BHO

William and Mary: December 1694

Pages 348-374

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William and Mary, 1694-5. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1906.

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December 1694

Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the extraordinary expenses of Mr. Matthew Prior, their Majesties' secretary residing at the Hague from 1 August till 1 Nov., 1694. [Ibid. 39, p. 122.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the extraordinary expenses of John Robinson, their Majesties' agent at the Court of Sweden from 12 Aug. until 3 Nov., 1694. [Ibid., p. 123.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Samuel Alston, shewing that he was "turned" from being a gentleman pensioner by the late Lord Lovelace, without cause, and has served in Flanders this last campaign at his own cost; being restored by the Duke of St. Albans to his place, his Majesty suspended him from waiting till further order. Mr. Wroth, who was in his place, being lately dead, he prays the suspension may be taken off. Referred to the Duke of St. Albans. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 3, p. 90.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Ann Hornsey, sister to Colonel Baker, late governor of Londonderry, deceased, shewing that no order has yet been made on her former petition for a pension, and praying for a small allowance for herself and her five children. [Ibid., p. 96.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Mr. George Fielding to be cornet to Captain John Tooke in the Earl of Oxford's regiment of horse [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 232]; for John Skeys, gent., to be ensign to Major Henry Hickman's company in the regiment of foot commanded by the Duke of Bolton [Ibid. 4, p. 76]; for Claude Desbrosses, esq., to be captain of the company of which Captain Dhanus was late captain in the regiment of foot commanded by Major-General Isaac de la Meloniere; for — Dhanus, esq., to be captain in the same regiment; and for — Ferrand to be captain-lieutenant in the colonel's company in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 79].
Dec. 2.
Whitehall.
Pass for Mr. Nicholas Eaton and Mr. George Holdgate, merchants of Amsterdam, to go to Holland, recommended by Mr. Henry Baker. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 40, p. 9.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
Passes for James Rouland, a poor French protestant, to go to Harwich for Holland [Ibid. 37, p. 294]; and for Mrs. Elizabeth de la Rue and Mrs. Anne Lambert to go to Holland, recommended by Mr. Wills, in Durham Yard [Ibid. 40, p. 9].
Dec. 4. Sir Charles Hedges to Mr. Vernon. In order to assist Mr. Robinson the more effectually, I must desire the most particular descriptions he can give of any ship for which demand is made. As regards the ship St. Andreas, I cannot find the particulars of any English claim; the whole was ordered by me to be restored, though condemned by the Lords of Appeals. The master's name was John Kuil. The goods in the St. Andreas, Frederick Ryerson Keyl, master, were restored to the Danes, for I did not take this to be the same ship.
I observe the Swedes offer new proofs concerning their pretensions, and therefore think it should be hinted to Mr. Robinson that their Majesties cannot be obliged by anything of that kind. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 6, No. 5.] Enclosing:—
Notes as to the liability of ships going to and from the enemy's country, as to examination, confiscation, &c. [Ibid., No. 5 i.]
Dec. 4.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Sir Cyril Wyche and Mr. Duncombe. He has presented to the King the letter addressed to his Majesty and enclosed in theirs of 20th November to Secretary Trenchard. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 2, p. 12.]
Dec. 4.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Lewis Grabu, a master of music, with his wife and two children, to go to Harwich or Gravesend for Holland or Flanders; for Mr. John Walcop of Amsterdam, ditto; for John van Wyck, one of the King's gardener's servants, ditto; and for Job van Shagen, with his daughter, aged 16 years, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 295.]
Dec. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate to discharge Francis Dupré, in custody for being a French papist and coming into England as a spy. [Ibid. 39, p. 124.]
Dec. 5.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Earl of Carlisle. The Duke of Bolton having interceded with the King for the pardon of a soldier belonging to his regiment, who is condemned by a court martial at Carlisle, his Majesty is inclined to grant it. The duke has not yet given me the man's name, but it is the King's pleasure that the execution be forborne. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 104.]
Dec. 5.
Whitehall.
Passes and post-warrant for Elizabeth Ransford, an officer's wife, to go to Harwich or Gravesend, and embark for Holland or Flanders; for Lieutenant Colonel Ulrick Berr [Burke ?], with Toussaint and David Deschamps, to go to Harwich or Gravesend for Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 296]; and for Capt. Godfrey Richards to go to Berwick (recommended by John Cage) [Ibid. 40, p. 10].
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Dean and Chapter of Christ Church, Canterbury, granting the royal dispensation for the renewal by them of a lease of a house within the precincts of Canterbury Cathedral to William Kingsley, esq., a similar dispensation having been previously granted by Charles II. in consideration of the services of the lessee's family. [H.O. King's Letters 1, p. 54.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland for restoring to Captain James Waller, deputy vice-admiral of Munster, the ship Postillion; reciting the report made in the case by the Attorney and SolicitorGeneral of England, 4 Oct., 1694, with the concurrence of Sir John Temple, 15 Nov., 1694; and confirming the Queen's orders for putting a stop to all proceedings in the Court of Exchequer in Ireland, causing the sentence given against the said ship in the Admiralty in England to have due effect, and so preserving the rights and jurisdiction of that Admiralty in the kingdom of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 13, p. 177.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending, to prepare a bill containing a congé d'elire to the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury to elect an archbishop of that see, now vacant by the death of Dr. John Tillotson; and to prepare a letter for the royal signature, recommending Dr. Thomas Tennison, Bishop of Lincoln, to be by them elected archbishop. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 147.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mrs. Resena Wright and Anne, her daughter, to go to Harwich or Gravesend for Holland; for Ary Oosterhout, a Dutch mariner, ditto; and for Mrs. Mark Pietet, Mr. John Tremblay, and Mr. René Brière, three French protestants, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 296.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the naturalization of Abraham Gomez, Isaac Gomez, Moses Gutieres, Jacob de Medina, Moses Baruh Louzada, and Menaseh Benjamin Pereira. [Ibid. 39, p. 124.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Treasury to pay to George Stepney, esq., minister at the courts of the Elector of Saxony and Landgrave of Hesse Cassel, the sum of 300l. for his equipage, and the further sum of 4l. by the day for his ordinary entertainment to commence from 30 October last past; and also what has become due to the said George Stepney by virtue of letters of privy seal on 16 March, until 29 October. [Ibid., p. 128.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
Commission for Joachin Goudet, gent, to be ensign of the company of which Captain Richards is Captain in the Princess Anne of Denmark's regiment of foot, commanded by Colonel John Beaumont. [H.O. Military Entry Book 4, p. 74.]
Dec. 6–7.
[Dublin] Council Chamber.
Proceedings upon the claims of various persons to be within the Articles of Galway or Limerick. The following persons appear as claimants or witnesses: J. Donellan of Galway, Tirlogh Dowlan, Brian Brennogh, James Mullowne, Jeffery MacHugo, Joseph Lynch, Capt. Derby [?] Callahan, a captain in Saxby's regiment; Th. Dwyer, Henry Grady, Mary Butler, daughter of Lora Cahir; Cornelius Curten, Da. Heckey, Peter Trant, James Gheran, Daniel Faldy, John Kennan, Dennis Hanlon, John Ryan, Cornelius McGillicuddy, John Sullivan, Don McGillicuddy, Garret Sullivan, Henry Griffin, Sir Ulicke Bourke, colonel of foot; Dr. Archbold, William Kelly, John Kelly, John Browne of Athdare; Jeffrey Keating, Darby Long, Daniel Sullivan, Colonel John Hore, John Kelly, Cornelius Crow, W. Morgan, Garnet Dardis, Edmund Nugent, Christopher Nugent, John Nugent, Christopher Barnwell, Hugh McNemara, Tige McNemara, William and Elizabeth Bourke, Daniel O'Mara, Thos. Kennedy, Colonel Laurence Delahunty, Roger Smith, James Dunkin, Thomas Russell, Brian Rogers, Morgan Creak of Limerick, John Brostock, Philip Danter, Major John Kennigh, a commissioned officer at Limerick; William McKan, James Duncan, Captain John Kelly, Captain Hugh Kelly and Ellen his wife, Thomas Dempsey, Richard Kelly, Captain William Kelly, Captain John Noland, Colonel Gerret Moore, Bridget Nolan, Andrew Browne, Eleanor Kelly, Major George Yelverton, Thomas White, John Dowdall, Peter Smith, Morgan Ryan (a very old man), James Moore, Colonel Miles Rely, Peter Nihill, Piers Butler of co. Clare, Hugh Dowlan, Dennis Driscol, Donogh O'Grady, Brian O'Brian, Captain Edmund Bourke, John Ryan, John Anketell, junior, captain of a troop of horse; Stephen Cooke, Henry Dow, Roger Hickeye, Christopher de la Hide, Dominic Fenning, Edmund Hogan, Captain Thomas Dwyer, Edmund Farroll, Captain Charles Costello, Jordan Fitz Jordan, Daniel O'Sullivan More of Kerry, Owen Finnigan, Major James Poer (in Lord Galway's regiment of foot), William Jensenan, Andrew Richardson, Captain Luke Dillon, Captain Richard O'Donellan, Hugh Donevan, Lawrence Nihill, Murtogh O'Brien of Ballycastle in Clare, Donogh O'Loghlin, Thomas Rice, James Gerane, Roger O'Loghlin, James Davoren, Philip McAdams, Daniel Lynch, John Ronan, Richard Nash, Thomas Donnell, Dermot O'Brien, Captain Christopher O'Brien, Daniel McGhee, Daniel Williams, Edward Neylan, Thomas O'Connor, Dennis Handerhan, Andrew O'Donnell, Terence Toole, Patrick Monro, Thomas O'Donnell, Captain Donogh McNemara, Margaret Dun, Charles Caroll, Ignatius Kelly, Ennish Dun, Roger Caroll, Colonel C. O'Neele, Henry O'Grevin, Captain Oliver Rochford, Tirlogh O'Brien, C. McMahon, Roger Normell, Brian Mahon, Terence McDonogh, Colonel Roger Delamere, Owen Rely, Thomas Tawbin and James Tawbin, John Taubin, Brian Naghten, Edmund Lally, Anthony Kelly, Margaret Creake, John Ronan, Thomas Wall, Bartholomew Stretch and others. [S.P. Ireland 356, No. 80.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Trenchard to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. I enclose you a bill of exchange drawn upon me by Consul Parker for five and fifty pounds which he laid out for two expresses sent to Madrid. His Majesty has formally directed that these extraordinary disbursements for his service by the Consuls abroad should be always paid to them whenever they draw their bills for their money. I desire you will therefore direct the payment of this bill forthwith to the gentleman to whom it is made payable. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 3, p. 185.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Hughes, a seaman, setting forth his services on board the Duke and the England frigates; he has lately been turned out of St. Thomas's Hospital as incurable, and prays a pension out of the chest at Chatham or elsewhere. Referred to the discretion of the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 3, p. 91.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Anna Fitz Harris, widow, shewing that there was an address of Parliament to his Majesty to pay her 200l. a year, which she has not had; and being now a prisoner in the Marshalsea for a debt of 200l., she prays that amount from the arrears of the said pension may be paid to her. Referred to the Treasury for their report. [Ibid.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Robert Atkins, K.B., shewing that he has been "Speaker of the House of Lords" near four years, and has only received "for that hard service" 500l. advance upon his first entrance. He asks for some recompense, and also the payment of arrears of salary due to him as Chief Baron. Sent to the Treasury, to be laid before his Majesty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 3, p. 92.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Peregrine Bertie, Philip Bertie, Robert Sheffield, esquires, and John Hauksbee, citizen and draper, of London, praying a patent for Hauksbee's invention of an engine for fulling stuffs, which may be easily wrought by hand labour, obviating the inconveniences in the trade of fulling by water-mills. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [Ibid., p. 93.]
Dec. 7.
Kensington.
Commission for Andrew Taconet, gentleman, to be quartermaster to Count de Marton's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 4, p. 74.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Pass for the Anne pink of London, commander Samuel Lucas of London, to take on board French prisoners now in England and transport them to Calais in France, to be exchanged for our subjects, prisoners there. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 297.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the extraordinary expenses of the Right Honourable Robert, Lord Lexington, envoy extraordinary to the Emperor of Germany, from 1 April, 1694, until 1 Nov. following. [Ibid. 39, p. 125.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
Pass to Ezra Matthewman and Jonathan Reames, recommended by Mr. Robinson, to go to Holland. [Ibid. 40, p. 10.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Lords Justices of Ireland. His Majesty observes in your letters of the 24th November that one of the reasons alleged for the delay in passing the pardon, &c., to Mr. King, the late Lord Kingston's brother, is that this gentleman has his wife and children still in France. I am commanded to acquaint you that this is a circumstance his Majesty had not heard of before, and thinks it a sufficient ground for putting a stop to proceedings until his Majesty is satisfied of the removal of his family from France. [S.P. Ireland King's Letters 2, p. 13.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
The same to Lord Capell; a letter to the same effect as the above. [Ibid.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. King. It has been represented to his Majesty that your wife and children are still in France; it is not his intention to make those partakers of an act of mere grace and favour who are kept in France to be educated there. It will concern you therefore to remove this impediment, or otherwise it will not be in my power to do you the service I wish. [Ibid., p. 14.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mary Williamsen and her two small children to go to Harwich and Holland; for John Chapillon, a French protestant, ditto; for Adrian Balviaen, a Dutch seaman, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 298]; and for Alexander Broquet, a French refugee, to go to Holland, recommended by Mr. Rival, French minister. [Ibid. 40, p. 11].
Dec. 8.
Kensington.
Commission for Henry Nichols, gent., to be ensign of the company in the regiment of foot commanded by Colonel Henry Mordaunt, of which he himself is captain. [H.O. Military Entry Book 4, p. 85.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
Commission for Mr. Philip Bernard to be lieutenant of grenadiers to Captain Charles Barry in the Earl of Drogheda's regiment. [Ibid. 3, p. 232.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Lords of the Admiralty. Captain James Waller, lieutenant-governor of Charles Fort, near Kinsale, having been sent for upon a particular occasion, and being lately ordered to return to his command in Ireland, that it may not be prejudicial to him (as he is captain of a company in Lord Berkeley's marine regiment), his Majesty directs that the clerk of the check have orders for allowing and passing the said captain on the respective musters of the said regiment. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 105.]
Dec. 10.
Dublin.
Proclamation of a reward for the apprehension, dead or alive, of the following rebels, who have fled to the mountains and other places where they "stand upon their keeping":—Dermot Leary, late of Iveleary, in co. Cork; John Murphy, alias Roe, late of Tomes in the said county; John Hurly, late of Grillagh, in the said county; John Leary, alias Baroole; Dermot Leary, alias Baroole, late of Ivy Leary aforesaid; Dermod Sullivan, alias Skeelagh, late of Bantry, in the said county; Dermod Mullain, alias Thunder; Donagh Deeneen, alias Bariky, late of the parish of Clandroghid, in the said county; Tiege MacShane, Sulivan Garret Downry, Murtogh MacHugh, Cornelius Sulivan, alias Duff; Teige Seaghbogh, Teige Croneene, John Croneene, Tiege Crowly, alias Mague; Dennis Crone, Dermod Maghry, Maurice Splane, Tiege MacGeighy, Dermot MacMaurice Hurly, John Na Churig, Gnogher Reagh, Fumine McDonogh Sullivan, Tiege Barrull, John Canty, Daniel Mullane, Donogh Na Geehy, Daniel MacPhillip Dire, Murrogh MacErevan Sweeny, Cnocher Doroh, Donogh Doroh, Murtagh MacHugh Crone, John MacDermot MacCnoher, Patrick Real, John Real, Dermot an Taskig, Donogh Shehane, Cornelius Murrihy, Donogh MacMorto, John Dina, Cnoher Duff, Morris Gew, John na Gwinn, Daniel na Ganny, Tiege Oge na Ganny, Tiege Sweeny, Tiege mac Shane mac Aulif, Fanine mac Shane, Morto mac Hugh mac Morto, Donoh Oge begge na Buoly, Tiege Heagarty, Tiege Oge Nahaly, Guly mac Shane mac Guly, all lately in co. Cork; Edmond Knock Ryan, Cornelius Ryan, Mathew Higgins, Thady Lonergan, Richard Longan, Daniel Doran, Dennis Toghy, Phillip Roe Ryan, Richard mac Daniel Longardan, Phillip Shanahan, Daniel Lowre, Daniel Bawn Ryan, Daniel Meagher, Derby Bryan, William Banon, James Laghard, James Brenan, all late in co. Tipperary; Daniel Conway, late of Kells, co. Kilkenny; Simon Brenan, late of Corbetstown; Thomas Henessy, late of Ballyhemyn; Martin Cott, late of Clongagh; Derby Swedding, late of Killaloe; Richard Head, late of Tofeghny; Patrick Lawler, late of Knocktopher; Edmond Phelan, late of Claragh; Hugh Brenan and John Gorman, late of Bodolinore, all in co. Kilkenny; Patrick Malleaghill, late of Ballinorkill in the Queen's County; Murragh mac Sweeny, Turlagh Keith McFadin, and Patrick McCullin, of co. Donegal; Bryan mac Hugh, William Flanigan, Hugh Groome mac Gwire, Gormuck mac Hugh, Phelimy Dolan, John mac Gwire, Patrick mac Haran, Turlagh mac Gageran, Patrick Murritny and Edmond mac Cormick, all co. Cavan; Connor mac Gwire, Edmund Cormuck, Felin Dolan, Keadagh mac Sharry, Patrick mac Manus, Philip mac Cormuck, Patrick mac Gwire, Owen mac Corry, Patrick mac Corry, James mac Gowan, Cormuck mac Murray, William Moraghan, all late co. Fermanagh; Keadagh mac Manus, John Hanly, Cahil Daffie, Dermot Roe, Cormuck Lavin, Bryan mac Gilmartine, Cahil O'Birne, Daniel Kelly Laghlin, Dun mac Dermot, Tiege Mungan, Bryan mac Casker, alias mac Elexter, Farril Noran, Bryan mac Gill, Redmond Magrath, Manus Backagho Byrne, all late of co. Roscommon; Cormuck Morey, late of co. Leitrim; Henry Waldron, Jordan Grady, Kedagh Phillips, Manus O'Bryne, John McDonnel, Roger McDonnel, Patrick Rory, Duff Doharty, Don. Shiel, David McDonnogh, Charles McDonnel, Bryan Killehane, William Kelly, Thomas Grourke, Roger Dogherty, John Dogherty, Dennis Shane, Bryan Rumic, all late of co. Mayo; Owen-gar mac Kevet, James Roony, Daniel Oge mac Inallie, and Patrick Murphy, all late of co. Louth. Printed. [S.P. Ireland 356, No. 81.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Mons. de Membray, showing that he was an officer in De la Meloniere's regiment, and lost his leg at the siege of Limerick, being then but twenty-one years of age; having small hopes of getting anything further out of his small estate in France, he prays an allowance of 5s. a day. Referred to the Earl of Ranelagh. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 3, p. 94.]
Dec. 10.
Kensington.
Commission for John Mackenzie, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Lieut.-Colonel Murdoch Mackenzie is captain in the regiment of foot commanded by Colonel Henry Row. [H.O. Military Entry Book 4, p. 76.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Passes for Corporal Lesly, belonging to the Marquis de Rada's regiment, to go to Harwich or Gravesend for Holland; and for Marguerit Petitot, a French protestant, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 298.]
Dec. 10.
Kensington.
Warrant for a grant to incorporate the burgesses and inhabitants of Saffron Walden, Essex, by the name of the mayor and aldermen, &c., of the same town, with the usual privileges and with a grant of two new fairs. The following gentlemen are named of the first corporation:—James Robinet, gent., mayor; the Earl of Suffolk, recorder; Richard Reynolds, Richard Webb, John Lindsell, Thomas Wilmot, Jonathan Powell, Lancaster Richard, John Baker, Robert Thorowgood, John Morgan, William Patch, Edmund Harris and Richard Pomfret, aldermen; John Sparrow, gent., town clerk and coroner. [Ibid. 39, p. 130.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Lords Justices of Ireland, directing them to consider what number of able seamen can be provided in that kingdom to serve on board the fleet this next summer. [S.P. Ireland, King's Letter Book 2, p. 14.]
Dec. 11.
Westminster.
Writ of congé d'elire to the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury for the election of Dr. Thomas Tennison, Bishop of Lincoln, to the archbishopric of Canterbury, void by the death of Dr. John Tillotson. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 13, p. 180.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
Pass for Mr. Julius Heydor, lieutenant in the Dutch footguards, to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 299.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant for letters patent to Peter Oliver, gent., for an engine for the beautifying of all manner of linen cloth, calicoes, silks and stuff bare of wool, paper and pasteboards, by glazing, "sliking" and smoothing the same. [Ibid. 40, p. 12.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Caveat that nothing pass concerning the erection of a playhouse, or acting in any house erected for representing comedies, tragedies, or any other public entertainment, till notice be given to Sir Thomas Skipwith, bart., in Lincoln's Inn Fields, Mr. Charles Killegrew in Somerset House, and Mr. Christopher Rich, next to "the Eagle and Stone" in High Holborn, above Little Queen Street. [S.P. Dom. Entry Book 73, p. 20, and Ibid. 74, p. 2.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the extraordinary expenses of George Stepney, esq., their Majesties' commissary at the Court of Saxony, from 14 June till 30 Oct., 1694. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 39, p. 134.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Pass for Elizabeth Mackenly, recommended by Captain Dent, to go to Holland or Flanders. [Ibid. 40, p. 11.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Alexander Culpepper, esq. Shews that Charles II. and James II. granted him the office of Surveyor-General of Virginia, and that the present King directed he should be continued in the same office, the reversion whereof has since been granted to Francis Nicholson and William Cole, for the erection of, or to the use of, a college in Virginia; under pretence of which grant Nicholson and Cole and the governors of the said college have dispossessed the petitioner. Referred to the Committee for Trade and Plantations. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 3, p. 95.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Edward Price, shewing that his brother was one of the mates or surgeons of the ship Modena in her voyage to the East Indies, and on the said voyage was inhumanly ducked or keelhauled by the immediate command of William Wildey, commander of the said ship, from which treatment he "immediately died"; Wildey did not surrender himself for trial, and the petitioner prays the benefit of his recognizances, &c. Referred to the Commissioners of the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 117.]
Dec. 12.
Whitehall.
Commission for Mr. Charles Chauney [Chauncy ?] to be ensign to Captain Humphrey Coningsby in Colonel Lillingston's regiment. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 232.]
Dec. 12.
Kensington.
Warrant for the appointment of Captain Richard Betsworth as major of the Royal Hospital near Chelsea. [Ibid. 4, p. 75.]
Dec. 12.
Kensington.
Commissions for Ralph Turner, esq., to be captain of the company of which Capt. Richard Betsworth was late captain in the royal regiment of fusiliers commanded by Brigadier-General Edward Fitzpatrick [H.O. Military Entry Book 4, p. 89]; and for Marmaduke Roydon, esq., to be captain-lieutenant of the Colonel's company in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 90].
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Mr. Foden. In consequence of your letter of the 8th inst. about securing one who is suspected to be Joseph Bradshaw, mentioned in a late proclamation, I have sent to Dr. Littleton, whose servant he formerly was, and who took him into his service from his father's house near Lichfield, and the doctor has written to a friend to go to the prison and see the man. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 106.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Pass to Martin Ranges, a seaman, recommended by Mr. D'Allone, to go to Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 40, p. 12.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Proclamation for encouraging mariners, seamen and landsmen to enter themselves on board their Majesties' ships of war, promising to all who so enter themselves between the 20th inst. and the 20th of January next, bounties as follows: to each seaman three months' pay, and to each landsman one month's pay, and conduct money. If any ships be sent abroad, men so entered shall receive their pay before they sail. Printed. [S.P. Dom. Proclamations, Vol. 6, No. 108.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of William Hall, esq., setting forth that he was a purchaser under the attainder of Reginald Tucker, which attainder has now been reversed, and praying a writ of error. Granted. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 4, p. 12.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Earl of Romney to cause to be paid to Sir Martin Beckman, chief engineer and comptroller of the fire works, the arrears of his salary of 200l. per annum. [H.O. Military Entry Book 4, p. 77.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the issue of certain arms for a detachment of twelve hundred private soldiers, besides non-commissioned officers, to be sent to Jamaica. [Ibid., p. 78.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Passes for John Luijckesz, Koerdt Barentz, Henry Munt, Cornelis Barentz, Peter Jacobsz and Meyest Krael, six Dutch mariners, to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Christman Hope and Nicholas Pistor, being merchants' servants, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 299.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
Pass for Peter Herris, a Dutch seaman, to go to Harwich and Holland. [Ibid. 37, p. 299.]
Dec. 14.
Kensington.
Warrant to pay 200l. a piece to the late engineer Capt. Philips and Capt. "Banboe" [Benbow], for their undertaking the expedition at St. Malo. [Ibid. 40, p. 13.]
Dec. 14.
Kensington.
Commissions for Andrew Mortimer, gent., to be ensign to Captain Joseph Carpenter in Sir John Hanmer's regiment of foot [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 233]; and for Arthur Bradshaw, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Captain Nehemiah Farmer is captain in Colonel Henry Row's regiment [H.O. Military Entry Book 4, p. 79].
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Dr. Wallis. "I formerly gave you the trouble of some intercepted letters in cipher, which you succeeded in to his Majesty's great satisfaction; and there being two more of that sort fallen into his Majesty's hands, I am to desire your assistance in deciphering them." [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 106.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Dover, directing that the bonds given to the Mayor of Dover, in December, 1692, by Lady Philips and Mrs. Henrietta Grimes, her waiting woman, at their coming from France, for their appearance before the Earl of Nottingham, be sent to the Duke to be cancelled. [Ibid., p. 107.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the Earl of Carlisle, stating that Cheffly, the soldier whose execution was respited by the Duke's letter of the 5th, has been pardoned by the King, and directing that he be restored to his company. [Ibid.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Passes for John Mayers, Court Cooper, Gerrit Harts, Harman Burgars, Derick Essema, John Theissen, Wilhem Martens, and Claas Poulsen, seamen of Bremen, to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 300.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant to James Kitson for apprehending George Hill, together with his papers, for coming out of France without leave, contrary to the Act of Parliament. [Ibid. 39, p. 135.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Beat Lewis de Muralt and Francis Lewis, his brother, with their two servants, to go to Harwich or Gravesend for Holland; for Conralt Jansen, a Dutch seaman, ditto; for Mr. Luke Cahoe to go to Falmouth for Spain [Ibid. 37, p. 300]; and for Charles Soumain, a French protestant (recommended by Mr. Dayrolle), to go to Holland [Ibid. 40, p. 13].
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Lord Mayor of London, thanking him for his letter of the 15th inst., with notice where certain arms and accoutrements are to be found; if there be any occasion to produce them the Lord Mayor shall be informed. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 108.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Bernard du Faur, French protestant, to go to Harwich or Gravesend for Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 301.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
Passes for Captain Gorrert vander Woppell with his servant, both subjects of the States-General, to go to Harwich or Gravesend for Holland; and for Anthony Gargill, subject of Flanders, ditto. [Ibid.]
Dec. 19.
Kensington.
Warrant, signed by the King, to the Bishop of London, directing that publication be made in all parish churches within the city of London and liberties thereof, and within "the lines of communication," that the churchwardens or overseers of the poor shall collect the benevolence of charitable and well-disposed people at their respective dwellings, towards the support and relief of the poorer sort of his Majesty's subjects in and about the city; the sums so collected to be paid into the Chamber of London, to be distributed at the discretion of the Lord Mayor and the Bishop. "And that our own example may not be wanting, our further pleasure is that you call upon our Commissioners and our Treasury, for such sum of money as we have directed and appointed to be paid to that end, and to dispose the same as aforesaid." [H.O. King's Letters 1, p. 55.]
Dec. 19.
Kensington.
A warrant of the same date to the Lord Mayor, directing him to encourage the citizens of London to a more than ordinary demonstration of their compassion and liberality on this occasion. [Ibid., p. 56.]
Dec. 19.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Attorney-General, enclosing for his opinion a petition already presented, which the King is inclined to grant. The petitioners have had some of their goods coming from France seized and forfeited, which are, it seems, given to Mr. Henry Pelham; they do not expect those to be restored, but only the crime to be remitted. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 108.]
Dec. 19.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Lewis de Sediere, esq., to be captain of Captain Nard's company in Colonel Colt's regiment of foot; for Mr. Webb to be captain in Lord Berkeley's marine regiment; for Mr. John Philipps to be captain-lieutenant to Lord Berkeley; for Mr. John Monkes to be first lieutenant to Captain Samuel Robert in the same regiment; for Mr. James Mallory to be first lieutenant to Captain Bazill Beaumont in the same regiment; and for Mr. James de Bordes to be second lieutenant to Captain John Nevill in the same regiment. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 233.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Lords Justices of Ireland. With regard to the articles given by Captain Sterling to a French privateer called the Wheel of Fortune, taken near Galloway [Galway ?], without first examining whether there were any of their Majesties' subjects on board, the Lords of the Committee for the affairs of Ireland are of opinion that since the articles are given they ought to be made good, and that considering the circumstances the privateer was in, and the damage she might have done, there appears no reason to blame the captain who gave them. [S.P. Ireland, King's Letter Book 2, p. 15.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The Committee for the affairs of Ireland are of opinion that the case of the ship Duke of Bavaria, belonging to Ostend, and arrested at Waterford, should be left to the law. [Ibid.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Karny to go to Gravesend or Harwich for Holland; for John Hooghendyck, a seaman, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 301]; and for Horman Jansen, a Dutch seaman, to go to Harwich and Holland [Ibid., p. 302].
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Recorder of London for John Weaver, who was found guilty of felony and sentenced to death, to be inserted in the next general pardon for poor convicts of Newgate, upon condition of transportation. [Ibid. 39, p. 185.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Mr. Walter van Coverden to be captain-lieutenant in Colonel Lillingston's regiment; and for Mr. Moses Leather to be captain of grenadiers in the same regiment. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 233.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
Passes for Elizabeth Bell and one small child to go to Harwich or Gravesend for Holland; and for Rachel Simpson, a drummer's wife, and her little son, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 302].
Dec. 22.
Whitehall.
Caveat that no pardon pass for either John Garland or William Garland for misdemeanours against the revenue of the customs, until notice be first given to Mr. Hutchinson, solicitor of the Custom House. [S.P. Dom. Entry Book 73, p. 20.]
Dec. 22. Passes for James Perrot, a French protestant, to go to Harwich or Gravesend for Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 302]; for Daniel Sadler, gent., going to reside at Rotterdam as agent for all matters relating to the transportation of forces into Holland or Flanders, with his servants, goods and necessaries to embark in any port of England for Rotterdam; and for Captain Brochwell Lloyd, of Colonel Fairfax's regiment, with his sister and two servants, to go to Harwich and Holland [Ibid. p. 303].
Dec. 22.
Kensington.
Commission for Henry Morrison, esq., to be captain of the company of which Colonel William Seymour was late captain in the second regiment of foot guards, called Coldstreamers, commanded by John, Lord Cutts, and to take rank as lieutenant-colonel of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 4, p. 76.]
Dec. 22.
Kensington.
Warrant for the appointment of Henry Morrison to be captain of the company of which Colonel Seymour was late captain in the second regiment of Coldstream guards, commanded by Lord Cutts. [Ibid., p. 80.]
Dec. 24.
Kensington.
Commissions for Daniel Hunt, gent., to be lieutenant of the company of foot in the province of New York, commanded by Capt. Wemyss; for John Gignaus, gent., to be lieutenant of the company of which Lieut.-Colonel Augustus de Rabat is captain in the regiment of foot commanded by Colonel Edward Dutton Colt; for Humphry Stuart, gent., to be lieutenant of the company of which Captain Sinclair is captain in the regiment of foot commanded by Colonel Gustavus Hamilton [Ibid., p. 81]; for Henry Tomson, gent., to be ensign, in the same; for Henry Cartwright, esq., to be captain of the company of which Captain William Warner was late captain in the regiment of foot commanded by BrigadierGeneral Ferdinando Hastings; for Percy Brook, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Lieut.-Colonel Augustus de Rabat was captain in the regiment of foot commanded by Colonel Edward Dutton Colt [Ibid., p. 82]; for William Bury, gent., to be lieutenant of the company of which Robert, Lord Lucas, is captain in the regiment of foot commanded by Brigadier-General Ferdinando Hastings; for Alexander Dutems, gent., to be adjutant in the same regiment; for Alphee Beauregard, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Captain Ralph Argyll is captain in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 83]; for Peter Regnauld, gent., to be ensign of the company in the regiment of foot commanded by Edward Dutton Colt, of which he himself is captain; for John Caswell, gent., to be lieutenant of the company of Grenadiers of which Captain George Colt is captain in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 85]; for Charles Dereham, esq., to be captain of the company of which Captain Richard Busbie was late captain in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 86]; and for Roger Wright, gent., to be second lieutenant of the company of foot in the province of New York commanded by Captain William Hyde [Ibid., p. 87].
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Hierosme Forty, a gentleman of Florence, with his three servants, to go to Falmouth and Spain; for Mr. Francis Petitot, a French protestant, to go to Harwich or Gravesend and Holland; and for Helbert Andriess, a Dutch soldier, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 304.]
Dec. 24–25.
Kensington.
A list of the names of the officers in Colonel Luke Lillingston's regiment of foot designed for Jamaica. [H.O. Military Entry Book 4, p. 139.]
Dec. 25.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Lords Justices of Ireland, directing them to consider from what ports of that kingdom corn may be best exported, so as the French may not be supplied therewith, either by the ships going to France or otherwise; as also for what ports it may be necessary to have convoy, and when the corn ships will be ready to sail. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 2, p. 16.]
Dec. 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the keeper of Newgate to permit Mr. de Loches to speak, from time to time, with Mr. Jennings (a prisoner) at convenient hours and in the presence of a keeper. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 39, p. 133.]
Dec. 26. Sir Charles Hedges to [the Duke of Shrewsbury], reporting his opinion on Admiral Russell's letter and the matters mentioned in the Duke's letter of the 24th inst.
(1) That Genoese ships laden with French goods may be detained by Admiral Russell, and made prize by the Court of Admiralty, unless it be proved in that court that they belong actually to "neuters."
(2) That goods of the growth of France laden in Genoese ships bound to any port belonging to Spain or the Allies, on account of such allies, may be made prize and the ships detained until discharged by an order of the said court.
(3) That a Genoese ship bound to or from France, or suspected to carry French effects, may be justly detained until evidence as to the property of the lading, &c., be given in the said Court of Admiralty.
(4) That in case any ship's papers are concealed or embezzled, so that it appear not to whom the French goods, &c., belong, it is not only a just cause of seizure and detention, but of condemnation as a good prize.
(5) When any ship is seized upon just cause of suspicion the papers are to be secured, and the master and crew examined, their answers transmitted to the Court of Admiralty, and some officers put on board for the safe custody of the ship and goods.
(6) There is no authority at present in Spain for clearing or condemning ships taken as prize, neither can there well be without the King of Spain's consent, so that it must be done here till his Majesty can find a means to have a court settled there, in the way of which there are some difficulties.
(7) A standing commission will be necessary for taking examina tions there.
(8) All papers must be transmitted thence to the Court of Admiralty.
(9) In case of perishableness of goods, there must be another standing commission to dispose of them as required by law.
(10) The Admiral has sufficent power either for the safe detention of ships in the fleet or sending them hither.
(11) The Genoese, not having yet acknowledged their Majesties, may justly be dealt with according to the utmost rigour of the laws of nations. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 6, No. 6.]
Dec. 26.
Whitehall.
Post-warrant for John Murray, esq., commissary-general in Jamaica, and his servant, with two able post horses, etc., to go to Plymouth. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 305.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to the Transport Commissioners, directing transport to be provided for two thousand men going to Cadiz. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 5, p. 109.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Admiralty, directing victuals to be provided for the same soldiers. [Ibid.]
Dec. 28.
London.
The Marquess de Canales, Spanish Ambassador, to the Duke of Shrewsbury, touching the case of the ship Queen of Sheba taken by the Ostend convoy. [H.O. Admiralty 7, No. 93.] Enclosing:—
Statement of the case of the ship Queen of Sheba; undated. [Ibid., No. 93 i.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
Pass for John Henry Metzner, a German, to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 37, p. 304.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Order by the Privy Council for the requisite alterations in the church service upon the death of the Queen. Printed. [S.P. Dom. Proclamations, Vol. 6, No. 109.]
Dec. 29.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Mr. William Cressy to be second lieutenant to Captain St. John Webb in Lord Berkeley's marine regiment; for Mr. Ralph Haslam to be adjutant to the same regiment; for Mr. Griffith Vaughan to be lieutenant to Captain Thornhill in the same regiment; and for Mr. Thomas Miles to be second lieutenant to Sir Cloudesley Shovel in the same regiment. [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 234.]
Dec. 30.
Whitehall.
Commission for Mr. Paget to be chaplain to Colonel Cholmondely's troop of Grenadier Guards. [Ibid., p. 239.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending, to prepare a bill containing a confirmation of the election of Dr. Tennison as Archbishop of Canterbury. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 148.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
License for William Bennett, esq., high sheriff of Dorset, to live out of that county during his term of office. [H.O. King's Letters 2, p. 59.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland, upon the petition of Alexander Higgins in right of his wife Susanna Tobyn, as executrix of Marmaduke Boynton, esq., deceased, for the satisfaction, out of the estate of the late Earl of Tyrconnell, of a certain bond given by him, by the name of Richard Talbot of Westminster, esq. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 13, p. 183.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant for the preparation of a licence to Lord Carteret. Recites that, by letters patent of 19 April, 18 Charles I., George Carteret, esq., had a grant of the fees and manors of Melesches, Grenville and Noirmont in the Isle of Jersey, and of the warren of conies in or near the parish of St. Heliers, and the reversions of the said premises after the determination of the interests of Sir Thomas Jermyn, knight, Henry Jermyn and Thomas Jermyn, to be held in chief by knight service, and by the service of bearing the royal banner within the said isle whenever his Majesty's enemies should enter or come there in hostile manner, and by the service of maintaining, at every such hostile entry, six able and fit men, with arms and other necessaries, trained up in the said isle for the defence thereof, and by a yearly rent of 6l. 13s. 4d.; these letters patent further granted license for the erection of one water-mill and one windmill on the premises. By other letters patent of 11 January, 1 Charles II. [A.D. 1650], the said George Carteret (afterwards Sir George Carteret, knight and baronet, and since deceased), had a grant of the manor of Chesnell alias Pesnell in Jersey, and of the watermill called Tessen Mill (all which premises were mentioned to be parcel of his said late Majesty's duchy of Normandy), with leave to erect a dove-house and windmill. This grant also provided that all the premises should be for ever united and consolidated in tail male, and should never be alienated, under penalty of forfeiture. Wherefore, at the request of Lord Carteret, grandson of the said Sir George Carteret, the present license is to be made out, empowering him to grant, sell, or convey the premises in several parcels to George Bandinell, Phillip Durell, Elias Pipon, Abraham de Carteret, and Philip de Carteret, all of Jersey, gentlemen, to be held by them by the same tenures as in the grant to the said George Carteret, the grantees being restrained from alienating. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 39, p. 136.]
[Dec.] A list of the names of the Lords of the Committee for the affairs of Ireland. The Lords Keeper, President, and Privy Seal, Duke of Shrewsbury, Marquis of Normanby, Earl of Romney, Earl of Ranelagh, Lord Godolphin, Lord Coningsby, Mr. Comptroller, Mr. Secretary Trenchard, Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer, Sir John Lowther, Sir Henry Goodrick. [S.P. Ireland 356, No. 82.]
Anonymous letter endorsed:—"For the King." "Having made it my business not only to give a constant attendance in the House at this sessions, but at all meetings to which I was called to consider how to carry on your affairs, and having thereby had an opportunity to make several observations that may prove for your service to know, I think myself obliged to lay them before you. And it being generally discoursed as if you had a peace in prospect, you will pardon me if I presume to say how much it will contribute to your future happiness that it should, if possible, be perfected before the meeting either of this or any other Parliament.
"Considering the present state of the kingdom and the factions that are in it, the two great points that require more especially your care are how to manage the parties as to maintain yourself against the enemies abroad, and at the same time to preserve your authority at home, that the necessity of doing the one may not bring you to such circumstances that it will be impossible for you to keep the other, and this is more difficult because the Tories who are friends to prerogative are so mingled with Jacobites that they are not to be confided in during the war, and the Whigs, who are for the reason of necessity to be employed to support your cause against the common enemy, will, at the same time, endeavour all they can to make use of the opportunity to lessen your just power; and, let them pretend what they will to you, the several instances they have given this sessions of their intentions that way puts this matter out of all doubt to any person who has taken the least pains to observe them, and it is beyond all dispute manifest, that they will give money to keep out King James, yet they never give you one vote to support your just right in any point where (what they please to call) the interest of your people is concerned.
"This being the condition of the party, which I presume you will allow to be too true, I am confident when you look into the funds that are given for the service of this year, and consider how much they lessen and incumber your hereditary revenue, and when you know that if the war continue it will be impossible to save the customs (which is the only tax now left you can expect they will ever give for a longer time than from year to year), from being likewise pawned for five years at least, I presume to say that these things considered, you will be of opinion that it is more your interest with relation to your affairs at home to have a peace this summer than ever it was since you sat upon the throne of England, and that if you have it not, as things have been managed, the next year's expense will so anticipate those branches of the revenne that ever have been kept hitherto for your ordinary support of the government, that it will be scarce possible that you should ever see an easy day, though hereafter you will have such peace as you could wish; and the ground on which I build this assertion is that it ever was, and ever will be impracticable for any King of England to be the least happy, who must depend upon a Parliament every year, to give him a million of money for his common and necessary support; and that this will be your circumstances if the war be another year continued will from the following guess at the expenses be very near a demonstration.
"The funds for '94. Land Tax, besides what is paid thereout to the defect of the poll to this year's charge, 1,500,000.
"2nd. Ninepence upon the excise granted for 16 years, to commence from May, 1697; the salt to make good the funds in the meantime, to raise by way of lottery for this year's service, 1,000,000.
"3rd. Ninepence upon the excise granted for 99 years, to commence from May, '97, the tonnage being to supply the same in the meantime, to raise upon perpetual interest and lives for this year's service, 1,500,000l.; quarterly poll given for 0,700,000; hackney coaches to be licensed for 21 years, 0,100,000. Paper act for four years, 0,230,000. Total, 5,030,000l.
"Note that the two ninepences granted this year upon the excise, with what was last year given upon the same revenue for raising a million of money upon lives, are allowed to sink the hereditary excise above 250,000 per annum; and the remainder being made a collateral security, that the salt and tonnage shall answer 280,000 per annum till May, 1697, will, in all probability, be thereby sunk about 100,000 a year more, so that from that branch must not hereafter be expected more than 300,000 per annum, though formerly it yielded when the half-crown stood singly (and that's only hereditary) 650,000 a year.
"I take it for granted that if the war continue it will be impossible for you to lessen the charge, for as the confederates must take it ill if the land forces are not the same, for the Parliament will never suffer the navy to be decreased, therefore I compute the money necessary to be given to be likewise 5,000,000.
"A guess at the Funds for 1695: Four shillings in the pound upon land, unless it be more equally assessed (and that the major part of the House will never allow), will not yield above 1,800,000, and if that then will probably be anticipated by the clauses of credit given this year about 600,000, for this to next year's charge there must not be expected more than 1,200,000.
"The poll can't possibly be repeated next year, in regard it will be in collection in April next. No more can be got upon trade since the tonnage is now granted. There can be no more money raised by protests for want of funds, there being no revenue out of which to make any but the small remainder of the hereditary excise; so that not only the customs must be pawned for a considerable time, but a further charge upon land and several heads of excise must be brought to make up the sum wanting, and when the customs are so pawned, the hereditary excise, part lessened for ever and another part made a collateral security for three years, and its prejudice 100,000 per annum and the nine pences (that used to be given to the Crown in cases of necessity) settled, two of them for 99 years and the third for 19 years to come, nothing is more plain, than that you have not a revenue of your own to depend upon in prospect of above 400,000l. per annum, nor will there be any other in prospect, when the usual ones are disposed of as above; for that computing the necessary charge of the government in time of peace at 1,400,000l. a year, which is the lowest it has been estimated at, a million must constantly be raised out of your subjects' pockets by extraordinary ways for your support; and how uneasy that will make the government to yourself I leave you to judge; I shall only add that it is manifestly the designs of some people to keep necessities always upon you, and it was from such that the "resertion" of the 600,000 upon the East India Company, and the resolution to charge the Customs this year proceeded, and nothing I can assure you prevented the latter but the warmth you spoke with on the subject to your Secretary.
"A new Parliament will not help this matter, for let who will be the giver, there will remain still the same ways of giving; and let which sort of men be chosen, I dare answer but a majority of them will be much rather for mortgaging the revenue of the Crown than their own land; and this makes me have reason to fear you will never again have such an offer as was made you this sessions, and refused by those that pretended to be your friends, and soon after repented that it was ever tendered by those that were your enemies, when, upon thinking out more thoroughly, they found of what infinite advantage it would have been to your government.
"But since I have mentioned a new Parliament, and knowing you will be pressed by the Whigs to have one, being sanguine enough to imagine they shall be able to get a greater majority in the next than they can pretend to in this, it seems to be unquestionably your interest if the war continues to continue the Parliament, and if the war ends to let that end with it; and my reasons for this opinion are:—
"1st. These are the same men that engaged in the war and are obliged by their vote to support you in it.
"2nd. The experience you have that this House will do it ought to be an unanswerable argument against parting with it for a new one, when you do not know whether they will be for you or not.
"3rd. The great reason that is given for dissolving this being because it is said they have an ill reputation, ought not to sway in this affair, but the contrary, since it is only a scandal raised by the enemies of the government, and the supporting you being a crime they lay to their charge, your friends ought to esteem them, for they are hated by your enemies.
"4th. You have for the last four years past been giving all employments to members of the House, which, though it has not signified much in any party business, yet in that grand affair of carrying on the war they have been of mighty service.
"There is (sic) very few instances of any of them but that, upon occasion, appear to be hearty to your government in relation to the foreign dispute, and many of these will be left out in a new choice, which will be no small prejudice to you, considering that most of your enemies in the House of Commons are made so because they have not places like the rest; but the most dangerous consequence of a new election is that it will throw the balance too much on the one side or the other, for either the Whigs will, according to their expectation, get it into their hands entirely, and then I fear you will think the impositions they'll be laying upon you unreasonable, or otherwise the Tories will have the ascendant, and then it's to be doubted that they, in revenge to the Whigs, will for the major part be governed by the artifices of the Jacobites, and from such a misfortune nothing less than destruction can proceed. Whereas, as the House is now constituted, the Whigs are not strong enough to make use of the necessities of your government, as much as they are inclined to do, neither are the Tories numerous enough to resent your favouring the Whigs.
"So, upon the whole, I shall presume to conclude as I began, that the parliament that began with the war should likewise end with it, not before. And if it pleased God to grant you an honourable peace, and you would then be pleased to set up for a party of your own, and let all people see that if they expected your favour they must depend upon you for it, and not let any one hope for promotion for being true to a faction but by serving of you, I presume to say that the war being ended, a new parliament called, and such measures pursued, you would quickly find that the Jacobites would turn moderate churchmen and loyal subjects, and the Whigs much more obsequious courtiers and easy servants than they now are. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 69.]
Calculations relating to the supply voted for the land forces for the year 1694, including subsidies, viz., to the Duke of Savoy, 72,000l.; to the Duke of Hanover, 58,000l.; to the Duke of Saxony, 25,000l.; to the Landgrave of Hesse Cassel, 35,000l.; to the Elector of Brandenburg, 28,571l. 8s. 6d.; to the Bishop of Liege, 12,000l. [Ibid., No. 70.]
Memorandum of the officers of Lord Galway's regiment not serving, and the reasons of their absence. Second Major and Captain d'Esciury: he has, I believe, seven children, for which the King ordered me to give him the two commissions. He has only one arm and is very sickly. Captain St. Cyr: has always served with me until the last campaign, and then retired on a question of precedence. Captain [R]uvigny has always been in London with the King's permission, and pays the regimental pensions to the widows, &c. Gaptain Guérin is groom to the Duke of Schomberg. Captain Cramahé is my aide-de-camp. Captain des Loires is captain of foot, and lost his right arm at Steinkirk, and has no pension. Lieutenant des Marais is with Mons. d'Odick. Lieutenant Sijol is on half pay, in bad health. Lieutenant Cassel has gone to Ireland, in consideration of some colony he was to found there. I have allowed him to remain on half-pay; the other half is received by Lieutenant Pineau. Lieutenant Mailleraye: always served with me till the last campaign, is now in ill-health. Cornet . . . .: is my groom. Cornet . . . . . . always served with me till last campaign, is now prevented by short sight. With the exception of St. Cyr, Sijol and Cassel, I have had the King's permission for them all. [Ibid., No. 71.]
Statement, by an applicant for a grant of the honour of Tutbury and Needwood Forest in Derbyshire, of the amount at present due to the trustees thereof under a decree made in the time of Charles II., who had granted the same to Colonel Edward Vernon. [Ibid., No. 72.]
A list of the land forces which his Majesty thinks necessary to be maintained in England, Scotland, and beyond the seas, for the service of the year 1694. This paper was delivered to the House of Commons, 5 Dec., 1693. [Ibid., No. 73.]
Abstract of the Civil List, 1694, with account of payments in 1693. [Ibid., No. 74.]
A calculation of the number of men on board English and Dutch ships, and a note as to bedding required. [Ibid., No. 75.]
Memorandum as to the difference between the established and reduced army pay. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 15, No. 76.]
Memorandum as to sums due to Mr. John Knight, who is by letters patent constituted receiver-general of the Customs, with a clause not to be removed till he be repaid the moneys he should lend to their Majesties thereupon; with notes on the possibility of discharging these debts. [Ibid., No. 77.]
"Memorial for the King." Apparently a French account of a report made for Louis XIV., with regard to the strategy of the campaigns with the Dutch. [Ibid., No. 78.]
Proposals for the improvement of the Irish revenue. His Majesty having reduced his Irish establishment to eight hundred thousand pounds per annum (from 24th June inst., to 24th next June), sufficient for the military and civil charges of the kingdom during that time, A. B. presumes he could secure able and honest persons, well acquainted with the successful methods of the former Irish war, who would readily undertake, by the pursuit of those methods, to raise a moiety of the aforesaid eight hundred thousand pounds out of the kingdom of Ireland, on condition that the English Treasury should be charged with four hundred thousand pounds for the aforesaid year. Should his Majesty see fit to encourage this plan, the undertaking will be effected by the method pursued in those times as appears by the records of the Auditor's Office now in Dublin:— In the former war three days' pay in seven was charged on the forfeitures, which at the end of the war proved to many officers and soldiers more beneficial than if the said three days' pay had been paid in ready money. The said A. B. proposes that only two days' pay be placed upon the forfeitures, he in no way doubts the final success of the plan, by the improvement alone of the duties of Customs and Excise, forfeited rents, goods and stocks, with the same additional tax on corn and cattle as was assessed by the Lord General and Council of State in the former war, which may more readily be assessed for reasons following:—His Majesty having, by Act of Parliament of England, 27th January, 1 William and Mary, released his subjects in Ireland from all sorts of rents, hearths, &c., being a much greater revenue than can be expected from this additional tax on corn and cattle, and the country being now much richer and more populous, the said A. B. promises to bring into the King's treasury the said four hundred thousand pounds if the King will grant him the administration of the plan, he and his partners taking one-third of the overplus, in case Dublin is included, and two-thirds for the costs and charges should Dublin not be included. [Ibid. No. 79.]
Memorandum as to the Sieur Blancard, provost-marshalgeneral of Jamaica. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 6, Nos. 7 and 8.] Enclosing:—
(1) Copy of a letter from Viscount Sydney to the Earl of Inchiquin, dated 7 Jan., 1691–2. The Sieur Blancard, provost-marshal-general of Jamaica, has represented to the King that he has been obliged to revoke the deputation granted to Mr. Ryves and two other persons whom he appointed deputies for the execution of that office, because they did not ratify and confirm the contract which Mr. Gracedieu, a merchant trading to that island, but residing here, had made in their names; and that the Sieur Blancard has therefore, as well for the execution of the said office as for the better enjoying of the fees and profits arising out of the same, constituted and appointed Louis Galdy, a resident merchant of that island, to be his deputy, and has thereupon desired that the King would order you to confirm and allow the said deputation of Louis Galdy, according to the laws and constitution of that government. Their Majesties being willing to show all possible marks of favour to the said Sieur Blancard, Lord Portland joins in the recommendation of the said Louis Galdy. [S.P. Dom. William and recommendation of the said Louis Galdy. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 6, No. 8 i.]
(2) The same to the same, dated 12 January. I wrote to you about a week ago, by his Majesty's command, on behalf of Provost Marshal General Blancard, but in case that letter has not reached you, I send you a duplicate. [Ibid.]
The case of Edmund Warner, gent., in relation to an Act of Parliament to be passed for repealing the 32nd Article in the Act of 5 Elizabeth, concerning divers artificers, and others, relating to the weaving of cloth. The said Warner and his ancestors have time out of mind been seised of an estate in the county of Suffolk, out of which they have been wont to dig a certain clay, which is proper only for the making of white and painted earthenware, with which the potters of England have always been furnished. Since the prohibition of commerce with France, the Dutch potters have likewise been furnished therewith. About a year since the customs' officers seized several vessels laden with it, under pretence that it was fuller's earth; there have been two trials at the Exchequer Bar, in both of which the jury found it was potter's clay. The committee to whom the said bill is referred are empowered to bring in a clause prohibiting the exportation of all earth and clay whatsoever, which will entail loss on various classes of the community. Printed. [Ibid., No. 9.]
Reasons offered to the consideration of Parliament for the stricter prohibiting the importation of white and painted earthenware into England.
In the houses already set up in England for this purpose wares are made as good as in any parts beyond the seas, and in quantities sufficient for the nation. The Dutch are chiefly concerned in bringing this merchandize here, and sell to loss in order to beat down the manufacture here. The materials required are all home produce. The Dutch in return export from England large quantities of clay, which they use as fuller's earth. Many people are maintained by the industry in England, including poor children from eight years of age and upwards, that otherwise must be a charge upon their parents, or their parishes, and are hereby employed till they are big enough to be apprentices to trades; likewise all old men and maimed soldiers that are a charge to the parish may be employed herein, and care is taken for them in case of sickness. The Dutch had the knowledge of perfecting this art from the English, their now chief workmen being English. It is also humbly prayed that the prohibition to import beaten leaf, gold and silver, made up into papers for painters' use may be extended to beaten copper and other metals; for now foreigners beat such metals, "and by poisonous things" colour it like gold and silver, make it into papers and send it into England, where often it is used by apothecaries in medicaments to the endangering men's lives. Printed. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 6, No. 10.]
An account of the trial of fourteen notorious prisoners for high treason in the Marshalsea, in Southwark, on Monday the 26th inst., before a High Court of Admiralty. Nine of them received sentence of death, viz.: Captain Golding, Thomas Jones, Gold, &c., who were ordered to be drawn, hanged and quartered for piracy.
"They were most, if not all of them, of the Romish persuasion, and their principles no grace to their religion; true Tory breed, and fit for the trust their bloody commissions gave them." [Ibid., No. 11.]
Account of objections raised by Dr. Oldys to prosecute certain privateers as pirates.
In November, 1692, the Lords of the Admiralty appointed Dr. Oldys their advocate, to prosecute as pirates certain Englishmen and Irishmen taken whilst acting under King James's commission. This he declined to do, saying they were not pirates but privateers. The paper gives an account of the proceedings thereupon at a Council meeting, about September, 1693, when Dr. Oldys was summoned to appear before the lords, and with him Doctors Waller, Littleton and Tindall. [Ibid., No. 12.]
Brigadier Thomas Earle to —. By the Duke of Ormond's recommendation and mine, Captain Oxenbridge Harward had a troop promised him in Colonel Leigh's dragoons, but another interest carried it. I acquainted the King with his case, and with his services in Ireland, and he was pleased to promise him the first vacancy. I doubt not but the Queen will make good the engagement. [Ibid., No. 14.]
The proposals for Irish forfeitures considered with regard to law and good conscience, the forfeitures being proposed as security to raise a million of money towards the charge of the war. Printed. [Ibid., No. 15.]
A list of contributors of various sums of money for a purpose unspecified, containing over a thousand names (the addresses are in some instances given), including Sir Thomas Lane, knight and alderman, Sir Selathiel Lovell, knight, recorder, Sir John Houblon, knight and alderman, Captain John Smith, Camberwell, Arthur Barron, Esq., Sir Francis Child, knight and alderman, the Marquis of Carmarthen, Jacob Eeles, Mrs. Elizabeth Barron, John Smith, Esq., Isleworth, Isaac Houblon, merchant, Sir William Scawen, John Houblon, merchant, Mrs. Mary and Elizabeth Houblon, the Company of Fishmongers, Peter Nepeu, the Greenland Company, the Marquis de Heucourt, Samuel Cox, Michael Rolls, Captain Timothy Keyzer, Peter Houblon, merchant, Dr. Thomas Plume, Greenwich. [Ibid., No. 16.]
A paper of "references" containing his Majesty's pleasure on various petitions and other matters submitted in council. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 6, No. 17.]
The complaint of several hackney coachmen in and about London and Westminster. Sets forth that, for carrying on the war against France, it was enacted that every hackney coachman should pay 5l. yearly towards the same; which, with all imaginable cheerfulness, they were willing to pay, supposing themselves thereby freed from the oppression and slavery of the city of London. But the late Lord Mayor and the court of aldermen have compelled them to take licenses, and for non-payment of the sums demanded, have caused them to be arrested. [Ibid., No. 18.]
Sir Godfrey Kneller to Sir Edward Ward, Attorney-General at the Inner Temple. "I remember you promised to pay me 50l. for the two pictures of the King and Queen, and 10l. for the frames . . . . which I expect. I never did any pictures of that kind so cheap before. My price is 40l. or 50l. apiece, and no less." [Ibid., No. 19.]
A paper of directions (in French) for French sailing ships. [S.P. Ireland 356, No. 83.]
A number of disconnected rough notes, dealing (inter alia) with the ratio of papists to protestants in Ireland; privateers; a boy cured by visions; the diocese of Killaloe; sheep-raising in Tipperary; price of meat, &c., &c. [Ibid., No. 84.]
Dublin. Notice of Assizes to be held in Ireland in 1694. Printed. [Ibid., No. 85.]
Remarks on the Bill for encouraging privateers. The preamble complains that in the late Act for encouraging privateers sufficient encouragement for those and the men-of-war is not therein provided. It is submitted that those encouragements were sufficient.
It was thought necessary by the late Act to use all imaginable cautions that no private French trade should be carried on, nor embezzlements made of what was bona fide taken; for which two reasons that bill did strictly command all captors to bring the prize into some convenient port, and thereupon (before they broke bulk) to put such prize into posssession of some officers or agents by the commissioners of the prize office to be appointed, who, with certain officers by the commissioners of the customs in that behalf empowered, and two or more mariners on behalf of the captors, should take care of the same (to the prevention of the least embezzlement in any respect) till such prize should be condemned. Here were three checks appointed on each other, and each independent of and consequently not to be influenced by each other.
Whereas in the new bill there is no care taken to prevent the captor's embezzlement, in the last Act the captor, if he embezzled, forfeited his thirds, his gunnage, 500l. to the King, and was incapable for seven years of serving his Majesty. This kept them in order. Whereas if the captors shall, by this new bill, be let loose (their checks being taken away and penalties destroyed) the consequence will prove very prejudicial to the King in his customs, his other interest in the prize, and all concerned therein. It is presumed the Prize Office will not be supposed useless when this instance is considered. Suppose a captor take a tun of French wine (and so it is in foreign sugars and tobacco) worth 44l., and 23l. of this be paid his Majesty in customs, the tenth of the remainder to the Admiralty, a third of the remainder to the chest at Chatham, a third to the captor and his crew, and the last third, which is under 7l., to the Prize Office, out of which the charges of that commission are defrayed, and the overplus paid to the King; out of that 44l. prize, under 7l. comes to the Prize Office!
We might instance, if great care be not taken to restrain the abuses by men-of-war, that much damage may come to the King in making satisfaction for those wrongs from our captains to neutral princes; for, if we are not misinformed, some of them have made high demands for those damages which ships have sustained by being pillaged and stopped some months in our river from pursuing their voyage, without any just pretence of prize. It may therefore be presumed that the Prize Office is not so idle and useless an office as it is misrepresented to be, especially if it be considered that the commission sits three or four times in the week for securing the prizes in ships and goods, and other business. [S.P. Ireland 356, No. 86.]
The opinion of the judges of England as to whether it is the sole and undoubted right of the Commons of Ireland in "Parliament Assemblies" to prepare heads of bills for the raising of money, and whether the Lord Lieutenant and Council may not prepare and certify bills for raising money to their Majesties and Council of England, to be returned under the Great Seal of England, and afterwards sent to the Commons, unless the heads of such bills have first their rise in that house. The judges disallow the first and allow the second right. [Ibid., No. 87.]
Mr. Mackie's statement re passes. In June, after granting those instructions, it being represented to Mr. Secretary Trenchard that the executions of the first part of the second article of those instructions would be a great obstruction to the trade of the neighbouring towns of Colchester, Ipswich, Norwich, etc., Mr. Secretary, by a letter, gave an allowance to Mr. Mackie to suffer such persons as were known to be trading people, and who lived at such distances from London that they could not, without great inconvenience, procure passes, to pass in the packet-boats, they being certified to be well affected to the government. Mr. Mackie has always since kept a book of those persons' names, and the places of their abode, and the names of those certifying for them. Officers of the army with recruits passed upon their recruit orders; other officers not without passes, except field officers such as my Lords Rivers, Cutts, etc. Mr. Mackie desires to know whether a certificate, from the justices of the peace of any county at a great distance from London, will warrant him for suffering the person so certified to pass, he having no acquaintance at Harwich. Scotch Secretaries' passes have never been allowed, but for Scotchmen coming immediately from Scotland. [S.P. Ireland 356, No. 88.]
Notes relating to the privateers' bill. That the ships taken as prize shall be immediately delivered, with the hatches sealed, to the Commissioners of the Prize Office as before. That the clause giving the men-of-war all the privateers they shall take includes almost all ships taken, for all French merchantmen that have guns have letters of marque, or commissions from the French king to be privateers; so that if this clause passes the captains of the men-ofwar shall have the said ships. That there is no penalty in the said bill on the captains in case they shall embezzle, but there are penalties in the former bill. That the clause in the bill empowering the consuls in the Mediterranean to deliver the prize ships on bail to the captains, until those ships are condemned in England, is pernicious, in regard it may prove that the captains are not sufficient security; this clause also bars the merchants from the benefit of appeals, and may endanger the breach of his Majesty's treaties with his allies. [Ibid., No. 89.]
Changes directed by his Majesty to be made in the government of Ireland if approved by Lord Capell. The names in parenthesis are those proposed for the various offices in lieu of those whose names they follow. Sir Richard Reynell, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench (Sir Richard Pyne); Sir Richard Pyne, Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas (Sir John Hely); Sir John Hely, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer (Mr. Robert Doyne); Sir Standish Harstonge, Baron of the Exchequer (Nehemiah Donelan, esquire, his Majesty's prime sergeant); John Temple, Attorney-General (Mr. Robert Rochfort); Richard Levinge, Solicitor-General (Mr. Alan Brodrick); Richard Cox and Sir John Jeffryson, being now Privy Councillors, and both Judges of the Common Pleas, are to be removed out of the Council and succeeded by Sir John King for the Province of Connaught, Sir Arthur Roydon for Ulster, Sir Christopher Wandesford for Leinster, Mr. Thomas Brodrick for Munster. The general officer commanding in chief to be a Privy Councillor. [Ibid., No. 90.]
A similar list, giving names of those persons who are to be continued in the government. Sir Charles Porter, Lord Chancellor; Baron Eckler, of the Exchequer; Mr. Justice Cook, of the King's Bench; Mr. Justice Lindell, of the same Court; Mr. Jefferson, of the Common Pleas; Mr. Justice Cox, of the Common Pleas. The three chief Judges to continue of the Privy Council. [Ibid., No. 91.]
Two notices, dated at Dublin, inviting offers to purchase lands, being the estate formerly belonging to the Duke of York. Printed. [Ibid., Nos. 92 and 93.]
Commissions for Mr. John Penny to be lieutenant in Captain John Redmore's company in Brigadier Earle's regiment of foot [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 165]; Irish commissions without dates:— Mr. William Chaunders to be adjutant of Colonel Echlin's regiment of dragoons; for Mr. William Matthews to be lieutenant to LieutenantColonel Oliver Long in the same regiment; for Mr. Andrew Lindsey to be lieutenant to Captain John Davis in Colonel Cunningham's regiment; for Mr. Stephen St. John to be ensign to Colonel St. John's own company; for Mr. Arthur Webb to be captain of Major Astley's company in Colonel Gustavus Hamilton's regiment; for Mr. Richard Dawson to be lieutenant to Captain Arthur Davis in the Earl of Donegal's regiment; and for Mr. John Desmineres to be ensign to Captain James MacCormack in Colonel Mitchelburne's regiment [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 222]
Extract of a letter from Captain Crow, commander of their Majesties' ship Norwich, about his "running aboard" a Swedish manof-war in the Downs. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 406.]
A list of what ships and other vessels were cast away by the late southerly winds, at the latter end of September. In quadruplicate. [Ibid. 7, Nos. 89 to 89 iii.]
An account of such ships and goods as are mentioned in the Swedish minister's memorial, which appear to have been in the possession of the Commissioners of Prizes, showing the time when condemned or restored, &c. [Ibid., No. 94.]
A like list of ships as abovesaid which have never been in the possession of the said Commissioners. [Ibid., No. 94 i.]
List of the Danish vessels which have been restored, giving the masters' names, &c. [Ibid., No. 95.]
Abstract of the papers of the ship Golden Falken, Matthias Tolleshausen, master, sailing under a pass from the Royal Colleges of Commerce and Accounts of Sweden. [Ibid., No. 96.]
Warrant for the denization of Moses Continho, Isaac Vernandes Dias, David Castelo, Joseph Bueno Henriquez, David de Robles, Raphael Abandanna and Samuel Joseph Frazon, aliens born. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 496.]
A list of some of their Majesties' messengers' bills allowed by the Duke of Shrewsbury, &c., 1694. [Ibid. 39, p. 61.]
Note relating to the petition of Sir Richard Pine, Chief Justice of the Common Pleas in Ireland, setting forth that he and his ancestors have been possessed of the lands, &c., of Water Park, and only interrupted by the rebellion of 1641, and the late rebellion. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 403.]
Proposals as to the repairs most necessary to be done in Guernsey, by Captain Phillips and Mons. Carles. [S.P. Channel Islands 10, No. 4.]
Proposals offered to the King by the deputies of Guernsey for the present security of that island, requesting:—
(1) That the officers of the Earl of Monmouth's regiment may have orders to repair to their respective commands in the island, there being scarce enough to mount the guard there.
(2) That arms may be issued to the parish captains, out of the stores sent from England last summer.
(3) That a troop of dragoons may be raised and employed in the island, similar to that which is to be raised according to the proposals delivered in to the Council by the inhabitants of Jersey.
(4) That a squadron of men-of-war may cruise about the islands. [S.P. Channel Islands 10, No. 5.]
State of the cannon in Castle Cornet in Guernsey. [Ibid., No. 6.]