants, would have been in the same manner acquitted and, if you find these things so and that the said witnesses had not that credit given their oaths or are like to have it, for want of reputation among their neighbours, you are to give directions to the Attorney General to enter a nolle prosequi on the indictment of the said lord and that he and his bail be discharged, and then we shall signify our further pleasure concerning the pardon. [1¼ pages. S.P. Ireland, Entry Book 1, p. 28.]
Jan. 5.
Chichester.
The examination of Francis Porter. (To the same effect as that of Elizabeth Wicker, calendared ante, p. 3.) [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 6.]
Jan. 5.
Chichester.
The examination of William Bettesworth. The evening of last St. Stephen's Day he heard a disturbance in his house and found there Francis Porter, Lambert Barnard, junior, Robert Whitcher and Woodnet. [Copy. Ibid. No. 7.]
Jan. 5.
Amsterdam.
Robert Ferguson to his wife. (Printed in Ferguson, Ferguson the Plotter, p. 99.) [Ibid. No. 8.]
Jan. 5. Post warrant to John Parker to ride in post from hence to the city of Wells and back. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 189.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a patent conferring on Robert Pringle of Stitchill and the heirs male of his body the dignity of a knight baronet. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 518.]
Jan. 6.
Badminton.
The Duke of Beaufort to [Secretary Jenkins]. I received the enclosed last post and thought it incumbent on me as Lord Lieutenant of that county to make use of the power and pursue the directions of the Militia Act in that case and sent an order to my deputy lieutenants to disarm the persons therein mentioned, but as to Coningsby etc. I shall defer that till his Majesty's further pleasure be signified to me, since he puts off declaring his resolution. This I looked on as necessary now without further direction than the Act, especially it having been practised so, as you told me, by Col. Stawell in Somerset, and it is certainly a satisfaction due to loyal men that make a particular complaint, but, if his Majesty dislikes it, I shall forbear it hereafter, for he is best judge how he is to be served and therefore 'tis not fit to be earnest in such a thing, when it is once laid before him, which made me so indifferent, as his Majesty said I was, in the other case. I think it of the greatest importance to have it done every where, but the delay of that must not make one decline it in a particular emergency, when the Act is so express and trusts the preservation of the peace in, and prescribes that method to, the Lord Lieutenant or two of his deputies in that case. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 9.]
Jan. 6. Bond for 60l. by John Langley to secure payment of 30l. to John Rous, if he procures for Langley on the manor of Mold in Flintshire 2,000l. or thereabouts for 6 or 12 months. [Ibid. No. 10.]
Jan. 6. Secretary Jenkins to Col. Coningsby. Acknowledging his letter of the 28th and desiring patience till it be proposed to his Majesty. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 182.]
Jan. 6. Secretary Jenkins to the Bishop of Bath and Wells. I am sorry to see the refractoriness of your people, but they are altogether in the wrong, as having begun the breach without reason. You may be sure no address nor any thing like it shall pass to the King through my hands. If I hear of it, I will obstruct it all I can and you may be sure it will have no effect with his Majesty. Pray have a care that Mr. Pa[cker] do nothing there but what he has warrant for from the Attorney General. [Ibid.]
Jan. 6. Commission to Edward Shirley to be captain of the company at Tangier whereof Edward Griffith was captain in Col. Charles Trelawny's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 69, p. 17.]
Jan. 6. Secretary Jenkins to the Lord Deputy. I am at last enabled to send you his Majesty's resolution relating to Lord Brittas. The draft letter was at first laid before his Majesty without the condition now annexed but on debate it was thought fit not to pass it without that condition. In this city there is a majority, though not by many heads, in the new Common Council of men that are true to the government, so we are not so much in danger of seditious motions and petitions nor of Acts of Common Council calculated as of late they have been for the thwarting of the government. The Amsterdam letters of yesterday sennight speak Lord Shaftesbury to be laid up of the gout and that Waller and the rest of his friends there are not without apprehensions of him, the gout being got into his stomach. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 341, p. 136.]
Jan. 7. Secretary Jenkins to the Earl of Peterborough. The preface was looked on as too sharp and personal, therefore 'tis advised that it be left out. If it be thought of use that a presentment be at all made, all the whereases are best left out and it will be best to begin We therefore of the Grand Jury, then the meeting must be described as in the whereas and instead of some of the said addressors other words as several disaffected persons should be inserted. This was considered in the best circumstances you could desire. I know our friend has a foul copy, so I do not send yours back again. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 183.]
Jan. 7.
Dublin.
The Lord Deputy to Secretary Jenkins. I shall not be particular on the subject mentioned in yours of the 23rd, because the Post Office is in such hands here that I am not certain but even my letters to you may be opened. I hope care will be taken to put it into better hands. I shall in general inform you that, on information formerly given me by the Lord Lieutenant, I gave directions to have a strict eye kept over those ports and, on the new commissioners coming in room of the farmers, I have lately got them to give directions to their officers in the several ports, and this is done without noise, for I gave no reason but the care they ought to have that his Majesty should not be defrauded of his customs. I shall make prudent inquiry after the merchants you name. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 343, No. 78.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney or Solicitor General of the petition of Thomas Rowe of Dover for a pardon for transporting wool out of the kingdom, he being altogether ignorant of the statutes against it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 228.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Reference to Sir Richard Lloyd, Judge Surrogate of the Arches, of the petition of Richard Beeston, vicar of St. Alkmond's, Shrewsbury, for a mandate for stopping all further prosecutions against him for marrying without a licence, which happened by the neglect of an apparitor, whom he entrusted to take it out, for which he is prosecuted in the Arches. [Ibid. p. 229.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lords for Ecclesiastical Preferments of the petition of John Brereton, M.A., rector of St. Mary's, Beverley, for a presentation to the rectory of Welton, Yorkshire, void by the death of John Dove. [Ibid.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Reference to the same of the petition of William Lambert, M.A., vicar of Hornsey in Holderness, for a grant of the vicarage of Welton. [Ibid. p. 230.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland of the petition of William Bridges praying that, having by his Majesty's leave purchased the employment of secretary to the Commissioners of Accounts and also to the Council of Trade of that kingdom and letters patent for the said employments having been granted him in the name of Robert Bridges, his trustee, with the fee of 200l. a year during good behaviour, and he not having received the money he paid for the said employments, his Majesty would order the said salary to be inserted in the civil list of the establishment now preparing. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 231.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
The King to Sir Thomas Exton, the King's Advocate, and Samuel Franklin, the King's Proctor. After reciting that several persons have been convented before Thomas Pinfold, Doctor of Laws, official to the Archdeacon of London, for not frequenting their parish churches and not receiving the Sacrament, requiring them to appear for the said Dr. Pinfold in any appeals brought against him by any of the said persons and to oppose the granting of any inhibitions to them being factious appellants, and to give him their assistance therein. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 189.]
[Jan. ?] Statement that several factious persons were presented by churchwardens in the city for not frequenting their parish churches and not receiving the Sacrament. Several appeared before Dr. Pinfold, official of the Archdeacon of London, who only admonished them to frequent their parish churches and to receive the Sacrament, from which some of them appealed to the Arches Court. Sir Richard Lloyd, Surrogate to the Judge of Arches, admitted their appeals, but denied their inhibitions except they would perform what the canons enjoined, from which they appealed to his Majesty in Chancery. They petitioned the late Lord Chancellor for commissions to judges of the common law and civilians and put two or three in a petition, though their facts were different and their appeals distinct. The Lord Chancellor granted to every person a single commission to civilians only, viz., Doctors Masters, Oldys, Raines, Hodges and Brice, that it might receive a speedy dispatch as its nature required, which commissions the appellants never extracted.
It is desired that the Lord Keeper may be desired not to grant any commissions to the appellants jointly and that the commissions may be granted to civilians only to avoid the great charge and delay which they endeavour by their appeals and that in all causes the civilians be Doctors Masters, Oldys, Hodges, Brice, Littleton, Thompson and Oxenden, the others being engaged as counsel.
Some of the appellants were of the Ignoramus juries. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 11.]
[Jan. ?] Statement by Mr. Newcourt of the manner in which excommunicated Dissenters may be relieved. At common law, if a Dissenter be excommunicated and will not be absolved by taking the oath de parendo juri et stando mandatis Ecclesiœ he procures a mandamus from the King's Bench to absolve him on fidejussory caution, which the ecclesiastical judge cannot refuse. Or, if the writ de excommunicato capiendo be taken out against him, he interposes an appeal before a public notary, on which the Lord Chancellor supersedes the writ, that he may prosecute his appeal, which he never does, unless the ecclesiastical judge by certifying the non-prosecution gets the supersedeas superseded, which cannot be done without great loss of time and great trouble and expense.
Neither Sir Robert Wiseman nor any other ecclesiastical judge should grant an inhibition without the justices being absolved and not without taking the oath himself personally or by commission. If by commission great care to be taken in naming the commissioners. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 12.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Attorney General. A fresh complaint is come from Berwick to the Duke of Newcastle and from him to his Majesty that the outlaws of Scotland resort thither in great numbers and take up houses there in numerous families, so that they are at this time in a condition to act any insolency against the garrison there. His Majesty, not having any troops so near that he can send them thither on the sudden, has resumed his first thoughts of bringing the place to some order by the civil magistrate and, calling to mind that the ordering a commission of association for that place was recommended to your care, commanded me last night to write to you to know if anything were done in that affair and, if not, to desire you to do all that can be done in it with all possible speed. He has likewise commanded me to tell you that he desires you would call to you Mr. Solicitor, Sir Francis Withins and such other of his counsel as you desire to consider of several great matters that are now depending or are to come on next term. If any of those you desire to speak with be out of town, he has commanded me on notice from you to write to them to be in town by such a day this week as you shall appoint, that you and they having spoken together, you and they may attend his Majesty at an evening here. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 184.]
Jan. 8.
London.
The Duke of York to the Prince of Orange. (Printed in Dalrymple, Vol. II., Appendix, Part I., p. 46.) [Nearly 2 pages. Holograph. S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 3, No. 76.]
Jan. 9. — to Secretary Jenkins. To-day, as the King went through the Park in his sedan from Mistress Gween's (Gwyn's) to Whitehall, two men were observed in disguise, whispering near the garden door between the Pall Mall and the garden wall and I heard them say, Damn him, we shall never have such an occasion again. Prevent any evil that may happen, if neglected, or we three, that were witnesses and are known in the world, will call you to an account. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 13.]
[Jan. 10.] Jacques Guibal and 9 other French Protestant refugees to the King. Petition for assistance to settle in Virginia. (Printed in S.P. Col., America etc., 1681–85, p. 367.) [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 14.]
[Jan. ?] Three French families to the King. Petition for a passage on one of his ships to Pennsylvania, where they are resolved to end their days having been obliged to leave their country two years ago on account of the persecution of the Protestant religion to which they belong. [French. Ibid. No. 15.]
Jan. 10.
London.
Constant Oates to Secretary Jenkins. Informing him that he is going to sea, and that, in case his Majesty should have any occasion for him, he will leave word with his wife where he may be sent for, and asking to intercede with the King and some of the lords that he may not be ruined by those fanatical fellows. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 16.]
Jan. 10.
Chichester.
Capt. Edward Sandys to the Earl of Oxford. Sending him the enclosed copies of the examinations taken before the Mayor. The Bishop presents his most humble service to you. The Mayor has done as much as in him lies, having secured the parties concerned in prison. [Dated 1682, but endorsed 1681–2. Ibid. No. 17.]
Jan. 10. Statement to Sir John Churchill, Recorder of Bristol, of the constitution of the corporation there and of the politics of the members of it, and suggesting the expulsion of the 4 Aldermen indicted for joining with Sir Robert Atkyns, and how it can be managed best. [Ibid. No. 18.]
Jan. 10.
Morpeth.
Order of the Northumberland Quarter Sessions after reciting an order of the Quarter Sessions at Hexham, 12 July last, on a letter from the Duke of Newcastle that the management of country keeping be lodged in the High Sheriff, provided that the said order be confirmed at the Michaelmas Quarter Sessions, which it was on 4 Oct., and that the court considering the said orders and it appearing that no salary was agreed on for the said country keeping nor any conditions made on behalf of the county nor any order for levying money for the said country keeping and by reason of the defects of the said orders they conceived themselves at liberty to dispose of the said country keeping to such as would take it on the best terms, and also on reading a letter from the Duke of Newcastle to Sir Ralph Delaval, intimating his intent in his former letter was to ease the county by lessening the charge of country keeping, and James Howard, a justice for the county, offering to take the said office of country keeping for 300l. per annum (500l. per annum being paid formerly for the said service) and to pay for all horses, cattle and sheep stolen out of houses, stables or byres as well as out of the open fields, and Edmund Craister, the High Sheriff, refusing to accept the said office on the same terms as the said Howard: that James Howard be country keeper for the year beginning last Michaelmas and that all former orders concerning the same be vacated and that he have for his salary 300l. per annum and give good security to the county and that warrants forthwith issue to levy 12s. 6d. per pound for his said salary, 100l. whereof is to be paid to him forthwith and the remainder to be kept in the Treasurer's hands till the county be paid for stolen goods. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 19.] Annexed,
Copies of the said orders of 12 July and 4 Oct, 1682. [Ibid. No. 19 i.]
[Jan. 10 ?] David Fitzgerald to the King. Petition for an order for payment to him of the contents of the account lodged by him with Mr. Secretary so that he may obtain his liberty. Has been prisoner some 5 weeks in the Gatehouse for debts contracted in promoting the King's interest. (See last volume of the Calendar, pp. 565, 587.] [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 20.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland of the petition of Maurice Hurly, showing that his father was sequestred of 2,000l. per annum in Tipperary by the usurped powers and that he was adjudged innocent and to be restored since the restoration and that he is frustrated of the benefit and dispossessed of the lands set out to him by the usurped authority in Connaught without any previous reprize, contrary to the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, and praying a reference of his petition to the Duke of Ormonde. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 230.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Queensberry, Treasurer Principal, and John Drummond of Lundin, Treasurer Deput. Warrant for returning to Sir William Sharp of Stoniehill, late cash keeper, his bond for 450l. sterling or thereabouts due to the King as the balance of his accounts of moneys received and paid by him since 1 May last, and to take his discharge for so much of the balance due to him of the accounts of money received and paid by him before the said 1 May last. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 519.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to Major Andrew White, Lieut.-Governor of Edinburgh Castle, during pleasure of a yearly pension of 200l. sterling to be paid at Whitsunday and Mertinmes, the first payment to be made next Whitsunday, the perquisites and fees belonging to his present employment coming far short of what he had enjoyed when major to the Earl of Mar's regiment. [1½ pages. Ibid. p. 520.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a presentation in favour of William Speid, late minister at Botriphnie, in the diocese of Moray, to be minister at the parish church and parochine of Ednam in the shirefdome of Tweeddale and diocese of Glasgow. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 521.]
Jan. 11. The Earl of Oxford to Secretary Jenkins. Sending him the informations, which had just come into his hands. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 21.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen. Recommending to them Thomas Fuller, M.A., of Christ's College, Cambridge, for presentation to the rectory of St. Margaret Pattens, void by the death of Edward Hicks, D.D., the last incumbent, and in their disposal. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 85.]
Jan. 12. The Grand Jury at the Quarter Sessions for Southwark to the Justices thereof. Presentment praying them to take some effectual course for the suppression of all the conventicles in that borough and to exercise their utmost authority to increase the number and strengthen the interest of the loyal subjects among them, they in that borough labouring more particularly under this grievance, that persons notoriously disaffected are become the majority of governors of an hospital of royal foundation among them and so the disposers of all offices relating thereto and the managers of a large revenue belonging thereto. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 22.]
Jan. 12.
Amsterdam.
Robert Ferguson to his wife. (Printed in Ferguson, Ferguson the Plotter, p. 100.) [Ibid. No. 23.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
Presentation of Richard Bravill, B.D., to the vicarage of Welton, Yorkshire, void by the death of the last incumbent. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 57, p. 57.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Bishop of St. Asaph. His Majesty has received a good character of the loyalty of William Thompson, rector of St. Peter's in Chester, and of his pains in executing his functions for several years with good success, considering the varieties of ill men he has had to deal with. He has been likewise informed how he has shown himself active in prosecuting and bringing to justice both several Dissenters and others, whose practices were dangerous to the government, which gave occasion to the disaffected there to level their malice not only against himself but stir up the late rioters there to commit outrages against his church too. For these and other reasons he gave me his special command to write to you recommending him to your particular favour for the next sinecure in your gift that shall become void, which may be some help and encouragement to a person so useful in the times we are fallen into. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 53, p. 86.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland of the petition of Theodore Russell, Governor of Galway, for a reference to the Duke of Ormonde of his petition and annexed case, setting forth some differences in accounts between him and the corporation of Galway and that he is advised by his counsel that in justice and equity the revenue of the said town belongs to him till in one payment they pay him 3,000l., and therefore praying a grant to him of the mesne rate of the premises and the charter duties of the said town. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 231.]
Jan. 13. Secretary Jenkins to the Earl of Oxford. His Majesty directs that Capt. Sandys apply to Sir Richard May, Recorder of Chichester, for advice what to do in order to the setting at liberty of those two soldiers that are under arrest. His Majesty is told that, if they proffer common bail for their appearance, it cannot be legally refused. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 185.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Duke of Newcastle. Your letter to me of the 30th was produced last night before his Majesty with those of Mr. Wray and the Mayor of Berwick. His Majesty gave that credit to Mr. Wray's account that he resolved, Mr. Attorney being present, that a commission of association should be sent thither. This was with the advice of the Lord Keeper and several others of the Council. Mr. Attorney acquainted his Majesty that he had made great search for the entry or enrollment of the Berwick charter, but had found nothing of it, yet that it was in a manner necessary he should see it, lest there should be clauses in it exclusive of an association and so our labour prove to be in vain. Therefore his Majesty desires you to procure a copy of their last charter and to send it hither as soon as you can. He desires from you likewise what account you can give of the Recorder newly chosen there and whether his approbation be requisite to the confirming of him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 185.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Duke of Beaufort. I had not an opportunity till last night of laying before his Majesty your letter of the 6th, with Serjeant Hopton's letter to you. His Majesty and those of my lords, who heard the account of it, approved fully of what you had given way to and your deputy lieutenants had executed in the disarming of those fanatics. When any further or more general resolution is taken, you shall hear of it. [Ibid. p. 186.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Mayor of Durham. Your letter to me and the enclosed information were read yesterday in Council. His Majesty approved of your proceedings in that you put the matter into a legal way of trial. He desires you to take care the witnesses be not absent, when this cause is brought to trial. [Ibid.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Commissions to James Fletcher of Cranston to be cornet of the troop of the Earl of Balcarres and to John Cleland to be quartermaster of Lord Rosse's troop, both in John Graham of Claverhouse's regiment of horse. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, pp. 522, 523.]
Jan. 15. Sir Robert Sawyer to Secretary Jenkins. Informing him that in the last charter of Berwick granted 30 Ap. 2 Jac. there are no words of exclusion restraining his Majesty from granting a commission of association, so that he is of opinion he may do so. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 24.]
Jan. 15. Sir Roger L'Estrange to Secretary Jenkins. Had my importunities to have had the sifting of Baldwyn prevailed, he should either have delivered up some persons more considerable than himself or not have been in a condition at this day to do more mischief. To-day is published by him a libel entitled A Defence of the Charter and municipal rights of the City of London, written by Hunt, of venomous malice against the King and the Duke, so far as I can judge by dipping into it.
Another devilish thing is come out this morning too of Hickeringill's called The Test and Trial of the goodness and value of Spiritual Courts, printed by Larkin, another instrument to the faction. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 25.]
[Jan. 15.]
Stamford.
Thomas Oliver to Mr. Beake at his coffee-house at Charing Cross. Being informed you are one of the messengers, if you are, pray give me your advice on the following. 30 Oct. last I was with two or three of the capital burgesses of this corporation, when one of them, Matthew Dawkins, said, The King is a rogue, of which words I have given information on oath to the Mayor, but I received a check from one of the Aldermen, who said I was a rogue, so there will be whiggish dealings, if they are left to themselves. [Undated. Postmark 15 Jan. Ibid. No. 26.]
Jan. 15.
London.
Cheque from Thomas Shepard to Thomas Pilkington for 3,000l. with receipt on the back by Pilkington. [Ibid. No. 27.]
Jan. 15. Bond by Thomas Pilkington for securing payment to Thomas Shepard of 3,045l. on 16 April next. [Ibid. No. 28.]
Jan. 15. Information of Mr. Stepkin written in Secretary Jenkins' presence. Father Creagh, Magragh (Macgrath), Dwyer, Synod and Duggin are acting their parts in London.
Macdaniell with an engineer came by London for Ireland about 6 days since, to take an exact account of all the forts and seaports there to supply two imperfect surveys he has already. 5,400 arms are already landed in Ireland and 6,600 more are to be dispatched from Paris to Nantes and thence for Ireland. I saw one Roach, who goes by the name of Stone, and one O'Neal that takes the name of Russell then going from Versailles to Nantes to conduct the last arms to Ireland. Lord Clanrickarde, Col. Maccartie and Col. Lacy are to head the matter in Ireland, when put in execution.
With much entreaty I got the knowledge of this from Capt. Sheldon. As I have been further informed by him I found him very punctual and seemingly very zealous for his Majesty's interest and I the rather believe it as I could never find he received any reward from the French King, though all the rest have been plentifully requited. He is a man of sober conduct and professes himself a Roman Catholic. I have known him about 6 years but more intimately the last year. I left Paris on Sunday and came to Calais last Monday and stayed there for a wind till Friday morning and for more expedition hired a boat.
At a conference at Trapp by Cardinal de Bouillon, Capt. Sheldon and others some seemed to scruple the success of this design, for the King of England had now reduced that part of his discontented subjects to more obedience than formerly, to which the Cardinal answered that he could in a month make as great a division there as ever was in man's memory.
I had the first propositions about 4 days before I left Paris from Capt. Sheldon. The other, that was presented at Versailles, Capt. Sheldon received from one Floree and immediately, when he had copied it, gave it me.
This design was to be put in execution on a Sunday in service time in all the most considerable towns in Ireland by surprising the people at the church doors, giving no quarter, in case they should apprehend the attempt difficult, and at the same time the gates and, before this was to be done in Limerick, they should have notice from a merchantman at the harbour that there was assistance by 6 men-of-war at hand, that were to be furnished with men, arms and ammunition.
This design has been hatching this 12 months but nothing reduced to any method before 24 Oct. last, when these propositions were presented at Fontainebleau.
At the first proposing of this, which was to Cardinal de Bouillon, he assured them that, if the King should not assist so good a design, he would render his all to it, and would acquaint the Pope, who, he was confident, would freely contribute to it.
I never had any conference or the least knowledge of this design with any but Capt. Sheldon. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 343, No. 79.]
Jan. 15.
Guernsey.
The Lieut.-Bailiff and Jurats to Secretary Jenkins. The information we have had by the letters of Sir E. Andros, our Bailiff, of your favour to us in having taken into your consideration the difference between our Governor and ourselves obliges us to render you our most humble thanks and encourages us to inform you of the facts concerning the let-passes which have been lately imposed alike on the foreign merchants and the inhabitants of the island who go out with their ships from the harbour of the highway. You will know that at the end of 1677, when war with France was expected, his Majesty sent some companies to the island and it was found proper to place a guard of soldiers on the said highway and afterwards our Governor ordered that all masters of vessels going out of that harbour should have a pass signed by him or his lieutenant. This is the first establishment not only of the passes but of the guard in this town. We bore this innovation in that time of danger but though the cause for the establishment of the guard is gone, it is continued on other pretences, from which divers inconveniences have followed, for instance shipmasters being obliged to pay 5 sols for each pass and soldiers of the guard being employed to arrest ships and goods and to fire musket shots (and afterwards the castle cannon shots) to oblige the ships to return, when they have failed to show their pass to the soldiers of the guard, and very often after the guard prevents inhabitants and foreigners and even sailors to go on the said highway. We could add several other grievances. We do not differ with the Governor about the duties of the ship masters to him. It has been the constant practice that the receivers of the customs for the Governors inform themselves from the masters of ships of whence they are come and whither they are bound and bring them before the Governor, if he thinks fit, but at present those who performed these duties are arrested by the guard when they neglect the pass, which is imposed on all. The guard house is continued more to serve as an office and the soldiers as agents of the receivers of the customs than for any other reason, the masters of ships which remain in the road without coming into the harbour not being obliged to take the said let-pass. We are far from disposed to quarrel with our Governor, to whom we have and always shall have all the respect due to his quality and merit. We have in all respectful ways tried to obtain by his means the redress of our grievances but, notwithstanding his letter to us, we see everything continue as before. We therefore beg that through your favour every thing in this island should be put in the condition in which it was before 1677 and that the soldiers be withdrawn to the Castle where his Majesty has caused convenient lodgings for them to be built. We also beg you to allow our Bailiff to represent to you (and if necessary to his Majesty) the disastrous consequences of this matter, which is so contrary to our privileges. [2 pages. French. Signed by the Bailiff and 11 Jurats. S.P. Channel Islands 1, No. 127.]
[Before Jan. 16.] Alphabetical list of the adventurers of the Royal African Company and of the Court of Assistants with the number of attendances of each and notice of the election of officers to be held 16 Jan. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 29.]
Jan. 16.
London.
H. Peirson to — Blunt. I delivered your letter according to your desire and last Sunday was ordered to appear before the King and Council. The first word the King spoke was that he intended to pardon Lewis, but first desired he would come over, and gave me his royal word that not a hair of his head should be touched, if he could discover anything that would deserve his pardon, but the King is afraid he intends to cheat him. He also told me that, if he would come over and let him know what he has to discover, he would give him a good gratification and, if he can discover nothing but what has been discovered already, the King will order him to be set on shore in Holland again and no man should molest him, so I desire you to persuade him to come over.
After I had spoken in your recommendation, I told the King you desired him to grant you a pardon, for you had a great discovery to make to him. His answer was that he knew you to be a very honest man, which he told to all the Council and spoke much in your behalf and told me he would not send you a pardon, but he will protect you so that no man can touch you, for I heard him say to the Lord Keeper, you should be kept private in Whitehall. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 30.]
Jan. 16.
Littlecote.
Edward Seymour to the Earl of Conway. I have been so diligent in attending that I have not had leisure to give an account of my charge, but it is no small satisfaction that, since I must part with her, she returns to you safe and sound and so mettlesome that, if you are not an arrant fumbler, we shall be blest with a second chapter in Matthew full of names. For permitting her to be so long absent, I can thank neither you nor her enough. [Conway papers. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 31.]
Jan. 16/26.
Amsterdam.
Robert Ferguson to his wife. (Printed in Ferguson, Ferguson the Plotter, p. 102.) [Ibid. No. 32.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting that Robert Lever of Alkerington, Lancashire, has stated by his petition that as executor and administrator of several persons he has been forced to suits in law and equity and that his solicitor for gain deserted his business and by combination with his adversaries preferred a malicious indictment of barratry against him and that at the trial during his absence and unpreparedness a verdict was given against him and a fine levied on his goods and that he is threatened to be ruined by like indictments against him in the names of insolvent persons and therefore besought a pardon, a reference thereof to the Attorney General and his report that the said conviction was obtained unduly and by surprise and that the prosecutors thereby encouraged prosecute the petitioner for very trivial matters, for a pardon to the petitioner for all offences of barratry and trespasses committed by him. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 54, p. 149.]
Jan. 16. Certificate by Secretary Jenkins that on that day the oaths of allegiance and supremacy with the usual oath of the office were administered by him to Dr. William Trumbull on signification of his Majesty's pleasure for his admission in the office of one of the Clerks of the Signet on the death of Sir Philip Warwick. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 66, p. 190.] Prefixed,
The said oath of the office. [Ibid.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a patent for 14 years to Jeremy Fisher for his invention of an engine for sawing wood and timber. [Ibid. p. 191.]
Jan. 16.
London.
Newsletter to John Squier, Newcastle. 'Tis almost impossible to tell you how the proceedings of the Common Council last Tuesday have altered the affairs of this city, for the Whigs are so disordered by being forced to return thanks to Sir John Moore that they know not how to behave. All agree that the Lord Mayor behaved in the chair with a great deal of prudence and resolution. Sir Robert Clayton attacked him first with a petition, which he desired might be read to the Common Council, but he told Sir Robert that he ought to have shown that petition to the Court of Aldermen and have had their approbation. Since he had not proceeded regularly, he would not have any one surprised and therefore it should not be read. He added, as he was chief magistrate of the city, he would preserve the privileges thereof and the rights of the chair and therefore ordered them to proceed on the question he should propose.
Pursuant to the Lord Mayor's order several meetings were disturbed and some citizens taken there, who are indicted for rioters, the justices themselves appearing evidence against them. They were found guilty.
Yesterday the Lieutenancy met at the Matted Gallery in Guildhall, where great expectations were of what would be done by them, but nothing passed but the examining and fining of several defaulters for not being on duty nor any one for them, among whom were several Quakers, who were forced to pay down what the court assessed them, and this day 'twas said a court of Aldermen would sit in order to swear Sir Thomas Hammond, the new judge of the Sheriff's court, but, being sessions at the Old Bailey, they did not meet, but the Committee for the city charter met to-day to consider what methods to take for the defence of it against the Quo Warranto. The Common Council not only voted their thanks should be returned to Sir John Moore, late Lord Mayor, but actually [did] it before they rose that day, he being then in court, though much opposed by one lately a sheriff, he saying that Sir James Edwards in his mayoralty kept the city in peace and had no thanks given him, to which the Lord Mayor replied they should, as voted, give thanks to Sir John Moore, and, if they thought fit, to all his predecessors.
Yesterday was seized at Mr. Baldwin's, the printer's, a libellous book of Mr. Hunt's entitled, The Defence of the Charter of London.
The States of Holland consulted with the Deputies of the Admiralty about raising the money for fitting out the squadron of men-of-war designed to sea this summer and find they will want a great deal more than is already raised, for which they have no fund. They are thinking of raising a new one on chimneys, which they hope will bring in as much money as will pay a debt of 7,000 tun of gold contracted by them in 1659 for succouring Copenhagen.
They write from Vienna that a party of the garrisons of Komorn, Papa, Uspring and Raab were charged by a party of Turks and forced to retreat, having left 200 of them dead on the place. Prince Charles of Lorraine is made President of the Council and to command solely during the Emperor's absence from Vienna. [3 pages. Admiralty, Greenwich Hospital 2, No. 67.]
Jan. 16. Informations from Mr. Stepkins. Capt. Shelton brought the 4,500 arms a fortnight ago next Friday week. The last parcel of arms was sent for Nantes. Creagh to be found at Wise's, a merchant from Waterford. Comte d'Auvergne to command in chief. The Irish regiment incorporated in Furstemberg's regiment. Sheldon to have a better commission. The Cardinal paid for the arms, but the money came through Sheldon's hands. Is charged for having cheated him with 600 arms. Tilly is Sheldon's true name. Stepkins lives at Calais, but has been at Paris since October.
Glissane at the conference at Trapp assured the Cardinal the whole of Ireland, both gentle and simple, would be in readiness on knowledge that the French King would assist them with arms and ammunition. The Cardinal replied that they should be furnished with men, money, ammunition and arms and that nothing should be wanting they thought might advance their design.
Their preferments:—Col. Lacy's son is made lieut.-colonel to Count Koningsmarck's regiment besides 1,000 crowns a year pension. Glissane has already a benefice of 3,000 livres a year and a good gratuity of ready money. Creagh is made Prior of the Jacobins in Langres, value, 1,200 crowns. The rest were gratified with ready money and further preferments promised them. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 343, Nos. 80, 87.]
Jan. 17. Commissions to Symon Greensted to be lieutenant and to Thomas Russell to be ensign of the company of trained bands of Feversham and to Anthony Jennings to be lieutenant and to Thomas Jennings to be ensign of trained bands of Fordwick, both in the first regiment of the Cinque Ports. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 69, p. 20.]
Jan. 17.
Dublin.
Lemuel Kingdon to the Earl of Conway. Our debate to-day with the farmers before the Barons of the Exchequer lasted so long and the packet is so near going that I cannot give you a relation of the length I intended. The enclosed is the state I promised of the late farmers' accounts, only they have since claimed above 50,000l. paid here and in England on account of Tangier. How much thereof will be allowed them cannot be known till we hear further from the Treasury in England. By the next you shall find me larger.
The late farmers have let a lease of the hearth money for the present year to Roger Moore. [Conway papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 343, No. 82.]
Jan. 18. Samuel Oates to Secretary Jenkins. I write to take off the calumnies which by ill men may be offered to you of me. I am amongst that party every day and intimate with them but not of them. Would I but be of their way, it would not be with me as it is now. The want of incouragement prevents much business and were I under that I could do his Majesty at this time the best of service, but people will not talk of things in the street. I am endeavouring to smoke out a design of some, who are gone over to Holland, I suppose under pretence to visit their little Anthony, but I find it will be to some other purpose and this I. expect to get out by our Fifth Monarchy friends.
I am very earnest with my brother, the doctor. I have persuaded him out of his great opinion of those people. If he were some time privately sent for, he would offer proposals, which, I am sure, would please his Majesty.
I beg you to intercede with his Majesty concerning my part or moiety of the discoveries of the Jesuits' estates, which he has granted me an order for our hearing before the Lords of the Treasury. I have been at great charges three years about them, My right in these discoveries will amount to 6 or 700l. Our business is now coming to a hearing. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 33.]
[Jan. 18 ?] John Guillim, late captain in the Guards, to the King. Petition for his Majesty's bounty as formerly, having been ordered 35l. a quarter, which is now 1½ years in arrear, amounting to above 200l., the petitioner having lain sick five months. (See last volume of the Calendar, p. 557.) [Ibid. No. 34.]
Jan. 18. A short memoir of Guillim's sufferings and services. At 14 he entered the late King's service, was cornet to the late Marquess of Worcester, served in the garrison of Raglan Castle during the whole siege, went afterwards to France and thence to Ireland but not meeting with any service there for his Majesty, he went with 80 or more English officers to Spain where, for the death of Ascham, he was imprisoned above 40 months suffering great hardships and, when he escaped, was sent by his Majesty to Lord Middleton in Scotland, whence he returned with Lord Middleton and was afterwards in the regiment of Guards in Flanders. He was twice captain in that regiment and was twice put out for his religion in which he was born and educated. Endorsed, " 18 Jan. '82[–3]. Notting[ham]." [Ibid. No. 35.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Sir John Berry. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that he receive on board the Henrietta or any other of the ships under his command and designed for Tangier, four Moors, subjects of the Emperor of Morocco, one woman said to be the wife of one of them, one Algerine Turk and two Jews, who are all to have their passage gratis to Tangier, and further that the usual allowance of victuals be given to the first six, but that all of them be treated with the civility and humanity becoming the commanders of his Majesty's men-of-war.
The Algerine desires to be shipped in some other vessel than that wherein the Moors are shipped and I think it would not be amiss to gratify him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 63, p. 59.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Earl of Nottingham. His Majesty, having seen the memorial enclosed is willing to gratify the French Ambassador. He would therefore have you send your orders to your officers at Portmsouth to let the Frenchman have such a mart for his money as is therein desired. [Ibid. p. 60.]
Jan. 18. Secretary Jenkins to Sir William Turner. I enclose a petition to his Majesty for his recommendation to be matron of Bridewell worth 30 or 40l. a year from a poor woman, representing her husband and herself to have been great sufferers for the right cause. If her case be found favourable and she well qualified for the employment she desires, I doubt not she will find your usual charity and protection to those in her circumstances. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 187.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall, Treasury Chambers.
Report by the Lords of the Treasury on the petition of Thomas Tilson, craner of the port of Dublin. Having considered the matter and the reports of the Solicitor General of Ireland and the Surveyor of fortifications and buildings there we agree with the Lord Lieutenant in concurring with their opinions as to the petitioner's right to the house mentioned in his petition and to the value thereof which we conceive may be properly paid out of the charge of the management of the customs, but, when that office shall next become void, we offer our opinions that it will be for your Majesty's service to except the said house out of any new grant of the office. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 343, No. 92.]
Jan. 19. Hastings Pitt to Secretary Jenkins. A petition was given in to you yesterday at your own house, where I waited till you went to Whitehall, where you told William Ashlocke he should give you a copy of the papers he mentioned, which are of great moment, and which are at your command, if you admit us to your presence. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 36.]
Jan. 19. Declaration by Richard Robinson that, whereas he is now sued in the ecclesiastical court for saying in the market-place of Josias Pleydell, Archdeacon of Chichester, that he heard he was drunk at Petworth, all the grounds he had for saying so were because Rice, the coffee-man at Petworth, had said so, and that he was satisfied that he ought not to have said so and was sorry for it. [Attested copy. Ibid. No. 37.]
Jan. 19/29.
Amsterdam.
Robert Ferguson to his wife. (Printed in Ferguson, Ferguson the Plotter, p. 102.) [Imperfect, the end being cut off. Ibid. No. 38.] Enclosed,
The recipe for a plaister mentioned in the letter. [Ibid. No. 38 I.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
Reference of the petition of John Bawdon and William Bolton of London, merchants, for a nolle prosequi on an information against them for transporting some subjects to Barbados and Maryland contrary to law, whereof they are convicted, to the Attorney General, who, with the assistance of Serjeant Sir George Jeffreys for his better information, is to examine and report hereon. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 232.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lords of the Treasury of the petition of Richard Hutton of Goldsburgh, Yorkshire, for a lease for 31 years of the tithes of herbage, corn and grain annually paid from the parishes of Cleyton, Frickley and Shipping, Yorkshire, to commence from the expiration of his former lease at the same rent and such fine as his Majesty shall think fit. [Ibid.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Sir John Berry. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that he receive on board one of the ships for Tangier not only the Algerine Turk mentioned in his last, but also four bales of goods belonging to him, the same as well as himself to be transported gratis. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 63, p. 60.]
Jan. 20.
Chichester.
Samuel Carleton to Secretary Jenkins. As I hear that Mr. Burton, to whom I sent a bill of my charges in Mr. Farrington's business, is gone into the country very sick, I enclose a particular thereof. The person who will wait on you with this letter will receive the money and remit it me. All the news here is of the Duke of Monmouth's coming here, 3 February. The factious party have provided all things for his reception already. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 39.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Duke of Newcastle. The Attorney General having since my last found out the charter of Berwick dated 2 Jac., his Majesty desires you to send hither a list of gentlemen fit to be put into a commission of association. Mr. Attorney desires they may be persons of constant and eminent affections to the government, of competent estates and resiants within or near the town. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 187.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Sir Roger Norwich. The presentment you sent me was read last night before his Majesty and several of the Council and, the Lord Keeper being absent, I was commanded to recommend it from his Majesty to him to issue one or more commissions for administering the oaths as you direct. [Ibid. p. 188.]
Jan. 20. Secretary Jenkins to the Earl of Gainsborough at Elmington in Rutland. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that Viscount Campden be added to the number of deputy lieutenants for Rutland. [Ibid.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Archbishop of York. The Lord Keeper and the Lord President, having had a printed sermon of a Mr. Clifford's put into their hands that has several passages in it that deserve, as they judge, your censure, desired me to acquaint you with it and to transcribe one paragraph that goes inclosed. They leave it to you to proceed as you see cause. The title is The Power of Kings etc., asserted etc., the author William Clifford, the printer Robert Clavell, at the Peacock in St. Paul's Churchyard, 1682. The malicious use made of it is to show that Protestants have reason to be for a Bill of Exclusion. [Ibid. p. 189.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Bishop of Carlisle. His Majesty, having a very good testimony of Mr. Hassell, the now High Sheriff of Cumberland, and being confirmed in his good opinion of him from his near relation to you, was pleased not to alter his resolution nor to name another, notwithstanding the Earl of Thanet's intercession in his behalf, being persuaded that you would have that care and kindness for your nephew as to lighten his burden, which may not prove so heavy that it may be unseasonable for his present circumstances, and this is the request I have to make to you. [Ibid. p. 190.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Mayor of Lincoln. I am informed that Dawkins, a capital burgess of your corporation, spoke about the end of last October certain insolent and ugly words of his Majesty, and that information has been given in before you of those words and I hope such proceedings have been had against the offender as is agreeable to law and your duty. I shall desire a line from you that I may be able to give an account of what is done. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 190.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Mr. Morley at Farnham Castle. Your letter to me of the 14th was laid before his Majesty. It gave him welcome occasion to express his sense of the respect and frankness wherewith the Justices at Winchester expressed their readiness to part with their county hall and to transfer their right in it to his Majesty for his better conveniency of building. He will give them his thanks when he comes next among them and desires you in the meantime to assure them that what they intend is very acceptable to him and so is that of the wealthy farmers of the country to assist him with their teams and carriages. Certainly the county will be made very happy by his residence among them and they will deserve to be so more and more by such dutiful applications. I beseech you to present my most humble service to my Lord of Winton. [Ibid. p. 191.]
Jan. 21.
Fulham.
The Bishop of London to Secretary Jenkins. The Lords, finding a former grant to this place only ad corroborandum recommended Mr. Withers to the King's favour, who being in full possession is to resign the benefice and take it of the King pleno jure. It is therefore prayed you would withdraw the caveat, which stands in the way of his Majesty's right. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 40.]
Jan. 21. The Bishop of Chichester to the Duke of York. Sending a true state of what affairs are reduced to in Chichester by the maladministration of the present Recorder, Sir Richard May, who had at an election of parliament men opposed a worthy loyal gentleman and joined with Major Braman, who had given notice to Hastings, an apothecary, charged with scandalous language against the King and the Duke of York, to conceal himself till the assizes were over and had quitted him by an Ignoramus jury, who had prevented Henry Peckham, then Mayor, and the loyal citizens from presenting an Address to the King and had torn the city seal off it, who, when Samuel Carleton, the Bishop's secretary, who had offered to serve as constable, arrested 14 Jan. last an Anabaptist preacher, set him at liberty, though he refused to take the oath of allegiance, and who said that the two or three young fellows, who assaulted one of Capt. Sands' soldiers, were but silly boys and children who ought to be set at liberty, but aggravated the soldier's cutting one of them as a great offence. If he were a man of good principles and put the laws against conventicles vigorously in execution, he might reduce the people to a general outward conformity in a very short time. [3½ pages. Ibid. No. 41.]
Jan. 21.
Dublin.
The Lord Deputy to Secretary Jenkins. I received yours of the 6th with the enclosed letter concerning Lord Brittas last Council day at the Board, but had not time to discourse the matter, but found that the conditions added will endanger his not receiving the benefit he expected, for the judges will be very shy how they put under their hands what they believe would have happened, if he had been tried, and we shall scarce represent any more in his favour, unless they do.
I am glad to hear affairs go so well in the city and wish they may daily improve as also the Lord's gout you mention. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 343, No. 84.]
Jan. 21.
7 p.m., Dublin.
Lemuel Kingdon to the Earl of Conway. Last post I sent you the state of the Farmers' account and we have been twice with them since before the Barons of the Exchequer. We have closed their account to 1 May last. As soon as it is drawn out, I will send you an abstract of it. The Farmers put into the Exchequer to-day a paper, a copy of which I cannot get to-day to send you. The effect of it was that they would account no further than to 1 May last and I really believe they will pay no more money but leave the government here at least 6 months in arrear. They will certainly claim Lord Ranelagh's 80,000l. and the 24,000l. bond besides their claim to the hearths and some pretence I hear they have to the quit rents and have great reason to think they will go a great way in carrying their two pretences to the 80,000l. and the 24,000l. bond, such is their interest here. We find almost every body averse to this our management, for the pill wants gilding, but truly I think we shall carry it through, though, if I durst trust paper, I could make great complaints to you, but of them by a safe hand.
Little more of moment has since happened and I have been very large with Lord Rochester. I desire, when you have oppotunity, you would with care see how he relishes things from me and how I stand with him, for I find plainly officious things are done from hence. I take all the care I can to prevent their practices, but shall want your assistance for my support.
Lord Ranelagh would do well to take some care of his undertaking on your side the water and that suddenly, for this term he will be driven furiously both on the bond and the undertaking. I have given him an account; the longer that matter is delayed, the worse it will grow. On this side the water he is sure to meet with persecution; it would be a kindness, if you would let me know how he stands at court and how our new cashier proceeds. [2½ pages. Conway papers. Ibid. No. 85.]
[Jan. 23 ?] Robert Ferguson to his wife. To all my other afflictions I have lost my honourable friend the Earl of Shaftesbury, of whose fatherly love and care I have had great experience since I came to Holland, and of whose friendship I was well assured, had God ever restored him to power and interest in England. Though I wanted nothing for my subsistence here, having spent little since I came, yet, seeing my lord has left me 40l., I am not only in a condition for some time to subsist myself, but to contribute to thy support and accordingly I design to remit 20l. to thee. His death so discourages me, that, though I enjoy perfect health and hope God will preserve it to me, yet I dare not invite thee hither, as fearing the air will not agree with thy constitution, but, as I shall in the mean time take the best care I can for thy maintenance, so I hope it will not be long before God brings us to the mutual enjoyment of one another in England. A friend is to come from hence this week, by whom I propose to send a token for my girl, and, as I shall be then more at leisure, so I intend to write at greater length by him. I have received all thine and, if thou sendest sometimes to Mr. Sheppard and sometimes to Mr. Carryl to enclose for Mr. Hayes, thy letters will come safely without putting me to expense. I long to hear what benefit thou hast by the means Dr. Cox advises and I entreat thee by the bearer, whom I have ordered to wait on thee, to send me as large an account concerning thyself as thou canst and that thou wouldest remit what thou either hast or canst procure me from others. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 42.]
Jan. 23. Ralph Montagu to Secretary Jenkins. Being so unfortunate as not to have the honour of coming into his Majesty's presence, I desire you to present this petition to him. Your station and the relation my petition has to your office, I hope will excuse my giving you this trouble, nor would I do it now under the circumstances I lie under of his Majesty's displeasure, but that I know his goodness to be such that, though one loses his favour, yet one has never reason to despair of his justice. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 50, p. 96.] Annexed,
Ralph Montagu to the King. Petition stating that the petitioner was twice ambassador to France, the first of which embassies determining about April, 1672, 1,300l. was then due to him for his ordinary entertainment, as appears by a tally then given him for the same, but that tally was not then satisfied, nor much pressed by the petitioner, the Commissioners of the Treasury then telling him that he had a good security in his hands for the said sum, meaning the plate which he had on his bond from the Jewel House for his use in that employ, that the same plate without alteration or addition served the petitioner again in his second embassy, from which being recalled 3 July, 1678, there was then further due to him 22,000l. as appears by certificate from the Secretary of State and Sir Robert Howard, that the petitioner is called on by the Master of the Jewel House to answer his said bond either by restoring the plate received from thence or the value of it and that the petitioner's departure from Paris on the determination of his last embassy was so sudden that, having a little before advanced all his ready money at his Majesty's desire to bring the English troops out of France, who were then in great necessity, he wanted wherewithal to pay his debts there and to provide for his family and servants remaining behind, and was thereby forced to sell his own plate as well as that he had out of the Jewel House, and therefore praying that his Majesty will direct that the value of the said plate may be allowed to him for so much due to him and that the Master of the Jewel House may be ordered to deliver him his bond for the same, and for the rest remaining due to him he shall wait till his Majesty's convenience. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 50, p. 97.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
The King to the Marquess of Queensberry, Treasurer Principal. Warrant, after reciting that John Drummond of Lundin, late Master of the Ordnance, found it impossible to get master gunners and fireworkers for the pay set down in the establishment of the artillery and therefore was necessitated to agree with such as were qualified in their respective countries, most of them being strangers, and that he has not only paid all the artillery attenders conform to their capitulations, as well those that are strangers as those levied in Scotland, but has also provided a considerable number of things necessary for the train of artillery, by which not only the money arising from the reduction of the forces on account of the artillery is exhausted, but also 459l. 4s. 1d. of his own money is advanced, for payment to him of the said sum as the balance of his account. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 524.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
The King to the Marquess of Queensberry, Treasurer Principal, and John Drummond of Lundin, Treasurer Deput. Warrant recalling the letter of 3 Feb., 1681–2, in favour of Bailie William Carmichael, he having by virtue of a commission for sequestrating the moveable goods and gear of some rebels uplifted upwards of 300l. sterling, notwithstanding his having most impudently denied having received one farthing, and for disposing of the forfeitures mentioned in the said letter according to the instructions formerly given for the sale of forfeited estates. [Ibid. p. 525.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Protection in the new form to the Earl of Mar for one year. [Ibid. p. 527.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a remission to Andrew Herron of Kerrochtrie of the crime of communing, corresponding with, harbouring, resetting, supplying and entertaining rebels and traitors and particularly his second son, Patrick Herron, and Anthony McKie of Cloncaird, his wife's nephew, reserving power to the Privy Council to impose such a moderate fine on him as his condition may bear, if they think fit. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 528.]
[Jan. 24 ?] The case of Sir Thomas Beckford, slopseller to the Navy. Instructions of the Lord High Admiral direct the quality and prices of clothes furnished by the slopseller and provide that no clothes be vended to the seamen nor allowances made for them but such as shall be certified by the ships' officers. The usage of the Navy has always been that the purser's books signed by the ships' officers, wherein each seaman's clothes appear, have been approved by the Navy Commissioners and then deductions have been made at the pay of each ship out of each seaman's wages by the Treasurer of the Navy, and so much certified due for clothes, each seaman then owning the receipt of the clothes, for which the money is deducted, and this by the usage of the Navy and an order in Council of 1671 the Treasurer is to pay to the slopseller, who pays himself for what has been furnished by him, and the residue he pays to the pursers for the clothes they by reason of long voyages or otherwise have furnished, which are brought into the slopseller's account of clothes, it being provided that but one account for clothes should be made, and by the constant practice of the Navy and the instructions and the judgment of the Court of Exchequer in the Attorney General v. Sir T. Beckford (28 May, 1677) are to be allowed and paid to the slopseller.
The instructions prescribed the quality and prices of clothes, yet by the constant usage and the desire of the officers etc. clothes of other kinds and greater prices have been always furnished, but in this the King is not injured, all coming out of the seamen's wages and without this they would not be satisfied but be apt to mutiny.
Sir T. Beckford from 12 July, 1673, to 29 Feb., 1675[–6], was slopseller and by the ship book and ship officers' certificate, allowance of the Navy Commissioners and of every individual seaman had the money due for clothes allowed and defalked by the Treasurer of the Navy; part is paid but about 12,000l. detained in his hands which ought to have been paid him, so that he might have paid what belongs to him and the rest to the pursers, who clamour much for it, but out of the 12,000l. he has been able to obtain orders only for 3,000l., the other 8,000l. (sic) remaining in the hands of the Treasurer of the Navy under pretence that he has not complied with what the Treasurer requires, which is to give an account of the quantity and quality and prices of the clothes delivered with account of what is returned from each ship, which he is not able to give, or, if he was, it is not incumbent on him as his duty. His Majesty is not concerned in any of the money detained but it arises out of the seamen's wages, who have allowed it, for by article 7 of the instructions the Treasurer of the Navy is to pay no money for clothes without a certificate of the ship officers of the kind and quantity of clothes sold and the parties to whom they have been sold and the total due from each, and by 8th the purser is required at every voyage end to specify in the margin of his sea books each man's debt for clothes, that so the same may be defalked by the paymaster, all which has been fully observed, so that the things required being of great trouble and delay, if they could be done, and now being out of Sir T. Beckford's power to do, and his Majesty and the seamen being no way injured, Sir T. Beckford prays he may have the 8,000l. paid him without further delay, and the rather because having been slopseller from 1664 to 1673 he has passed his account to 1668 in the same manner he now seeks to do and in a long and chargeable suit against him in the Exchequer it is adjudged the method used by him was right, and from 1668 to 1673 his accounts have been passed as now he desires and not one complaint from any seaman that he had not the clothes, for which he allowed the money defalked by the Treasurer. (See Privy Council Register, Vol. 69, p. 619.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 43.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Conway to Sir George Jeffreys. His Majesty being informed that in a suit between the Company of Merchants Adventurers and certain interlopers he is retained as counsel against the said company, signifying his pleasure that he do not appear in any manner against the said company in behalf of the said interlopers, his Majesty intending by all lawful means to encourage the trade of the said company. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 56, p. 65.]
Jan. 24. Commission to Philip Kirke to be captain of the company whereof — Daniell was captain in the first regiment of the Foot Guards. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 69, p. 22.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant and the Lord Deputy. Warrant for a grant of a baronetcy of Ireland to Sir Robert Hamilton of Mount Hamilton, co. Armagh, and the heirs male of his body with a discharge of all services in consideration thereof or payments to be made in lieu of such services. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 11., p. 135.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Capt. Shelton. Viscount Preston by his letters last August has made known to his Majesty your fidelity and affection to the Crown. His Majesty, on further overtures very newly received from you by Mr. St[epkin], desires to speak with you with all speed. You will take Lord Preston's directions and address yourself to me, when you come. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 44.]
[Jan. 25.] Peter Stepkin to the King. Petition for relief, he with some difficulty and expense having been instrumental in bringing to his Majesty's knowledge the present design of the French against Ireland and his father having served his Majesty's father as a colonel, in which service he lost both his life and estate, and the petitioner having by this present service made France unsafe for him any longer to abide in, if discovered, and being security for the debts of some insolvent persons here. Endorsed, Received by the Lord Lieutenant 25 Jan., 82/3. [Ibid. No. 45.]
Jan. 25. Commission to Herbert Throckmorton to be captain of the company whereof Philip Kirke was captain in the Holland regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 69, p. 24.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall. Treasury Chambers.
Report of the Lords of the Treasury on the petition of Clerk and Robinson (calendared S.P. Dom., 1682, p. 535) and the Duke of Ormonde's report thereon and also the report of the Commissioners of the Revenue in Ireland, with which they concur. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 343, No. 86.]
Jan. 25. Affidavit by Peter Stepkin that on the 1st, 2nd or 3rd instant O.S., he received these propositions from Roger Tilly alias Shelton at Paris and that he believes it to be his handwriting. Prefixed,
The said propositions presented to the Most Christian King from the noblesse and people of Ireland, 24 Oct., 1682.
1. That all the nobles and peoples of Ireland entirely consent to recognize for ever his Most Christian Majesty and his heirs as their King in every thing after God and the Blessed Virgin.
2. That all the towns, fortifications, seaports, vessels of war and all other towns and vessels in the said kingdom shall be put into the hands of his said Majesty and his heirs for ever, provided that he will permit to enjoy the same law as it was before the Huguenots usurped the said kingdom.
3. Should he have need of a parliament in Ireland, one half shall be French and the other the people of the country and that one shall have as much power as the other.
4. That he will fortify all towns, fortifications, etc., according to his will, provided that as many of the noblesse of the country as of French be employed.
5. In all matters of trade we shall have the same liberty as before the conquest of the country.
6. That all those who have been outed from their property since the conquest of the country shall be permitted to seize and hold all the property of those who have enjoyed theirs since the usurpation and that every person be put in possession of their said properties which they enjoyed before the usurpation.
7. That the French should enjoy as much liberty in trade and everything else in Ireland as the Irish, but no other nation without permission.
8. That the Roman Catholic religion be re-established as it was before the usurpation and be governed by the Pope, as it always was, and that no other religion be permitted in the country.
9. That the number of soldiers and sailors to be maintained in the country be at his Majesty's discretion, provided that as many natives be employed as French.
10. That the Viceroy shall be always a person of quality of the country and shall be chosen by his Majesty, provided he be changed every two years.
11. That all the churches demolished by the Huguenots shall be rebuilt by them and that they shall be obliged under pain of death to restore all the ornaments and other church furniture they have taken. [3 pages. French. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 343, No. 87.]
Another copy of the above propositions endorsed "Sent in by Lord Preston, 15 Feb. and received the 16th." [Ibid. No. 88.]
Jan. 25. Affidavit by Peter Stepkin that about the 1st, 2nd, 3rd or 4th instant Tilly alias Shelton showed him a placet at Versailles, which he then had from Mr. Floree, a commis in the Secretary's office at Versailles, as he told him, and that this is a copy of it in Tilly's own hand. On the other side,
Address to the King of the nobles and peoples of Ireland. They are always in a wretched condition from the loss of their property and from being every day hindered in practising their religion. Having already importuned his Majesty several times and been favourably received they most humbly entreat him to grant them 6,000 muskets and fusils, since they are now in a sufficiently good condition to undertake their design, as soon as they shall have the said arms, provided they shall be assured of his assistance, as soon as they shall take a seaport to open an entrance to him. [French. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 343, No. 89.]
Jan. 25. The information of Peter Stepkin, being a summary of all his previous informations, calendared ante, adding little to what is therein contained. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 90.]
Jan. 26./Feb. 5.
Amsterdam.
Robert Ferguson to his wife. (Printed in Ferguson, Ferguson the Plotter, p. 104.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 46.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
Commission to Thomas Cornwallis to be captain of the foot company in garrison at Portsmouth whereof Frederick Cornwallis was captain. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 69, p. 21.]
Jan. 26. Commission to Francis Wheeler to be captain to the company wherein John Price was captain in the first regiment of Foot Guards. Minute. [Ibid.]
Jan. 26. Elizabeth, Lady Dunkellin, to Secretary Jenkins. Complaining of the straits of her husband and herself owing to the Earl of Clanrickard's stopping the small allowance granted them at his Majesty's desire and entreating him to move his Majesty to write as of his own accord to the Earl that, if he will not increase the allowance, yet he expects him to continue it. I alone am the occasion of the Earl's hard dealing with us, by reason of my steadfast resolution in continuing in the Protestant religion. [S.P Ireland, Car. II. 343, No. 91.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Deputy. Warrant for causing Sir Robert Hamilton of Mount Hamilton, co. Armagh, to be sworn and admitted a privy councillor. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 11, p. 136.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant and the Lord Deputy. Warrant for taking off the stay of proceedings against the Earl of Anglesey, Sir George Carteret and Sir Richard Bellingham directed by letters of 9 Jan., 1676[–7], calendared in S. P. Dom., 1676–77, p. 500, and for proceeding in the said cause as if the said letters had never been. [Ibid.]
Saturday,
Jan. 27.
Peter Stepkin to [Secretary Jenkins]. I have expended in bringing this discovery to his Majesty 50l. so I hope he will reimburse me that sum, with what I have already had, that I may redeem my own and my wife's clothes, which were stopped at Dover by the master of the vessel that brought me over for 37l. due to Mr. Nowell, the chief searcher there. For any further charity I shall wait the King's pleasure till he be fully satisfied of the truth of what I have in part informed you of, though the danger of my children at Calais is considerable to me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 47.]
[Jan. ?] Peter Stepkin to the King. Petition for relief, his chief errand to England having been only intended to do his Majesty service, by which he has exposed himself to some of his creditors, who will put him into perpetual imprisonment to the utter ruin of his wife and children, who are now in France without any support, for the small relief he left them is in this month he has attended his Majesty's commands quite expended. He has expended in this affair, with the value of the things taken from him in his journey, 80l. [Ibid. No. 48.]
Jan. 27.
Newcastle.
Capt. Henry Brabant to Sir Nathaniel Johnson at the Hearth Office, Throgmorton Street. By yours I observe the great mindfulness of those honourable persons relating to the business and your own readiness to promote it, on which I have had a consult with four or five trusty friends, two of them Common Council men, who are so well affected to it, that they think no man that pretends to the least loyalty will oppose it, but they are of opinion that it is of such concernment and service for his Majesty's interest as to be managed with all prudence and that your presence here is absolutely necessary, for you know my interest lies not with our brethren of the magistracy, who are chiefly to be gained in this point and require our conjoined skill and industry to bring them into a compliance, but I dare positively affirm that for the greater part of the Common Council will be right. Of all the bench I durst move the thing only to Aldermen Robson and Jeffrayson, who, after some scruples, were so well satisfied with my assurance of the great advantages to the town thereby that they professed their inclination to a surrender and should be ready to consent. I have the words of them and those other friends above mentioned to keep all private till your coming down, which I request may be with what convenient speed you can. [Ibid. No. 49.]
Jan. 27.
Durham.
John Hutchinson, Mayor, John Morland and Miles Stapylton to Secretary Jenkins. Enclosing copies of informations. The persons informed against are Papists and lie there for debt. They deny all the words in the informations. The informers are committed on suspicion of stealing two mares. [Ibid. No. 50.] Enclosed,
The information of John Green, a prisoner in Durham gaol. About 6 or 7 days ago Henry Young, a prisoner, in the presence of the informant and William Young, another prisoner, said, I hope within a year to see the King die the death of his father and to see as great a massacre of the Atheists in England as there was in Ireland and I hope to kiss the Pope's hand in England and to have as much power in Durham as my Lord of Durham now has and to have a troop of horse in co. Durham to serve the Pope, on hearing which Bartholomew Garrey, another prisoner, said, I wish to God to see that day, for then I will lay my hands about me. [Ibid. No. 50 i.]
The information of William Harrison, prisoner in Durham gaol. Identical with the last, except that it omits the part about Garrey. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 50 ii.]
Jan. 27.
Bentley.
Thomas Lane to Sir Francis Lawley. You told me you had entered a caveat against Walsall charter, but they say there is no such thing and are gone up this week with money to fetch one down and I am afraid they will prevail, if great care be not taken, for Mr. Byrche's interest is great with some of the chief lawyers as North, Sanders and Pemberton. Therefore, if you go not above these, they will be sure to have it. You cannot do the King better service than to prevent it, for they began the last rebellion first in these parts and seized the King's officers that were beating up for men and sent them prisoners to Coventry, and in order to a new rebellion they keep constant conventicles and I think there is not above one honest man in the town and 'tis within a mile of me, therefore I would not have so ill a neighbour as a Rumpish corporation. [Ibid. No. 51.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a remission to John Gordon, eldest son to Robert Gordon of Barharrow, who was engaged in the late western rebellion at Bothwell Bridge, of the crime of treason and rebellion, so far as may be extended to his life and personal freedom but no ways to his land and heritages if any he has, with a clause in this and the next 4 commissions in respect of the poor and miserable condition of each person pardoned, commanding all persons concerned to exped and pass this remission gratis. [Over 1 page. Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 528.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a remission to William Kennedy, son to David Kennedy of Knockaldine, who was in company with some of the rebels in arms in 1679, of the crime of treason and rebellion, as to his life and fame, and restoring him so as to be capable of enjoying any after acquired property, but without prejudice to the Crown and donators of the right to his real and personal estate accrescing to his Majesty. [Over 1 page. Docquet. Ibid. p. 530.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a remission to Alexander McKie, late of Drumbuy, who was in the company of the rebels that appeared in arms at the town of Wigton, as to his life only of the said crime of treason and rebellion, without prejudice to the right of the Crown to his estate real and personal accrescing to his Majesty, but restoring him so as to be capable of enjoying after acquired property. [Over 1 page. Docquet. Ibid. p. 531.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a remission to Anthony McKie, late of Glencaird, who was with the rebels at Bothwell Bridge, as to his life only of the crime of treason and rebellion, without prejudice to the right of the Crown to his real and personal estate accrescing to his Majesty, but restoring him so as to be capable of enjoying after acquired property. [Over 1 page. Docquet. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, p. 532.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a remission to David Gibson, David White and David Robertson, petty fewars in Lanerick, who were engaged with those appearing in arms at Bothwell Bridge, as to their lives only of the crime of treason and rebellion without prejudice to the right of the Crown to their real and personal estates accrescing to his Majesty, but restoring them so as to be capable of enjoying after acquired property. [Over 1 page. Docquet. Ibid. p. 534.]
Jan. 28. Commission to Henry Wigmore to be ensign of Capt. Henry Savile's company in the first regiment of Foot Guards. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 69, p. 21.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pardon to the Earl of Conway, Secretary of State, for all crimes and misdemeanours committed by him or by his advice, assent, consent or procuring before that date, either in relation to the King's person or his public negotiations or transactions with foreign ambassadors or in not rightly pursuing the King's instructions to ambassadors abroad. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 54, p. 153.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Aberdeen, Chancellor, and the rest of the Privy Council. Warrant for a proclamation further adjourning the parliament from 15 March next, to which it stands adjourned, to 10 July next. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 7, p. 536.]
Jan. 30. G. S. to Mary. I hope to be at home on Saturday or Wednesday next at furthest. I do not doubt the continuance of your care to my children, which, I hope, I shall be in a condition to gratify for all things go well here. (The above in a woman's hand and in Mr. Stepkin's as follows.) Mary, if any more letters come from Paris, send them as the others to Mr. Gray's, which I had. Your old master, the Alderman, is dead and left none of his servants anything. He gave all to Tom's master and Mr. Gower. Mrs. Clarveato remembers her to you and the children. By the next let's have two lines from you directed to Mr. Gray's. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 52.]
Jan. 30./Feb. 9.
Amsterdam.
Robert Ferguson to his wife. (Printed in Ferguson, Ferguson the Plotter, p. 105.) [Ibid. No. 53.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Mr. Morley. When I represented to his Majesty the dutiful respects of the Justices assembled at Winchester in their complying so frankly with his Majesty's convenience for building there, I did not mention the least syllable of the pretension or expectation that those gentlemen might in behalf of the county have from and upon his Majesty by way of compensation. My reason was that I perceived by your letter that the matter was in negotiation among the gentlemen and that they in their frankness and dutifulness might at their next meeting so resolve the point that nothing on the King's part would remain to be done but to accept this offer of the loyal body of gentry and that they would provide for their own conveniency without putting his Majesty to any trouble. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 192.]
Jan. 31. William Levett in behalf of his son Henry to the King. Petition stating the letter of 12 July last for electing his son a scholar of Charterhouse, and a Committee of the Governors meeting 12 Sept. last and two places being then void on his Majesty's account they elected Mr. Dryden's son and his, who was then about 6 weeks under 16, and would have admitted them but Mr. Lightfoot, the Register, said they could not be admitted till 2 Nov. and the Governors ordered the petitioner to place his son there and pay for his schooling and diet till 2 Nov., which he did, but on 2 Nov. the Register again opposed his son's admittance, saying he was superannuated, that another letter of 4 Dec. last to the Governors was granted ordering them to admit his son a scholar forthwith, and that his Majesty caused the Bishop of London to see his son forthwith admitted, who delivered his Majesty's commands to the Governors at their meeting last Friday, when the Register again opposed his son's admittance insisting on his being superannuated and they delayed his admittance till his Majesty's further pleasure be known and therefore praying him to declare his commands for the present admitting of his son or that cause may be shown why his last letter is not obeyed and that the Register may be called to account for so much opposing his Majesty's right and prerogative. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 54.] Annexed,
The King to the Governors of the Charterhouse. (The purport appears from the above.) Dec. 4, 1682. [Ibid. No. 54 I.]
Jan. 31. Peter Stepkin to Secretary Jenkins. Had this matter any falsehood in it or if the King does not believe it, then my necessities might well be a bar to his present consideration of me, but, if he believes it, I might haply be so represented to him that my wants might not so fully appear. [Ibid. No. 55.]
Jan. 31. — to Secretary Jenkins. Doubtless 'twas not intended to remove Tanner, that Trinitarian incumbent (though your Honour and your honest intentions have not succeeded), yet I am not thereby discouraged from vindicating that Joseph Browne, the Coopers' anti-monarchical clerk, was not with the Master and Wardens of his Company at St. Mary Bow at the late commemoration of that abhorred 30 January. You would do well to acquaint his Majesty that he ought not to be baffled by Dissenters of whom the subscriber is none. [Ibid. No. 56.]
Jan. 31. The information of Peter Stepkin. At Paris last October he heard of Creagh, a Papist priest, a native of Ireland, as he has been told, whom he believes to be at present in or about London, and that he is come in order to carry on dangerous correspondencies relating to the disquiet of the Crown and the lessening of his Majesty's dominions.
Father Glissane, one Kearney and one Bourke were the first that offered the design now on foot against Ireland to Cardinal Bulloine. At one of their last meetings the Cardinal assured them two millions of money were already set apart to encourage that design. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 57.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland of the petition of Margaret Walter alias Thickness to order a former grant of 15l. per annum out of any lands she shall pitch upon in his Majesty's dispose not granted to others and to order her to be reprized. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 55, p. 235.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Earl of Nottingham. There being some overtures of a treaty between the deputy lieutenants of the Tower Hamlets and the Brethren of the Trinity House in a difference referred to you and that Board, his Majesty desires you would not proceed to the hearing of it, till it be seen whether the parties will come to an accommodation in an amicable way. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 63, p. 61.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the High Sheriff of Sussex. His Majesty being informed that the Duke of Monmouth intends to be at Chichester the end of this week or the beginning of next and that several inns are taken up to receive him and his company, which, as is given out, is to be in greater number than is suitable to his present circumstances as being under his Majesty's displeasure, I am commanded to give you notice thereof and in his Majesty's name and by his special order to require you to have at this time a watchful eye over all such persons in that county as you know or justly suspect to be disaffected to the government and to have a care that they do not assemble themselves in such numbers or routes as may be a terror to liege people or endanger the public peace. You are therefore on this occasion to cause yourself to be well attended by gentlemen and others of known affection to his Majesty that in case of any concourse, whereby the King's peace may be in danger, you may, as the law enables you, require them in the King's name to disperse and keep the peace and, in case of a riot, you may proceed, as the law directs, to have it recorded on the view and further do and cause to be done as to the duties of your place shall appertain for the preserving of the peace and the safety of the government. [1¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 193.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to the Mayor of Chichester. His Majesty being informed that the Duke of Monmouth is expected to come to Chichester the end of this week or the beginning of next and that a sort of public reception is intended for him by the going out of numbers of disaffected, loose and idle people to meet him and bring him in as they did when he was there last year, to prevent the like disorders expects that you, being the chief magistrate of the place, should not only forbear to join in any such thing, but should give what discountenance you may to it, and thinks fit you should be advertized that the Duke is still under his Majesty's displeasure. I am therefore commanded by his Majesty's special order to require you to disperse such people, if any, as shall assemble on pretence to go out of town and meet the Duke or give him such public reception as was given him there last year, and, in case due obedience be not given you and all persons depart not to their own homes, you are to proceed against the offenders as rioters and disturbers of the peace. You are likewise to have a watchful eye that the public peace be secured and the dignity of the government maintained in all things, as law and reason require. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 68, p. 194.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Secretary Jenkins to Sir Christopher Musgrave. His Majesty, finding that the difference between Lord Carlisle and Sir George Fletcher in not yet composed, has appointed to hear the whole business on Wednesday in Easter week and has commanded that you have notice to attend. [Ibid. p. 195.]
Similar letters, mutatis mutandis, of the same date to Lord Morpeth, Sir George Fletcher and the Earl of Carlisle. [Ibid. pp. 196, 197.]
Jan. 31. Commission to William Hooke to be ensign in place of Edmund Windham of the company in the Isle of Wight, whereof Sir Robert Holmes is captain. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 69, p. 22.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Capt. Edward Rouse to be capt.-lieutenant of the company of the first regiment of Foot Guards, commanded by the Duke of Grafton, whereof he himself is captain, and to David Taylor to be lieutenant to Capt. Ferdinando Hastings in the same regiment. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 164, p. 89.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Col. Thomas Monke for causing drums to be beaten in and about the city of London and other parts of England for raising 200 volunteers for recruiting the English forces in the service of the States General, with a proviso that notice be given to the Lord Mayor of London, before the same be done therein. [Ibid.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Proclamation offering a reward of 10l. for the apprehension of James Husbands, and 10 others, highwaymen, within a year. [Printed, S.P. Dom., Various 9, p. 417.]
Jan. 31.
Lisburn.
Richard Mildmay to the Earl of Conway. About payment of bills of exchange. John Tattnall tells me he must now call on me every week for considerable money to carry on a great deal of paling round the great trench lately made through the great bog adjoining the Tunny Park. (About the horses.) What you wish about Edward Wigg has not yet taken effect. Henry Davis is now come home, having been at Dublin since the Commissioners came over. He never heard Wigg's name once spoken of by any of the Commissioners. All people here are extremely sorry for the loss of him and his wife. He has been true to those that entrusted him and civil to all else. 'Tis thought strange Sir Nicholas Butler should prevail in that preferment.
Most of this afternoon Sir George has had John Tattnall and me in discourse, to persuade me to leave this room and remove into the new tower, but I cannot consent, for I have laid out some money on your account and more on my own to make it handsome, convenient and safe for your receipt and the tower is so remote from any call that I with all you entrust with me may easily be surprised without any relief, all sorts of people in great numbers being constantly with me and sometimes I have not time to look up to see who they are. [Conway papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 343, No. 92.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Deputy. Warrant, after reciting that the flesh, fish and other markets in Dublin are kept in the streets, which very much disturbs and annoys the common passages thereof and may endanger by their stench the health of the citizens, for, with the advice of the Privy Council, issuing out such precepts to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen for removing the said markets into some convenient place, which may answer the occasions of the city, and that no persons whatever may be permitted to encumber the streets with any markets whatever. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. II, p. 138.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Deputy. Warrant, after reciting the letters of 26 Aug. last, calendared S.P. Dom., 1682, p. 355, for causing letters patent to be passed for incorporating the Butchers of Dublin and that there are very stately and convenient market-places in Dublin called Ormond Markets, where standings are prepared for shambles, which can no way annoy any part of the said city and yet very commodiously answer all parts thereof, for inserting in the said letters patent a clause that the members of the said corporation keep their common and usual standings within the said markets with fit provisoes and restrictions for enforcing the same. [Ibid.]
[Jan. ?] Philip Journo to the Duke of York. I am qualified by having been a Jesuit to declare any Jesuit in all England and, if you judge I can serve his Majesty in it, I will declare all the Jesuits. The Jesuits have been overseen in not getting me in prisons, for, though I have been mortified in their order, I retain that pride of honour, which will make [mate] me, whatever qualification of mine, to his Majesty's service. But I am not absolutely bent on the declaring of Jesuits, for I know this may prove as prejudicious to his Majesty's interest as it is like to prove advantageous. Has not the declaring of Jesuits opened the door to these later tumults and it might open the gates to greater seditions than ever Oates raised. I leave it to his Majesty's determination, whether I shall declare the Jesuits or no, whose will is mine, showing myself herein the true grandchild to Col. Gaye who died in the defence of the King and your father in the late civil wars. I am in great poverty. It belongs to your Highness to provide a subsistence for a loyal subject. The Jesuits have sent me out of their order, knowing I had never a penny in the world. If you doubt whether I have been a Jesuit you may be made certain of it by Lady Powis. I desire you to send me something by the bearer, for I am starved. The Jesuits sent me out of their order, because I was always melancholy and heavy and they thought I had no true vocation. (See his examination of 16 March post, p. 111.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 58.]
1682[–3]. [Jan. ?] The information of Richard Crowder. Was journeyman to Mrs. Curtis in September, when I helped to bind 500 of The Perplext Prince. Then Mrs. Curtis had printed a new impression of Julian and told me she would sell them at 12d. each. My friend the end of September deliver'd The Perplext Prince to the Secretary of State. He told him it was a very treasonable book and asked if he would swear it. He said, he could not but would bring one that should. He told him the messenger had a warrant for it, so my friend went to Mr. Stevens, the messenger, who said he had none, and desired that he might see me, so next Sunday my friend and I spoke with him and next morning, the day the Duke of Monmouth put in bail, the messenger carried us to the Secretary's office and then told us the King was with the Secretary and so put us off, and did not bring me to swear The Perplext Prince. Before we got back, he had been to Mrs. Curtis' and seen some of the books and had six of them sent him that evening. In September Mrs. Curtis caused her apprentice to gather up all the pamphlets and scandalous papers about her house and coming down to the cellar, where he wrought, to see how he had cleared the shelves the 11th or 12th Oct., 1682, she took a parcel of sheets in her hand and said, What do these Articles (those of high treason against the Duchess of Portsmouth) do here? Her man put them up amongst other papers and next Saturday her apprentice loaded a porter 8 times out of the house. Then I acquainted Mr. Stevens and gave him the Articles with other papers, Tore's Poems and a song, The Downfall of the Whigs, which Mrs. Curtis sang with me by her fireside. Then Mr. Stevens arrested her, and, she being in prison, asked me if I could swear the Articles and Wednesday, 1 Nov., I made affidavit before Lord Chief Justice North. The Chief Justice's clerk called me back and bade me set my hand to what I had sworn, being the Articles against the Duchess. About 4 or 5 days after Mr. Stevens told me he had searched her house and the house where the porter had carried the burdens and that the papers were nothing but Weekly Packets or Advice from Rome and that one witness would signify nothing. About a week after he came to my house on Sunday and told me Mrs. Curtis was to be tried next day and asked if I would come in against her, but when I came to his lodging next morning he told me she would not be tried that day, so he suffered her to be cleared without any evidence coming in against her.
Richard Crowder, being a drum-beater to Lieut.-Col. Legg in the Duke of York's regiment during his exile, was of the camp at Mardyke when his Royal Highness came on shore there in 1666.
Mrs. Curtis has sadly abused me since the messenger has cleared her and called me perjured and forsworn rogue and said she would have my ears in the pillory, and by her abuse and setting her man to report these things against me has hindered me in my trade so that I have had no work for several months. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 422, No. 59.]
[Jan. ?] Thomas Goddard to Secretary Jenkins. Petition showing that Mr. Soame being recalled and departing from the Court of Savoy about Nov., 1681, the petitioner received orders by his Honour's direction of 20 Oct., in regard those parts might probably become the scene of very considerable actions fit for his Majesty and his ministers to know, to give his Honour an account of his observations and he accordingly corresponded with Mr. Cooke for a year and upwards, and that towards the end of 1682 he received 20l., part of a greater sum, which he is informed his Honour had designed him about Feb., 1681[–2], and no more, and praying his Honour to procure him some compensation, at least towards his charges. [Ibid. No. 60.]
[Jan. ?] Edmond Craister, High Sheriff (and in behalf) of the county of Northumberland to the King. Petition for relief. At last Midsummer sessions it was ordered that the office of country keeper should be annexed to that of High Sheriff, which order was confirmed the following Michaelmas, in pursuance whereof the petitioner executed that office for some three months but at the last Christmas sessions set aside the orders of the two former sessions, contrary to the opinions of the majority of the Justices, who were then absent. (See Basire's letter of 26 Feb., p. 78.) [Ibid. No. 61.]
[1683 ? Jan. ?] Laud Crisp to Secretary Jenkins. Petition praying him to accept his humble Prayer Almanack and for some employment. Has been a clerk in the Great Wardrobe from 1660 but since the death of the Earl of Sandwich has had only an annuity of 20l. 16s. from that office of which 1¼ year is unpaid and is now out of employment. [Ibid. No. 62.]