BHO

William and Mary: January 1690

Pages 388-441

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William and Mary, 1689-90. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1895.

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January 1690

Jan. 1. An account, from the previous 1st of May, of the private soldiers wanting in their Majesties' forces in the Low Countries, according to the muster rolls in the Earl of Ranelagh's office. At the foot is a memorandum that "there are no rolls brought in for the Royal Regiment of Horse for November and December; my Lord Marlborough signifying to me that it is your Majesty's pleasure they shall be paid as full, for the said two months." [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 84.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
The King to Major Wildman. Whereas we have issued our order to recruit the several regiments of foot in our service in the Low Countries, it is our will that you give directions to the masters of our packet boats to Holland and Flanders to give free passage to any such recruits as shall present certificates. [S.P. Dom. King's Letter Book 2, p. 38.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords of the Treasury. Mr. Butts writes me word from York that no part of the 10,000l. ordered by your lordships for the Danish forces will be paid there by Mr. Williamson, he alleging that he cannot raise it in the country, and that he has none of the King's money in his hands, whereof I give your lordships notice, that you may give such directions in it as you shall think necessary. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 68.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Roger Williams, praying to have the execution of the naval office in Antigua, Nevis, Montserrat, and St. Christopher, last executed by Sir James Cotter, a papist now in arms against the King, in Ireland. Referred to the Committee of Trade and Plantations. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 167.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Neale, esq., stating that Queen Elizabeth, on 12th March 1602, granted a lease of the marsh lands in the parish of St. Giles (where the laystall is now), with covenant to build, for 60 years, at the yearly rent of 60s., which term is nearly expired. Prays for a lease of the premises on the expiration of Sir Richard Studdolfe's. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 169.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Lieut. John Chichester, stating that being a Protestant he had quitted the Irish service, not being willing to serve under Lord Tyrconnel. Prays that he may be allowed half-pay, or put in employment here. Referred to the Committee for the affairs of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 170.]
Jan. 1. Warrant for the presentation of William Shelton, clerk to the rectory of Stisted, in Essex, void by the deprivation of Charles Trumbull, D.D., the last incumbent. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 71.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant for James Wollock to be physician to the garrison of Portsmouth. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, pp. 19 and 30.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to apprehend the Earl of Murray on suspicion of dangerous and treasonable practices, and to seize his papers. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 33.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to apprehend Cornelius Carter and Henry Williams for scandalous and seditious words against their Majesties and the Government. [Ibid.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Commissions for John Fowk, esq., to be captain of a company, whereof Captain William Dobbins was late captain in the regiment of foot commanded by Sir James Leslie [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 86]; for Samuel Venner, esq., to be lieutenant-colonel to Col. Daniel Dering's regiment of foot [Ibid., p. 97]; for Thomas Daliell, gent., to be second lieutenant of the company of grenadiers, whereof Captain James Douglas is captain in the regiment of Scotch foot guards, commanded by Lieut.-General Douglas [Ibid., p. 107]; for — Jones, gent., to be adjutant to the second regiment of foot guards called the "Coldstreamers," commanded by Colonel Thomas Talmash [Ibid. 3, p. 8]; for Harry Lawrence to be lieutenant of Lieut.-Colonel Clent's company of grenadiers in the Coldstream regiment commanded by Colonel Talmash [Ibid., p. 12]; for Philip Griffin to be captain of that company whereof Captain Adam Purdon was lieutenant in the regiment of foot commanded by Col. Daniel Dering [Ibid., p. 16]; and for— Blackburne, gent., to be ensign to Lieut.-Colonel Selwyn in the 2nd regiment of foot guards, called the "Coldstreamers." [Ibid., p. 28.]
Jan. 1. Pass and post-warrant for Gerrit Harman to go from Harwich or the river to Holland [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 32]; and for Captain Thomas Delaval to go from London to Plymouth. [Ibid., p. 33.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Duke of Schomberg. Lord Grandison has represented to the King, on behalf of his son, Colonel Villiers, that his private affairs require his attendance here for some time, promising that whenever there shall be occasion he will immediately return into Ireland; upon which his Majesty has left it to you to permit Colonel Villiers to come over into England if you think it consistent with his Majesty's service. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 69.]
Jan. 2.
London.
News letter. There is nothing new from Brest since the return of Mons. De Umphreville with his squadron. One part of the fleet has gone to Belle Isle and Rochefort, the rest are at Brest, being intended for transporting forces into Ireland. The French King intends to commence the campaign the beginning of February; it is supposed he will go in person to the army, and the Dauphin to Germany, where the Duke de Duras and the Duke de Large will serve under him. The Duke of Orleans will conduct the army in Flanders where the Duke of Luxemburg and D'Humieres will serve as lieutenants under him. Orders are sent to Flanders to burn all the Spanish Netherlands. Mons. de Lauzun and Mons. De la Hacquett have not yet gone to Brest, but the six regiments intended for Ireland are marching thither with all diligence to be embarked on board the fleet. Mons. de Boufflers and Mons. de Caillemote are marching with some design at the head of 3,000 horse and 4,000 foot. The privateers of St. Malo intend to have fifty sail at sea next spring. Since the French King publicly declared his intention to go into the field next spring, the Dauphin has made an essay of his arms, and Mons. de Grand and Mons. de Liseney (?) have orders to get all things in readiness for the service of the court.
On Monday last, Parliament resolved that for the raising the rest of the supply an imposition be laid on tea and chocolate at the Custom House, and also an imposition of one quarter of a year's full value upon every house built upon a new foundation within the bills of mortality since the 24th, to be paid by the present occupier, and ordered that bills be brought in to this effect.
Letters from Scotland of the 26th say that the Lord Cardross and the Council have sent several commissions to the gentlemen of the west country bordering on the Highlands, requiring them to have all their fensible men in readiness to oppose the rebels, and if any of their tenants refuse to march they are to be treated with the utmost severity. Expresses are sent to the Earl of Menteith, Lord Murray, &c., to appear before the Council on the 14th of January under the severest penalty. Col. Ramsey's regiment is still at Aberdeen. Col. Levingstone's regiment is ordered to march to reinforce the garrison of Inverness. One of Col. Levingstone's regiment was sent express by General Mackay to Aberdeen to order the Danes to come to him immediately. A skirmish is reported to have occurred in Argyleshire between the lieut.-colonel to Argyll and the rebels, in which 500 men were killed on both sides. It is said the rebels were worsted, but this wants confirmation. The Duke of Hamilton has gone to the country, and Lord Crawford acts as President in his absence. On Saturday last money arrived at Portsmouth to pay off several men-of-war which are now going to sea.
Yesterday morning the King made his offering at the Chapel Royal; six bishops attended; the Duke of Ormond carried the sword. [Greenwich Hospital News Letter 3, No. 84, and Greenwich Hospital News Letter Entry Book 2, p. 291.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Allowance of Samuel Carr's bill of 279l. 10s. for stationery, supplied to the Earl of Nottingham's office, from 25 March to 25 Dec. 1689. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 34, p. 170.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant for letters of denization to the following French Protestants:— John Menard, clerk; Lewisa his wife; Mary, Susannah, and Peter, their children; Anna Gendraut; Elias De Bonrepos; Esther his wife, Elias, Alexander, Anna, and Marguarita, their children; Mathew Herbert, Elizabeth, his wife, Mathew, James, and John, their children; Mathew Renaudet, Carola, his wife, Carola, Mathew, and Isaiah, their children; Peter Goujeon, Esther, his wife, Nicholas and Isaac, their children; Anthony Beraud; Lewis Guionneau; Samuel Boutet, Samuel Adam, James, Peter, and John, his children; Claudius Bruyers; Sebastian Poitevin; Andrew Jaquad, Magdalen, his wife, and John, their son; Peter Bigot, Magdalen, his wife, Peter and Magdalen, their children; Timothy Archenbeau; Stephen la Jaille; John Moller; Thomas Oulry; James Testarde, Catharina, his wife, James and Anthony, their children; William Barbut; Hilary Reneu; Daniel David; Esther Carlat, Catharina, her daughter; Michael Hubert, and Claudina, his wife; Isaac Bossis; Charles Moreau; Peter Hogelot; Peter Hugues; Lewis Testefolle; Samuel Paquet; John Roux; Isaac Bedoe; John Pineau; John Dry; Francis Beuzelin; Paul Boucher; Lewis Boucher; Francis Fornier; Abraham de Fouquemberges; Pascal Gaultier; John Girard, Anna, his wife, and Ann, their daughter; David Barrau; Arnaud Parquot; Elias Neau; Andrew Pasquinet, and Peter, his son; John Machet, Peter and John, his children; Nicholas Jamain, and Jane, his wife; Martin de Carbonel; Anthonie Marie de la Croze; David Preux; Peter and Marguerita Pasquereau; Paul Lorrain; James Gastigny; Francis Bauldouin, Anna, his wife; Stephen Roussell, Thomas and Stephen, his children; Moses Moreau; Peter L'Hommedieu; William le Conte; John Simeon; John Pelser; Peter Jay, Gabriel, John, and David, his children; Davierre Bauldouin, Mary, his wife; Stephen Monginot, Catharina, his wife, Stephen, Paul, and James, their children; James Reynaud; Gabriel Thomas Marboeuf, Thomas, his son; Peter Simon; Theodore de Maimbourg; Catharina Laurent; Magdalen Chenevix, and Lewis Seigneuret. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 34, p. 440 and 35, p. 174.]
Jan. 2.
Kensington.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Directing them to reimburse Captain Archibald Dunbar, for his expenses in freighting boats and seamen for blocking up the garrison of the Bass. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 14, p. 299.]
Jan. 2.
Kensington.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland adding the Earl of Morton to their number. [Ibid., p. 300.]
Jan. 2.
Kensington.
Docquet of the blank warrant for a gift, of the office of shireff of the Merse. [Ibid., p. 300.]
Jan. 2.
Kensington.
Blank warrant for a gift of the office of sheriff of Ayr and bailie of Kilstuart. [Ibid., p. 301.]
Jan. 2.
Kensington.
Warrant for a gift of the office of sheriff-depute for Aberdeenshire, to Andrew Fraser, of Kinmundie. [Ibid., p. 302.]
Jan. 2.
Kensington.
Warrant to Sir Patrick Murray and James Oswald, Receivers of their Majesties' rents in Scotland for paying the sum of 500l. sterling to William, Earl of Crawford, in consideration of his expenses in the King's service. [Ibid., p. 304.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Licence to John Mograge, town clerk of the city of Londonderry, to export from England 1,000l. in specie for the relief of the inhabitants of the said city, and a pass for him and his servant to go from London to Chester or elsewhere en route to Londonderry. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 32.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant to apprehend John Bruch, apothecary, on suspicion of dangerous and treasonable practices. [Ibid., p. 34.]
Jan. 2. Pass to Antoine de St. Ange with one servant to go from London to Dover and there embark for France. [Ibid., p. 33.]
Jan. 3.
Zell.
Sir William Dutton Colt to Mr. Warre. I see in the last Gazette that these Dukes are raising troops of which I have not heard anything here. The Duke has sent Mons. Botemer, his envoy at Berlin, to the meeting at the Hague. [H.O. Regencies 1, fol. 140.]
Jan 3.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to Mr. Dyves. I have this day received a letter from the Spanish Ambassador complaining that Vande Velde's ship has been lately unloading by order of the Commissioners of Prizes, notwithstanding that the cause is yet undetermined by the Lords Commissioners for Appeals. He insists, as a right, that no more of the goods be taken out, but rather that they may be put on board again until the Lords' judgment may be given. I desire you will let the Commissioners know this complaint and that I have been extremely importuned by the Spanish Ambassador and should be very glad if they would put me at my ease in it as, far as equity and preserving the King's right will allow. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 225.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Jephson. Understanding that the establishment of the army is now preparing by the Lords of the Treasury, I desire you to acquaint them that his Majesty was pleased to declare that Sir John Morgan should have the same allowances made to him as Governor of Chester as have been usually given to those of Portsmouth and Plymouth. [Ibid., p. 228.]
Jan. 3.
Kensington.
Blank commission for officers in the Earl of Angus's regiment of foot. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 14, pp. 304–311.]
Jan. 3.
Kensington.
Commission to Dr. William Blakader, to be physician of the forces in Scotland. [Ibid., p. 312.]
Jan. 3.
Kensington.
Blank commissions for officers, in the Earl of Argyll's regiment of foot. [Ibid., pp. 313 to 320.]
Jan. 3.
Kensington.
Blank commissions for officers, in the Earl of Glencairn's regiment of foot. [Ibid., pp. 321 to 337.]
Jan. 3 & 4. Blank commissions for officers in the Earl of Glencairn's, the Earl of Leven's, the Earl of Argyll's, and Richard Cunningham's regiments of foot. [Ibid., pp. 335 to 368.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
Pass to Erasmus Laurens to go to Harwich or any part of the River Thames for Holland. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 34.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to Captain Killigrew. Finding there is an alteration made at the Admiralty as to the sending Captain Rooke, it will be necessary that you think of some other person of those that are to go with you to do the business assigned to him, in case you cannot "make a turn at the three governments in Barbary." I have caused the instructions and commission to be prepared again, leaving a blank for the name, which I desire you to send me. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 225.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
The same to Captain Leech. I have received your letter of the 31st of December from Plymouth with the packet you brought from Jamaica, for which I thank you. [Ibid., p. 225.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Matthew Bridges. Upon receipt of your letter of the 26th December last with an account of your having caused three Scotchmen to be secured as dangerous and disaffected persons I forthwith sent copies to Lord Melville, the Secretary for Scotland, that I might have his opinion in this matter so that I might lay it before the King for further directions; but I have not as yet had any answer from Lord Melville. This is the reason I have not sooner written to you. However, in the meantime it is fitting those persons should be continued in custody till further order which I will not fail to send to the Mayor as soon as I receive them. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's), p. 226.]
Jan. 4. The King to the Privy Council of Scotland, adding Lord Belhaven to their number. [H.O. Scotland Warrant Book 14, p. 369.]
Jan. 4. The same to the same, adding Thomas Burnet of Leyes to their number. [Ibid.]
Jan. 4. The same to the same. Recommending them to devise means for providing subsistence for three more regiments in Scotland, and for raising seamen. [Ibid., p. 370.]
Jan. 4. Additional instructions to David, Earl of Leven, Hugh Mackay, and Sir George Munro of Culrain. Notwithstanding our former instructions, from what you represent we find ground to make the following alterations:—
(1) You are to consider for how many you can find subsistence by methods within your own power, and if that fall short of the number proposed by us formerly, you are to advise with our Council (before you proceed to model and disband) to know what they can propose for subsistence of the number mentioned by us, or more if they think fit, and find subsistence for them; and after you have found what the funds will sustain, you are then to proceed to model them accordingly and to disband the rest for making up of the regiments and troops that are to stand. For your better performance whereof, we have ordered our Privy Council to give you their concurrence.
(2) If the funds of subsistence money shall not amount to so much as will maintain the numbers formerly proposed by us to you, you are to appoint the regiments to consist of fewer companies than we mentioned in our former instructions.
(3) And to the end that the troops which are to stand be completed, you are to divide the troops commanded by the Earl of Annandale and Lord Ross (if they are to be kept up) among the standing troops for completing them; if otherwise, you are to disband them.
(4) You are to appoint the company in the Castle of Stirling, now commanded by the Earl of Mar, to continue an independent company, not to be "regimented," and to consist of—sentinels. And what numbers you shall appoint for the garrisons of Dumbarton, Blackness, and the Bass shall be independent; and —Erskin of Alva's company now in the Castle of Stirling, you are to appoint to be one of the "regimented" companies.
(5) You are not to levy any more foot for making up the seven regiments until some new fund be "condescended upon" for their subsistence.
(6) If the 10 battalions be so far short of their numbers as you conjecture, you are to enquire who have been guilty of false musters.
In all other matters we refer you to our former instructions, excepting in so far as they are hereby "innovated." [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 14, p. 371.]
Jan. 4. Commission to Hugh Mackay to be Major-General of all their Majesties' forces in Scotland. [Ibid., p. 372.]
Jan. 4. Warrant for a ratification and grant to the city of Glasgow for electing their own magistrates, as freely as any other royal burghs do within the kingdom of Scotland. [Ibid., p. 372.]
Jan. 4. Blank warrant for a gift of the office of one of the clerks of Parliament and principal clerks of Session. [Ibid., p. 374.]
Jan. 4. Warrant for a gift of the office of presenting signatures in the Exchequer and ordering of despatches in Scotland to John Veitch of Davick. [Ibid., p. 375.]
Jan. 4. Warrant for a gift of the office of Assay Master of the Mint of Scotland to Mr. Henry Alcorn and Henry Alcorn his son. [Ibid., p. 375.]
Jan. 4. Docquet of the warrant for a gift of a yearly pension of 20l. sterling to James Oswald of Fingaltown, as one of the two collectors of the Cess and Excise and one of the two Paymasters of all their Majesties' forces in Scotland. [Ibid., p. 377.]
Jan. The like warrant for a similar pension to James Dunlop holding the same office. [Ibid., p. 377.]
Jan. 5.
Sheerness.
The Duke of Portland to the King. I received your letter yesterday evening by the hands of Watson: I should have sailed but for the fault of the captain of the war-ship. I am glad to have learnt your sentiments about the troublesome affair on which I am going, and will, the moment I arrive, take measures to avert them. Expresses his intention to serve the King's interests at all hazards and discusses the situation of affairs in Holland. Hopes to be in the Meuse by to-morrow. Is sorry the King has a cough. I shall learn your sentiments more fully before I tell the people here [i.e., in Holland] about your intentions. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 85.]
Jan. 5. A list of the ships designed for the main fleet next year with the names of their commanders and lieutenants:
The Britannia, Edward Russell, admiral, David Mitchell, captain, Roger Betwood, lieutenant;
Royal James, Sir J. Ashby, vice-admiral of the red, E. Stanley, second captain, Leonard Crow, Edmund Freake, James Miles, lieutenants;
Neptune, George Rooke, rear-admiral of the red, Thomas Gardner, second captain, Jerrard Etways, James Peacock, William Coward, lieutenants;
Duke, H. Killigrew, admiral of the blue Edward Good, second captain, William Jumper, Edward Good, lieutenants;
Royal Sovereign, Sir R. Delavall, vice-admiral of the blue, Humphrey Sanders, second captain, Joseph Hartnell, Fleetwood Emms, George Simonds, lieutenants;
London, Sir C. Shovell, rear admiral of the blue, Thomas Jennings, second captain;
Albemarle, Sir Francis Wheeler, commander, John Fletcher, Francis Hillersly, lieutenants;
Coronation, Charles Skelton, commander, Christian Fogg, William Elwes, Ashby Hughs, lieutenants;
Duchess, John Clements, commander, Isaac Adams, lieutenant;
Ossory, John Tyrrell, commander;
St. Michael, Thomas Hopson, commander, John Knapp, John Smith, Thomas Swanton, lieutenants;
Sandwich, Anthony Hastings, commander, Bernard Darby, Francis Hastings, Hercules Mitchell, lieutenants;
Vanguard, Richard Carter, commander;
Windsor Castle, George Churchill, commander, Edward Bibb, William Sharp, Robert Arris, lieutenants;
Berwicks, Henry Martin, commander, John Kidvill, Charles Smith, lieutenants;
Burford, Thomas Harlow, commander;
Captain, Daniel Jones, commander, Thomas Humphrys, Robert Hollyman, lieutenants;
Cambridge, — Lestock, commander, Thomas Blacke, Jacob Wright lieutenants;
Defiance, — Gurney, commander, Thomas Frimly, Richard Ennavall, lieutenants;
Dreadnought, Bartholomew (?) Beaumont, commander, Charles Wager, James Littleton, lieutenants;
Edgar, John Jenifer, commander, Samuel Tilly, William Jenifer, lieutenants;
Exeter, George Meese, commander, James Jesson, Humphrey Blowers, lieutenants;
Eagle, John Leake, commander, John Lydcott, lieutenant;
Essex, John Bridges, commander, Leonard Jefferson, Robert Patridge, Lieutenants;
Expedition, — Owen, commander, Richard Sherborne, Richard Love, lieutenants;
Elizabeth, John Baker, William Prowers, lieutenants;
Grafton, William Bokenham, commander, James Studley, William Singleton, lieutenants;
Hope, Peter Pickard, commander, Richard London, Andrew Teale, lieutenants;
Hampton Court, John Graydon, commander, John Ward, lieutenant;
Harwich, Henry Robinson, commander, Robert Gifford, lieutenant;
Kent, John Nevell, commander, Richard Cotton, Lieutenant;
Lenox, John Munden, commander, Charles Brittiff, Edward Durly, lieutenants;
Lyon, John Torply, Robert Lash, Nathaniel Symons, lieutenants;
Modena, John Leader, commander, Theo. Hodgson, Thomas Meades, lieutenants;
Monck, Benjamin Hoskins, commander, Robert Hancock, lieutenant;
Monmouth, Thomas Raines, commander, Edmund Alston, Austin Lucas, lieutenants;
Montague, John Laton, commander, James Steward, John Perry, lieutenants;
Northumberland, Andrew Cotton, commander, Thomas Pinder, — Thompson, lieutenants;
Royal Oak, George Byng, commander, Charles Addamson, lieutenant;
Plymouth, Simon Foulkes, commander, William St. John, James White, lieutenants;
Resolution, Christopher Billop, commander, Edward Good, William Passenger, lieutenants;
Restoration, James Gother, commander, Andrew Pedder, William Griffith, lieutenants;
Sterling Castle, Benjamin Walters, commander, Thomas Miles, lieutenant;
Swiftsure, — Clarke, commander, John Buck, Clement Clarke, lieutenants;
Suffolk, the Earl of Danby, commander, Lionel Riply, Thomas Acton, lieutenants;
Warspite, Stafford Fairborne, commander, Edward Chant, John Mitchell, lieutenants;
Yorke, John Maine, commander, Francis Manley, John Nevell, lieutenants;
Advice, Edward Boys, commander, Edward Morey, Caleb Wade, lieutenants;
St. Albans, Richard Fitzpatrick, commander, Christopher King, Edward Owen, lieutenants;
Bonadventure, John Hubbard, commander, John Warner, Nathaniel Hubbard, lieutenants;
Crown, Robert Willmott, commander, Edward Littleton, John Luppthorne, lieutenants;
Deptford, William Kerr, commander, William Ayles, George Smith, lieutenants;
Dover, Edward Whittaker, commander, Jacob Townsend, Edward Loades, lieutenants;
Happy Return, Thomas Monck, commander, Robert Stapylton, John Helling, lieutenants;
Mary Rose, James Moody, commander;
Woolwich, Rupert Kempthorne, commander, John Fletcher, Henry Wilde, lieutenants;
Foresight, John Bounty, commander;
Mermaid, Arthur Ashby, commander, Jasper Bourne, lieutenant;
Milford, Charles Hawkins, commander, John Grant, lieutenant;
Pembroke, John Every, commander, Thomas Long, lieutenant;
Portsmouth, William Whetstone, commander, Richard Paul, lieutenant;
Greyhound, William Cross, commander;
Sandadoes, Roger Newton, commander;
Salamander, William Marten, commander;
Fubbs yacht, no officer named.
Concord and Society, hospital ships, Ralph Crow, Henry Collins, commanders;
Twenty fireships. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 86].
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
The King to the Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge. Recommending that the degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon William Foxlowe. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 73.]
Jan. 5. Warrant for a Commission to William Payne, D.D., one of the King's chaplains in ordinary, to visit all churches and chapels which are indisputably of royal and exempt jurisdiction within the city of London and 20 miles of the same, and where the episcopal authority has no pretence or claim or where such claim is disputed, as particularly in the parish churches and chapels of St. James', Duke's Place, and Trinity in the Minories. In which exempt churches and chapels divers clandestine marriages are celebrated and other crimes and illegal practices daily committed. He is likewise to inquire into unlawful marriages there celebrated and to punish the offenders by ecclesiastical censures, and to grant licences of marriage in those churches or chapels to seamen and others as is used in other places and to appoint a registrar or notary and to use a seal and what else may be necessary for such visitation. [Ibid., p. 75.]
Jan. 5. Pass to John Graham of Enniskillen to go from London to Chester, Liverpool or Hoylake for Ireland. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 32 and 34.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to the Duke of Bolton. Having received information that the Earl of Murray was concealed at a house of Mr. Kendall at Overshott [Aldershot ?], seven miles beyond Bagshot, I have sent for him in custody by a messenger. And being also informed that several of his horses were kept there, I gave directions to the messenger concerning them; but there being no neighbouring justice of the peace to whom he could apply, all that he could do was to charge the mistress of the house, Mrs. Kendall, who had the horses in keeping, her husband being from home, to see the horses were forthcoming when required. The horses were seven coach horses and five saddle horses, but Lord Murray came to town with two coach horses and two others. I desire your Grace to cause enquiry to be made by some justices of that county that the remaining horses be secured for his Majesty's use. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 226.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to apprehend — Varlotin upon suspicion of dangerous and treasonable practices against the Government and to seize his papers. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 34.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a bill revoking letters patent of the 8th of March last, appointing Arthur Herbert (now Earl of Torrington), John, Earl of Carbery, Sir Michael Wharton Sir Thomas Lee, Sir John Chicheley, Sir John Lowther, and William Sacheverell to be commissioners for executing the office of High Admiral of England, and also for constituting and appointing Thomas, Earl of Pembroke, the Earl of Carbery, Sir Thomas Lee, Sir John Lowther, and Sir John Chicheley, to be commissioners for executing the said office and also the office of High Admiral of Ireland and the dominions and islands of the said kingdoms. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 35, p. 163.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to discharge the Danish ship, the Younger Tobias of Altona, George Remus, master, taken by a French privateer, and retaken by the King's ship, the Mordant, Captain John Tirrell, commander, and brought into Plymouth. [Ibid., p. 168.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Colonel William Cole, of the office of Secretary of State of the Colony of Virginia, in the place of— Spencer deceased. [Ibid., p. 169.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Alexander Hicks, and Mary Miggs, stating that "having gained a decree in the Court of Canterbury," for the will of John Singleton, the said Hicks, being at sea, the said cause was reheard and the Decree reversed. Begs for a commission of review. Referred to the Commissioners of the Great Seal. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 167.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Alice Bond, Mary Greening, Mary Gardiner, Susan Jones, Joseph Utting, John Nicholson, and John Collingwood, prisoners in the new prison at Clerkenwell, in Middlesex, praying that, having been confined for non-payment of several fines which they are unable to pay, they may be discharged. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 169.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Simon Quash, praying for relief, he having faithfully served his Majesty as a sergeant in Ireland, and all through the siege of Londonderry, and being now, with a wife and three children, reduced to poverty. Referred to the committee for Irish affairs. [Ibid., p. 170.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to Mr. Jephson. About the 20th of November last I sent the Lords of the Treasury a letter with a pass enclosed, which I had then recently received from the Mayor of Dover, giving an account of a person secured there for transporting wool. -I desire to know if the Lords of the Treasury have done anything in it, and if not that you will on the first opportunity move their lordships for directions in the matter. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 227.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Dover. I have received your letter of the 4th instant with the enclosed papers containing false and seditious news; but unless the author or disperser of them can be discovered, the best course is to suppress them. I have written to Mr. Jephson, the Secretary to the Lords of the Treasury, as to the person in custody for transporting wool. [Ibid., p. 228.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
The same to Mayor of Exeter. Concerning Mr. Liliston I am not insensible of the mistake in my last, occasioned by wrong information of the person from whom I first received an account of that matter. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's), p. 229.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Plymouth. A like letter to that sent to the Mayor of Exeter, dated 31st December 1689. [Ibid., p. 232.]
Jan. 7. Proceedings upon the petition of the wives of the seamen of the ship Lively, praying that their husbands, being prisoners of war at Rochefort in France, may be released. Referred to the Commissioners for Exchange of Prisoners. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 168.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Stephen Thompson, knt. Prays that his Majesty will order two bonds entered into by Elizabeth Marshall a postmistress and Cuthbert Gibson to be delivered to him in satisfaction of his debt, against the said Elizabeth for wines. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Ann Oswell, Deborah Gough, and Margaret Steward, praying that their husbands, taken prisoners in the Swan, pink, and carried to Rochefort, in France, may be released. Referred to the Commissioners for the Exchange of Prisoners. [Ibid., p. 169.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John, Earl of Bath, chief ranger of St. James' Park, to deliver possession to Peter Guenon of Beaubuisson of "that little house in St. James' Park," now in the possession of George Holder for the conveniency of our service in keeping there our setting dogs. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 35.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Pass and post-warrants for Francis Tassell, a poor French protestant, to embark at Harwich for Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 35, p. 170]; for Jan Verhaest Dye to go from London to Harwich and thence to Holland; for John Redpen to go from any part of the river Thames to Scotland; and for Zachariah Audoier to go from any part of the same river to Holland. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 35.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant to apprehend Edward Elliot and William Arnold for forcibly rescuing Ferdinando Mighon, a deserter from Lord Sydney's regiment. [Ibid., p. 36.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
Passes for Elizabeth Rocks to go from London to Harwich or from any part of the river to Holland and to return; and for James Arthur and Ellen Arthur his daughter to go to any part of the river to Bilboa. [Ibid., p. 36.]
Jan. 9.
Lisburn.
The Duke of Schomberg to the King. Following your orders I have sent the cavalry officers to recruit and restore their regiments. Refers to his request, sent by Capt. Glom, for the increase of his regiment. The two reformed colonels, Romagnac and Louvigny are of little use here, the first has quitted the service for a long time and the second has been envoy in Poland. I wish to keep Capt. St. Sauveur who has done well at Sligo. I pressed him to leave with this despatch that you might learn my embarrassment caused by Harboard leaving me without money. He played me similar tricks at Dundalk. When affairs go ill he makes his escape. Does not believe in his illness. Hopes arrangements may be made with Pereyra or with others here for carrying provisions for 25,000 men for 20 days.
I am glad that the Danish cavalry is not coming too soon, for we have not enough to support the cavalry already here. Van Humery does not look well after providing hay. If Harboard had paid the French regiments they might have been sent to recruit in Switzerland You get more service from these three regiments, and that of their cavalry, than from twice the number of any others. Mons. de Cagny who serves me as aide-de-camp here as he did in France is a man of merit. Mons. de Lestang knows him well. Asks for his promotion. If you have no need of de Lestang's services he would be of use here. Ingoldsby's regiment has been disbanded (reforme). Colonel Sir Henry Ingoldsby's nephew is fit for a regiment, but only Lord Wharton's is vacant. There is one here named Crafton [Crofton ?] who has brought me a letter from Lord Shrewsbury for a regiment, but he is not a strong man and is of low birth.
You will see by my last the reasons I gave to the troops of Enniskillen and Derry to show it was not just that they should be paid as the English troops sent here. The Irish officers, mostly peasants, are paid too highly. Two or three of the French regiments have only subsistence money and 1,000l. is due to each of them. There is great want of money. Complains grievously of Harboard. Some officers of justice are needed here; those I employed only cause confusion. Lieut.-General Douglas showed me a letter from Count De Solms in which he says he has your leave of absence. He is too haughty to be liked in this army, but that might be overlooked on account of his capacity. I do not see any general officer here capable of commanding a wing of the army in battle. Mr. Douglas will tell you where the regiments suffer most for want of good lodging: "La nation Angloise est si delicatement elevée que d'abord quils sont hors de leur pays, ils deperissent partout où je les ay vu servir dans les pays étrangers les premières campagnes." Hopes that means may be taken to hinder French vessels bringing stores to the enemy.
Further reference to Harboard's monetary dealings, Van Humery and provisions. Has sent Capt. Kennedy who has come from Scotland, to Lord Crawford to obtain order to purchase provisions to send to the north parts of Ireland.
Mons. Scravenmoer has been to see the cavalry in the county Down; the regiments of Delamere, Devonshire, and Hewett are all officered by men who never saw any campaign but this last. Beverley, Hewett's lieut.-colonel is an honourable man, but I do not believe he ever saw a pistol fired. I never put any of the French among the English, unless the latter desire it. Scravenmoer takes Van Humery under his protection; he did the same with regard to Shales. Sends a letter found among Shales' papers since his arrest. Partly printed by Dalrymple. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 8.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to the Mayor of Carlisle. John Irving, George Irving, and Herbert Irving, three Scotchmen, have been lately stopped in your city by Sir Matthew Bridges, and by you committed upon the information. of Jane Wallace, charged with uttering seditious words. These appear to have been spoken by John Irving; and the information not extending to the other two, I am to signify his Majesty's pleasure, that only the said John be proceeded against according to the nature of his crime at the next assizes or quarter sessions of the peace, which you will take care to see done accordingly. The other two must be discharged, if there be nothing further against them. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 229.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Massereene. I have received your letter of the 4th instant concerning the petitions which were lodged in my hands, and as to that of the adventurers concerned in Lord Antrim's estate. The same depending entirely upon a settlement of the civil state in Ireland, I have only to acquaint you that though his Majesty has proceeded so far in the matter as to appoint civil magistrates there for prevention of such offences as may be committed for want of a due administration of justice and for the trial of petty causes, yet, seeing they are not to take cognizance of property of so great value as this which the petitioners lay claim to, there can be nothing further done in it at present. As to the establishment of boats upon Lough Neagh, you may remember the matter was by his Majesty's directions transmitted sometime since to the Duke of Schomberg for his opinion upon it; his Grace not having yet returned, I can at present make no further answer in relation to this or the other petition. [Ibid., p. 230.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Richard Dyer. A letter of the 10th December signed by you and two other gentlemen from Lichfield having been lately put into my hands, giving an account how you find the people of that place affected towards the present Government, I am obliged to say how surprised I am to find there should be any persons amongst them so ill advised as to be misled by the false and seditious insinuations of some malcontents, whose carriage in the last reign has made them so obnoxious in this, that the only thing they have to hope for is either to embroil the nation or involve as many as they can in the same condition as themselves.
But what I am more particularly concerned at is, that those who are well affected (though, as you have represented, but few in number) should be afraid to discharge their duty when the Government is ready to assist them in any legal act they may do for the preservation of the peace and quiet thereof. And therefore I am to recommend to you that an information be made upon oath before some justice of the peace against Morgan (the person mentioned in yours) of his being a papist or reputed papist, of his taking upon him to instruct people in the exercise of pike or musket, and his having arms in his custody, and, if it be the fact, to insert in the information that such practices are to the terror of several of his Majesty's subjects; which information I desire may be transmitted here that further directions may be given thereupon. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 230.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Fotherby. I have, according to your desire, moved the King for leave for you to come to town in order to clear your accounts, which the King has granted, and you will take care that his service may not suffer any prejudice in your absence. As to the pretences of Commissary Junge they are directly contrary to the treaty, by which it is agreed that the King of Denmark should furnish these troops with sufficient victuals and provisions and that in consideration of the expenses of the transportation the King should pay 240,000 rix-dollars, as you may see by an extract of the treaty, which I send you. His Majesty expects that the men should receive the full pay which he intends them, and that nothing shall be deducted out of it for their sustenance in the voyage, and certainly if any defalcation were to be made on that account, the benefit of it, as you observe, must be to the King, who furnishes the money and who bore the charge of their transportation and pays them, and consequently no other person can have any pretence to it. [Ibid. 2, p. 69.]
Jan. 9.
London.
News letter. Letters from Scotland say they have had a violent storm there for a fortnight and on the 30th ult. it broke down the new pier at Leith. One Cunningham has a commission to raise a regiment of 18 companies out of the four regiments disbanded. A party of the garrison of Abergelly sallied out and attacked some Highlanders who were plundering the adjacent country, killed several and took 18 prisoners. There are frequent robberies in and about Edinburgh. Two other generals, Lord Leven and Sir George Munroe, besides General Mackay, will command the forces in that kingdom.
Letters from Plymouth say that a prize galley laden with sugar was sunk in Catwater; there are hopes that the French privateer taken by the Dover and sunk there, may be raised. The James of Plymouth from Lisbon has arrived at Mount's Bay. The Portuguese ship cast away in the Isle of Wight was called the St. Josias and Our Lady; the master, Emanuel Sevars, and some servants of the English envoy, with 12 Portuguese, were drowned. Yesterday the common council received complaints of the undue election of several common councilmen, not being housekeepers but inmates. They also chose a committee to attend Parliament to have the judgment against the charter of the city reversed.
It is said the Earl of Argyll is expected here this evening and that the army that will be in Ireland next spring will consist of 60,000 men, commanded by the King. A paper was presented to the King entitled " Reflections on the last year from October '88 to November '89," which is such a libel that a strict enquiry is made for the author. Lord Murray, Lord Ross's son, is taken into custody. A petition is preparing by the builders against the Bill for laying a duty on new foundations. A patent is preparing for making Lord Brandon Gerrard Custos Rotulorum of Cheshire. It was resolved on Tuesday that the nominating of any member to the King for the office of sheriff was a breach of privilege. It was also resolved to address the King to appoint another sheriff for the county of York for this year in the room of Mr. Jonathan Jennings. Yesterday the Bill for an additional tax of 12d. in the pound for one year was read, and a second reading ordered. [Greenwich Hospital News Letter 3, No. 85, and Greenwich Hospital News Letter Entry Book 2, p. 293.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
A warrant directed to Col. John Beaumont, lieutenant of Dover Castle, to admit David Oldfield as gunner in Dover Castle in the room of James Deane, deceased. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 69.]
Jan. 9. The King to the Duke of Hamilton. Requesting him to prepare the lodgings lately possessed by the-Earl of Balcarres in the palace of Holyrood House for the Earl of Cassillis. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 14, p. 377.]
Jan. 9. Docquet for the warrant for a gift of a yearly pension of 200l. sterling to Sir Robert Sinclair of Stevenston. [Ibid., p. 378.]
Jan. 9. Warrant for a gift of the office of chamberlain of Fife to Mr. Duncan McArthur. [Ibid.]
Jan. 9. The like for a gift of the office of warden of the Mint in Scotland to Mr. William Spence. [Ibid., p. 379.]
Jan. 9. Commissions for Alexander Earl of Eglinton to be captain of the independent troop of horse now under his command [Ibid., p. 380]; for the Master of Forbes to be captain of the independent troop of horse now under his command [Ibid., p. 381]; for — Williams to be cornet in Sir Thomas Levingston's own troop in the regiment of dragoons of which he is colonel [Ibid., p. 382]; for — Boswell to be cornet in Captain John Hay's troop in the same regiment; and for Edward Murray to be cornet in Capt. Henry Balfour's troop in the same regiment. [Ibid., p. 383.]
Jan. 9. Blank commissions for officers in the Earl of Argyll's regiment. [Ibid., pp. 381, 382.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
Post-warrant for William Shuttleworth to go to Preston. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 35, p. 170.]
Jan. 10. Sir William Dutton Colt to Mr. Warre. Your particular news is very advantageous to his Majesty's service and gives great pleasure to us here. The loss of the ships at Plymouth is a trouble to us, making our enemies rejoice, of whom most of the courts in Germany have a number, the French Court never sparing money for intelligence. [H.O. Regencies 1, p. 144.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Passes for John Gerrard to go from London to Harwich or from any part of the river to Holland; for Mrs. Elizabeth Peguin, L'Angevin, her man, Mons. Poison, a painter, and Mons. Fontenay to go from London to Dover and Calais and to return (vide different spelling of their names in Pass of Jan. 11); for Gertruys Jans and two children to go from London to Harwich or from any part of the river to Holland; and for Matthias Wall to go from any part of the river Thames to Ireland. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 37.]
Jan. 11. P. Bowles to William Blathwait. Giving a list of ships of the West India squadron either ready at Spithead or ordered thither. Seal. [S.P. Dom. Will. & Mary 2, No. 96.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to the Lords of the Admiralty. Having this day received a letter from Exeter, giving an account that there pass great numbers of seamen from Plymouth, for that, as they say, they cannot be entertained there, I thought fit to give your lordships notice of it that you may give directions therein. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 232.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. James Knight. I have received your letter of the 8th instant, but cannot now so fully answer it as you might expect. As to that part of it which relates to an allowance during the time you were town-major, I have by this post written to Mr. Gibson, lieutenant-governor of Portsmouth, for better information on that matter, before I can transmit it to the Lords of the Treasury, to whom I must refer you for further directions.
If you have good grounds to believe that mass has been lately said at the house you speak of, or shall at any time hereafter be said at that or any other place, you would do well to inform some neighbouring justice of the peace that he may take such course as the law directs. But where you say the persons were taken up for speaking seditious words against their Majesties and the present Government and discharged upon their appearance when called, I am inclined to think that upon further inquiry you will find they have entered into their recognizances. [Ibid., p. 232.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lieut.-Governor of Portsmouth. I send enclosed a part of a letter which I received by the last post to which I desire your reply before transmitting it to the Lords of the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 239.]
Jan. 11. Commission to John Slezer to be captain of artillery in Scotland and surveyor of the magazines. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 14, p. 384.]
Jan. 11. Pass for Mrs. Elizabeth Beguin, alias La Foise, Le Angeirn, her man, Mons. Pouson, a painter, and Mons. Fontenay to go from Calais to London. (Vide different spelling of names in Pass of Jan. 10.) [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 37.]
Jan. 12. Order by the Lords of the Council to the Commissioners of the Admiralty to give directions for the ships at Spithead to carry 210 men of one of the Duke of Bolton's regiments, commanded by Lieut.Colonel Norton, as recruits for the other regiment of the Duke of Bolton. [S.P. Dom. Will & Mary 2, No. 97.]
Jan. 12.
Lisburn.
The Duke of Schomberg to the King. The bearer of this letter is named Matthews, the lieut.-colonel of Leveson's dragoon's; he is recruiting and is a good officer. Money is needed by the officers who go recruiting. Proposals to the Committee [of Ireland ?] in regard to money matters. I regret to see these disorders, since they hinder your service. Holograph. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 88.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant to affix the great seal to several commissions of the peace and sheriffs' patents for Ireland. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 38.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant to apprehend David Lindsay on suspicion of high treason, and to carry him to Berwick and thence to Edinburgh. A note that this warrant was never executed. [Ibid.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Schmetteau. I regret that I cannot have a conference with you to-morrow, but hope to do so on Friday next. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 71.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Charles Hedges. The Dutch ambassador having by a certificate under his hand bearing date the 7th day of January instant, declared that James Braynes had paid to him for the ship Mary, of London, John Harris, late master, taken by the French and retaken by a Dutch man-of-war called the Phœnix, the full proportion of salvage due, according to the treaty lately concluded between the King and the States-General, which he has been directed by the States-General to receive, and that the said ship is discharged from all process and proceedings against her under colour thereof, I do hereby, at the request of the said James Braynes and other owners, acquaint you with it; that, in case there is no other cause for detaining the said ship, you may forthwith give order for discharging her and restoring her to her owners and proprietors. [Ibid., p. 71.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
The same to the Principal Commissioners of Prizes. To the same effect as the foregoing. [Ibid., p. 72.]
Jan. 13. The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury of Scotland granting payment of 6,000l. to the Earl of Moreton. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 14, p. 384.]
Jan. 13. The same to the same. Order for the palace of Holyrood House, with all offices, houses, and stables thereto belonging, to be completely repaired. [Ibid., p. 385.]
Jan. 13. The same to the same. Warrant for the Earl of Cassillis to have the apartments in Holyrood House lately possessed by the Earl of Balcarres. [Ibid., p. 386.]
Jan. 13.
London.
News letter. Gives an account of the storm on the 11th as in Luttrell. It is reported that the French took, coming for England, between 500 and 1,000 Danes, officers, and soldiers, and carried them into Dunkirk. It is also reported that Schomberg is dead in the Isle of Man. An express to the Admiralty says that the storm has cast away 12 vessels and 50 more are wanting from the Downs. Six hundred a week die in Dublin of a raging distemper; the people have shut up their houses and left the town. The King has gone to keep Christmas at one of the Duke of Ormond's houses. The King of Sweden is about to treat with the King of France to hold a neutrality with him, for which the French King is to give a large sum of money monthly. An order is sent to all the counties of England for their militia and trained bands to be ready to draw to the sea coast in case of invasion. Count Lauzan with his officers has set forward for Brest. The King of Denmark is sending 2,000 more men to England. It is said that every considerable town in France is to send forth a regiment of 500 men for the next campaign. The King, ten days ago, looking out of the window, the sash fell upon his neck and held him fast till one of the lords came and lifted it up. [Greenwich Hospital News Letter 3, No. 86, and Greenwich Hospital News Letter Entry Book 2, p. 371.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings on the petition of Henry Baldwyn, John Morris, Timothy Biggs, and John Tustian, praying that the joiners and carpenters of Worcester, being numerous, may be incorporated. Referred to the Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 171.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Denny Muschamp, esq., praying for the office of Clerk of the Crown and Peace for Ulster. Referred to the Committee for Irish Affairs. [Ibid., p. 171.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Moore, esq., praying for a grant to coin copper money, to be uttered in Ireland. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 171.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant for John Norwood to be a gunner in Arcliffe Fort, in the place of Thomas Peirce. [H.O. Admiralty 3, p. 29.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Pardon to Timothy Hertogen, convicted of the murder of James Marsh, a coachman. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 42.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Passes for Herman Janse to go from Harwich or any part of the river to Holland [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 38]; and for David Adams to go from London to Richmond in Yorkshire with two servants. [Ibid., p. 39.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to the Attorney-General. I have your opinion that a Scotchman may be sent from hence to be tried in Scotland, but there being this further circumstances in Mr. Lindsey's case, that he is discharged from his first commitment by his Habeas Corpus and now under a recognizance to appear at the King's Bench the next term, I desire to know your opinion whether he can be taken up again under my warrant for the same offence and how far the enclosed paragraph of the Habeas Corpus Act is applicable to this case. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 233.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The same to Earl of Fauconberg. I have considered the papers which I received from you, amongst which was a list of several persons who are supposed to be engaged in a design of collecting money for the service of the late King James, a copy whereof was lately put into my hands by a gentleman upon the like occasion. Though some of the persons therein mentioned (to whose character I am not a stranger) may justly render the thing probable, yet the evidence does not amount to a direct proof against any of them. I know no other use that can be made of this accidental monition but to excite the deputy lieutenants and justices of the peace in those parts to have a watchful eye over all disaffected persons and particularly those mentioned in the list, to see if any of their actions will lead to a discovery of the design which the list seems to purport. [Ibid., p. 233.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
The same to Colonel St. Clair. The bearer hereof, one of the messengers, being sent to bring up 14 prisoners now in the Hope, I desire you will furnish him with a guard under the command of an officer for their safe conveyance here. [Ibid., p. 234.]
Jan. 14. The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury of Scotland directing a daily allowance to be made to Sir David Moncreiffe. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 14, p. 386.]
Jan. 14. The same to the same. Requiring them to grant a discharge to Robert Earl of Lothian for the "few and blench" duties of the lands and lordships of Newbottle and Jedburgh from July 1684 to July 1689. [Ibid., p. 387.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Reprieve for Hugh Jones and John Donelan convicted of killing Alice Beale, widow. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 39.]
Jan. 14. Passes for Simon Bloemendall, merchant, to go from Harwich or the river to Holland; for Mr. Varlotin to go from Dover or the river to Flanders [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 39]; for Samuel Smith, servant to Mr. Richards, his Majesty's Chief Engineer in Ireland, to go from Chester or any other port to Belfast [Ibid., p. 41]; and for William Burke to go to Barbadoes and the other Caribee Islands, and there to remain and trade. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 35, p. 174.]
Jan. 14. Commissions for — Bruce to be ensign in the Earl of Leven's regiment of foot [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 14, p. 387]; and for — Lawrence to be adjutant in the same regiment. [Ibid., p. 388.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to the Lords of the Admiralty. His Majesty has received an account from Mr. Goodwyn, his consul at Tripoli, concerning some passes he has given to the subjects of that Government. His Majesty is satisfied they have no right to demand them, the article of Peace on which they rely not being reciprecal; but, being done, his Majesty will not recall it, because it might expose the consul at a time when he is employed to renew the peace with that government. His Majesty's pleasure, therefore, is that the Commander of the Mediterranean squadron do "connive" at those who possess passes from the said consul. [H.O. Admiralty 3, p. 30.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
The same to Captain Killigrew. Upon Captain Rooke's being called off from the Mediterranean service, the uncertainty arises what ships may be spared to go on the Barbary coast; his Majesty is therefore pleased to intrust the consuls to renew the peace with the respective governments where they reside, and accordingly the commissions, letters and instructions are all prepared anew in their names which will be herewith sent you, and you will take care to send these dispatches with the bales of presents and other letters that are now on board Admiral Russell's ships to the several places in case you go not yourself. [Ibid.]
Jan. 15. Pass for John Persyn to go from Harwich or the river to Holland. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 41.]
Jan. 16.
Dublin.
Lord Lisburn to — I am infinitely concerned that I must give you so melancholy an account of the proceedings of that part of the army under Sir John Lanier's command, in which I was unfortunately and unwillingly engaged, believing there would be some failings not in my power to prevent.
From the minute of your lordship's departure, I found a coolness in our motions and great delays which I complained of very warmly, and it was Christmas day before any resolution was taken, at which time Sir John Lanier desired that Major-General Kirke, Colonel Villers, and myself would give in writing, and he would do the same, what was best to be done. I gave my positive opinion that the motion of the army was by the King's command, and in order to force a passage over the Shannon and post ourselves there, that General Ginckle's orders were to the same purpose, and that I saw no difficulty in performing those orders since our boats and guns were so near Lanesborough, the place agreed on to be first attacked. The rest of the opinions were different and it may be thought unkind in me to mention one by Sir John Lanier who supposed and was informed that Sarsfield was posted on our side of Athlone with a great part of his army, and that it would be dangerous to move towards Lanesborough lest he should get in our rear.
To prove this a mistake, I desired only 300 foot and 200 horse and I would march through all their quarters till I came very near Athlone and bring a faithful account of what forces were in those quarters. This party was allowed me, and on the Saturday night following, about 11 o'clock, I parted from Streames to me (sic) and early on Sunday morning I drew up all my party on a hill in sight of Athlone, and in all this march of eight miles, and in a country entirely possessed by the enemy, we only met with a party of about 20 horse. We killed some of them and took most of their horses, the men saving themselves in the bogs. On Monday I went to Mullingar and gave the generals an account of this march, and informed them that the enemy were posted on this side of the Shannon and near to Lanesborough. I asked for a strong party with which I would possess myself of Lanesborough town, Racline [Rathline ?], and all the other passes on this side the Shannon, and secure them till our boats and guns arrived. The generals ordered me on Tuesday morning 1,000 foot, and 300 horse and dragoons, with which I marched to Foxhall, ten miles from Mullingar. The next day I encamped at the foot of the causeway, within five miles of Lanesborough, which was cut and broken in thirteen places, and Col. Richards assured me that if I gave him 300 men to work all night he would make the passage good. Early on Thursday morning, which was New Year's day, my whole detachment had passed, and about 11 o'clock I drew up my party on a hill within a hundred yards of Lanesborough town and bridge.
It is impossible for me to express the confusion and surprise the enemy were in at our appearance. We killed several of them on the bridge, and found large quantities of corn and other provisions by the river side and about 3,000 head of cattle, and saw, on the other side, the enemy packing up. It is the opinion of myself and party that if our boats and guns had arrived we would have been masters of their broken bridge and pass without any, or little, opposition, as we saw only about 150 men. On New Year's day Sir John Lanier came to Lanesborough; he went early the next day for Mullingar to despatch the boats, guns and other necessaries. He met them advancing but ordered them back and sent an express to me to return. I sent him answer that I was there by his command and asked for the guns and boats. I received a second express and sent the same answer. On Wednesday I received another express saying that the boats and guns would be forwarded. Colonel Richards erected a strong battery at the entrance of the bridge for mounting our guns and within 40 yards of their fort, made of sods. On Thursday, the eighth day of our being in Lanesborough, Colonel Villers arrived with orders from Sir John Lanier that it was not to the King's service to take a post on the other side of the Shannon, nor would he, if he could. On Friday morning we retreated and on Saturday came to Mullingar.
Thus ended this shameful expedition which had every prospect of success. What this riddle means I cannot imagine; unless there is some change this war will continue too long not only for Ireland, but for England too. This is now a most miserable country, more ruined by our friends than our enemies; all those who have been sufferers have had their employments that were of value taken from them. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 89.]
Jan. 16.
Lisburn.
The Duke of Schomberg to the King. The best part of the county for taking in provisions will be between Ballyshannon and Sligo, where the enemy has made some entrenchments which they cannot defend when we march by Belturbet, which is at the head of Enniskillen marshes. Some of the old fortifications made about Drogheda in Cromwell's time have been repaired. Refers to the death of St Sauveur who was a man of great courage. The two companies of cadets are very useful. Mr. Rapin has gone to you about providing recruits and their uniforms. There are some vacant companies in the cavalry and in the infantry which must be filled. When Oxford's regiment was sent into Holland you took five horsemen per company from Langston's regiment which have not been replaced; it is the best that has come from Scotland. I have sent Lanier's and another regiment towards Monaghan and Claunish (?) The English troops do not care for their quarters here, being accustomed to those of England.
Progress of recruiting. Hastings' regiment has not brought 200 men from Scotland. Bellasis' is nearly perished. Mons de Scravenmoer is charged to give you an account of the regiments inspected by Kirke and Lanier. Asks instructions as to place which the Danish troops are to occupy in the army. The Duke of Wurtemburg has sent me the staff of that corps d'armée, which appears large enough for a force of 20,000 men. The cavalry ought not to be embarked till April, as we lack forage. The officers of the Tower should look better after the guns and muskets. I have not asked for pikes, being persuaded that "sweins feders" are more serviceable in Ireland. The posts are very irregular; letters should be sent by way of Scotland. I have given passports to the captains of the reduced regiments that they may return to England; pay is due to them; the lack of money is a great embarrassment to us.
Never were seen officers who have so little care for their soldiers' arms. Major Doucet, who leaves here, recruiting, deserves your attention for the care he has taken of his regiment. Colonel Villers, a brigadier of cavalry, is careless of his regiment. Carriages for provisions are—now that the army is to be strengthened—more necessary than ever. I have heard from the minister of Lady Louth, who is a protestant, that her papist husband is dead and that mortality continues amongst the enemy, particularly amongst the peasants; he (the minister) had heard it remarked at his master's table, by some of "my lords" and the Irish colonels, that the generals of their army had committed a great fault, when their army came to Ardee, and ours to Dundalk, in not marching to attack our camp. The papists have asked your protection to withdraw in these parts. Shall they be granted to all ? I learn that there are soldiers willing to desert. Asks if offers of money should be made to those willing to join King William's army. The officers on recruiting service leave daily for England. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 90.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to Dr. Edwards. I have received your letter of the 14th instant with the inclosed libels. I find these impertinences obtruded upon all kinds of people in most parts of the kingdom. I hope the endeavours that are being made to discover the authors will meet with success. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 234.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Chester. I wrote to you on the 17th December in answer to yours of the 11th, concerning the arms that are being seized, directed to Sir James Pooly, to acquaint you that the arms should be left with Sir George St. George till they were otherwise disposed of, which I hope you have complied with, or that you will let me know your reasons for not doing so. [Ibid., p. 234.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
The same to Viscount Lumley. Inclosed I send some papers lately put into my hands, amongst which you will observe a list of persons subscribing considerable sums of money for the use of the late King James; as many of them are within your lieutenancy of Northumberland, I recommend to you (the only use that can be made of this dark discovery) to cause the deputy-lieutenants and justices of the peace for that county to keep watch over all disaffected persons and particularly those mentioned in the list, to observe if their behaviour in future will give an insight into this matter. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 234.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
The same to the Deputy-Lieutenants of Durham. Inclosed I send you the copy of a list of several persons lately found in the highway not far from Sedgefield in the county of Durham, purporting to be a collection made of considerable sums of money for the use of the late King James. As many of the persons mentioned therein are, I am informed, inhabitants of your county I recommend you, and through you the justices of the peace, to have a watchful eye over all disaffected persons and in particular those mentioned in the list, to see if their action will amount to a proof of the design which at present is but suspicion. [Ibid., p. 235.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Robert Holmes. I have received your letter of the 13th instant upon Lord Inchiquin's memorial to have power to pardon pirates, which has been referred to the Lords of the Committee for Plantations who have heard what the merchants had to say on the subject and when any further proceeding is made in it, either at the committee or at the council board, I will take care to put your views before them, and nothing shall be done to your prejudice till you are heard. [Ibid., p. 235.]
Jan. 16. The King to the Privy Council of Scotland, appointing Alexander Inglis to be appender of the Great Seal. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 14, p. 390.]
Jan. 16. The same to the same. Acquainting them that Mr. Archibald Riddell, minister of the gospel, and James Sinclair of Freshwick, prisoners in France, are very hardly used. The King proposes to exchange them for two priests. [Ibid., p. 391.]
Jan. 16. The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury of Scotland. Ordering them to reimburse Robert Elphinstone of Lopness his expenses on behalf of the Crown [Ibid., p. 392.]
Jan. 16. Warrant for a commission appointing Robert, Earl of Lothian, justice-general, Sir George Campbell of Cesnock, justice-clerk, and Sir Colin Campbell, of Aberuchell, to be senators of the College of Justice at Edinburgh. [Ibid., p. 388.]
Jan. 16.
London.
News letter. Letters from Edinburgh of the 9th inst. say that the Council have ordered a letter to be sent to the officers of the Excise where their forces have been lying, to bring in the accounts due from the soldiers between this and the first of February. They have also ordered another writ to the heritors of Banffshire to provide a magazine of provisions at Gordon Castle for the use of the forces at the usual rates. This day the Earl of Lothian presented two commissions to the Privy Council constituting him lord-justice-general and principal sheriff of Midlothian and Edinburgh, with an order to affix the great seal to both. This morning a flying post came from the King, recommending the Council to keep up seven regiments of foot for the service of that kingdom to be made up out of those disbanded, together with instructions that those officers who are coming from Holland for recruits, for the royal regiment there, may be allowed to beat drums for the taking up of men for that use, and to keep up in pay whatsoever horse and dragoons they shall deem necessary, four of which he will pay and the three others to be paid by this Kingdom. His Majesty also recommended the exchange of prisoners for those seamen taken out of the two Scotch frigates, and desires provision of what other seamen that kingdom will allow.
Twenty-one of the merchant ships that were driven from their anchors have come into Dover and a great many more into the Downs. The master of the French mail reports that there are great wrecks upon the French coast, 20 sail being aground between Calais, Boulogne, and Dunkirk; among them is a Dutch man-of-war of 40 guns, all the men drowned; 22 ships of force are also driven on the same shore, one of them supposed to be the Samuel and Henry. She keeps the French off with her guns. The Rainbow that came into the Downs on Saturday last from the East Indies, very richly laden, was forced from her anchors in the storm and given over for lost. She came into the Downs yesterday but having no cable nor anchor, drove herself ashore in Sandwich Bay to save her cargo. Nine sail are also cast away on the Goodwin Sands, and the Supply, a man-of-war of 40 guns, was on Saturday last cast away coming from Carrickfergus into Hoylake, but all the men saved.
The country gentlemen of Ireland have met and presented an address to the Duke of Schomberg for a day of thanksgiving, also to lodge a store near Newry to maintain a sufficient party there for the defence of the place, for a free market, to raise 6,000 Protestants here, to stop all passes, and that the laws be revived for the peace of the country; but happening to deliver it just as the General was going into his coach to go to Armagh, he deferred his answer till his return. Some think he will give orders for bombarding Charlemont as soon as he returns, which it is thought will be in ten days. The Governor of Flanders having prohibited all commerce with France by sea, the French have done the like by land, which it is thought will oblige the Governor to recall his prohibition, the inhabitants not being able to subsist without commerce with France. [Greenwich Hospital News Letter 3, No. 87, and Greenwich Hospital News Letter Entry Book 2, p. 303.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant to commit Thomas Matthews, accused of being a Romish priest, to Newgate. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 43.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Arthur, Earl of Torrington, to be colonel and captain of the first marine regiment of foot [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 70]; for Sir Richard Onslow, bart., to be lieut.-colonel and captain of a marine regiment of foot under the command of the Earl of Torrington [Ibid., p. 71]; for Henry Davies, esq., to be major of the same regiment [Ibid., p. 72]; for Mr. Ash, to be captain of a company in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 74]; for Mr. Spicer to be captain-lieutenant of a company in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 75]; and for Mr. Duncombe to be first lieutenant of that company of which Lieut.-Colonel Sir Richard Onslow, bart., is captain in the same regiment. [Ibid., p. 80.]
Jan. 16. Passes for Christopher Liebesberg to go from Harwich or any part of the river to Holland; for Ida Jans to go from Harwich or the river to Holland; and for William Baillie to go from London or any part of the river to Holland. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 42.]
Jan. [17.]
Dublin.
Lord Seaforth to Sir Donald Macdonald of Slate. It gives me great satisfaction to hear of the readiness of you and your men to serve the King, which is the greatest proof you can give of your loyalty. Nothing shall be wanting on my part to do you right and kindness, and that I may appear a true gentlemen, pray order some one in your island to have a fine plaid ready for me. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 91.]
Jan. 17.
Zell.
Sir William Dutton Colt to Mr. Warre. We want two posts from England, and all our councillors here are at a conference with those of the other Dukes, so I have nothing to say till I have spoken to the Dukes of Hanover and Wolfenbüttel, in order to their giving instructions to their ministers to attend the congress at the Hague. To-morrow I go to Hanover where I hope to meet the whole family at an opera. [H.O. Regencies 1, p. 148.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to the Admiralty. I desire, in consideration of the services performed by Captain Thomas Powell of Dover, you will grant a protection to his four sons John, William, and Henry, all of Dover, and Thomas Powell, living near Southampton, that they be not impressed to sea. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 236.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant to apprehend John Tyrrell upon suspicion of dangerous and treasonable practices. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 43.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant to apprehend Father John alias Nicholas Linse, a Popish priest, for uttering traitorous and seditious words. [Ibid., p. 44.]
Jan. 17. Passes for Jan Aldenbode, Hanrens Devas, Arysut Ruyck, Ary Bastians, Castiaen Cysberts, Ary Gerrits, Kyssenburgh, Marten Bombery, Jan Jans, Cornelis Peters, Peter Ariens, Donter Leenderts, Deerck Gerritts, and Pieter Pieters, Dutch seamen, to go from any part of the river to Holland [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 42]; for the Sieur de Languedoc to go from Harwich or any part of the river to Holland [Ibid., p. 43]; for Isias Tarleing, Peter Srip and Jan Blom to go from any part of the river or Harwich to Holland; for Dereyen Corneel, Yson Lon, Veryp Fyssen, Peter Heremensen, Hendrick Aereyensen, Hiozef Hereemen, and Yansen Con, or Cousen, de Hoe and Jacob Gerretsen, Dutch seamen, to go from any part of the river to Holland; for Jacob Adriaensen, Freedryck Fyeldmansen, Jeremydsen Adreyansen, Jacob Ypereyanseng, Merten Yornsen, Corneleyse Corniellyanse, Dutch seamen, ditto; and for John Le Gros to go from Harwich or any part of the river to Holland. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 44.]
Jan. 18.
Lisburn.
The Duke of Schomberg to the King. Captain Glom [Glaum ?] who was bearer of a long letter to you and to whom I explained everything regarding the artillery, was forced by the wind to Scotland and died at sea. He is a great loss to me and his place cannot be filled by an officer in the artillery, in the Tower, or here; I hope someone may be brought from Holland. As to promotions in the regiments. Lord Hewett is dead and his regiment is sought for by Lieut.-Colonel Bayerley. Hardly any officers in this regiment are capable of commanding a squadron; it is therefore proposed to appoint Mons. de Cagny, who speaks a little English and has been a captain of cavalry for more than fifteen years, in case Bayerley is made colonel. This would stop solicitations being made to you for the lieut.-colonelcy, or the majority by a young captain named Littleton, for whom the post has been asked by Sir Robert Hoare, in order that Littleton might marry on it. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 92.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to the Mayor of Dover. I desire you will send me notice by a flying packet, as soon as the fleet with the Queen of Spain on board appear in sight of your port. Similar letters were sent to Deal, Portsmouth, Plymouth and Falmouth dated as above. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 236.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Jephson. Enclosed I send you the copy of part of an information I received this day relating to several French vessels employed to import silks, laces, and other French commodities, that you may lay it before the Lords of the Treasury; but I desire you to acquaint their lordships that whatever directions are given, all possible care should be taken not to excite the suspicion of John Jenner, named therein, of the discovery made, in the hope that further proof may be obtained against him.
The Charity, William Read, master, is now under an embargo for endeavoring to transport several passengers to France, and it being reported that there is some plate on board her, I desire you to acquaint their lordships with it, for directions to be given to the Custom House officers to search her before the embargo is taken off. [Ibid.]
Jan. 18. The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. The enclosed is a letter written to Count Mansfeld and sent by him to the Spanish Ambassador, from whom I received it and also a letter from Mr. Russell. I have also received another letter from Mr. Russell, wherein he desires me to put your lordships in mind of completing the provisions of the ships that are to sail with him from Portsmouth, that there may be no delay. He also tells me that he brings with him 150 Danes that were taken by the French and escaped afterwards into Flushing, for the disposing of which he desires his Majesty's orders. I presume they must be landed at Deal, unless your lordships can direct some yachts or sixth-rates to bring them into the river, and his Majesty shall approve this last method. Mr. Russell adds that there will be about 150 persons that now attend the Queen of Spain to return with him from the Groyne, and thinks that the two men-of-war, appointed to come back with him, will not be sufficient for that number. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 73.]
Jan. 18. The King to the Privy Council of Scotland, directing them to proceed to the trial, for treason, of Mr. William Levingston and other officers and soldiers of Sir Thomas Levingston's regiment of dragoons. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 14, p. 392.]
Jan. 18. The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury of Scotland, requiring them to administer the oaths of allegiance and fidelity to the Lords of the Exchequer. [Ibid., p. 393.]
Jan. 18. Warrant for a gift of a yearly pension of 500l. to William, Earl of Crawford, as one of the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 394.]
Jan. 18. Docquet of the warrant for a gift of a yearly pension of 500l. to John, Earl of Cassillis, as one of the Commissioners of the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 395.]
Jan. 18. The like for a gift of a similar pension to John, Earl of Tweeddale, as one of the same Commissioners. [Ibid., p. 395.]
Jan. 18. The like for a gift of a similar pension to David, Lord Ruthven, as one of the same Commissioners. [Ibid., p. 395.]
Jan. 18. The like for a gift of a similar pension to Alexander, Master of Melville, as one of the same Commissioners. [Ibid., p. 396.]
Jan. 18. Warrant for a gift of a year's rent of the bishoprics of Scotland to the Presbyterian ministers, their widows and orphans. [Ibid., p. 396.]
Jan. 18. Docquet of the warrant for a gift of a yearly pension of 100l. to David Moncrieffe, one of the clerks of the Privy Council of Scotland. [Ibid., p. 397.]
Jan. 18. Blank commission for the deputy-governorship of the Castle of Dumbarton and lieutenancy of the company of foot in garrison there. [Ibid., p. 398.]
Jan. 18. Blank commissions for officers in Lord Strathnaver's regiment. [Ibid., pp. 398 to 403.]
Jan. 18. Doequet of the warrant for a gift of a yearly pension of 500l. to William, Duke of Hamilton, as one of the Commissioners of the Great Seal of Scotland. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 14, p. 403.]
Jan. 18. The like for a similar pension to Archibald, Earl of Argyll, as one of the same Commissioners. [Ibid., p. 404.]
Jan. 18. The like for a similar pension to George, Earl of Sutherland, as one of the same Commissioners. [Ibid.]
Jan. 18. The like for the gift of a yearly pension of 300l. to the Earl of Forfar as a Commissioner of the Privy Seal of Scotland. [Ibid.]
Jan. 18. The like for John, Earl of Kintore. [Ibid., p. 405.]
Jan. 18. The like for John, Lord Carmichael. [Ibid.]
Jan. 18. The like for the gift of a yearly pension of 100l. to John, Lord Belhaven, as one of the Commissioners for discharging the office of Clerk Register of Scotland. [Ibid.]
Jan. 18. The like for Robert, Master of Burleigh. [Ibid., p. 406.]
Jan. 18. The like for Sir Duncan Campbell. [Ibid.]
Jan. 18. The like for Thomas Burnet of Leys. [Ibid.]
Jan. 18. The like for John Hay of Park. [Ibid., p. 407.]
Jan. 18. Pass for Jacob Jorrice, David Vee and Pieter Carels to go from any part of the river to Holland. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 45.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to Mr. Jephson. I desire you will acquaint the Lords of the Treasury that having examined Captain Read, who was lately stopped in the Hope, as he was carrying away men to serve the late King, I find that these passengers and several others who are on board vessels bound for Flanders, were all, or most of them, taken off at Gravesend or on this side of it, which the searcher there seems to have taken no notice of; how prejudicial this may prove to his Majesty's service, their lordships will easily judge. And it is further said that some of these vessels, particularly the "bylanders," under the pretence of trading to and from Flanders, carry their cargo directly to Dunkirk, and have thus lately gone there with several hundredweight of lead.
For a fuller discovery of this, if an account be drawn out from the Custom House books of what entries are made there of vessels, for the last four or five months, bound for Ostend or Newport, I will get it compared, by means of the Spanish Ambassador, with the entries that are kept in those places on the other side. It would be wise if their lordships would direct the officers or Commissioners of the Customs to examine Read (who will be sent to them when required) in order that these practices may be better understood and that orders may be given to prevent them in future. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 237.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to the Lords of the Admiralty. By the examination of William Read, who was lately stopped in the Hope by the Kitchin yacht, as he was carrying away men for Flanders, I find there are vessels now going with this convoy to Ostend which have passengers who are sent on the same errand to serve the late King; particularly the Phœnix, Stephen Warrener, master, the Anne ketch, and another, John Johnson and William Broad, masters, as also three or four "bylanders." You are, therefore, to order a search to be made for such suspected men, and also for arms. The enclosed petition from the Jamaica merchants is to be laid by your lordships before the King this afternoon. [H.O. Admiralty 3, p. 31.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
Order in Council approving of the report, dated Dec. 13th, 1689, a copy whereof is annexed, from the Principal Secretaries of State and the Lords of the Treasury to the King, concerning the extraordinaries to be allowed in future to the King's ministers employed abroad. The report referred to follows. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 35, p. 171.]
Jan. 19. Warrant to the keeper of Newgate to bring up Patrick Harding, under sentence of death, to be examined before a Committee of the Lords of the Council. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 47.]
Jan. 19. Passes for Jan Pieterse Rosebol, William Willemse, Joannes Bartels, Ary Jooste, Jan Govertse, Jan Hendrickse, and Jacobus Vandenbosch, Dutch seamen, to go from any part of the river or Harwich to Holland; for Jan Feyse, Lodewick Vander Hayest, Abel Bescom, Jacob Christianse, and Tennis Pieterse, Dutch seamen, ditto [Ibid., p. 45]; and for Wouter Arentse and Ary Jansse, ditto. [Ibid., p. 46.]
Jan. 20. The Duke of Richmond and Lennox to Sir Joseph Williamson. Thanking him for the trouble he has given himself concerning the writer's interest in the Alnage. Seal of arms. [S.P. Dom. Will. & Mary 2, No. 98.]
Jan. 20.
The Hague.
The Earl of Portland to the King. Proceedings in the States of Holland with observations thereon and on their various members. Refers to the design which the gentlemen of Amsterdam have against him. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 93.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to Mr. Houblon. I desire you will give notice to the Portuguese merchants to meet and consider the inclosed letter [see next entry] which is written to them by direction of his Majesty. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 237.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
The same to Portuguese merchants. His Majesty—being informed that the generality of the merchants trading to Portugal are dissatisfied at the choice of the consuls who were lately appointed for Lisbon and Oporto upon the petition of some of your number, without any opposition that appeared of the rest whilst that matter was for no small time pending, as also that you are aggrieved at the allowances and powers which are given to these consuls, as they were contained in former grants of this office—is disposed to remove any just cause of complaint and to give you all fitting assurances of his favour and countenance in the management of your trade in such methods as may be acceptable to you. He is therefore pleased that you should meet together and debate whether it would be most for the benefit of your trade to have one or more consuls in Portugal, what allowance you think ought to be made for the support of that office, what person or persons you judge most capable and fit to be proposed to his Majesty for the employment, and what powers they should have. What shall be agreed upon in these particulars, his Majesty desires may be forwarded to him. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 238.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
The same to the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex. Some persons of quality having acquainted me they intend to move his Majesty to remit that part of the sentence pronounced this last sessions at Hicks Hall upon Peter Roman which relates to his standing in the pillory, I desire you will suspend the execution of the same for a week, till his Majesty's further pleasure be known. [Ibid., p. 238.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. I understand that Mons. Beaujeu, in pursuance of his sentence, has been this day set in the pillory, where he has been scurvily used, and that it is appointed that he should stand there again to-morrow. I did not know the time was so short for inflicting this punishment, or I would before have interceded with his Majesty, in consideration of this gentleman's family, to remit it, and—illness now preventing me from immediately waiting upon the King—I desire you will suspend the further execution of this sentence for eight or ten days till the King's pleasure can be known. [Ibid., p. 239.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Sotherne. I have received by this post a letter from Vice-Admiral Killigrew (to whom I have sent, by his Majesty's commands, the King's commission and letters to the consuls of Tunis, Tripoli, and Algiers to renew the peace with those Governments, in case the Vice-Admiral cannot attend to do it himself), who acquaints me that he has no directions yet from the Admiralty to send any vessels to these places with these despatches and the usual presents, which are now on board the Duke. I desire therefore you will acquaint the Lords Commissioners and procure the necessary orders. [Ibid., p. 239.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I send your lordships herewith a paper I received from Mons. Rosenheim, the First Commissary of the Danish troops in England, that you may lay the same before the King for his directions in it. [Ibid. 2, p. 74.] Enclosing:—
Petition from Mons. Rosenheim to the Lords of the Treasury, dated 18th January, praying that the cost of the transport of the Danish troops may be paid. [Ibid.]
Jan. 20. Proceedings upon the petition of Alexander Hicks and Mary Meggs, executors of John Singleton. Praying that—two of the Commissioners of the Great Seal having denied them a commission of review —his Majesty will revive the commission under the Great Seal Granted. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 3, p. 172.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Summons to Francis Foot to give evidence against certain persons for using scandalous and seditious words against his Majesty and the government. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 46.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to search the house of Mary Mullins, in or near Clare Market, she being accused of having in her possession a considerable sum of money designed for the enlisting and maintenance of several traitorous and disaffected persons, and for the transport of them to France for the service of their Majesties' enemies, and to arrest the said Mary Mullins and to seize the said money. [Ibid., p. 47.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to apprehend John Welch, Walter Canfield, William Hill and John Tent for treasonable and seditious practices. [Ibid., p. 48.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the keeper of Newgate to bring up Patrick Harding, under sentence of death, to be examined before a Committee of the Lords of the Council. [Ibid.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Passes and post-warrants for Mr. Francis Geuilier to go from Harwich or the river to Holland; for Peter Brocas, James Cillet and Margaret de Guniques to go from Harwich or any part of the river to Holland [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 44]; for Lucas Battaile, surgeon to Colonel Groben's regiment, to go from Chester, or any other port to Ireland [Ibid., p. 45]; for Mr. William Newton to go from London to Portsmouth with two horses; for Johannis Souflant, Willemina Souflant, his wife, and their four children to go to some place unspecified [Ibid., p. 46]; and for John Thompson to go to Lochryan in Scotland and to return. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 35, p. 176.]
Jan. 21.
Lisburu.
The Duke of Schomberg to the King. As to musters and recruiting. I am daily expecting your orders and also some money, the wind being favourable. Complains of the Admiralty not sending small warships to escort the merchant vessels. The lack of money is a great prejudice to your service; the troops perish for want of accommodation. It is thought that the post may be best sent by way of Scotland. Presses the suggestion for obtaining the use of "les petits charettes d'Irland" for conveying provisions.
I am told by the oldest people of this country what Cromwell did when he had completed his conquest of it, and I send you a paper by which you will see how things have been disposed since that time; what you approve therein you can give orders thereupon. Difficulties in supplying the outlying garrisons. Van Homrigh is incapable here alone and Robinson, his associate, is always in England, where I hope he will make sufficient provision. I believe that Poth (?) will be the bearer of this dispatch; he is a good gunner, and will, I believe, ask you for Glaum's post, to serve in Holland; you know these sort of people better than I do, so I will only remark that we have need of Germans in the capacity. Strangers are more capable than the English who have not seen service. There is an Englishman named Coval [Covel ?] who, I believe, has pretensions [to the post ?], but he does not seem to me to be very capable. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 94.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to the Lord Mayor of London. I received yesterday an information from Wood Street Counter of very seditious words uttered by a prisoner there, one Mary Gooding; and sending there for a further account thereof, the enclosed examination was brought to me this morning by the clerk of the Counter, which I have thought fit to transmit to your lordship, requiring you to give such order for the prosecution as the case requires. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 240.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Bristol. I have received a letter of the 15th instant, subscribed by you and several other gentlemen, with the petitions, and a copy of yours of the 4th of the same month, concerning some Irish prisoners at Bristol, in relation to whom I have some time since signified the direction of the Lords of the Committee for Prisoners at their last meeting, which was, that they should be left to obtain their liberty by the ordinary course of law; that may be done by two ways, either by Habeas Corpus or the common gaol delivery at the Assizes or Quarter Sessions. But as you have represented them as persons not able to avail themselves of the former, they must wait to be discharged by the latter, which is the common provision made for the liberty of the subject. If any of them shall offer sufficient security, I am of opinion it ought to be accepted. [Ibid., p. 240.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Plymouth. I received both your letters of the 12th and 14th instant concerning Mr. Lilleston; in answer to both I have only to say I am fully satisfied with the account you give of your proceedings in that matter wherein you have acted according to law. [Ibid.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Ashmole. I have received yours with the libel enclosed in it, of which a great many have been dispersed, and I hope the author will be found out that he may receive due punishment. [Ibid. 2, p. 75.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Concerning the President's subscribing papers. Directs that search be made among the records to discover what methods have been used for subscribing such papers and Acts as were to be subscribed by the whole Council. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 14, p. 407.]
Jan. 21.
London.
News letter. Letters from Edinburgh of the 14th say that several persons were arrived there, who say that the late King left Dublin, by reason of the great mortality in the city, about six weeks since, and that our army, now in their quarters, are recovering from the country distemper. Those of Scotland have ordered 600 bolls of wheat for the present supply of our army there, and several merchants here have undertaken to supply them with clothes which will be paid for from the Excise. The engrossed Bill to vest their present Majesties with the lands and estates belonging to the late Queen Mary or to any persons in trust for her, was read a third time.
Some people from Calais say that the Dunkirkers have both lead and sea-coal supplied to them by English merchants, and that they are making great preparations by sea, there being in that port one man-ofwar of 70 guns, three of 50, and one of 36; they are well manned, and most of the men are Flemings; besides these there are several privateers. All the garrisons on the sea-coast have marched into Flanders and the newly raised forces are to supply their own place. It is said the King will be at the head of them at the beginning of the next campaign. A prohibition is sent to Calais and all the ports to prevent any seamen going out except such as are to go into the King's service. Letters from France say that the Pope had a surfeit on New Year's day last, which nearly cost him his life; he fell into a swoon going to the Chapel and coming to himself merrily said he believed the Cardinals thought he was dead. There is talk there of a league between the Princes of Italy to oblige the Catholic Princes to join and to declare war against those that refuse. Letters from Brest written on the 16th say that the ships designed to carry supplies for Ireland were fitting out with all speed, but the rains hindered them much in careening them, that most of the troops that were to embark were in the neighbourhood of Brest, and that the train of artillery and the ammunition were all ready.
Letters from Germany say that the country of Cologne was to pay 50,000 crowns to the Elector of Brandenburg; that it had been proposed to the States of that country to pay 19,000 crowns, and the subsistence of three regiments of Bavaria which are in that country; that the Elector of Brandenburg would send no troops towards the Rhine but only his quota. The news from Hamburg and Lower Saxony is that the Elector of Saxony augmented his troops to the number of 20,000. The Sieur de Ratisbon, gentleman in ordinary to the French King, has gone to Genoa as envoy. Mons. Turvile, Vice-Admiral of France, has quitted the Order of Malta and the King makes him Chevalier or Knight of St. Lazare and gives him a pension of 4,000 livres. It is said he will command their fleet with a particular commission from the King, and that Count D'Estrees will be Vice-Admiral under him. Mons. de Melac has returned to Treves, having made an incursion into the country of Cologne with 1,500 horse and dragoons, burnt above 28 villages and forced both that country and the country of Juliers to bring their contributions to Treves. It being apparent that Sir Robert Sawyer was one of the prosecutors of Sir Thomas Armstrong (when Attorney-General) it was ordered that he be expelled the House for the same. [Greenwich Hospital News Letters 3, No. 88, and Greenwich Hospital News Letter Entry Book 2, p. 307.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of James Lanesborough for security of his estates in Ireland, notwithstanding the loss of his documents of title. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 60.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to fetch the portmanteaus, &c., belonging to some of the Irish passengers lately seized on board the Charity hoy, as they were endeavouring to cross to France, and if found to seal the same and bring them to be examined. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 48.]
Jan. 21,
Whitehall.
Protection to George Quinnell, William Meddin, George Lucy, John Fisher, Samuel Hutson, and Richard Gibbens, whose services are absolutely necessary for the working of the ferry-boats between Fulham and Putney, from being impressed into his Majesty's service. [Ibid., p. 50.]
Jan. 21. A list of all the officers of the first marine regiment of foot, under the command of the Earl of Torrington.
Colonel:—The Earl of Torrington.
Lieut.-Colonel:—Sir Richard Onslow.
Major:—Henry Davies.
Captains:—Edward Ash, Joseph Stafford, Overton, Boothby, Martin, Anthony Gibbons, John Barrington, Mostyn, Ellis Cooper, William Prince, Every, Erasmus Philips, Spicer, Duncombe, and John Fairman.
First Lieutenants:—Apollo Morrice, Bradbury, Umpton Dering, Gilbert Simons, John Foster, Levesque, Needler, Cooke, Price, Beverley, Townsend, Button, Weaver, Thomas Horner, and Radborne.
Second Lieutenants:—Kinnion, Sanderson, Philips, Henry Flutter, Woddington, Anderson, George Noble, Butler, Lary, Yateman, Grace, and Harris.
Quarter-masters:—Mr. John Marsham, Mr. Pattills, and Charles Christian.
Surgeon:—Robert Manesty. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 82.]
Jan. 21. A similar list of officers for the marine regiment of foot under the command of Thomas, Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery.
Colonel:—The Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery.
Lieut.-Col.: Sir William Villers.
Major:—Webberley.
Captains:—John Sydenham, George Naylor, James Waller, Arthur Owen, William Spragg, Richard Shorditch, Lesley Finch, Anthony Duncombe, Thomas Michael, Richard Courtenay, Francis Marsh, William Hayward, Samuel Odtbert, Henry Rous, and James Langton.
First Lieutenants:—James Thomas, George Rowles, Lambert, Thomas Price, Paul Batchelor, Richard Leigh, John Bennett, Barry Moor, John Philips, John Gardner, Charles Owsley, Henry Morgan, William Williams, William Farmery, and Hill.
Second Lieutenants:—John Garsh, Purvis, James Mallory, Thomas Owen, St. John Webb, David Ward, Edward Newbold, Mansel Stradling, Nicholas Bennet, Rhodes, Philip Thomas, and Thomas Browne.
Quarter-masters:—Mr. Minait, Buckler, and Stephens.
Surgeon:— Francis Mogson. [Ibid., p. 83.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Captain Ash, to raise volunteers for a company of foot under the command of the Earl of Torrington [Ibid., p. 81]; and for —Logan to be a lieutenant in the Earl of Leven's regiment. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 14, p. 408.]
Jan. 21. Blank Commissions for officers in Lord Strathnaver's regiment. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 14, pp. 408–421.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Pass for the ship Betty of London, to take French prisoners to France in exchange for English. [H.O. Admiralty 3, p. 41.]
Jan. 21. Passes for Mons. Scafre, Mr. Duray, Mr. De la Lane, Mr. De la Cleuse, Mr. Grimar, Mr. Battingge, Mr. Gross, Mr. Monplesier, Mr. Champagne and Mr. Martin to embark in the river or at Harwich for Holland [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 46]; for Abel Brusian and John Maynard to go from Harwich or the river to Holland; for Robert Woodman to go from Chester, Liverpool, or Hoylake to Ireland; for James Benoist to go from Chester, Liverpool, or Hoylake to Ireland; for Mary Dauglade, a native of Berne, to go to Harwich or any part of the river to Holland; for John Hermense to go from Harwich or the river to Holland [Ibid., p. 49]; for Frederick Tolemaz (sic) and others, Dutch seamen, to go from any part of the river to Holland [Ibid., p. 50]; and for Roger Tilley to go to Chester, or other place thereabouts, and embark for Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 35, p. 174.]
Jan. 22. An account of the arrears due to the army, including the Enniskillen and Londonderry forces. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 93.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to the Deputy-Lieutenants of Hertfordshire. Understanding that there is urgent necessity of raising money for the use of the Militia of the county of Hertford, both for buying trophies and defraying of other necessary charges, I desire you therefore to take speedy care for the raising of one week's tax, according to the Act of Parliament for the Militia, throughout the whole county of Hertford. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 241.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
The same to the Earl of Faversham. I am informed that Jenks and Thursby, two popish priests, against whom I have issued a warrant, are concealed in some of the "out-lodgings" of Somerset House; but before directing a search to be made, I have, in deference to Her Majesty the Queen Dowager, given your lordship notice of it. [Ibid., p. 242.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant to seize the seditious and treasonable papers belonging to Henry Nevil, alias Payne, a prisoner in the Fleet. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 50.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant to search for and apprehend Thursby, Manwell, Codrington, and Purcell, Romish priests, now lurking in or near Westminster. [Ibid., p. 51.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
Passes for Francis Burnaby and Mr. John Waters to go from Dover or the river to Flanders; for Anthony Row, esq., to go from London to such places as he shall have occasion on his Majesty's service, and to return [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 49]; for Paulus Wouterse and Robert Small, Jacob Robertsen, Robert Admitten, Jan Stuart, Maerten Jouse, Henrick Sunt, and Jan Jacob, Dutch seamen, to go from Harwich to Holland [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 50]; for John Henry Ullrick to go from Dover to France; for Jacob Areson, David Gillis, Jacob Vangell, and Barcut Dirksen, Dutch seamen, to embark in the river or at Harwich for Holland; and for Abel Buscan and John Meynard to embark in the river or at Harwich for Holland. [Ibid., p. 51.]
Jan. 23. "Disposition" of the sum of 24,145l. 16s. 2d. for various services, including 1,000l. to Mr. Jephson for the King's secret service; 1,000l. to Mons. Vanderesch, for the engineer, General Cambon, and other officers, for arrears; 360l. to Count Schomberg as general of the horse for the months of November and December; 90l. to an "ensign of the Danish forces, lately escaped from France;" 21,000l. for "the Danish clothing"; and 203l. to the Commissioners of Sick and Wounded for the prisoners in the Marshalsea. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 96.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to Mr. Wettenhall. I have received your letter of the 15th instant and am making enquiry about Mr O'Brien. I am informed by the Commissioners for Prisoners that they ordered his discharge last month, having exchanged him for the master of an English vessel. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 241.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
The same to the Earl of Macclesfield. I received a letter by the last post, inclosed in one from Mr. Philip Wingfield of Preston Brockhurst in Shropshire, with an account that a letter carrier, belonging to the post office in Shrewsbury, calling at Mr. Edward Leighton's at Wattlesborough to leave a letter there, accidentally dropped one (whereof I enclose a copy) sealed with a cypher and coronet. The gentleman into whose hands it fell, not thinking it of such importance as the person who transmitted it here, inadvertently tore off the address, but he remembers it was directed to Mr. Thomas Price of Llantyllin in Montgomeryshire, a known and zealous papist, and one who, it seems, in that part of the country bears the character of a very busy and designing man.
You will find by the contents of the letter how necessary it is to use all expedition, as well as care, imaginable in the directions you shall think fit to give for the prevention of this threatened design, or the arresting and punishment of those who shall be found the contrivers and dispersers of such false and seditious reports; and therefore I shall only recommend it to you as an occasion to excite the DeputyLieutenants and Justices of the Peace in those parts to a more than ordinary vigilance at a time when the professed enemies of the Government alarm and provoke it with their daily threatenings and scurrilous reflections. [Ibid., p. 242.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
The same to Major Wildman. Having lately received a letter purporting very dangerous designs against his Majesty and the Government, which was accidentally dropped at a gentleman's house in Shropshire by a letter carrier belonging to the post office in Shrewsbury, sealed with a cypher and coronet and addressed to Mr. Thomas Price of Llantyllin in Montgomeryshire, a known and zealous papist, wherein mention is made of one Mr. Pooley, though I have given such directions therein as I judge most beneficial for his Majesty's service, yet I think fit to acquaint you with it, that whenever letters shall come to your hands so directed, you may take care to stop them and send them to me for examination. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 243.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Wingfield. I have received two of your letters of the 17th and 19th instant, with the inclosed to Mr. Price, and will take care to give such speedy and effectual directions in this matter as may, I hope, prevent this sudden and (as the writer calls it)"fortunate astonishment," which he so confidently threatens us with. I hope, if they can be discovered, to make a just example of the too frequent authors of such idle and seditious reports and insinuations as tend to the daily disquieting of the minds of the people and the common disturbance of the Government. [Ibid.]
Jan. 23. The same to Mr. Knight. I have received your letter of the 20th instant which, with your former and that from Lieut.-Col. Gibson, I shall transmit to the Lords of the Treasury, when you may be assured I shall recommend your case to their lordships. [Ibid., p. 244.]
Jan. 23.
London.
News letter. Letters from Dover of the 21st says that on the 20th, about 8 o'clock at night, the Duke, on board of which was the Queen of Spain, and about 40 sail more, passed to the westward, but there being a small gale, it was thought they would come back to the Downs. It is said from France that the Princes of Italy have made a league to defend all attacks against the territories of any of them, and that the indisposition of the Pope was such that the next letters may bring news of his death. The French flatter themselves that he would favour them, having sent his nephew, Cardinal Ottoboni, to make his first visit to the French Ambassador before he made any to the Spanish. The French have not been able to make a difference between the confederates about business of Saxe Lawenburg; they now confess that the matter is settled to the satisfaction of all parties.
On the 18th inst., nineteen sail of Dutch and Swedish ships bound for the Straits, sailed for Plymouth, but were driven back by contrary winds. The next day there arrived the Venetia and Britannia of London, with three Dutch merchantmen, from the Straits. They came out with upwards of 20 English and Dutch merchantmen and three Ostend men-of-war; they are very richly laden. Yesterday one Patrick Hardwine was executed for high treason for levying war against their Majesties; and at the same time six others for various crimes, amongst them a Dutch soldier who murdered his child in the cradle.
Yesterday Sir Peter Rich attended in his place to answer the petition of Sir Thomas Pilkington and others, who were fined for riot at an election of sheriffs for the City of London in 1682. Sir Peter was heard in his defence, and after some debate the question was put whether a bill should be brought for reparation out of the estates of the persons mentioned in the petition, but it was negatived without a division. The House resolved into Committee on the Bill of Indemnity, inflicting penalties on such as should be exempted out of the Bill. Dr. Tillotson and Dr. Scott were desired to preach before the Commons on the 30th instant in St. Margaret's. On the 21st the Mary and Henry arrived at Portsmouth and also three men-of-war, with 150 merchantmen. [Greenwich Hospital News Letters 3, No. 89, and Greenwich Hospital News Letter Entry Book 2, p. 309.]
Jan. 23. Warrant for the presentation of Robert Hoblyn, clerk, to the rectory of Lanteglos and Advent in Cornwall, vacant by the resignation of James Beaufort, clerk, the last incumbent. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 47.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to apprehend Charles Taylor, Jean Taylor, John Clarke, Mrs. Clarke, Nathaniel Williams, Mrs. Blow, Mrs. Garrot, Mrs. West. Mrs. Hearon, Mrs. Brooks, and Mr. Brunskill, Mrs. Price, Mrs. Ratcliffe, Mr. Lock, Robert Couper, Captain John Pennington, Mrs. Standly, and Mr. Chamnore for traitorous and seditious practices against their Majesties and the Government. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 52.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for Peter Guenon de Beaubuisson to be keeper of the private armoury. [Ibid., p. 177.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
Pass for the Lady Mary Trant, with her two sons, James and Lawrence Trant, and her servants, Ellen Richard and Helen Jones, to go to Dover and embark for Calais. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 35, p. 176.]
Jan. 24.
Hanover.
Sir William Dutton Colt to Mr. Warre. Your letters were delayed because of the snow. This family is here together, excepting the Duke of Zell and his court. We have had a "camavat" and "most magnificent opera of voyces from Venice which has drawn much company hither." I hear nothing of any levies in these parts which our Gazette mentions, and I cannot get their pretensions in writing to the Duchy of Saxe Lawenburg. The Duke of Zell sends Mons. Bettemar to the Congress at the Hague, the Duke of Hanover, the Baron Goerts, and the Duke of Wolfenbuttle. [H.O. Regencies 1, p. 152.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to Mr. Jephson. Having received two letters from Mr. James Knight of Exeter, desiring payment of his Majesty's allowance during the time he was town-major there, I wrote to Lieut.-Colonel Gibson, the governor of that city, for more particular information, whose reply, together with Mr. Knight's letters, I desire you will lay before the Lords of the Treasury and give him all the assistance you can in it. I desire also that you will acquaint their lordships that by informations lately come to my hands, I find Mr. Chiffinch, the searcher at Gravesend, is concerned with one Jenner, a Quaker there (of whom I gave their lordships an account about a week since), not only in conniving at the running of goods but in conveying several disaffected persons beyond sea, knowing them to be such, and that they were designed for the late King James's service, of which I could now give two or three instances; but I hope in a short time to have more undeniable proofs. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 244.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Dover. It being of great importance to his Majesty's service that Mr. Williamson, who is gone this day to Dover and intends to lodge at Mr. Bastick's, the master of the Flanders packet, should be secured and strictly searched for letters and other papers, which I am informed he has in his charge, I have despatched the bearer hereof, one of his Majesty's messengers, to you for that purpose, and I desire you will give him all the assistance you can in it. I think it will be convenient to let Mr. Williamson get on board, in case he designs it, and then let the boat be stopped just as it is going off, and all the passengers, and every place in the boat, searched thoroughly. Whatever letter, or packets you find about any of them I desire may be carefully sealed and delivered to this bearer to be brought to me for further examination. However, I would have you secure the said Mr. Williamson in safe custody, whether he goes on board or not, until further order. Memorandum "This letter was sent by Mr. Young, the messenger, at 12 o'clock at night, in so great haste that I had not time to enter it before it went, but did soon afterwards and this is the substance. I do not mean that the packet boat should be delayed any longer than until she is searched." [Ibid., p. 245.]
Jan. 24. Pass for David Martell to go from London to Harwich and Holland. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 52.]
Jan. 24.
The Hague.
The Earl of Portland to the King. Progress of the proceedings. The States of Holland. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 97.]
Jan. 25.
London.
News letter. Letters from Lyme, of the 20th, say that the Bonadventure from Jersey arrived there, having on board 20 passengers, 19 of them being masters and mates of English ships, taken by the French. They report that there are 40 men-of-war fitting out at Brest for Ireland; that they came on foot from Brest to St. Malo and were civilly treated all the way, but that the people generally are discontented and full of complaint for want of trade. The English and Dutch fleet is still at Spithead. Five troops of Danes are quartered at Newcastle, some of them attacked a country gentleman and wounded him, for which they were tried by a council of war. One ran the gauntlet, and four others were bastinadoed with cudgels, a punishment which, it seems, they inflict in their own country.
Letters from France say that Count de Lauzan was ordered by the King, four or five days ago, to proceed to Brest where they are hastening the succours for Ireland; that the Elector of Brandenburg not only intends to be reimbursed all his expenses but has carried off all the cannon from Bonn as a conquered city; that the Bishop of Munster is not well pleased with the treatment his subjects receive from the forces quartered on them; that 2,000 hogshends of wine, 500 pipes of brandy, and a great quantity of meal, biscuit, and corn are shipped for Ireland without paying custom; and that the King's household are ordered to rendezvous at Champagne on the 1st of April. They also confirm the news of many of our ships being stranded on the French coast, among them being the Greyhound, Captain Saunders, who defended it for four days against the French, but at last was forced to yield; the men are all imprisoned at Boulogne. Mons. Chateau Reneau is ordered to Toulon to hasten the ships to Brest. Yesterday, several French merchants were seized by way of reprisal for some of ours taken in St. Malo, their names being Dulmere, Didier, Deprement, and two middies, Margnett and Berlins.
It is said from Edinburgh that the Duke of Gordon and the young laird of Langton were set at liberty by order of the Council. It is said that the King will, for the encouragement of our fishery, order a company to be formed for the better carrying of it on. The Convocation met yesterday and adjourned till Monday. [Greenwich Hospital News Letters 3, No. 90, and Greenwich Hospital News Letter Entry Book 2, p. 311.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Certificate that James Johnston, esquire, envoy-extraordinary to the Elector of Brandenburg, kissed the King's hand on his departure, on 24th January. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 35, p. 177.]
Jan. 25. Warrant for letters patent creating John Lauder of Fountainhall, a baronet. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 14, p. 421.]
Jan. 25. Warrant for a gift of the office of master and keeper of their Majesties' wardrobe in Scotland to John Auchmouty. [Ibid., p. 422.]
Jan. 25. Docquet of the warrant for a gift of a yearly pension of 35l. to Helen Johnston, Lady Graden. [Ibid., p. 423.]
Jan. 25. The like for a pension of 40l. to Margaret Johnston, relict of Sir John Wemyss of Bogie. [Ibid., p. 423.]
Jan. 25. Warrant for a gift to John Nairn, of all goods &c., which pertained to George and James Campbell, merchants of Edinburgh, escheated to the Crown on their being found rebels, "and put to the horn by virtue of letters of horning, purchased, raised and executed against them at the instance of Alexander Simpson." [Ibid., p. 424.]
Jan. 25. Blank warrant for a gift of the office of clerkship of the cocquet and searcher at the port of Montrose. [Ibid., p. 425.]
Jan. 25. A similar blank warrant for the like offices at the ports of Atcheson's Haven and Preston Pans. [Ibid., p. 427.]
Jan. 25. Warrant for a gift of the office of clerk of the cocquet and keeping of the cocquet seal from the water of Leven to Fife's Ness or the town of Crail inclusive. [Ibid., p. 428.]
Jan. 25. Docquet of a blank warrant for a gift of the like office at Leith. [Ibid., p. 428.]
Jan. 25. Docquet of a blank warrant for a gift of the office of Clerk of the Coquet, &c., from Inverkeithing to the water of Leven. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 14, p. 429.]
Jan. 25. The like for a gift of the like office at Dundee. [Ibid., p. 429.]
Jan. 25. The like for a gift of the like office for the north side of the water of Forth, above Queensferry. [Ibid., p. 430.]
Jan. 25. The like for the same office on the south side of the water of Forth above the Queensferry. [Ibid., p. 430.]
Jan. 25. Commission to Viscount Kenmure to be colonel of a regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 430.]
Jan. 25. Blank commissions for officers in the same regiment of foot. [Ibid., pp. 431–436.]
Jan. 25. Docquet of the warrant for a gift of a yearly pension of 1,000l. to William, Duke of Hamilton, as President of the Privy Council of Scotland. [Ibid., p. 437.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Pardon for John Goodwyn of Weston in Gloucestershire, if he should be found guilty at the next assizes of killing William Gorton. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 56.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Passes for Alert Pooiter, Willem Janse, Josias Janse, Willem Willemsze, Robert Craffert, Jan Adriese, and Michiel Calvyn, Dutch seamen, to go from Harwich or any part of the river to Holland; for Mons. Trepaud ditto [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 52]; and for David Tessoniere ditto. [Ibid., p. 53.]
Jan. 26.
The Hague.
The Earl of Portland to the King. Events in Holland. Military matters. Will provide boats for service in Ireland. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 98.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to the Duke of Norfolk. I have laid before the King your letter of yesterday; he is pleased to gratify the Queen in allowing you to make a compliment to her brother and to give him the title of Highness. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 245.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
Passes and post-warrants for Vincent Pastery, Anthony Raffa, and Joseph Manzone to go from Chester to the north of Ireland [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 51]; for John Coury, servant to the Duke of Norfolk, to go from London to Portsmouth; for Captain George Beale to go from London to Plymouth; for Samuel Huntziger and Adam Abraham de Palezieux, natives of Berne in Switzerland, with Isaac Forgeur, their servant, to go from London to Dover, and embark for Flanders [Ibid., p. 53]; and for Jan Janse to go from London to Holland. [Ibid., p. 54.]
Jan. 27. The Earl of Marlborough to the King. I have taken all the pains I can with the officers to be industrious in making recruits for Ireland; but most of them think it impossible to find the whole number. I have let no day pass without speaking to "Lord G." about what you command, nor will I be rebutted in it, though I do not prevail much with him, save that I make him melancholy; your kindness to him has most weight with him. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 99.]
[Jan. 27.] Speech intended to have been delivered by the King at the opening of Parliament. Hopes for the speedy reduction of Ireland and states his resolve to go there in person. Written by the King. Printed by Dalrymple [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 100.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
The King to Samuel Hanson, esq., high sheriff of Carnarvonshire, granting him leave to remain and dwell out of the county during his term of office. [S.P. Dom. King's Letter Book 2, p. 38.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to Sir Charles Hedges. The enclosed extracts of the Consul at Genoa's letter being laid before his Majesty, I am directed by him to ask your opinion, whether the ship St. Antonio may be detained here upon her arrival, or the Genoese ships trading to Spain or Portugal seized by his Majesty's frigates and sent to England. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 246.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petitions of Colonel Baldwin Leighton, praying that the office of Warden of the Fleet, granted by King Charles II. to Sir Jeremy Whichcote, deceased, may be conferred to him. Referred to the Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 172.]
Jan. 27. Proceedings upon the petition of Edward Gilmore, serjeant in Captain Charles King's company, praying payment of the arrears of his pay. Referred to Viscount Sydney. [Ibid., p. 173.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Proceeding upon the petition of ten grooms of the Great Chamber of King James, praying for payment of arrears in their salaries. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 173.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate to receive into his custody William Hodges, James Lowell, Charles Young, Matthew Dorrell, John Cooke, Abraham Royley, Garriot Roach, David Kennedy, Alexander Roach, Mallecese Lounghen, James Calley, John Pearce, James Dimsey, and William Read, master of the Charity hoy, on suspicion of high treason. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 53.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Remission of that part of the sentence passed upon Peter Roman— convicted at the last session at Hick's Hall, Middlesex, for speaking scandalous and seditious words against the Government—under which he was to receive corporal punishment. Besides being sentenced to receive corporal punishment, he had been fined 20 marks, and ordered to stand in the, pillory at Charing Cross and at St. James's Street. [Ibid., p. 55.]
Jan. 28.
The Hague.
The Earl of Portland to the King. Progress of events in Holland. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 101.]
Jan. 28. Cash Account. The balance on Jan. 23, was 106,208l. 10s. 5¾d. The receipts include 300l. from forfeitures for treason, 20l. from the rent of lighthouses, 45,000l. for loans on East India goods, 132,000l. from the second aid, and amount to 195,492l. 7s. 3d. A statement of payments, money appropriated or reserved, and particulars of "disposeable money" follow. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 102.]
Jan. 28.
Hanover.
Sir William Dutton Colt to Mr. Warre. We want three posts. The snow and frost continue. Our opera and theatre "is most magnificently fine," exceeding even that of Italy, though the Duke of Zell is not here, nor any of his court. I am under dreadful apprehensions that cur mirth will not end well, being concerned for the safety of Prince Charles, the fourth son of this Duke, who is marching from Pristina. If he be killed, it will bring both the Duke and Duchess with sorrow to their graves. I am much alarmed by news introduced here by our good friends, that on the 11th and 12th there had been a great storm in the Downs, and many men-of-war and merchant ships were cast away. I hope it is not true. The envoy from London writes word of the sudden journey of the King to Scotland and afterwards to Ireland. [H.O. Regencies 1, p. 156.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to Colonel Pope. I acquainted the King with your condition and desire to come over to England for recovery of your health, which his Majesty would have you take care of, and by his orders I have written this night to the General to give you leave; but I am likewise directed to acquaint you that your absence can be dispensed with but for a very short time, his Majesty intending to have the army very early in the field and to be himself at the head of it, on which consideration I do not question you will still continue in that country unless there be an absolute necessity for your removal. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 246.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
The same to Major Wildman. Mr. Francis Williamson has, by his Majesty's directions, been lately stopped at Dover, where he still remains in custody; among the papers found on him, I find the copy of a recommendatory letter from yourself on behalf of him and two other persons. I have some reason to believe, both from the letters that were found about him and from some information I have received, that he was employed to carry letters and intelligence from France; for although your letter was for his passage to Flanders, yet I understand by the Mayor of Dover that his design was to go to France. I desire therefore an explanation what you know of him; and how you came to give him your recommendation. [Ibid., p. 246.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Dover. I have received your letter of the 26th instant reporting the arrest of Mr. Francis Williamson with the inclosed papers which were found upon him. I have directed an Habeas Corpus to issue to bring him up, in order to his further examination touching the same, and the Lords of the Treasury have given the like directions to Mr. Aaron Smith, their solicitor, concerning Robert Smith, now a prisoner in your gaol for transporting wool. [Ibid., p. 247.]
Jan. 28. The Earl of Nottingham to Mr. Hearne. His Majesty is content that the 40,000 crowns, remitted by you to Mr. Texeira, be paid by him to Mr. Molesworth or his order. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 75.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Fotherby. I have received your letter and have acquainted the King with it, by whose order I will speak to the Prince of Wurtemburg concerning some of the points contained in it, and to the Lords of the Treasury concerning the rest, and will afterwards give you an answer to them. [Ibid., p. 76.]
Jan. 28. Warrant to the Commissioners of the Treasury of Scotland for payment of 100l. to Sir George Munro in part payment of his pension of 300l. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 14, p. 437.]
Jan. 28. The King to the Privy Council of Scotland, ordering them to grant letters of marque and general reprisal against French and Irish ships to Captain John Boswell. [Ibid., p. 438.]
Jan. 28.
London.
News letter. The news from Rome of the 20th is that there is no appearance of an accommodation between the Pope and the French King; the Pope insists on the restitution of Avignon, that the bishop of Noyson (?) be set at liberty, that the propositions of the clergy be retracted, and that the propositions of Mademoiselle de Mandeville be revoked. The French demand that the Pope should send out a bull declaring that he has not "directly or indirectly any light upon the temporalities of kings," that he should deliver up all ecclesiastics guilty of treason against his Majesty, that the proceedings against Cardinal Furstemberg be revoked, and that the library of the late Elector Palatine, which is entire in the Vatican, be restored to the Duke and Duchess of Orleans, they being his heirs.
Letters from France say that much wreck and many dead bodies are cast upon their coast, and that some considerable English ships have been forced into Boulogne, which the French King has presented to Mons. D'Aumont, governor of that place.
Letters from Ireland say that since the King's proclamation for permitting all goods to be imported free of duty, our army have had all manner of necessaries at reasonable rates. From Edinburgh they say that Macneal, and about 100 of his followers, have deserted the Highlanders' interest. The Laird (?) of Pollock, who was exchanged for Strauven Robertson, has gone to Glasgow. About thirty sail of English and Dutch ships bound for St. Tubal and Cadiz have arrived at Falmouth under a Dutch convoy. The Queen of Spain arrived at Spithead on the 25th. This day an embargo is laid upon all ships both English and foreign. Many persons are making preparations to accompany the King to Ireland, most of the Irish nobility attending the King as volunteers. [Greenwich Hospital News Letters 3, No. 91, and Greenwich Hospital News Entry Book 2, p. 313.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Report by the Solicitor-General upon the petition of Captain George Meese. He has examined the allegations in the petition, and finds that in Easter term, 36 Charles II., a decree was obtained in the Court of Exchequer, whereby it appears that the manor or lordship of Stanford Hall, in the county of Essex, was charged with the respective annuities of 40l. each to Richard and Robert Petre for their respective lives, and that the said Richard and Robert Petre, being under the obedience of the said late King, went beyond the seas, and were trained up in a popish college, contrary to the law of the land; that the said Richard Petre was attainted of high treason by outlawry, and the said Robert Petre convicted of high treason, whereupon it was adjudged that the terre-tenant of the premises should, for the future, satisfy and pay the same annuities unto his said Majesty, during the lives of the said Richard and Robert Petre. Referred to the Commissioners of the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book, p. 61.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the Lady Margaret Hay, administratrix of William, late Earl of Kinnoul, stating that by letters patent the Earl should, upon a surrender of the Barbadoes or the Caribbee Islands, have received 500l. per annum, for 7 years, and 1,000l. per annum for ever, after. Prays for payment of arrears. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., 2, p. 173.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of George Cocks, praying that— as he voluntarily left his ship and effects at Amsterdam, to attend his Majesty into England, and exhausted all he had—he may receive present relief, until he can be provided for in the fleet. Referred to the Admiralty. [Ibid., p. 174.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings on the petition of James Ap Rice. Praying that he, having discovered a method "to improve the Excise to several thousand pounds per annum," may have a commission for the counties of Pembroke, Carmarthen and Cardigan. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 175.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings on the petition of Katherine Craddock, praying that her son, Peter Craddock, who served long as a gunner in the Royal Navy and who has now been pressed before the mast, may be restored to his former employment. Referred to the Admiralty. [Ibid.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Samuel Kempthorne, praying for employment in the fleet, he having served at sea in the last Dutch war under Sir John Kempthorne; he had been master of a merchant ship for 12 years, was taken prisoner by a French privateer, and released by way of exchange. Referred to the Admiralty. [Ibid., p. 177.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir John Barker, bart., stating that he is owner of the manor of Walton-cum Trimley, and that there was a ship wrecked on the said manor, which was broken up and her cargo carried away by the soldiers and the deputygovernor of Landguard Fort. Prays that they may be ordered to restore the said goods. Referred to the Attorney-General. [Ibid., p. 181.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Commission to—Oldys to be lieutenant to Captain Sanderson in Colonel William Beveridge's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 2.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Anthony L'Avergne to go from Harwich or the river to Holland; for Gysbert Gerisse, a Dutch soldier, to go from London to Harwich or any part of the river to Holland; for Gerrard Eli and Nicholas Van Uliet, ditto; and for Jan Gerrise, Fran Janse, Claes Pieterse, Garnese, Willem Hubreghsse, and Jacobus Michelse, ditto. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 54.]
Jan. 29. Disposition of money. 4,000l. to the Treasurer of the Navy; 550l. for Mr. Henry Martin, receiver of the first 12d. aid for the county of Worcester, being part of the money advanced by him for buying and hiring engines for pressing and packing hay, &c.; 36l. for three weeks' subsistence for the sick in Col. Hastings' regiment, they being to march from Sussex to Leicestershire; payments to various officers; 3,000l. to be paid to Mons. Vanderesch, in part of 9,350l demanded by his memorial for recruits for the Dutch troops in Ireland; payments on account of the "Danish cloathinge"; 92l. to Sir John Morgan for subsistence of the prisoners at Chester, and for the pay of "extraordinary gunners" there; payment on account of the arrears to the "blew regiment of guards," &c. Total sum, 34,708l. 11s. 4d. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 103.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to the Dean of St. Pauls. Mr. Harrison, who has for some time been chaplain to Sir Thomas Lee, will wait upon you with this, being desirous to make use of my interest upon this occasion. I desire to recommend him to you for some preferment in the church, whenever a vacancy occurs. I am loath to engage in matters of this nature and should have declined but for the good character I have received of this gentleman, seconded by the application of some particular friends. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 247.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
The same to Admiral Russell. I have just received information that Captain Seymour (as it is supposed, of the Guards) and Captain William Leech, of Colonel Trelawny's regiment, are gone down to Portsmouth, designing to go on board Captain Whitcomb's ship, he having undertaken to carry them to Ireland to serve the late King. The ship is now lying near the point at Gosport, and if all diligence is not used, they will be gone.
I have therefore despatched this messenger to give you this account and "have enclosed the warrant, that even the person who is to execute it does not know the business he goes about; for the information being sent from a nameless person it may be abusive" in which case I would not have gentlemen made a subject of discourse. Therefore I recommend you to use all necessary precaution in employing such as may effectually search this ship, and if such persons be found there, they may be apprehended and given into the custody of the messenger to be brought up with a guard from Portsmouth, and in that case a search should be made for letters or papers, and if there should be any other suspected persons, though not named herein, that they also may be apprehended. It is not said positively that the name of the master of the vessel is Whitcomb, but it is that or a name like it. Upon this occasion I acquaint you further, as I formerly had an imperfect account, that in this fleet, outward bound, there were some ships designed for Ireland; if the information is true, it may be a means to throw some light on the subject. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 248.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Colonel Berkeley, stating that, under several Acts of Parliament passed in the reign of Edward VI. and Elizabeth for preventing the growth of popery, all estates, both personal and real, belonging to popish priests or appropriated to superstitious uses, are forfeited to the Crown. There being such estates in Sussex, Suffolk, Norfolk, and Lincoln, he prays for a commission of enquiry to be issued out for discovery thereof. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 174.]
Jan. 29.
Kensington.
License to John Kynaston, high sheriff of Shropshire, to live out of the said county. [H.O. King's Letter Book 1, p. 19.]
Jan. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant for James Johnson, esquire, envoy-extraordinary to the elector of Brandenburg, and Gregory King, esquire, Lancaster herald of arms, to convey the Order of the Garter to the said Elector. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 35, p. 178.]
Jan. 29. Warrant for the reprieve of Charles Dering, esquire, convicted of the manslaughter of Henry Goring, esquire. [Ibid., p. 180.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to apprehend Captain Seymour, Captain William Leech, and Captain Whitcomb, at Portsmouth, upon suspicion of dangerous and treasonable practices against their Majesties and the Government. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 57.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Pass and post-warrant for Captain Labat and Mons. Mordagne, his serjeant, to go from Harwich or any part of the river to Holland; and for Mr. Robert Irwyn, and one servant, to go from London to Bury St. Edmunds. [Ibid., p. 56.]
Jan. 30. The Lords of the Treasury to Sir Robert Howard, auditor of the receipt of the Exchequer. Directing the issue of certain sums out of any disposable money. [S.P. Dom. Will. & Mary 2, No. 99.]
Jan. 30.
Lisburn.
The Duke of Schomberg to the King. Announces the arrival of the Charles galley with 30,000l. sterling; the captain struck on a rock on the coast of Strangford and nearly caused the loss of some merchant ships which followed him. Details of what he has done with this money: some spent on clothing for the Enniskillen and Du Cambon's regiments. Yesterday I made a division of 30,000l. sterling amongst all the regiments and sent some money on account to Van Homrigh [Van Humery ?] for his expenses in carrying provision towards the frontier towns. I have sent Colonel Du Cambon to make some intrenchments, and ordered Colonel Wolseley to advance with most part of the dragoons and cavalry of the Enniskillen troops; near Cavan they took 200 cattle and horses.
Refers to the enemy's method of recruiting; they take, by force, those that come to mass, and the priests conduct them to the regiments; there is more sickness amongst their troops than amongst ours. Arrangement should be made with the enemy about the exchange of two officers. Is glad that Pereyra has undertaken the carriage of provisions with the army, having always had a good opinion of his capacity. Refers to a dispute he (Schomberg) had in the committee with Lord Halifax on the subject of Pereyra, in which the latter said that Schomberg desired "favoriser ceux de ma nation; surquoy je le repliquay que je le croyois autant de sa nation que de la mienne."
We hear from England that you will leave in March for Scotland and that you will cross from there into Ireland. The passage may easily be made in summer in four or five hours. Expresses joy at the King's intended visit, which will give courage to the troops here, oblige the officers to do their duty better, and so astonish and alarm the enemy that they will be forced beyond Dublin; you will thus soon be able to return to Scotland. Approves also of the King's design to draw troops from around Dublin, Cork, and Kinsale when the enemy assemble their army at or near Drogheda. Need of capable officers. Suggests Beckman being sent to fill Glaum's place. Difficulties of sending provisions into the more distant parts. Van Homrigh, who is faithful, is not capable. Robinson shirks work. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 104.]
Jan. 30,
Whitehall.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to the Mayor of Hereford. I have received two of your letters with informations against several persons, which I have sent to the Council that further proceedings may be taken against them. It is necessary to know which of them are committed and to what prison, as also if any of them have been admitted to bail. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 249.]
Jan. 30. The same to Lord Melville. I have presented Joseph de L'Age's petition to his Majesty, who is pleased to order that he be made a serjeant in one of the regiments where he served and was wounded. [Ibid., p. 249.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
The same to Major-General Kirke. Lord Cornwallis has recommended to me the bearer, Edward Crofton, whom Dr. Walker has also certified was an officer, and behaved well at the siege of Derry, I do not question but you retain a kindness for persons of this kind and therefore it will not be difficult to engage your assistance to procure him such employment in the foot as he may be capable of, "for I fear he is not in an equipage to pretend to horse service." [Ibid., p. 249.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Treasury. The King is informed that on board the Hopewell, of London, James Stoakes, master, now lying at "Three Mariners' Stairs, on Rotherhithe side," there is a considerable quantity of lead and other commodities designed, it is believed, for France, the owners being French merchants, and that she intends suddenly to steal away in the night without clearing at Gravesend. His Majesty commands that she be forthwith searched and if any such commodities are found on board, which you suspect to be destined for France, that you cause the said vessel and master to be secured. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 1, p. 250.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords of the Treasury. By the treaty with the King of Denmark for his troops, the last payment was to be 120,000 crowns, of which 16,000 crowns, his Majesty has appointed to be paid here to Mons. Rosenheim, who is contented to take after the rate of 4s. 10d. for the crown and the whole sum to him will be 3,883l. 6s. 8d. But Mons. Rosenheim at present desires only 12,000 crowns, so that if your lordships please to give me an order to Mr. Hearne to pay 2,900l. I will take care to get Mr. Rosenheim's acquittance for 12,000 crowns. Of the remainder that is to be remitted to Hamburg, Mr. Molesworth has already procured 60,000 crowns to be impressed to the King of Denmark and is engaged to see that sum repaid out of the money that shall be returned from hence, and his Majesty's pleasure is that your lordships give directions to Mr. Hearne to send orders to his correspondent at Hamburg to pay to Mr. Molesworth the said sum of 60,000 crowns; and his Majesty would have the payment of the rest to be deferred. [Ibid. 2, p. 76.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Donelan, convicted of causing the death of Alice Beale. States that he, being an officer of the bailiff of Westminster, in executing a legal warrant against the said Alice was assaulted by her, and that by accident, giving her a push, she fell, and through the inexperience of the surgeon, she, about two months afterwards; died. Prays his Majesty's clemency. Referred to Sir William Dolben, one of the justices of the King's Bench, who tried the case. [Ibid. 2, p. 176.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Mary Harward, praying for arrears due for drugs supplied to George Wigmore, deceased, late surgeon of Sir Henry Ingoldsby's regiment. Referred to William Harboard, esquire, Treasurer for the Forces in Ireland. [Ibid.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Lord Fairfax, praying that he may be constituted governor of the Company of Coal Heavers of London, in the letters patent, about to be granted to incorporate them. Granted. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 62.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the pardon of John Vaughan, of Pantglasse, in the county of Carmarthen, esquire, convicted of the manslaughter of Joseph Binson. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 35, p. 181.]
Jan. 30. Warrant for payment of levy money for the Earl of Torrington's regiment. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 84.]
Jan. 30. The like for the Earl of Pembroke's regiment. [Ibid.]
Jan. 30. Further warrant for payment of levy money for the Earl of Torrington's regiment. [Ibid., p. 85.]
Jan. 30. The like for the Earl of Pembroke's regiment. [Ibid.]
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Thomas Knatchbull, esquire, to be Clerk of the Check and Commissary of the Marine Regiments. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, pp. 87 and 91.]
Jan. 30. Passes for Mr. Gaspar Anthony de Boiselair and Mary Margaret, his wife, to go from London or Harwich to any port in Holland or Denmark [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 37]; for Manginis Frederick Herpstein, servant to Captain Foigil of the guards in Ireland, to go from Chester to Ireland [Ibid., p. 56]; for William Janse, Aert Jacobse, and Robert Thomas, Dutch seamen, to go from Harwich or any part of the river to Holland; and for the Sieur Salomen to go from Harwich to Holland. [Ibid., p. 57.]
Jan, 31.
The Hague.
The Earl of Portland to the King. Events in Holland. Money matters. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 105.]
Jan. 31.
Hanover.
Sir William Dutton Colt to Mr. Warre. News is very welcome to me where I have so many French interests to confute. I have had audience at our Court, and am constantly to attend. The loss of Prince Charles at Pristina is a great affliction to this Court, and will hinder it from going to Brunswick. There are letters here that say that some saw Prince Charles wounded, his sword broken, and his horse killed, and some flatter themselves that he is a prisoner; but I think there is little reason for that hope. The Duke has received a letter from Buda that Prince Charles was not found amongst the dead, and that many are taken prisoners. [H.O. Regencies 1, p. 160.]
Jan. 31. The Earl of Shrewsbury to the Lords of the Admiralty. Upon the Consul of Genoa's letter, it is his Majesty's pleasure that you cause the ship St. Antonio to be arrested as a pirate. [H.O. Admiralty 3, p. 33.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of William Stout, praying that having commanded several men-of-war in the time of Charles II., he may have the command of a man-of-war. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 177.]
Jan. 31. Caveat that nothing pass in relation to the provision of their Majesty's stables, pertaining to the office of Keeper of their Majesties' Great Wardrobe—a verdict having been obtained, upon a trial directed by his now Majesty in Council to be had at the bar of the Court of Exchequer in Michaelmas term last—till notice be given to the Earl of Montagu that he may be heard by himself or counsel. [S.P. Dom. Entry Book 73, p. 8.]
Jan. 31. The establishment of the two marine regiments. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 90.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John Grantham to search all printing houses, booksellers' and bookbinders' shops and warehouses and all other suspected places, and to apprehend all authors, printers, booksellers, bookbinders, hawkers and others, found printing, stitching, or crying, any unlicensed, seditious, false, and scandalous books against the Government. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 58.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Pardon for Mr. Paroculus Parmiter, sentenced to death at the Bristol assizes for procuring Edward Lynch to personate Abel Wilton and, in his name, acknowledge a statute of 300l. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 91.]
Jan. 31. Passes for Peter Grimaile to embark at Harwich or in the river for Holland; for Mr. William Buckingham to go from London to Lancaster [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 57]; for Elizabeth Sanderson, with one servant, to embark at Dover for Flanders [Ibid., p. 58]; for Gregorias Nienburg to go from Harwich or any part of the river to Holland [Ibid., p. 59]; and for John Danblart, a Frenchman, to go to Harwich, for Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 35, p. 181.]
[Jan.] [Sir Robert Southwell's] discourse on the methods to be observed for a speedy reduction of Ireland.
England can be neither safe nor happy till the reduction of Ireland is accomplished. It must be done quickly, and it is better to spend 2,000,000l. in one year than to spend 1,000,000l. for seven years. The King and kingdom of England are in honour bound to be concerned for the protestants of Ireland for all their sufferings proceed from a passionate affection for King William and their adhesion to the protestant religion.
These Irish protestants are the fittest to be employed in the conquest of Ireland; they may be trusted, and are embarked on the same bottom with present Government; they are men of briskness and courage, acquainted with the country and used to the climate, and, above all, "they have, naturally or by custom, an ascendant over the Irish, as, on the contrary, the Irish have an habitual dread of them." These protestants are strangers in the remote provinces, and so the advantages will be much lessened if Munster men be sent to Ulster, or vice versâ.
No people in the world are more unanimously engaged to King James than the Irish papists; the number of those fit for war is not less than 120,000. 100,000 of these never had property worth 5l. a piece, and they have nothing to lose and so will endeavour to prolong the war. All these will ever hate King William, and be "sticklers" for the Prince of Wales. This vast number of people cannot be subdued for many years, without the assistance of famine and disease. One harbour in Munster, say Kinsale, will be more useful than half the province of Ulster can be.
From all this, I assert that no one army in Ulster can conquer Ireland in less than three or four or, perhaps, seven years, because the ports of Munster being open, the Irish can always get supplies from France, therefore, they must be attacked at both ends of the Kingdom. This descent should be made at the same time that the Duke of Schomberg can advance forward from his winter quarters, which I suppose he may do in February, as Cromwell did, when he was in Ireland, the spring being three weeks earlier there than in England. The great difficulty will be as to forage which must be sent from England.
The place of descent must be Cork harbour; a retreat from there could easily be effected, and in the county of Cork there are 10,000 protestants still resident, who, and their families, would be relieved by an invasion of that part of Munster. If the invading force destroys all the corn that it cannot secure and drives the cattle into Ulster, the Irish must soon perish from famine.
The strength of the Irish lies in their horse, and in this we must overpower them by sending, in May or June, 1,500 or 2,000 more horse. The English army being the aggressors, should fight on all opportunities and "shun" the siege of any strong fort, Dublin excepted, because, by wasting the county round about, such fort cannot long hold out. The biggest of our armies should follow King James wherever he goes. Regiments of horse of Ulster men and Munster men should be raised; these, in their respective provinces, would do more service than double the number of strangers; by this means, too, many poor gentlemen would be provided for without further charge. Lastly means should be taken for dividing the Irish, especially after they receive a considerable blow, and a good way to do this will be to make a difference between those who are of English extraction and those that are not, which would make it appear as if this was a national quarrel and not a war of religion. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 6, No. 106.]
Jan. [Sir John Trevor to the King] giving his views upon the present Parliament. Printed in full by Dalrymple. [Ibid., No. 107.]
Jan. List of the forces to be transported into Ireland. English Horse: two troops of guards and one of grenadiers, Colchester's and Godfrey's regiments; total 1,302 men and the same number of horses. Dutch, ten regiments of guards; total strength 1,417. Danes, three regiments, total strength 1,034. Dragoons, Berkeley's and Eppinger's: total strength 1,538. English Foot, two battalions of guards, and Trelawny's, St. George's, and Foulkes' regiments; total strength 4,140 men, 276 horses; two other battalions of guards, total strength 1,500 men and 100 horses. Dutch, Nassau's, Brandenburg's, Talmash's, Babington's and Cutts'; total strength 5,600 men and 300 horses. Danes, six battalions, 6,466 men and 416 horses. Scotch, four regiments, 3,720 men and 100 horses, and recruits, 4,000 men and 100 horses. Horses for bread carts, artillery, &c. 3,300; 450 bread waggons, and 100 artillery waggons. [Ibid., No. 108.]
[Jan.]
The Hague.
The Earl of Portland to the King. Events in Holland. [Ibid., No. 109.]
Jan.
Whitehall.
Passes for John Lake and Mary Joyce with their necessaries to go from London to Dover or any part of the river and embark for Flanders [Ibid., p. 53]; and for several Dutch seamen to go from any part of the river to Holland. [H.O. Warrant Book 5, p. 45.]
Jan.
Whitehall.
Pass for the ship Imployment of London to take French prisoners to France in exchange for English. [H.O. Admiralty 3, p. 32.]