BHO

William III: December 1697

Pages 497-546

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William III, 1697. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1927.

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December 1697

Dec. 1.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland for a grant to Thomas Cook, merchant, for 27 years of the lands forfeited to the crown by the attainder of Dennis O'Bryan. Cook is lawful proprietor and actual possessor of the town and lands of Dungillane, co. Cork, consisting mostly of unprofitable and mountainous ground. He was greatly disturbed therein by the said O'Bryan, by colour of a pretended lease, all rights under which (if it existed) have now vested in the crown. The said lease was asserted to have been granted in 1636 by Viscount Sarsfield to Daniel and John O'Bryan, and was ultimately confirmed by a decree in the court of Chancery in Ireland.
Annexed is a schedule of the lands, viz. in Dungillane, Ballynoughan alias Ballygrenagan, Caroone alias Carmore, Ballynadder alias Ballymeadagh, Propoge alias Propegna, Cronagh, Ballynemoony, and Knockatronany alias Knockdrishane, in the baronies of Condons and Clangibbons, co. Cork. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office Book 14, p. 36.]
Dec. 1.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland for payment of a salary of 200l. yearly to Daniel Cottin, esquire, major of the ordnance in the kingdom of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 41.]
Dec. 2.
Whitehall.
J. Vernon to the Lords of the Admiralty, directing a yacht to be provided to convey Count Mansfeld from the Thames to Nieuport or Ostend. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 204, p. 149.]
Dec. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the keeper of Newgate to receive into custody Richard Condon, who has owned he was born in Ireland, and went thence into France, where he served as a soldier under the French king during the late war, and returned into England without the King's licence. [Ibid. 348, p. 1.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to "Lord Ambassador" Williamson. Part of what I barely hinted to you as talk only, in my last, has now come to pass, no less to our surprize than perhaps it will be to yours in a double respect. Mr. Secretary Trumbull has resigned the seals, and the King has been pleased to give them to Mr. Vernon, who is Secretary of State for the Northern Province. Sir William Trumbull resigned on Wednesday night, and yesterday Mr. Vernon had the seals delivered to him. He has not settled his office, nor, indeed, can he do it, till he hears from the Duke of Shrewsbury, whose office is dismantled by this, so that as yet I cannot tell whether I shall be continued, any more than I can whether Parliament will give the revenue for the King's life, or keep a standing army. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 111.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
R. Yard's news-letter to the same. Mr. Secretary Trumbull's resignation surprized a great many people, who are endeavouring to find out the reason of it. All I can hear is, that he did not think himself enough considered in his station; that in the summer he was not one of the Lords Justices, and that he has been overlooked in other things since; or that he thought it prudent to make his choice, which he foresaw he could not prevent. Thus people conjecture, and that is all I can hear of it. Mr. Vernon succeeds him, with a general satisfaction. He had the seals delivered to him last night, but is not yet sworn. This I believe will be done at the Cabinet Council on Sunday next.
We are now entering upon the business of parliament. The great point will be about the land forces; divers country gentlemen are very much set against everything that looks like a standing army; but, when they come to consider, I hope they will be convinced of the necessity there is to make provision for the security of the kingdom and the preservation of what we have been so long contending for.
In a day or two the Lords of the Treasury are to make their report about the excise commission, and then we shall know what alterations will be made in it. [Ibid., No. 112.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
Another news-letter. The thanksgiving for the peace was observed yesterday with much solemnity and rejoicing. The King came in the morning to his chapel here, where the bishop of Salisbury preached. His Majesty dined at Lord Romney's, and afterwards saw the fireworks prepared in St. James's Square. The choir of St. Paul's church was opened the same day; the bishop of London preached, and the Lord Mayor and aldermen went thither in their "formalities."
On Monday last a court martial for the trial of Captain Harlow was held on board the Queen at the buoy of the Nore; Sir George Rooke and the rest of the flag officers and above forty captains were present. The trial lasted eleven hours, and ended with his acquittal, the court declaring they were of opinion he had done his duty on this occasion. On the following day Captain Hubbard of the Devonshire, one of Captain Harlow's squadron, of which she was the headmost ship and nearest to the French, was likewise tried and acquitted.
Parliament met this day, and his Majesty went with the usual solemnity to the house of peers. [Here follows a brief account of the proceedings.]
They write from Edinburgh on the 27th ult. that two regiments of foot are disbanded in that kingdom, viz. Tullibardine's and Lindsey's, and also Forbes' dragoons. Brigadier Cuningham died on the 26th ult. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 113.]
Dec. 3. The King's speech at the opening of Parliament. Printed. [Ibid., No. 114.]
Dec. 3. " Votes" of the House of Commons, being the proceedings for that day. Printed. [Ibid., No. 115.]
Dec. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for the appointment of James Vernon, esquire, to be one of the principal secretaries of state, with the fee of 100l. per annum. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 348, p. 1.]
Dec. 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the apprehension, &c. of Charles Broxton and Peter Kycaut [sic]. [Ibid. 349, p. 42.]
Dec. 3.
The Hague and Whitehall.
Pass and post warrant for Mr. John Methuen, son to the Chancellor of Ireland, who had spent the summer in Holland [Ibid. 386, p. 5]; and for John Thornborough, with one horse and a guide, to go to Harwich. [Ibid. 388, p. 57.]
Dec. 4.
The Hague.
Passes for Brigadier d'Offarrell (sic) with his lady, 2 children and 3 servants, viz. Anthony Huissman, Francis Ferall and Joanna Voutens, having had a ticket from Mr. Blathwaite to go on board the Centurion; and for Andrew Ker, esquire, a Scotch gentleman, who has been a student at Utrecht for about 2 years [to come to England]. [Ibid. 386, p. 5.] Recommendation for the last, signed Jo. Lillie. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 116.]
Dec. 4.
Dublin Castle.
Lord Galway to James Vernon, asking the Duke of Shrewsbury's pleasure upon the enclosed lists. [S.P. Ireland 359, No. 189.]
Enclosing:
(1) A list of such persons as stand indicted of treason, and have surrendered themselves on the exigent or first process, and are bound by recognizances to appear in the court of King's Bench:—
In co. Meath.—Thomas Plunkett of Lagore, esquire, and Laurence Cusack of Staffordtowne, gentleman.
In co. Westmeath.—Richard Fitz Gerrald of Rogerstowne, Levallin Nugent of Tulihan, Thomas Kennedy of Turin, Redmond Dillon of Lara, and James Dease of Turbetstowne, gentlemen.
In co. Dublin.—Richard Long of Finglass, William Clinch of College, Thomas Dowde of Murdery and John Denn of Sagard, gentlemen.
In the city of Dublin.—Laurence Taaffe of Brownstowne, co. Meath, M.D., Lawrence Cruce of Crucestowne, co. Meath, gentleman, Thady Quin of Adair, co. Limerick, esquire; Michael Archbold, linen draper, Michael Linclone, Edmond Reily and John Moore, merchants; John Burne, cooper, James Malone, bookbinder, Francis Mathews, innkeeper, Miles Bermingham, tailor; Robert Warren and Nicholas Linclone, merchants, all of the city; Oliver Grace of Dublin, esquire, Thomas Bourke of Portumna, co. Galway, esquire; Ellen, Countess Dowager of Clanrickard; William Conron of Dublin, merchant; Peirce Bryan of Shrule, Queen's co., esquire; Jeremy Donovan of Dublin, esquire, and James Clarke of Dublin, merchant.
In co. Louth.—Anthony Murphey of Castletowne Cooly, Hugh Hanlan of Ballagan and Patrick Plunkett of Piperstowne, gentlemen.
In co. Kilkenny.—John Shortall of Danganbeg, clerk.
In co. Cork.—Patrick Myagh of Kinsale, Arthur Galway of Spike Island, Edmond Kearny of Garestowne, Edward Roach of Tinor, Cornelius Donovane of Kilmakee, Daniel Donovane of Killglany, Garret Goold of Knockraha, Murrogh McTeige Donovane of Litterlekey, Francis Roch of Trabolgan, gentlemen; and Maurice Fitz Gerrald of Ennismore, co. Kerry, esquire.
In the city of Cork.—Patrick Roach of Dundamon, co. Cork, esquire; Maurice Roach, esquire, Robert Healy, junior, gentleman, Thomas Murrogh, merchant, and James Sarsfeild, vintner, all of the said city.
In co. Wexford.—John Dalton of Cloghin, gentleman, a protestant.
In Queen's co.—Loghlin Fleming of Kilfeake, gentleman.
In co. Waterford.—Richard Mansfeild and James Fitz Gerrald, both of Ballincullagh, Thomas Ronane and Maurice Ronane, both of Dunllaleene, John Power of Clashmore and Thomas Briver of Monaghegy, gentlemen.
In co. Ardmagh.—Henry Hovendon of Ballynemetagh, Robert Stewart of Portualegan, Walter Hovendon of Palenagh, William Tipping of Tullyvallen and Bryan Mornaghan of Mornaghansbridge, gentlemen.
In co. Catherlogh.—William Cooke of Painestowne, esquire, Garret Quigley, gentleman and John Warren, esquire, both of Catherlogh, and Patrick Wall of Graganspidoge, esquire.
In co. Kerry.—John Stack of Ballyconerig, gentleman.
In co. Longford.—John Farrell of Tully, gentleman. [S.P. Ireland 359, No. 189 i.]
(ii) A list of such persons as stand indicted of foreign treason (&c. as above).
In co. Dublin.—Sir Lawrence Esmond of Ballytraman, co. Wexford, baronet, John Warren of Corduffe, co. Dublin, gentleman and Margaret, Viscountess Dowager of Gormanstowne.
In the town of Drogheda.—John Cheevers of Brittas, co. Meath, gentleman, and Christopher Dowdall of Drogheda, merchant.
In co. Louth.—Charles Throckmorton of Crucestowne, esquire.
In co. Kildare.—Margaret Eustace of Dublin, widow, and Maurice Fitz Gerrald of Brownestowne, gentleman.
In co. Meath.—John, Viscount Netterville of Dowth, John Barnewall, esquire, commonly called Lord Trimleston, William Luttrell of Moyary, Francis Cusack, junior, of Kilbally Porter, Christopher Pipard Fitz George of Ethelstowne and Robert Balfe of Corstowne, gentlemen.
In the town of Galway.—Simon Kirwan, gentleman, and Mary his wife.
In co. Dublin.—Richard Barnewall of Turvy, esquire, Robert Leigh of the city of Dublin, esquire, John Trant, late of Caldwells, co. Dublin, esquire, commonly called Sir John Trant, baronet, and Mary, Viscountess Kingsland.
In the city of Dublin.—Sir Justin Aylmer of Donadea, baronet, Luke Aylmer, late of the same, esquire, and Lady Ellen Aylmer of Allen, widow.
In co. Westmeath.—Richard Nugent, Earl of Westmeath.
In co. Sligo.—John Crean, late of Sligo, gentleman.
In King's co.—John Coghlan of Kiliolgan, gentleman. [S.P. Ireland 359, No. 189. ii.]
Dec. 5/15.
Brussels.
Maximilian Emanuel, Elector of Bavaria, to the King. He had intended sending Baron de Simeoni to the King with secret matters, but has been hindered by the baron's illness. He now reports the measures he has taken for garrisoning the places given up by France. Holograph. French. [S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 17, No. 17.]
Dec. 5.
Kensington.
Commissions for Mr. Henry Devenish to be ensign to Major Thomas Cary in Colonel William Northcote's regiment of foot [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 167, p. 300]; for John Salter, gentleman, to be lieutenant to Captain—Blynman in the same regiment; and for —Farnham, gentleman, to be second lieutenant to Captain — Courtney's company of grenadiers in the same regiment. [Ibid., p. 310.]
Dec. 6.
Kensington.
Address of the House of Lords in reply to the speech from the throne. Printed. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 117.]
Dec. 6.
Kensington.
Commissions for Mr. James Denise to be lieutenant of Captain James Edward's company in Colonel Farrington's regiment of foot; for Mr. Nicholas Bissett to be ensign of Captain Charles Cracherode's company in the same regiment; and for Mr. Walter Dogherty to be second lieutenant of Captain Philip Odbart's company in Sir Cloudesley Shovell's regiment of marines. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 167, p. 300.]
Dec. 6.
Kensington.
Warrant for the payment to Matthew Prior, esquire, appointed secretary to the extraordinary embassy now being sent to the Most Christian King, of 300l. for his equipage, and 40s. for his daily allowance. [Ibid. 348, p. 2.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
R. Yard's news-letter to Sir J. Williamson. The business of this day occasioned a pretty warm debate in the House of Commons. The struggle was whether they should go into a committee of the whole House to-morrow morning to consider of the King's speech in general, or of the motion for a supply. The first was moved by Mr. Harley, seconded by Colonel Grenville, and supported by Sir Edward Seymour, Mr. Boyle and others. The motion with regard to supply was made by Lord Coningsby and seconded by Mr. Pelham. During the debate Sir Edward Seymour took occasion to say that there were divers abuses, which ought to be enquired into, and particularly about the Exchequer notes, and the proceedings of those who had pawned the Parliament. Mr. Montague answered him that he would join with that gentleman in examining all abuses, that the business of the Exchequer ought indeed to be inquired into, and he himself would bring it before the House. He did not know what Sir Edward meant by pawning the Parliament; he thought what they had done in borrowing money of the city and others, to pay off the great ships, &c., ought rather to be commended, for it had saved a great deal, and been of great service to the public. Mr. Pelham likewise took notice of the expression of pawning the Parliament, and said it was a hard and unreasonable reflection. As for examining abuses, he would concur with Sir Edward, and go as far backward as he pleased. But at last it was carried by 156 against 153 to consider of the supply to-morrow.
It is daily expected that orders will be given to break four regiments of foot; meanwhile they have disbanded nineteen men in each company, and ten in each troop of horse.
Mr. Secretary Vernon is now removed to his own office, and as yet I remain alone in the Duke of Shrewsbury's. The Duke will return to town as soon as his health permits. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 118.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
News-letter to the same. Mr. Vernon is now removed to his own office. Mr. Ellis and Mr. Hopkins are his secretaries. The Northern Province is under his care, as it was under Mr. Secretary Trumbull's before.
Mr. Prior's privy seal for his equipage and allowance as secretary to the embassy to France is now passing. Lord Portland intends to go hence about the beginning of next month. His equipage will be very noble and magnificent. Lord Jersey proposes to set out about the same time for Ireland.
Letters from Ireland of the 27th ult. inform us that the House of Lords in a committee of the whole House had disagreed to two clauses in the bill for security of his Majesty's person and government, one for obliging all persons to take the oaths to his Majesty, (such as do not incurring a prœmunire), the other allowing Quakers to make a solemn affirmation instead of an oath, which was carried by 18 to 14. After this the bill was rejected, because, by Poynings' act, the Parliament of Ireland can make no amendment or alteration in any bill that is brought before them to be passed into a law. As to our Parliament here, the House of Lords met yesterday, and read and agreed to their address to his Majesty, and appointed the lords of the white staves to know his pleasure when the House should attend him with it. It is appointed to be at twelve o'clock to-morrow at Kensington. In the House of Commons the address was agreed to to-day, and such members as are privy councillors were ordered to know the King's pleasure, when the House shall attend him with the same. After this a bill was brought in to prevent all persons, being his Majesty's subjects, that were in France during the war, from returning to England, and also to prohibit the holding of correspondence with the late King James; and another for regulating the press. Then the King's speech was read, and a motion made to go into a committee of the whole House to-morrow morning, to take the said speech into consideration. Another motion was immediately made for granting a supply to his Majesty, but, the former question being insisted on, the previous question was demanded and put, whether that question should be now put, and carried in the negative, the Ayes 153, the Noes 156. Then the other question was proposed, for granting a supply and it was resolved to go into a committee of the whole House to-morrow morning to consider the same; and on Thursday, to consider the King's speech. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 119.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
A news-letter containing news, as in other letters of this date. [Ibid., No. 120.]
Dec. 7. "Votes" of the House of Commons. Printed. [Ibid., No. 122.]
[Dec. 7.]
Whitehall.
Address of the House of Commons to the King. Printed. [Ibid., No. 123.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
J. Vernon to " Lord Ambassador " Williamson. Your letters of the 3rd, 6th and 13th inst. [N.S.] to Sir William Trumbull have been put into my hands to-day, but I shall have no opportunity of laying them before the King till to-morrow. In the meantime I am commanded to inform you that the King has had under consideration the setting up of the packet boats between Dover and Calais. Before giving any orders, he wishes to be satisfied whether the French are ready to convey English letters to their destinations, and that there will be no difficulty in exempting the packet boats from the duty of tonnage, in which they were always privileged.
The Commissioners for the Management of the Post Office have represented that we are under a disadvantageous treaty in relation to the carrying of letters, which was agreed on in 1670 between Lord Arlington and Mons. de Louvois; there is a demand upon us on that account, which was questioned by former postmasters, and the clearing thereof delayed in hopes of having better terms from them. The King thinks this will come under consideration some other time, and that the making use of the convenience of sending letters now should not be looked upon as a renewing of the former contract or an acquiescence in it.
You are already informed that, by a law lately passed in Ireland, it is made treason for any Irishman, who has served as a soldier in the French King's dominions during the war, to return to Ireland. The Lords Justices report that some arrive there with foreign Ministers' passes. The King would have the giving of all such passes forborne by you and the rest of the foreign Ministers. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 121.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Dover. With regard to Rencourt (sic), a suspected person lately landed from France, I desire you will examine him as to how long he was a prisoner there, upon what account, and what brings him into England, sending me the examinations, and keeping him in custody till you hear further from me. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 99, p. 405.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords Justices of Ireland. Before calling away the four frigates, that have attended on Ireland during the war, the King desires to know whether the continuance of those ships upon that service would be of any further use at present. [Ibid., p. 406.]
Dec. 7.
Kensington.
Order to Peregrine, Marquis of Carmarthen, colonel of the first marine regiment, to quarter his soldiers, when on shore, according to the distribution provided for the two marine regiments in the seventh article of the first establishment, viz. at Chatham five companies; Sheerness, one; Portsmouth, four; Deptford, two; Woolwich, two; and Plymouth, one. [Ibid. 347, p. 113.]
Dec. 7.
Kensington.
A like order to Sir Cloudesley Shovell, colonel of the second marine regiment. [Ibid.]
Dec. 7.
Kensington.
Warrant for a grant of the dignity of a baronet of England to Richard Farrington of Chichester, Sussex, esquire. [Ibid., p. 114.]
Dec. 8. Address of the House of Lords to the King, with his Majesty's answer thereto. In duplicate. Printed. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, Nos. 124 and 125.]
Dec. 8. "Votes" of the House of Commons. Printed. [Ibid., No. 126.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to Mr. Stocke. I have sent a messenger to receive into custody Samuel Savery, who, you report, landed lately from Boulogne at Rye, where he ought to have been stopped, if the mayor had done his duty. You have done well to stop him at Dover, on his way to Calais, with two children that are none of his own. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 99, p. 406.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Approbation of John Herbert and Joseph Offley, esquires, as deputy lieutenants of the county of Middlesex, with authority to the Duke of Bedford to issue out deputations accordingly. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 167, p. 301; and 347, p. 112 b.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the apprehension of Samuel Savery, on suspicion of high treason; to be examined before Mr. James Vernon. [Ibid. 349, p. 40.]
Dec. 8.
[Whitehall.]
Pass for Joseph Walden, huntsman, with a pack of hounds, and Nicholas Woolf, groom, with two horses, to embark at Dover for Calais. [Ibid. 387, p. 143.]
Dec. 9. "Votes" of the House of Commons. Printed. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 127.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Mayor of Dover. You may discharge Mr. Joshua Barnes, on the testimony of John Robson and William Crawley and some merchants of credit, that he was bound in a small vessel of his own, with goods on board, from Dover to Portsmouth, and by stress of weather was forced into Calais. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 99, p. 407.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Treasury, directing the payment of the arrears due to Colonel Maurice Hussey upon the establishment of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 408.]
Dec. 9.
Kensington.
Warrant for a further reprieve for Cecilia Labree. [Ibid. 347, p. 115.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the apprehension, &c. of Peter Longe, on suspicion of high treason. [Ibid. 349, p. 40.]
Dec. 9.
[Whitehall and the Hague.]
Passes for William Robertson, late of the Colonel's company in Colonel Marquit's regiment in the service of the States; for Michael Boulgier, late of Captain Carel Utenhove's company in Colonel Amclisweert's regiment, having his discharge from Lieutenant-Colonel d'Abadie at Bois-le-Duc on the 4th inst.; for John Coffin, late of Captain Tologne's company in Colonel de la Valette's regiment, having his discharge at Rotterdam, 28th Nov. [Ibid. 386, p. 5]; for James Jourlin of Utenhove's company (as above) [all to come to England] [Ibid., p. 6]; and for Dr. Lyster, Abel Dallone, — Darnell and James Vernon, esquires, with their servants and baggage, to embark at Dover for Calais. [Ibid. 387, p. 143.]
Dec. 10.
London.
James Sloane to Sir J. Williamson. Since I received your last commands about the debates of the House, nothing at all has happened, nor yet in this sessions, worth troubling you with, save what you have in the public accounts, till to-day, when at twelve o'clock the King's speech was taken into consideration before a committee of the whole House, Mr. Conyers in the chair. Mr. Harley first opened the debate on that part relating to the army, and showed the danger and mischief of a standing army in time of peace; he proposed that the land forces raised since 29 September, 1680, should be paid and disbanded, but put no time. He was seconded by Jack How, inveighing much against our army, exalting liberty and law, and depending on our fleet as our only security. Lord Ranelagh then came to show that at that time in 1680 there were not above 6,000 troops. He was followed by Mr. Montague, Lord Coningsby and others, who showed that nobody designed a standing army in time of peace; they said we were but just got into the peace, and know not yet how the King of France, who has broken former treaties, may behave in this; "he now disbanded few and retained many others; let the fort be never so strong and our intelligence never so good, there might by accident of winds &c. be an invasion; that we had also enemies amongst us at home; and therefore to prevent any sudden suspicion either from abroad or at home, it were fit some small number, such as might be thought necessary, should be retained till Parliament meet [sic], and in the mean time the militia might be made more useful. It would then appear how things are, and how far it is necessary further to continue them; this being by the consent of Parliament, and only temporary for the present necessity, it could not be considered illegal, nor any breach of the Bill of Rights."
As to the necessity, it was said on the other side that that would always continue an argument, during the life of the King of France, of King James and the Prince of Wales.
On these topics went the debate. They were followed by Sir Edward Seymour and "all those, " except Sir Christopher Musgrave, who said not one word all day. When the question was put about four o'clock, it was carried by such a cry, at least three to one, and this not by their own strength, though they were all unanimous, but by Mr. Norris, Sir William St. Quintin, Sir William Strickland, Sir Herbert Crofts and others firm to the government, who were very zealous for the question, and eminently Mr. Norris, who had a prepared speech of at least an hour, with many turns of wit in it; among the rest he proposed to follow the French King's precedent of sending a commissioner of inquiry into all the mismanagements during the war, and particularly into such as had enriched themselves and got estates upon the spoil of the public, and to have a present made of them to the officers, who are to be disbanded. Very inveterate he was, though it is not yet known for what reasons.
The vote is to be reported to-morrow at twelve, but I see no prospect of opposing it.
Pray favour me with a line of your thoughts of this. We want you much in the House, for I fear this will be a warm session. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 128.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
R. Yard's news-letter to Sir J. Williamson. This has been a great day in the House of Commons. The business appointed was to consider of the King's speech in a grand committee. Mr. Conyers was put into the chair. Mr. Harley immediately made a speech against a standing army, and concluded with a motion that all the forces that have been raised since 1680, should be disbanded. This was seconded, and remained the subject of the whole debate, all the country gentlemen giving in to it. It was endeavoured to divert this by another motion, viz. that it should be the question whether a land force were not necessary for the public safety; but they that proposed it could not be heard. There appeared so great a majority for what Mr. Harley had moved, that it was given up, and the vote passed as in the printed paper.
It is reckoned that in 1680 there were not above 6,500 men in the King's pay; but they would not allow any number to be mentioned, lest it should look as if even these were authorized by Parliament, whereas they would have it thought only a connivance. The chief of those that spoke for the disbanding were Mr. Harley, Sir Edward Seymour, Mr. How, Grenville, Norrys, Sir William Strickland, Sir Herbert Crofts and Sir Francis Winnington; on the other side were Mr. Montague, Sir Thomas Littleton, the Attorney and Solicitor General, Lord Ranelagh, Lord Coningsby, Sir Robert Rich and Colonel Wharton. These insisted upon the necessity there was to provide for the security of the kingdom, as affairs stood at present at home and abroad, and they were answered that this might be done by keeping a good fleet, and making the militia more useful.
It is to be reported to-morrow. Perhaps hereafter something may be proposed to make a better provision for our security. It is certain the country gentlemen cannot bear the thought of a standing army, but withal they will do anything else for the defence and preservation of the government. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 129.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
News-letter reporting the delivery of the address of the House of Lords to the King at Kensington on Wednesday, and his answer to the address of the Commons " yesterday. " [Ibid., No. 130.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Thomas Hopkins to "Lord Ambassador" Williamson. Mr. Vernon has been pleased to take me into his office in the room of Mr. Tucker, who was under Sir William Trumbull. I am not so fortunate as to be known to your Excellency, but no one shall be more proud of receiving your commands than myself. I shall take care that the occurrences of this place shall be duly continued to you, and, whatever extraordinary arises, you shall be sure to receive it from me. [Ibid., No. 131.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to the same. To-day in a Committee of the House of Commons in the debate on the King's Speech, they fell first upon the matter of the army, and between 4 and 5 p.m. came to a vote that all the forces in England raised since 24th September, 1680, should be paid and disbanded. It is hoped some "temperament" may be found in the House, so that some part of the forces may be saved, and the nation not left naked, till the militia is made useful enough to defend us from an invasion. The debate lasted above four hours, and the majority for disbanding was so great that it came to no division. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 132.]
[Dec. 10.] Mons. W. de Schmettau to [the same], sending a French translation of the imperial act of ratification of the peace. Its opponents have made a reservation with regard to the clause added to article 10, which I will also have translated to send to you. French. [Ibid., No. 133.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
News-letter to the same. In the Commons yesterday a motion was made that a parliamentary credit should be given for borrowing 600,000l., to pay the fleet, the army, and what is due for the soldiers' quarters in England. This is not only necessary for subsisting the forces, but will likewise save a great deal of money in discharging the great ships and the soldiers ordered to be disbanded. After some little debate it was resolved that 600,000l. may be borrowed upon the credit of Parliament for the service of the fleet and other pressing occasions, with a promise to repay the same out of the next aids to be granted to his Majesty. Then they adjourned, and went at three o'clock to Whitehall, to present their address.
In the morning the King came to St. James's to visit the Princess of Denmark, who has been indisposed, and miscarried some days ago; and he dined at the Lord Chamberlain's.
Mr. Mackay is appointed director of the packet boats between Dover and Calais, and between that place and Nieuport.
Count de Bonde, ambassador extraordinary of Sweden, is expected here next month. A house is already taken for him. [Ibid., No. 134.]
Dec. 10. "Votes" of the House of Commons. Printed. [Ibid., No. 135.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Lords of the Treasury, transmitting for inquiry and report an application from the ambassador of the States General of the United Provinces with respect to the ship St. Christo, which was taken by the French at Carthagena, and retaken by the Hollandia, belonging to the States General, Captain Hoggenhock, commander. She was cast away near Rye, the goods on board her saved, and put into a warehouse there. The Custom-House officers demand duty on such goods as may be disposed of there. The ambassador asks that the perishable goods may be disposed of here, without paying duty, and the cannon and other imperishable goods transported to Holland by the first opportunity. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 99, p. 408.]
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Harvey of St. Andrew's in Old Buckenham, co. Norfolk, esquire. The petitioner has a house at St. Andrew's, to which there is now no courtyard. He is desirous of making one, but cannot do it except by taking in a pathway in his lands, leading from Carleton and a common called Cundall's Green to Old Buckenham Green, and abutting (sic) east on a road leading from Cundall's Green to St. Andrews, and on a way leading from Old Buckenham Green to St. Andrews, towards the west; and except also by turning a road near adjoining to St. Andrew's, lying between St. Andrew's on the north, and a field called the House Close on the south, and abutting upon a way leading from St. Andrew's to Old Buckenham Green on the west, and upon a lane leading from St. Andrew's to Cundall's Green and New Buckenham on the east.
In lieu of this path and road, the petitioner is willing to assign another path and road, more commodious, to all sorts of travellers, viz., in lieu of the path, a pathway through a close of the petitioner's near the old park, called Wrong Close, abutting on Cundall's Green towards the east, and on a way leading from Old Buckenham Green to St. Andrew's on the west. And in lieu of the road, a road to lead out of St. Andrew's Lane, and abut upon the old road, which leads from Cundall's Green. He prays for a licence accordingly. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 238, p. 166.]
Dec. 11. "Votes" of the House of Commons. Printed. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 136.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Mayor of Newcastle. The Secretary of State for Scotland has been acquainted with the whole affair of Fordyce, whose further examination you sent to the Duke of Shrewsbury. Until some reply is received to the Secretary's letter to Scotland, nothing can be done in the matter. Meanwhile both Fordyce and Irwin are to be continued in custody. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 99, p. 409.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Dover. The examination you have taken of Francis Prendcourt (sic) is not satisfactory; I have therefore issued a warrant for a messenger to take him into custody. [Ibid.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Dacres Barrett, esquire. The petition sets forth that there lately depended before the judge of the Prerogative Court a cause concerning the validity of the will of Richard Barrett, deceased, between the petitioner as son and heir, and executor of the true will, and Richard Owen, servant and pretended executor of a pretended will, of the petitioner's father, whereby he claims the personal estate of the deceased to the value of 10,000l., which was unduly obtained by him. The petitioner appealed to the King in Chancery from the judgment given against him, and a commission issued to ten Delegates. In the proceeding of this appeal the petitioner offered an allegation containing the most substantial part of his defence, which was heard before only two of the Delegates, who rejected the same. He prays for a commission of review. Referred to the Lord Chancellor, to give such directions as he shall think fit. [Ibid. 238, p. 165.]
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant to take into custody Francis Prencourt (sic), detained at Dover for suspicion of treason. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 349, p. 41.]
Dec. 12/22.
Brussels.
Maximilian Emanuel, Elector of Bavaria, to William III, regretting the King's indisposition, and reporting the arrangements for garrisoning the places given up by France. Holograph. French. [S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 17, No. 18.]
Dec. 12.
The Hague.
Passes for Ralph Hunter, late of Captain Dorrol's company in the regiment of Frise, having a certificate under the hand of Brigadier de Loche; for John Hickock, late a soldier of Captain Desmaret's company in the same regiment; for Thomas Boniel, late of Captain de Loche's company in Brigadier de Loche's regiment; and for John Rayle, late of Captain Montbrison's company in Colonel Witsoe's regiment; [all to return to England]. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 386, p. 6.]
Dec. 13. "Votes" of the House of Commons. Printed. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 137.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to Mr. Stocke. I find, by yours of yesterday, that Savery absconds in order, you think, to get over the search by stealth, which I doubt not you will take all care to prevent. It seems not worth while to detain his wife in custody, though you did well to refuse her your pass. Thank you for your care of my son. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 99, p. 410.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Admiralty. The King has received a petition on behalf of John Allein, lately condemned for piracy, and has directed Sir Charles Hedges to report upon the case. His execution is to be deferred meanwhile. [Ibid. 204, p. 149.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Allein, condemned for piracy. The petitioner was a woollen-draper, and unfortunate in trade; he, however, paid all his creditors. He intended to go to the West Indies, partly as a seaman, partly as a passenger. By reason of some piratical practices of most of the ship's crew of the Hannibal, on which he embarked, the petitioner was involved with others, accused, and found guilty of piracy. He prays the King's mercy. Referred to Sir Charles Hedges, judge of the Admiralty. [Ibid. 238, p. 166.]
Dec. 13.
Kensington.
Warrant for the appointment of commissioners of appeal in admiralty cases, viz. Prince George of Denmark, the Archbishop of Canterbury, John, Lord Somers, Baron Evesham, Chancellor of England, Thomas, Duke of Leeds, President of the Council, Henry, Duke of Norfolk, Earl Marshal of England, William, Duke of Devonshire, Steward of the Household, James, Duke of Ormonde, Charles, Duke of Bolton, Mainard, Duke of Schomberg, Charles, Duke of Shrewsbury, one of the principal Secretaries of State, William, Duke of Bedford, Charles, Marquis of Winchester, Robert, Earl of Lindsey, Great Chamberlain of England, Robert, Earl of Sunderland, Chamberlain of the Household, Aubrey, Earl of Oxford, Thomas, Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, Charles, Earl of Dorset and Middlesex, John, Earl of Bridgwater, Thomas, Earl of Stamford, John, Earl of Bath, Lawrence, Earl of Rochester, William, Earl of Portland, Groom of the Stole, Thomas, Earl of Fauconberg, Ralph, Earl of Montague, Richard, Earl of Scarborough, Francis, Earl of Bradford, Henry, Earl of Romney, Ford, Earl of Tankerville, Edward, Earl of Orford, Edward, Earl of Jersey, Richard, Earl of Ranelagh, Charles, Viscount Dursley, John, Viscount Lonsdale, the Bishop of London, Thomas, Lord Wharton, Controller of the Household, Robert, Lord Lexington, Charles, Lord Cornwallis, Sidney, Lord Godolphin, Thomas, Lord Coningsby, Peregrine Bertie, esquire, ViceChamberlain of the Household, Sir Robert Howard, knight, James Vernon, esquire, one of the principal Secretaries of State, Charles Montague, esquire, Chancellor and Under-Treasurer of the Exchequer, Sir John Holt, knight, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench, Sir John Trevor, knight, Master of the Rolls, Sir Henry Goodrick, knight and baronet, Sir Joseph Williamson and Sir William Trumbull, knights, Hugh Boscawen and John Smith, esquires, or any three of them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 347, p. 117.]
Dec. 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the apprehension, &c. of John Pearce, on suspicion of high treason. [Ibid. 349, p. 41.]
Dec. 13.
The Hague.
Passes for Thomas Glinn, late a soldier in the Sacconay (sic) regiment in the service of the King; for John Williams, late of the Sacconith (sic) regiment in the service of the States [Ibid. 386, p. 6]; and for Richard Bodily, late of the last said regiment; [all to come to England]. [Ibid., p. 7.]
Dec. 14. "Votes" of the House of Commons. Printed. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 138.]
Dec. 14.
London.
James Sloane to "Lord" [Ambassador Williamson]. On Friday night last I sent you the vote of that day at the committee, which was reported on Saturday; and thereupon arose a great debate about agreeing with the committee. On this everybody was against a standing army in time of peace, and likewise everybody was for continuing some for a time for guards and garrisons; but the vote was for those to remain who were in existence on the 29th of September, 1680, which in several respects is uncertain. To make all things plain, it was therefore proposed to substitute a certain number; some proposed 16,000, some 14,000, some 12,000 and some 10,000. At the end of the day it was much insisted on to have the vote re-committed, to ascertain all those matters, and at last, at five o'clock, the House divided, and it was carried against the re-commitment by 185 against 148. I was one of the tellers. The question was then carried to agree with the committee, and the other matters are to be further settled at the next debate, which I believe will end in 10,000 or 12,000 Englishmen, to be settled by a bill and not by connivance, as many would have it, which, I take it, would neither be well for the King nor sufficient for the officers, nor would it be becoming a House of Commons to connive such a breach of the law.
Friday and Saturday were days of much heat, and Lord Cutts and Major Holmes were going out to quarrel, till they had the injunctions of the House laid on them. The quarrel was that Holmes, to second a story of Jack How's about officers' meddling in elections, said that Lord Cutts in the Isle of Wight had displaced several officers of the militia for voting for him, which Lord Cutts said was not true, and he replied he would justify it, but were kept the peace [sic].
This was a great disappointment at court, and it is reckoned they may thank themselves for it; for some of them, as they say, projected the keeping up of 35,000 and all the foreigners; such as were disbanded to be English. The sending the French into Ireland and bringing Lord Portland's regiment here, and other things, which they say were projected, put people in such a flame that on Sunday no less than a prorogation or a dissolution was talked of. But I know that the King never had a thought of it, and God forbid, for, in this little time, many of those who were so hot have grown much easier, and I doubt not but that all will end well in this matter.
Yesterday was spent in bringing in the estimates of the deficiencies to lay before the committee, which I think are about 5,000,000l.; as they were not all complete, it was put off till this day. The House went into committee, the estimates were read, and there were long speeches from Lownes [?], Neale, Ranelagh and Montague, and others, but nothing effectively done.
This is our present condition of affairs, and I shall from time to time acquaint you when anything material happens, for I know it must be grateful to you to have accounts on which you may depend.
Please let my Lady know that we had our judgments last term against that old Roger Burrowes, but, when we were to arrest him for the remainder of the arrears, he took sanctuary in the Temple, and there he is.
You will see how and what our address is by the last Gazette. I sent it to the mayor, and he sent it me back, signed by the whole town except Freeman the sadler [?]. The mayor desired me to acquaint Sir John Wodehouse with it, which I did. He could not sign it because of the clause of "rightful and lawful," which he refused before. Yet I found him fond of going; we go with the Duke of Norfolk. I told him, if he went with his Grace, he should go without the address; and so he went with Lord Wharton, as you see.
I wish your Excellency, when you have leisure time, would write two words to Candler the Mayor, to show you remember them. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 139.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to "Lord Ambassador" Williamson. Thank you for your offer of directing "the ordinary prints of that country" to be sent to this office, which will be very obliging to us.
Though the Commons have passed a vote for disbanding the army, we are still in hopes that they will so far consider the present posture of affairs abroad as to leave the King 18,000 men on foot, the eagerness of some warm men being observed to abate by the converse of more moderate ones, for all discourses run at present on that subject and scarce anything else. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 140.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
R. Yard's news-letter to the same. When the report was made on Saturday of the resolution of the committee for disbanding the forces, it was opposed with more warmth than the day before; but the country gentlemen were still possessed by their notions against a standing army, and a question, whether it should be recommitted, was lost by 37, of which number were Sir William Trumbull, the Duke of Devonshire's two sons, Mr. Pelham of the Treasury, Sir Richard Onslow and other gentlemen, who used not to be of that side. But it is hoped that after all they will be brought to consent to 14,000 or 15,000 men.
Yesterday and to-day an estimate was given in of the arrears due to the army and fleet; the first comes to 2,000,000l., the other to 1,500,000l., and the last year's deficiencies to 1,500,000l. more; so there is a debt of 5,000,000l., besides the ordnance and other services.
The country gentlemen talk very much of making the militia useful. I wish they may find it practicable. I think, till it be done, they should not leave us defenceless; but they that best know the Parliament say all will do well, and that last Friday's vote was the effect of the gentlemen's first heat and aversion to a standing army. [Ibid., No. 141.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
News-letter. In connection with the vote for disbanding the forces raised since September, 1680, it is reckoned that there were then about 7,000 soldiers on foot. To these they are willing the marine regiments should be added, which are about 3,000 more. This, with a good fleet, and the militia made useful, they think may be sufficient for the security of the kingdom.
The regiments of horse lately commanded by Colonels Windsor and Harvey, and the dragoons of Denbigh and Leigh, are actually disbanded.
We hear Lord Inchiquin is bringing over the addresses of the Irish parliament on the conclusion of the peace. The Lord Chancellor of Ireland is shortly expected here.
The pirates belonging to the ship Hannibal, lately convicted, will be executed to-morrow.
Mons. d'Allonne and some other gentlemen of Lord Portland's retinue went hence on Friday for France.
This day an estimate of what is due to the navy was presented to the House of Commons, amounting to about 2,500,000l., towards discharging which the Admiralty have in their hands 1,000,000l. in tallies. An estimate of what is due to the ordnance amounts to 204,000l., of which they have in their hands 178,000l. in tallies. These papers, and also those given in yesterday, were referred to the committee of the whole House, and it was ordered that it should be an instruction to the said committee to consider the gratuities for the officers and soldiers of the regiments to be disbanded.
A particular committee was afterwards appointed to examine and state the deficiencies, in order to lay the same again before the committee of the whole House. A bill was read to enable soldiers, that are disbanded, to return to their trades. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 142.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
News-letter. This day a petition was read from the traders in the woollen manufacture of Exeter; a bill was ordered for their relief, and to prevent the carrying of wool from Ireland to France, and a committee was appointed to consider of the trade of England and Ireland, and how the same may be made most beneficial for England.
The Lords of the Treasury were ordered to lay before the House an account of the receipts and issues for the year ending at Michaelmas, 1697. It was likewise ordered that an account be brought in how the revenues of the crown stand charged. [Ibid., No. 143.]
Dec. 14.
Kensington.
Warrant for John Fulford, gent., to be quartermaster to the regiment of foot commanded by Colonel Thomas Brudenell. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 168, p. 228.]
Dec. 14.
Kensington.
Warrant for the allowance to Jane, Lady Berkeley, widow of John, late Lord Berkeley, vice-admiral of the blue squadron, of what remains of 5,000l. imprest money issued to her late husband between 1694 and 1696. There are not accounts of the expenditure of the whole, owing it is alleged, to the sudden death of the said Lord Berkeley, who usually made up his accounts with his own hand. [Ibid. 347, p. 116.]
Dec. 14.
[Whitehall.]
Pass for Baron de Schonborn, and Baron de Schonborn his brother, Baron de Gortz, Mons. Louis de Schvartenfels, Mons. Frederick de Tabelents and Mons. Godfrie de Stockhausen, with their four servants, to embark at Dover for France. [Ibid. 387, p. 143.]
Dec. 15. "Votes" of the House of Commons. Printed. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 144.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Lords of the Council of Trade, transmitting the draft of a treaty of commerce with Sweden, sent by Dr. Robinson, his Majesty's Resident there, with the explanations of points in which it differs from that sent home by Mr. Warwicke in 1681. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 99, p. 410.]
Dec. 15.
Kensington.
Warrant for a patent for the presentation of John Whitehand, M.A., to the rectory of Shepton Malet, Somerset, void by the cession of Andrew Cranston, the last incumbent. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 151, p. 21; and 347, p. 120.]
Dec. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the payment of the expenses of Edward, Earl of Jersey, ambassador extraordinary for the peace, and ambassador to the States, and plenipotentiary at the congress at the Hague, 11 July to 15 November, 1697. [Ibid. 347, p. 149.]
Dec. 15.
[Whitehall.]
Post warrant and pass for Mons. Schonborn with 3 horses and a guide to go to Dover; and for Mr. Adryaen van Brakel, one of the King's servants, with one servant, to embark at Dover for Calais or Ostend. [Ibid. 387, p. 144.]
Dec. 15.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland to satisfy Colonel Maurice Hussey for arrears due on a grant of a pension of 200l. for eight years, made under the great seal of Ireland 22 May, 1672, to Captain John Wilson in trust for the said Hussey. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office Letter Book 14, p. 43.]
Dec. 16. "Votes" of the House of Commons. Printed. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 145.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Mayor of Dover. If you send me a moderate and reasonable account of the charges of persons, who have been in the custody of the keeper of the prison at Dover, for coming out of France without passes, such as shall be fit to be laid before the King, I will acquaint his Majesty with it, and take his pleasure thereupon. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 99, p. 411.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Treasury. I send, by the King's command, accounts sent in by the consuls in the southern parts of disbursements made on account of British seamen set on shore in foreign countries, concerning whom his Majesty some time since appointed certain rules to be made. You are to consider what method can be taken for payment of them. [Ibid.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Council for Trade, sending an extract of a letter from Sir Joseph Williamson, Ambassador Extraordinary at the Hague, touching the practice of carrying wool from Scotland to Rotterdam, and an account of 1,000 great bags so carried in October last. (Enclosures not entered here.) [Ibid., p. 412.]
Dec. 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the apprehension, etc. of Peter Fitzgerald, on suspicion of high treason. Appended are notes of like warrants for John Brady and Anthony Everden. [Ibid. 349, p. 42.]
Dec. 16.
The Hague and [Whitehall].
Passes for Anne Philips, wife of Gilbert Philips, a soldier in Colonel Reynolds' company in the Scots Guards; for Elizabeth Anderson, wife of Monger Anderson, and Marguerite Camerun, wife of Donnell Camerun, both soldiers in the same company [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 386, p. 7]; and for Jeremiah Peirce and Thomas Barnard to embark at Dover for France. [Ibid. 387, p. 144.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
J. Vernon to "Lord Ambassador" Williamson. Your letters of the 20th and 24th, N.S., as well as the letters from the King of France and the Dauphin have been laid before the King.
The memorials about St. Christopher's, and the selling of some negroes and buccaneers at Virginia, will be considered at the Cabinet Council on Sunday next. The King approves your answer to the Danish memorial in relation to the city of Hamburg, and does not see that any further explanation will be necessary, since the style in which he mentions them is the same as his predecessors have used, and it is apparent that he intended only that they should have the benefit of the peace he had concluded. with France, without determining any rights or pretentions that had no reference to this treaty.
"As to the Act of inclusion on the part of France, nominating such as his Majesty's consent was never asked for, he expects to hear from you what effect his representation has had by the way of the mediator."
The House of Commons has done little the last two days. To-day the Committee of the whole House decided, as to the naval force for next year, that they would maintain after the rate of 10,000 men for 13 months. It might have been carried to 12,000, if it had been insisted on, but, as it is, the charge is estimated at near 1,000,000l., including the ordinary of the navy, which has now grown to upwards of 400,000l. Sir Richard Onslow moved this day for a Bill to be brought in for making the militia useful. It was referred to seven or eight of them to prepare it. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 146.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to the same. Thank you for your congratulations on my continuance in this office on this sudden revolution. Mr. Secretary is my old acquaintance and friend, and I find him, as a wise man, in no way altered by his promotion unless it be for the better. I am not only much satisfied with his kind usage of me, but pleased to think I may have opportunity, by my station here, to receive your commands and to execute them.
It is presumed that, in the further debate of the militia question, it will appear that the charge of it will be much greater than that of a moderate standing force, such as the King desires. [Ibid., No. 147.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
T. Hopkins to the same. I believe the proposition of rendering the militia useful will be found altogether impracticable; so that, notwithstanding that at the opening of the session they were for disbanding so great a part of the army as would, in a manner leave the nation defenceless, yet I do not question that upon second thoughts they will judge it necessary to keep a good number of regular troops in pay. I find several members, who were the most violent for reducing the army to the establishment of the year '80, are now more cool upon the matter, and will in a great measure comply with the King's desires. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 148.]
Dec. 17. J. S. Champneys to the same. I gave you some hints, in my last letter about Lord Cornbury's affair, and I can now say that, without putting you to expense, I can do you and my Lady a piece of service in that matter. I am sure Sir Charles Bickerstaff is now absolutely at your devotion, and I have told him, "as a reward for so far" and an earnest of future kindness, that I do not doubt but that you will remit him some part of his annuity to answer his pressing necessities.
I suppose by this time you have heard of the vote against the standing army, which is in effect undoing what you took so much pains to do; and so the King was pleased to express himself on Saturday night, when he heard the vote; though it is said that a 'peak' of country gentlemen against Mr. Montague occasioned that hot resolve. They were so unkind in the house as to say some ill-natured things of the Lord Chamberlain; but what reason they have to be out of humour with such a king and such a minister few can know, who think right.
Lord Jersey's going for Ireland is at present at a full stop. I met him on Thursday at the Lord Chamberlain's, and he gives you his humble service. Our late Secretary was one who voted against the army. They seem now to think the French King designs the Prince of Conti a power [sic] to return to Poland next spring; but some, who pretend to know further, say his forces will not go so far. The know-all's say that we must have a new Parliament, but what grounds they have for this I know not.
Mr. Prior, who goes secretary to the French embassy, told me to-day they should be going in a month to Paris. The Irish Countess of Longford is dead, which brings 1,000l. a year to Lord Arran.
Mr. Conway, Lady Normanby's heir, is suddenly to be married to a daughter of Lord Brooke's. It is thought the Scotch Lord Arran will come into some business, for he has been in private with the King.
I once more desire your kindness for Sir Charles Bickerstaff; he is wanting money to the last degree to put himself in mourning for his sister, Floyd, who has been dead this fortnight. [Ibid., No. 149.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
R. Yard's news-letter to the same. I do not perceive that the change of a Secretary of State is like to produce any other alterations. The reason of Sir William [Trumbull]'s going out is yet unknown to me, further than that his friends say he was not well used. Whatever his dissatisfaction may be, it was not taken much notice of. Upon the question on Saturday last about disbanding the forces, Sir William stayed with those that were for it.
Very little material has passed this week, except presenting to the House the accounts of the debt that lies upon the crown, amounting in the whole to 6,000,000l.
This day they were upon the consideration of the fleet; some proposed to maintain 12,000 men, but they agreed to 10,000, which may man sixty ships of war of the third rates, and so downwards.
The committee has met several times to examine the papers concerning the deficiencies, arrears, etc., but are not yet ready for their report. Till that be made, the House will hardly proceed in the business of the supply, which is to come on again on Monday next. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 150.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
News-letter to Williamson. On Wednesday the House of Commons sat but a little while, that the committee, to whom the examination of the deficiencies and other papers were referred by the House, might meet in the afternoon. Yesterday the House was called over, which took up their whole time.
In the House of Lords there has hitherto passed very little; they have read some Bills, and particularly one for preventing clandestine marriages, upon which they were in a committee of the whole House yesterday.
This day a motion was made in the House of Commons for a bill to make the militia more useful, which was ordered accordingly, and Sir Richard Onslow is to prepare and bring in the same. Then they went into a committee of the whole House to consider what naval forces may be necessary for the next year. After some debate it was resolved that 10,000 seamen should be maintained and paid for the year 1698, which may be sufficient to man sixty men-of-war from third-rates downwards in the summer and provide a good guard in the winter. This passed unanimously.
The Bishop of Durham, on succeeding his brother Lord Crewe, lately deceased, in his honour, was this day introduced as a baron into the House of Lords, and took his place as such.
Vice-Admiral Mitchell, with several men-of-war and yachts, has been ordered for the coast of Holland to bring over the Czar of Muscovy. [Ibid., No. 151.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
News-letter, reporting news as in other letters of this date; also that a message came from the Lords to acquaint the House of Commons that they have passed a bill to prevent undue marriages of infants, and for the better securing the guardianship of them. [Ibid., No. 152.]
Dec. 17. "Votes" of the House of Commons. Printed. [Ibid., No. 153.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Mayor of Dover. I have directed Richard Hayward, the messenger, now at Dover, to bring up Thomas Fulton, whom you have stopped for coming out of France without a pass, for examination. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 99, p. 412.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Robert Jefferys. I have given a warrant to a messenger to take into custody one Erwin alias Johnson, whom you believe to be the person of that name mentioned in several proclamations. [Ibid., p. 413.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Edisbury at Harwich. I send you a description of two persons expected shortly from beyond sea, that I should be glad were stopped. One White, an Irishman, may perhaps come with them. [Ibid.]
Similar letters were written to the mayors of Dover and Rye.
Dec. 17.
Kensington.
Commission for Major John Fetherstonhaugh to be lieutenant governor of Carlisle. [Ibid. 167, p. 300.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Anthony Dagley, messenger in ordinary, to receive into custody John Irwine alias Johnston on suspicion of high treason. [Ibid. 349, p. 43.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard Hayward, messenger, to receive into custody Thomas Fulton, detained at Dover on suspicion of treason. [Ibid.]
Dec. 17.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the Earl of Bath, praying leave to bring a writ of error against a judgment given against him in the King's Bench for perjury, at the suit of one Greep. Referred to the Attorney General. [Ibid. 238, p. 168.]
Dec. 17.
The Hague.
Passes for Mr. David Foulis, son to James Foulis, merchant of London, who has lived with a merchant at Amsterdam; and for Mr. Charles Hill, son to Robert Hill, esquire, consul for the States General at Cork [to come to England]. [Ibid. 386, p. 7.]
Dec. 18. "Votes" of the House of Commons. Printed. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 154.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Mayor of Gravesend. I am informed by his Majesty's searchers at Gravesend that they seized one Henry de Namur, as a suspected person, attempting to go into Flanders, and delivered him to you. I have sent down a messenger to bring him before me for examination. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 99, p. 414.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
The same to his Majesty's searchers at Gravesend commending their care in arresting the said H. de Namur. [Ibid.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Haverfordwest. Sergeant Woogan has informed me you have detained Lord Bophin and two others with their servants, who put on shore near your town. I learn they have come over on the business they gave you an account of; therefore I desire you will discharge them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 99, p. 415.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
The same to the Postmaster-General. I have perused Mr. Fearnes' letter to you of the 14th inst. from Harwich, reporting that persons were refused passages on the packet-boats there for want of having passes, and that they thereupon embarked on the Bridgman sloop, or other vessels bound to Holland, to the prejudice of the King's packet-boat. You are therefore to direct your officers at Harwich to suffer all persons to leave by packetboat for Holland, although they have no passes, unless there be some just cause of suspicion against them. No person may come into the country without passes. [Ibid.]
Dec. 18.
Kensington.
Warrant for a patent confirming the Earl of Derby's nominaof the Rev. Thomas Wilson to be bishop of the Isle of Man and Sodor, the see being void by the death of Dr. Baptista Levin, late bishop. [Ibid. 151, p. 22; and 347, p. 121.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
J. Vernon to the Lords of the Admiralty, directing the discharge of two Swedish subjects, pressed from on board the merchant ship King William, Captain Merry, commander, and forced to serve on board his Majesty's ship Gloucester, now lying at Woolwich. [Ibid. 204, p. 150.]
Dec. 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to George Collins, messenger, to receive into custody Henry de Namur, detained at Gravesend on suspicion of treason. [Ibid. 349, p. 43.]
Dec. 19.
Eyford.
The Duke of Shrewsbury to Mr. Vernon. Last night I had your letter of the 17th inst. by a messenger some hours after I was in bed. I am truly sensible of his Majesty's favour in inquiring after my inclination to accept an employment of so great trust and honour as that of governor to the Duke of Gloucester.
Though I am conscious myself of many defects, which render me unfit for the conduct of so important an education, I shall forbear mentioning them, presuming that many more besides these are visible to his Majesty's discerning judgment. But what makes me think myself wholly incapable of executing this office, which his Majesty seems to design for me, is that my health will by no means permit me at this time to attend, and I think the presence of the governor will never be more necessary than at first, to put his education in a proper method, and to see to the well-modelling of his family. Unless I recover this winter much faster than I expect, I shall be obliged next year to try a warmer climate. Holograph. [S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 17, No. 19.]
Dec. 19/29.
Brussels.
Maximilian Emanuel, Elector of Bavaria, to William III, recording the King of Spain's gratitude for the offer of troops by the States General, and recent arrangements for the garrisoning of the places given up by France. Holograph. French. [S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 17, No. 20.]
Dec. 20. "Votes" of the House of Commons. Printed. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 155.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Lords of the Council of Trade. I transmit a copy of a memorial lately given by the French ambassadors at the Hague to his Majesty's ambassadors there, concerning the restitution of part of the island of St. Christopher, taken by us during the late war. You are to report how much of the island is to be restored to France by virtue of the late treaty of peace, and whether anything be to be demanded on his Majesty's part either in relation to St. Christopher or any other parts of America.
I also transmit a memorial of Ralph Grey, Governor of Barbados, concerning an allowance of shipping for his attendance and equipage thither, besides the tonnage for his goods. You are to report what tonnage may be fit to be allowed. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 99, p. 416.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Admiralty. The French ambassadors at the Hague have complained to the King's ambassadors there, that the squadron under the late Vice-Admiral Nevill, when obliged to put into Virginia, had sold there the greater part of the negroes, whether free or slaves, found on board the vessels of freebooters on their return from Carthagena; also that they had bound several Frenchmen servants there for five or six years. They require that both negroes and Frenchmen shall be set at liberty, and sent home by the first English ships from Virginia. The King requires a report of what negroes or Frenchmen were brought by that squadron to Virginia, and how they disposed of them there. [Ibid. 204, p. 150.]
Dec. 20.
Whitehall.
Certificate that Matthew Prior, esquire, returned into his Majesty's presence from his employment as secretary to the embassy for the treaty of a general peace 13th December, 1697. [Ibid. 347, p. 130.]
Dec. 21.
London.
J[ames] S[loane] to [Sir Joseph Williamson]. I wonder you complain of not hearing from me this session, for I sent you two letters as soon as any material debates came on in the House; since the last of those two letters all stands as it did about the number of forces to remain, or manner of it. But now there have been two other very great debates, one relating to the Bill for prohibiting persons from returning from France, who went thither without licence, or were in service there, and also commanding all persons, who have so come, to depart the kingdom forthwith, if they do not get licence to stay. On great debate the offence is made treason, and so it is to correspond in any way with King James or any of his adherents, to aid or assist him or them by letters, messages or otherwise. Great exceptions were taken to the words messages or otherwise, and the uncertainty of the crime and proofs. Some, whom you may safely guess, were for any latitude, but it was clearly carried against them. Then came a clause offered by Sir Rowland Gwyn, which makes it treason for anybody hereafter to receive or accept any pardon from King James, and the like for anybody who may at any time have received such pardons, and shall not deliver them up to the King in council before the 13th of February next; and they have no indemnity but the King's mercy, if they do. On the offer of this clause there was a general laugh, and, when some debate took place as to what the offence of receiving the pardons should be, I told them I was glad to see everybody so well pleased and merry on the debate, for by that I knew we had nobody there concerned in the question; but that for people abroad it was no hardship, for I took it that such owning King James's power was as much as owning the pope's jurisdiction, for, though we had heard of two Kings of Brentford, we never allowed two Kings of England.
Many people here are much offended with the late Paris gazettes, which, speaking of the late King and Queen, call them the King and Queen of Great Britain, as they used to do, though the clause passed to make the pardons treason. (This is a digression.)
After this Jack Howe offered a clause, which likewise pressed to make all grants of any estates forfeited by this act to be void; on this occasion mention was made of the unreasonable grants in Ireland, contrary to the King's proviso; and he discoursed of a general act of resumption, saying, if ever there was cause for such a bill, it was now, which seemed to relish very well with many people. The bill was ordered to be engrossed, and this day has passed.
Yesterday was chiefly spent in a long debate, which lasted till past four o'clock, in the committee about a supply for the civil list. The debate at first ran "on the regularity," because, as there were no particulars laid before the House, they could not come to any estimate. It was answered the particulars had been there in the convention and parliament, and passed at 600,000l., and so several times since. Mr. Montague intimated that there is now to be added 50,000l. to be put beyond sea, meaning to the late Queen, and 25,000l. to the Duke of Gloucester, and, upon the whole, proposed the question that, as a gratitude to his Majesty and for his support of the civil list, a sum not exceeding 700,000l. should be given to the King for life. By this he meant that the present established revenue is to be cleared and the rest made good to that sum; the expense of such forces as are agreed upon to stand are not to be included in it. At last it was carried for the question. This was reported this morning, and the debate on the report was very long, one side insisting on the danger of trusting so much money with any king, the ill consequences of arbitrary power, and the impossibility of raising such a sum, questioning also why it should be for life, while the other side put forward the great gratitude due to the King, and the necessity of establishing a revenue to him and his family for life, the little danger there was of his being an arbitrary governor, and the ill comparison made between him and the Stewart kings; they asserted it ill became some of them who did it. After a debate as to whether it should be re-committed, it was resolved in the negative by 225 against 86, and then the chief question was put, and the same agreed with the committee; so that is over.
The argument of the danger of an army or arbitrary power was not well relished; but another argument of danger was proposed, viz. that, while we have some next the king, who was [sic] the ringleader of all mischiefs in the last reign, if he fall to govern all, neither king, money nor people, could be safe; satisfaction ought to be given to remove such from the King's counsel and presence for ever. This was very well relished by most people of both sides, and I believe you will find it end in the downfall of a great man to universal satisfaction. You must know whom I mean, for most people generally reckon every body as a saint to him, and think the King will be far better and safer without him.
Seymour wondered much to see such a bill against King James in the morning, and such care taken to maintain Queen Mary in the afternoon; and Harry M[ontague ?] answered that he wondered that Seymour, of all men, should complain of it, for in the last sessions he thought she had so good a right by her jointure, and she had no attainder on her, and might take it.
I have spoken to Mr. Montague this day, who says, if the rest are paid, you shall have your arrears of salary as soon as possible. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 156.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
R. Yard's news-letter to the same. It has been in my thoughts for some time to get Mr. Lefay, who is now with your Excellency, into the Duke of Shrewsbury's office, his father being an old acquaintance, and having served many years. I have now obtained a vacant seat for him. This may in time be much to his advantage, but on the other hand I would not have him leave you, without your approbation and conveniency. In case you allow him to accept this, he should make what haste he can to take possession of his seat, for fear of any disappointment which might be occasioned by the solicitations of others.
The proceedings in parliament begin to take another turn than they did at first; the gentlemen who oppose everything that comes from the court thought by the vote concerning the army that they had the majority of the House on their side; but they found the contrary yesterday, for, though Sir Edward Seymour, Sir Christopher Musgrave and others endeavoured to keep off their going upon the civil list, and afterwards would have entered into the examination of every particular, they were not heard. Mr. Montague told the House that in the convention 600,000l. was allowed for the civil list, and that there was now an addition of 50,000l. to be paid yearly, which he thought he need not explain, believing the House understood what he meant, and that it would now be necessary to make a provision for establishing the Duke of Gloucester's family, of between 20,000l. and 30,000l. per annum, the certain sum to be left to the King. This the House agreed to almost unanimously and passed a vote to give 700,000l. to the civil list. Now they have come into a good temper, every one believes they will consent to some augmentation of the land forces, but I believe they will hardly exceed 12,000.
This day an effort was made to get the report about the civil list re-committed, but their number was very small. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 157.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
J. Vernon to "Lord Ambassador " Williamson. With regard to the restitution of St. Christopher's, and the negroes and Frenchmen that were left at Virginia, the King has directed the Lords of the Admiralty to inquire from the commanders of Vice-Admiral Nevill's squadron what men they took coming from the Carthagena expedition, and how they have disposed of them. If any Frenchmen were left in Virginia, they will be released. The King cannot think that any such have been engaged for a term of years, as is complained of in the memorial.
He intends that the terms of the treaty shall be punctually complied with, as well in relation to St. Christopher's as the other parts of it. The Commissioners for Trade and Plantations are directed to report how much of the island is to be restored, and in what manner it will be fit to be done. It is not well understood here what the French ambassadors mean by negres libres et engagés, and what is the mark of distinction between them; nor is it supposed they look upon blacks as prisoners at war, to be delivered back as such. The King's subjects at Jamaica did not find that was their practice, when they carried away their slaves from that island.
The Duke of St. Albans has been appointed to carry the King's compliments to France on the marriage of the Duke of Burgundy; I believe he will be going this week. I hear that Lord Portland is taken very ill at Kensington with a great dizziness and swimming in his head. Dr. Ratcliffe had been sent for, and will bleed him to-morrow if the distemper continues. [Ibid., No. 158.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to the same. From the majority on the vote giving the King the civil list for life, we begin to hope pretty assuredly that 18,000 men will be allowed, though under some other style than that of a standing army. The Earl of Pembroke arrived on Sunday in good health. The famous Socinian Mr. Firmin died yesterday morning. He was on the Exchange on Saturday, taking opium for an asthma, and it despatched him quickly. [Ibid., No. 159.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
News-letter, reporting parliamentary news as in the preceding letters.
Yesterday Lord Mohun, who stands indicted for killing a young gentleman in a quarrel at the tavern, whereof you had an account some time ago, and was on the last day of the term committed by the court of King's Bench to the Marshalsea prison, was by habeas corpus brought before the House of Lords; he prayed to be admitted to bail, because the coroner's inquest found it only manslaughter. Their lordships appointed a committee to examine the matter, and to look into former precedents. In the meantime they ordered Lord Mohun into the custody of the Black Rod, and the House adjourned till Wednesday, appointing the committee to sit to-day.
Vice-Admiral Aylmer has been chosen member of parliament for Dover, and took his place in the House yesterday.
The Most Christian King has written a letter in his own hand to his Majesty, to acquaint him with the Duke of Burgundy's marriage, and the Dauphin has done the like; whereupon the King has appointed the Duke of St. Alban's, one of the lords of the bedchamber, to return this compliment and he will depart in four or five days for France.
Colonel Yelverton, who had a company in the Guards, died two days ago.
Lord Portland found himself indisposed this morning, and was obliged to go to bed. I hear this evening he has a fever. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 160.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
News-letter. This day the House of Commons ordered a Bill to be brought in, to continue in prison Counter Bernardi and others, who were committed to Newgate for being concerned in the late conspiracy to assassinate the King. The Bill to prevent the currency of any hammered silver coin was read the first time. [Ibid., No. 161.]
Dec. 21. " Votes " of the House of Commons. Printed. [Ibid., No. 162.]
Dec. 21.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Mayor of Newcastle. The secretaries for Scotland have received an answer to their letters about Mr. Fordyce and Mrs. Irwyn. Upon this, the King has thought fit that sureties be demanded from Robert Fordyce for immediately going beyond seas, and not returning without leave into any of his dominions. Mrs. Irwyn may be discharged at once. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 99, p. 417.]
Dec. 21. Warrant for a reprieve for William Johnston, sentenced to death for burglary at the last sessions at the Old Bailey. [Ibid. 347, p. 122.]
Dec. 21.
Kensington.
Warrant for a confirmation to the borough of Romsey, co. Southampton, of a charter granted to them 5 James I, with certain additional liberties [Ibid., p. 133]. A list of the names of the members of the corporation, who desire to be inserted in their new charter in their several capacities: Charles, Marquis of Winchester, steward; Edmund Pittman, esquire, recorder, John Stoke, mayor, John Good, late mayor (these three are justices of the peace); William Kent, Thomas Burbank, Walter Bell, Henry Squibb, Edward Day, William Baker, aldermen Isaac Knight, Stephen Rolfe, Peter Elcombe, John Wale, William Freeman, Edward Hunt, Robert Newland, John Vanderplanke John Gifford, John Fish and Nicholas Belben, capital burgesses Thomas Shory, town clerk; Richard Streape, senior and junior sergeants at mace and attorneys of the court of record. [S.P Dom., Entry Book 347, p. 206.]
Dec. 21.
The Hague.
Passes for John Smith, Timothy Allen, John Atkinson and Edward Tye, seamen belonging to the St. George of Ipswich, Jonathan Hammond, master, laden with coal from Newcastle to London, cast away on the coast of Holland; and for John Genks of Bristol, late of Captain de Prestinville's company in Colonel Lislemarais' regiment. [Ibid. 386, p. 8.]
Dec. 22. "Votes" of the House of Commons. Printed. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 163.]
[Dec. 22.] Petition of Michael Schade, master mariner, born a subject of his Majesty in the [Dutch] county of Lingen, master of the ship Perseverance. The petitioner has been ruined by the violent dealings of the people at Dimchurch, and prays such redress as the King shall think fit [Ibid., No. 164].
Appended are:
Declaration with respect to the ship Perseverance, undated. The ship was freighted at Ostend to carry some of the King's soldiers to Cork in Ireland, viz. Colonel Zachary Tiffin, a brigadier, with his officers and men. She sailed from Ostend about the 19th of this month of December, N.S. The next morning she was cast ashore by a violent storm at Dimchurch, about fourteen miles from Dover, being then whole and tight. As soon as the master found the ship on the ground and that she could not turn, he had the main mast cut down so that she might not work into the sands. He did not doubt but that, with the flowing of the tide, he should have got her off, but a great number of the country people came down to the shore, and, when the master and his crew endeavoured to save what goods and tackle they could, they beat them, and took from them all they had brought out of the ship. The master went to Dover to complain and to get some assistance, but in the meantime the rabble entered the ship, and plundered her of all her tackle and all that was aboard her, notwithstanding all the opposition the colonel, his soldiers and the crew, could make Some of those, who came on board cut two holes in the hull of the ship, so that the water and sand came in so fast that there was no probability of saving her Mr. Gillet, treasurer of Nieuport, John Huytin of Rissel in France, and the Master of Lingen in Holland, belonging to his Majesty as Grave of Lingen, are the true owners of the said ship. [Ibid., No. 164. i.]
Enclosing:
A certificate dated 22 December, 1697, by Colonel Zachary Tiffin, signed by himself, Francis Gore and John Woodward, as to the truth of the facts of the running aground of the Perseverance etc. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 164. ii.]
Dec. 22.
Kensington.
Warrant for a reprieve for John Norcot, convicted at the last sessions at the Old Bailey of breaking into the house of David Sheerwood, and stealing thence goods of great value. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 347, p. 122.]
Dec. 22.
Kensington.
Pass for the Duke of St. Albans to go to France on the King's business. [Ibid. 387, p. 144.]
[Dec. 23 ?] Petition of Peter Crapp or Crop, master of the Diamond of Topsham, Samuel Hagon, master of the Vine of Yarmouth, for themselves and for Samuel Duersly, master of the Mary Anne of Scarborough, Daniel Smailes, master of the Catherine, John Russell, master of the Fortune, and William Hill, master of the Recovery.
The petitioners show that on the 11th, 13th and 14th of October last, O.S., five of them were taken by several French ships off Dunkirk, whither they were bound with coal; and on the 28th of the same month Peter Crop, the other petitioner, bound from Newfoundland to Topsham with fish and train oil, was likewise taken by a French ship about nine leagues from Scilly; all the said ships were carried into Dunkirk.
In a few days the petitioners were restored to their ships. They were advised to stay and prosecute their captors under the articles of peace; but, on the 4th of this instant December, an order came from the court at Paris to stop their ships, which were accordingly seized and are now detained at Dunkirk.
They beg restitution of their ships, with damages. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 165.]
Enclosing:
Memorandum of the damage suffered by each of the abovesaid ships, the captors being the Dragon, Captain Dumaitre, the Portsmouth Galley, Captain Dirck Platon, Captain Bateman of the ship —, and the Milford Galley, Captain Matthew Dupre. [Ibid., No. 165. i.]
Dec. 23. "Votes" of the House of Commons. Printed. [Ibid., No. 166.]
Dec. 3–23. Notes of proceedings in the House of Lords, made for the benefit of Sir Joseph Williamson. [Ibid., No. 167.]
Dec. 23.
Kensington.
Licence for John Biggs, esq., high sheriff of Berks, to live out of the county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 163, p. 97; and 347, p. 123.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
J. Vernon to the Lords of the Admiralty, directing that five Algerines, to be sent home by the first opportunity, shall be received on board one of his Majesty's ships at Portsmouth, bound for the Straits, and there entertained at the ordinary allowance of seamen. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 204, p. 151.]
Dec. 23.
Kensington.
Commissions for Croft Pierce, gent., to be ensign of Lieutenant Colonel William Mathews' company in Lord Cutts' Coldstream regiment of foot guards; for Arthur Cecil, esquire, to be lieutenant of Captain Henry Edgeworth's company in the same regiment; for Daniel Woolett, esquire, to be lieutenant of Lieutenant-Colonel Salisbury's company in the same regiment; and for Richard Steele, gent., to be ensign in Lord Cutts' company in the same regiment. [Ibid. 167, p. 301.]
Dec. 23.
Whitehall.
Letters of approval for Jacob des Bouvières to be one of the deputy lieutenants of Kent; the Earl of Romney to issue out his deputation accordingly. [Ibid., p. 313; and 347, p. 112 b.]
Dec. 23.
Kensington.
Warrant for Robert Keylway to be surgeon to the second troop of horse guards whereof James, Duke of Ormonde, is captain and colonel. [Ibid. 168, p. 229.]
Dec. 23.
The Hague and [Whitehall].
Passes for Mr. John Gouge, John Grosvenor and John Serle, English merchants dwelling at Amsterdam, as appears by a letter from Mr. Kick, the King's consul there; and for Mr. Jerome Clifford, James Cumberbatch and Martha Fletcher of the Hague; all to come to England [Ibid. 386, p. 8]; and French pass for the ship Anne of London, — Bridges, master, 350 tons, 80 men, bound to the East Indies. [Ibid. 387, p. 145.]
Dec. 24.
London.
[J. Sloane] to [Sir J. Williamson]. Nothing of any consequence has happened in debate since the last post, save what you have in the public [papers], and then I gave you a particular account of how the civil list is settled. I do not doubt but that the House will soon decide about the forces to remain. I believe now it will be about 15,000 men, besides Ireland, the Islands and Plantations. With the militia well disciplined, I hope this will do well, and also satisfy the King, who was much pleased at the great majority we had in the vote about the civil list, and might have had everything as easy and well, but that I see all sides displeased at the great man lately brought to his elbow. Yesterday was designed for the attack, but a debate about the taking away the currency of clipped silver lasted so much longer than was expected, that it did not come on. I hear of none of that side for him save Seymour, who they [say ?] will speak, and Musgrave sit silent, and most of the other side serve to join against him; yet, for my part, I care for nothing but his destruction. It is said he has thoughts of lying down quietly, but people seem so far from being contented with that, that they talk of a Bill to disable him for ever from any office or trust, for we have got a good king and government, and would keep it so. They say, he who would change his God for a piece of bread, and then worship it, and then eat it, and then drop it again,—he who would own the pope's jurisdiction here,—would he not change King William for King James, his old master, and own his jurisdiction ? He who swears he was present, and saw the pretended Prince of Wales born, does he not believe him to be rightful and lawful ? These and thousands more things are remembered and repeated on this occasion to alarm people to believe that nothing is safe under his conduct.
I have desired Mr. Hornsby that I may speak with Sir Ch. B., and told him that, if needful, I will go to the north. By Mr. Johnson's means I have put him in a way, so that you will constantly have the proceedings of the House of Lords.
The Lord Chancellor of Ireland came to town last night. I know not how true it is, but I hear of several Irish lords to be made, viz. young Colvill, Tom Broderick, Hill, Moulseworth, Allen and God knows who. This is to balance the bishops there. I am sure it would far better become you, every way, than any or all of them, and therefore, if you have any fancy that way, I dare say I can put it in a way. Pray, therefore, let me know your thoughts, and do it soon, for fear I serve you whether you will or not.
I accidentally met with your brother Jersey this day at Lady Orkney's, where we had a loving discourse, and agreed so well that he has desired my further acquaintance, and that I may come often to court. Lord Arran is in great grief for the death of his only daughter of the small pox.
I am going out of town for two or three days, to keep out of harm's way of drinking and gaming till the House meets again. I wish you a good and merry Christmas, and that we had some of your wine to drink your health, but since we cannot we will repeat it the best we can in claret, which is now pretty good. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 168.]
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
R. Yard's news-letter to the same. The Duke of St. Albans says he will set out to-morrow on his journey to France. We long to hear how he is received at Versailles; according to that, it is probable that Lord Portland may hasten or delay his journey. He is abroad again, the illness that seized him last Tuesday having gone off.
There has been a talk that the Lord Chamberlain, understanding that several reflections have been made on him of late in the House of Commons, has desired his Majesty's leave to retire. I am apt to believe it is true, but do not know what is the King's resolution upon it.
The Lord Chancellor of Ireland has come to town. Some think it is not only the consideration of his health that brings him over, but that he is to give the King a particular account of the state and dispositions of men and things in that kingdom, and what may be requisite to be done. [Ibid., No. 169.]
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
T. Hopkins to the same, with news as in other letters. [Ibid., No. 170.]
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
J. Vernon to the same. The King commands me to return you the nomination signed by the French plenipotentiaries without a date. He approves of the reason you have given for not accepting the Act of inclusion last offered you under the French King's hand, as being grounded on the erroneous supposition that his consent was not necessary. At present he notices only the mistakes in the form in which this nomination is drawn up. The substance of it he will take into consideration at the Cabinet Council on Sunday next, when he will decide how far it may be fit for him to consent to the inclusion of some of the parties proposed. He will then also consider their memorial inclosed in your letter of the 27th inst. [N.S.] concerning the ships they demand to be restored. Only one is named, which was lost at Margate. I will inform myself in the mean time how the case stands.
There was some expectation yesterday of a motion being made against the Lord Chancellor, and that Lord Norris was to begin it; but either it was not intended, or they doubted of its success. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 171.]
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to the same, with news as in other letters. [Ibid., No. 172.]
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
News-letter. On Wednesday the Commons were in a committee of the whole House to proceed upon the consideration of the navy. Supply was granted for 10,000 seamen to be maintained for the service of the next year. It was resolved to allow 4l. a man per month for 13 months, which includes wages, victuals, wear and tear of the ships, and ordnance stores. This comes in all to 520,000l. They are in the next place to consider of the ordinary of the navy which, as proposed by the Admiralty, comes to 200,000l., and some other extraordinary expenses.
The same day Mr. John Howe found in the box at the door of the House of Commons, where the letters of the members are kept, a unsigned letter directed to him, in these words:
It is the principle of soldiers to resent injuries; our swords are yet in our hands, therefore atone before it is too late, if you will be safe.
This he showed to some of the members, and Colonel Granville acquainted the House with it, and moved to have a reward offered to discover the author of it. The House, however, looked upon it as a jest or contrivance, and so it fell.
On Wednesday the Lords read the Bill against corresponding with the late King James, and ordered Lady Inchiquin to be heard by counsel at the bar of the House on Monday se'nnight, upon the petition that Lord Howard of Escrick may be obliged to waive his privilege in the suit depending between them.
Yesterday their lordships had Lord Mohun's plea to be admitted to bail under consideration. After some debate they adjourned the matter till Monday se'nnight. After dealing with the Bill against corresponding with the late King James, they adjourned till Monday se'nnight, by reason of the "holy days."
The Duke of St. Albans will set out to-morrow for Dover, where a yacht attends him. Lord Portland purposes to be going on his embassy in a fortnight.
The Earl of Castlehaven took his place this week in the House of Peers as Baron Audley; none of his ancestors has sat for many years, they being all papists.
The Lord Chancellor of Ireland and Lord Inchiquin, the latter bringing over the addresses of the two Houses of Parliament in Ireland, landed at Chester on Saturday last, and are expected in town this evening.
Letters from Dublin of the 16th inst. give an account that Brigadier Wolseley, master of the Irish ordnance and colonel of a regiment, died at Dublin that same day. His Majesty's ship the Hastings, Captain Draper, commander, was cast on the rocks near Waterford on the 10th inst. in a violent storm, and was broken to pieces. The captain and all the crew of 149 men, except five or six, were lost. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 173.]
Dec. 24.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Lords of the Admiralty, directing the discharge of a Swedish subject pressed on board his Majesty's ship Plymouth from an English merchantman, which brought him from Cadiz, where the Compass, the Swedish ship to which he belonged, was sold. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 204, p. 152.]
Dec. 25.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Robert Southwell. The King directs that you make a full return, so far as your knowledge permits, of all persons, with their places of residence, to whom protections were given or sent in the late war in Ireland; especially of any protection granted to any one of the surname of Geoghegan, with his Christian name and place of abode. [Ibid. 99, p. 418.]
[Note.—A similar letter was sent to George Clarke, esq.]
Dec. 25.
Whitehall.
The same to the Recorder of London, desiring a return of all persons found guilty of coining and clipping during the last two or three years, and who have not suffered for the same, and of persons against whom warrants have been issued for this offence, and who have not been apprehended, with copies of the informations against the latter. [Ibid.]
[Note.—A similar letter was sent to the Warden of the Mint.]
Dec. 25.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Stocke. I am surprized you should not have received mine, informing you I raised no objection to Mrs. Savery's going over, but should have been glad to have spoken with her husband, if he had stayed or been detained, till I had answered your first letter concerning him. [Ibid., p. 419.]
Dec. 25.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Admiralty, enclosing an extract (not entered here) from a letter from Mr. Paul Methuen, the King's envoy at Lisbon, concerning his Majesty's ship Portland, which put in there in want of water and provisions. Methuen recommends that a credit should be settled with the consul for the benefit of ships putting in there. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 204, p. 152.]
Dec. 25.
Kensington.
Licence for Dr. Peter Allix, canon residentiary of Salisbury, engaged upon a great and useful work relating to the history and councils of the Christian Church, now almost ready for the press, to be exempt from personal residence during the impression of the said work. [Ibid. 163, p. 103; and 347, p. 139.]
Dec. 25.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Norcott, a prisoner in Newgate. The petitioner was convicted at the last sessions at the Old Bailey, upon the evidence of one Dorothy Cousins alias Sharwood, of a robbery, which she herself committed. He has a wife and three children, and for their sake prays a pardon Referred to Sir Littleton Powis, to report how the fact appeared upon trial. [Ibid. 238, p. 168.]
Dec. 25.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Francis Pousset, Andrew Brieux, John Goudet and David Barnaw. The petitioners have found out the true art of making black silk crape and white silk crape, and brought it to such perfection, that there is no difference between their manufacture and that of the city of Bologna in Italy. By establishing the manufacture in England, it will set a great many poor weavers to work. They beg a patent for fourteen years. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [Ibid., p. 169.]
Dec. 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the apprehension, etc. of Thomas Benn, on suspicion of high treason. [Ibid. 349, p. 43.]
Dec. 25. Account by the judge of the Admiralty of the cases of the Dragon and Greyhound of Dunkirk.
The Dragon of Dunkirk, Francis de Mitter, commander, a French privateer of 12 guns, was taken by his Majesty's ship Maidstone, Captain Heling, commander, and brought into the Downs. On the 3rd of November, 1697, the ship was discharged according to the treaty of peace, it appearing that she was taken on the 19th of October preceding.
The Greyhound, John Roevroy, commander, a privateer of about 40 tons' burden, mounted with eight guns, four of which were thrown overboard in the chase, to lighten her, was taken on the 3rd of October, 1697, by his Majesty's ship Experiment, Captain John Lapthorn, commander; her papers were brought in on the 11th, and on the 3rd of November all proceedings were discontinued, and the ship set at liberty, as far as concerns the court of Admiralty. [S.P. Dom., Naval 5, No. 74.]
Appended are:
(1) Major-General Erle's case in relation to his hostage now detained at Dunkirk, undated. Major-General Erle with several other gentlemen, passengers in the same ship, was taken by Captain Francis Demiter of the Dragon, in their passage from Holland to England, ten days after the British seas were agreed to be free by the plenipotentiaries of both crowns in Holland. The privateer parted with them at sea, taking with them two hostages and an instrument under the Major-General's hand, by which it was agreed he should pay 4,000 crowns for his ransom, if they proved prize; if not, the hostages should immediately be at liberty to go for England.
Upon application to the French plenipotentiaries at Delft they were declared to be no prize; notwithstanding, one of the hostages is detained at Dunkirk, upon pretence that the said privateer is stopped in England.
The fact is that the Dragon came no further than the Road of Dunkirk, and sent in his hostages, after which he went to sea again, took an English ship, and sent her into Dunkirk as prize, where she still continues, then came to sea again, and was himself taken prisoner by the Maidstone frigate, and sent into Dover.
Upon notice that his hostage was stopped, Major-General Erle applied to the Admiralty, who at once released the Dragon, but she was arrested again by one Mr. Lambert, the merchant, whose ship she had taken since the agreement that the seas were at liberty. [S.P. Dom., Naval 5, No. 74. i.]
(2) The case of Captain Demiter, commander of the Dragon privateer, taken by the Maidstone about the 24th of October, 1697, dated at the Office for sick and wounded seamen, 18 Nov., 1697. The ship's company were landed at Rye, and thence sent to Dover, and all transported to Calais on the 28th of October, except the captain and five of his men, who voluntarily remained behind at Dover, expecting to have their ship restored to them, which was done by order of the Admiralty. But the captain has since been arrested, and his ship attached, by one Mr. Lambert, a merchant in London, in lieu of a ship of his, which Demiter had taken and carried into Dunkirk the day before he himself was taken by the Maidstone; and he is now in the custody of the marshal of Dover Castle as the Lord Warden's prisoner, and not a prisoner of war. The captain, finding his business will be tedious, has sent away three of his men, and retains only the lieutenant and clerk, who, he desires, may stay with him till there be a determination of his business. [Ibid., No. 74. ii.]
(3) A translation into French of Nos. 1 and 2. [Ibid., No. 74. iii.]
Dec. 26./Jan. 5. Frederick, Elector of Brandenburg, to the King, announcing Baron de Dobrizinsky as his envoy extraordinary to England. Holograph. French. [S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 17, No. 20a.]
Dec. 27.
Whitehall.
J. Vernon to the Lords of the Admiralty. Upon Captain Michael Lang's memorial of his case, with your solicitor's report thereon, the King orders that you give directions for the bailing of the said Lang forthwith. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 204, p. 153.]
Dec. 27.
[Whitehall.]
Post warrant for Anthony Dagley, messenger in ordinary, to go to Windsor with one horse and a guide. [Ibid. 387, p. 145.]
Dec. 28.
[Whitehall.]
R. Yard's news-letter to Sir J. Williamson. Some reflections have been made in the House of Commons upon Lord Sunderland, in relation to the part he had in the ministry during the late reign, by Sir Thomas Dyke, Sir Francis Winnington, Jack Howe and others. The first of these said he would be one to move the House to make an address to the King to remove him from his counsels; it looked as if they intended to fall upon Lord Sunderland with the first opportunity that offered. He was alarmed at it; his friends were of opinion the House could make nothing of it, even if they attempted it; but Lord Sunderland would not run the hazard, and desired the King's leave to quit his place of Lord Chamberlain; last Sunday evening he delivered up his white staff. It is not known who is to be his successor.
Lord Portland is very well again, and purposes to set out for France about the middle of next month.
When the House of Commons meets again, I believe an effort will be made to get 14,000 or 15,000 men allowed to be kept up for the security of the kingdom, which we hope will be obtained, for divers country gentlemen are well inclined to it. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 174.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
Thomas Hopkins to the same. On Sunday night Lord Sunderland resigned his white staff to the King, and is going to his seat in Northamptonshire, where it is thought he will continue during the winter. His successor, in my private opinion, will be the Duke of Newcastle. The fall of this great minister is the subject of everybody's discourse and admiration. The various sentiments mankind has of it make it more a riddle. Some will have it, it was to avoid a storm, which he thought was coming upon him in Parliament, and rather chose to make it his own act, than to be plucked from the king by an address from the House of Commons. The King went yesterday to Windsor, and does not return till to-morrow. The melancholy thoughts, which this day must needs create in his Majesty (being the unlucky day which deprived both him and us of the best of queens) has made him take this journey to retire from company and business. [Ibid., No. 175.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
News-letter (giving news as in other letters of this date). We have an account from Plymouth that the Antelope, an 'interloper,' arrived in that port on the 22nd inst., from the East Indies. She came from St. Helen's (sic) near the Cape of Good Hope about ten weeks ago, and left there the Benjamin and Tonkin, two ships belonging to the East India company, likewise homewardbound, but they intended to go first to Cadiz, not knowing of the peace.
Mons. Disbeau is coming hither as commissioner from France to regulate the Hudson's Bay business and other matters relating to trade. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 176.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
J. Vernon to "Lord Ambassador" Williamson. At the Cabinet Council on Sunday last I laid before the King your letters relating to what had been proposed to you by the mediators about including the Pope in the treaty of peace between England and France. His Majesty thinks this a novelty that has never before been offered to any of his predecessors professing the Protestant religion. He observes that in the treaty of Breda a reservation was made, allowing only those to be comprehended, who should be named by either party with common consent. He supposes that such a reservation was then made, to prevent a nomination such as could not be borne by our constitution, where our laws and the frame of our government have set us at such a distance from the Pope. For these reasons he cannot but dissent from including him in our treaty. As to all the others mentioned in the said instrument his Majesty readily gives his consent, and thinks it ought to be so expressed in the form to be prepared for that purpose, according to the intent of the treaty.
At the same time the King considered a report from the Commissioners of Trade and Plantations upon the reference made to them as to restoring St. Christopher's, of which I am commanded to send you a copy; they demand that the liberty be continued of fetching salt from the French part of the island, pursuant to a treaty made in that behalf, and that the French should not pretend to more of the island than was formerly in their possession, and of right belongs to them, which by their memorial is mistakenly called les deux tiers. You will observe by this report that the cohabitation of two nations intermixed with one another is liable to great inconveniences to both, and therefore it is to be wished that the French would take an equivalent for their part, so that the possession might remain entire as it is. The King would be glad if this could be brought about, and would have you sound the French ambassadors upon it, so that, if they have any inclinations thereto, they may give instructions accordingly to the commissioners they are to send here under the 8th article of the treaty. In the meantime the King has given the necessary directions to the Commissioners of Trade and Plantations to prepare the necessary orders for delivering possession to the French of that part of St. Christopher's which they held before the declaration of war, that nothing may be wanting on his part towards the performance of what he has agreed to.
He has considered the French ambassador's memorial about restoring the ships on each side, which it is pretended have been unduly taken. He finds there are but two such ships of theirs on this side, for which they talk of confiscating the sum agreed to by Major-General Erle and his officers for their ransom, and six other ships, which are detained in the port of Dunkirk after they were discharged by the Court of Admiralty there, as you will see by the enclosed petition of their masters and the copy of a letter to Major-General Erle from Dunkirk.
One of the said French ships is that of Captain Demetres, who took Major-General Erle. It is certain he is not kept here by way of reprisal, since he was long ago cleared by the Court of Admiralty, but happened to be seized again upon a civil action brought by one who sues him for damages in unjustly taking his ship and sending her into Dunkirk. The complainant in this case is not one of the above-mentioned masters. Though this is a process agreeable to the laws of nations, and their making this a pretence to grant reprisals against others of his Majesty's subjects is contrary to the treaty, yet the King intends to have this ship forthwith released, in order to cut off all occasions of cavil. To that end I have spoken with the judge before whom this cause is pending, that he should more particularly consider the case, which seems to be complicated. If there be no other way, the King will take it upon him to order bail to be given in this action, that the ship and captain may be immediately released and sent home.
The other French ship is the Levrette, mentioned in the memorial, taken by Captain Lapthorne. I send you the account given by himself and his lieutenant, both of how she came to be taken and of how she was sunk at Ramsgate, which shows the disingenuous representation the privateer has made of the matter in pretending he was bound to Bordeaux, and that our men threw their cannon overboard, when it was they themselves who did it, to make their ship lighter for an escape, though they had engaged in a fight, when it was not necessary, and therefore there seemed to be a plausible colour for seizure. Yet, as the judge of the Admiralty found she was taken beyond the time limited for hostilities, he would suffer no proceedings against the ship, and tells me there is nothing to hinder the owners having her again, if she is in being, as he supposes she is, having been weighed. If they have any demand for damages of any kind, all right shall be done them as soon as they take the ordinary methods of attaining it. This is pursuant to his Majesty's pleasure that all justice and due satisfaction be given in this and all other cases that shall happen. He hopes and expects that his subjects shall be dealt with in like manner, and particularly that Major-General Erle's hostage be no longer detained, that the six ships mentioned in the petition be forthwith released, and that the masters' complaints of the wrongs done to them be speedily determined.
On account of the mention made of the Lord Chamberlain in the House of Commons, and for some other reasons, he resolved to lay down his office, and resigned accordingly on Sunday last, notwithstanding the persuasions made to the contrary. The King loses a very able, useful minister, and therefore I cannot but be concerned that he has taken so abrupt a course to procure quiet, for I think there was no real occasion for it. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 177.]
Dec. 28.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords Commissioners of Trade. Your report of the 24th inst. has been laid before the King, and he commands that you prepare the necessary orders for restoring to the French that part of the island of St. Christopher of which they were possessed before the war, pursuant to the treaty, together with a draft of such instructions as you judge fit to be sent for delivering up the French part of the island, and with what limitations it is to be done, in order to secure to his Majesty's subjects there the advantages they formerly enjoyed.
You are likewise to consider such particulars as shall be fit to be proposed to the French commissioners, who will be sent here to adjust and determine the several matters mentioned in the eighth article of the treaty. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 99, p. 420.]
[Dec. 30.] An account of the new milled moneys coined in the six mints, viz. London, Bristol, Chester, Exeter, Norwich and York, from February, 1695[–6]. The total value is 6,394,445l. [S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 17, No. 21.]
Dec. 30. "Votes" of the House of Commons. Printed. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 178.]
Dec. 30.
Kensington.
Licence for George Howells, esq., high sheriff of Glamorgan, to live out of that county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 163, p. 97.]
Dec. 30.
Kensington.
Warrant for a grant to Joseph Bookey, gentleman, of what may become due to the crown, in case three ships, viz. the Unity, Captain Stroud, commander, and the Good Heart, both laden with wine, and the St. John the Baptist, a small ship laden with salt, be adjudged as perquisites of the crown. They were taken from the French by Commodore Norris, commander of the Monk and the Guernsey, or some of the ships under his command, near the banks of Newfoundland. [Ibid. 347, p. 129.]
Dec. 30.
The Hague.
Passes for Robert Thomas, late of the Royal Regiment of Ireland commanded by Captain Hamilton; and for Peter Bell, a seaman belonging to the ship Unity under Rear Admiral Allemonde, who came over to Holland in a Dutch merchantman called The Gold Dragon, John Roberts, master. [Ibid. 386, p. 7.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to "Lord Ambassador" Williamson. I could not write by the last post, having been unexpectedly summoned to attend the King at Windsor. He went there on the 28th inst., to be absent from Kensington and to be retired. It was the anniversary of our late gracious Queen's death, and his Majesty observed it very strictly, fasting all day and admitting no one to his presence but his necessary attendants.
The Earl of Sunderland goes to Althorpe to-morrow. His lady is very ill, and is now at Windsor for the air.
It seems probable that the staff has been offered to the Duke of Shrewsbury, but whether he will accept it I do not yet hear.
The Earl of Portland's equipage leaves to-morrow, and he will follow on Tuesday. Mr. Stepney will also start very soon. Sir Fleetwood Shepherd is dead or dying. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 179.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
J. Vernon to the same. It is not yet determined who shall be Lord Chamberlain. The King would think it very well bestowed upon the Duke of Shrewsbury, and I hope all good men would be of that opinion; but his want of health must make it uncertain, at least for some time, whether he will undertake it.
The King is dispatching Mr. Stepney to Berlin to do what good offices he can to President Dankelman, and to mitigate the Elector's displeasure against him, as far as the King's minister can be allowed to interpose in such domestic concerns. [Ibid., No. 180.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Treasury. Orders are to be given to the Commissioners of Customs to permit Mr. Benjamin Steel to ship twenty small brass guns for use on two pleasure boats of the Dey of Tunis. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 99, p. 421.]
Dec. 31.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. It is necessary that George Stepney, esq., whom the King has appointed his Envoy Extraordinary to the Elector of Brandenburg and the other princes of Germany, should depart with all possible expedition. His equipage money is to be advanced at once, together with his arrears for similar service not long since in Germany. [Ibid., p. 422.]
Dec. 31.
The Hague.
Pass for Mr. Arthur Irvine of London, merchant [to come to England]. [Ibid. 386, p. 7.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant for the appointment of Sir John Hamilton of Halcraig and Sir James Scougall of Whitehill, two of the senators of the College of Justice, to succeed the late Sir John Hall of Bunglass and Alexander Spittell of Leuchat on the commission for the plantation of kirks and valuation of teinds. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 16, p. 458.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant for the appointment of new commissioners for the visitation of Scottish universities, colleges and schools, several commissioners appointed by the Act of Parliament being now deceased. The new commissioners are the Duke of Queensberry the Earls of Melvill, Tullibardine, Sutherland, Buchan, Annandale Leven and Ruglen, Sir James Ogilvie, Sir James Stuart, Advocate Adam Cockburn of Ormistoun, Justice Clerk, Sir John Home of Blackadder, Sir Patrick Home of Lumsdean, — Udnie of that ilk, — Forbes of Eight, Sir Robert Cheisly, late Provost of Edinburgh, William Dunlop, James Osburn, Thomas Ramsay, George Anderson, William Crichton, David Williamson, George Hamilton, John Moncreif, William Trail, Charles Gordon, John Forrest, — Chalmers and Robert Anderson, ministers. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 16, p. 459.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant for the payment of 50l. to Lord Mordington on his going to Scotland to reside, as a mark of the King's bounty. [Ibid., p. 460.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant for the payment of 20l. to John Grant, writing master, who presented a piece of writing to Queen Mary of blessed memory, for which he got no allowance. [Ibid.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant for a patent to Thomas Hay of Balhousie, creating him Viscount Duplin and Lord Balhousie, in consideration of the proofs of duty and affection he has given upon all occasions to the King and his government. [Ibid., p. 461.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant for the appointment of Mr. John Murray, brother to Lord Philiphaugh, to the commissariot of Peebles, vacant by the decease of Robert Burnet. [Ibid., p. 463.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant for the appointment of Sir Robert Anstruther of Wrae to be clerk and keeper of the cocquet seal for the south side of the water of Forth above the Queen's Ferry inclusive, and for the north side for all above the North Ferry. [Ibid., p. 464.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant for the confirmation of James Murray, servitor to the Earl of Tullibardine, as commissary clerk of Dumblain, following upon his appointment by Hugh Kennedy of Schelloch, commissary of that commissariot. [Ibid., p. 465.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant for the appointment of Mr. John Borthwick, goldsmith in Edinburgh and late essay-master to the incorporation of goldsmiths there, to be essay-master of the mint in Scotland, the post being vacant by the death of Henry Alcorn younger, appointed jointly with his father. Henry Alcorn elder, 22nd March, 1687[–8]. [Ibid., p. 466.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant for the appointment of John Monro, bower and burgess of Edinburgh, to be the King's master bower and armourer in Scotland during pleasure. [Ibid., p. 469.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant for the appointment of David Mitchell, baker and burgess of Edinburgh, to be sergeant of the King's pastry and master baxter in Scotland, for life. [Ibid., p. 472.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant for a grant to James Scott of Benholm of the taxt ward and non-entry duties of his lands and barony of Benholm since the decease of Robert Scott, his father; also of dues on the lands of Hederweek and Clayleck, pertaining to John Scott of Hederweek, his brother, and of Newbigging, Colt and Caple, and Glenskenno Miln, belonging to the said John since the decease of David Scott of Hederweek, his uncle; with his own and his brother's marriages. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 16, p. 473.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant for a grant to Mr. David Dewar, second son to David Dewar of Lassodie, of the lands of Wester Balgony alias Little Balgony, both sunny and shadow halves thereof, extending to 40s. land of old extent, with the manor place etc., and the privilege of pasturing upon any part of the lands of Dundonald; and of the shadow half of the lands of Balbedie; upon the resignation of Sir John Dempster of Pitliver, with consent of Dame Jean Areskine, his spouse, and John Dempster, his only lawful son, and of his creditors. [Ibid., p. 474.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant for a patent of knight baronet to Patrick Wedderburn, of Gosford, in tail male. [Ibid., p. 475.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
A like warrant on behalf of Sir Patrick Home, Advocate. [Ibid. p. 476.]
Dec. 31.
Kensington.
Commissions for James Smith to be lieutenant, and William MacKenzie and John Tewtsdale to be ensigns, of the company in garrison in Edinburgh Castle. [Ibid., p. 477.]
Dec. 31. A complete list of the royal navy of England, with the rating of the ships and their number of guns. The ships are as follows:—
First rates: St. Andrew, Britannia, London, Queen, Victory and Royal William.
Second rates: Albemarle, Association, Barfleur, Duke, Duchess, St. George, Royal Catherine, St. Michael, Neptune, Namur, Ossory, Sandwich and Vanguard.
Third rates: Berwick, Boyne, Breda, Burford, Captain, Cornwall, Chichester, Cambridge, Cumberland, Content Prize, Defiance, Devonshire, Dorsetshire, Eagle, Edgar, Elizabeth, Essex, Expedition, Grafton, Hampton Court, Humber, Ipswich, Kent, Lancaster, Lenox, Monmouth, Norfolk, Northumberland, Newark, Royal Oak, Resolution, Restoration, Rupert, Russell, Ranelagh, Stirling Castle, Suffolk, Swiftsure, Shrewsbury, Torbay, Warspight, and Yarmouth.
Fourth rates: Assistance. Anglesey, Advice, Bristol, Bonaventure, Burlington, Blackwall, Canterbury, Centurian, Chatham, Chester, Crown, Colchester, Coventry, Deptford, Dover, Dragon, Dunkirk, Dreadnought, Exeter, Falmouth, Foresight, Falkland, Greenwich, Gloucester, Guernsey, Harwich, Kingston, Kingfisher, Lincoln, Lichfield, Lion, Medway, Monk, Mary, Montague, Medway Prize, Newcastle, Norwich, Nonsuch, Oxford, Portland, Pembroke, Pendennis, Plymouth, Reserve, Rochester, Ruby, Romney, Southampton Sunderland, Severn, Tiger, Trident, Weymouth, Woolwich, Windsor, Warwick and York.
Fifth rates: Adventure, Assurance, Arundel, Betty, Bedford Galley, Charles Galley, Dolphin, Dover Prize, Experiment, Feversham, Fowey, Garland, Gosport, Lyme, Lynn, Lowstoft, Lewis Prize, Mary Galley, Mermaid, Milford, Poole, Richmond, Ruby Prize, Roebuck, Rye, Rainbow Prize, Sheerness, Sweepstakes, Soldado's Prize, Shoreham, Sorlings, Speedwell, Scarborough, Southsea Castle, Terrible, Thunderbolt Prize, Virgin Prize, Winchelsea and Loo.
Sixth rates: St. Alban's Prize, Bideford, Brilliant Sloop, Dunwich, Deal Castle, Essex Prize, Flamborough, Gernoon Prize, Greyhound, Henry Prize, Jersey, Jolly Prize, St. Joseph, Lark, Lizard, Maidstone, Mariana, Orford, Penzance, Queensborough, Rupert Prize, Swan, Solebay, Seahorse, Sun Prize, Seaford and Royal Transport.
Fire-ships: Crescent, Flame, Fortune, Firebrand, Griffin, Hunter, Hawk, Joseph, Lightning, St. Paul, Phoenix, Rose, Strombolo, Vulture, Vulcan, St. Vincent and Vesuvius.
Bomb-vessels: Basilisk, Blast, Carcass, Comet, Firedrake, Furnace, Greyhound, Julian Prize, Kitchen, Mortar, Mary Ann, Owner's Adventure, Phœnix, Portsmouth, Salamander, Society, Star, Serpent, True Love, Terror and Granada.
Hulks: Asia, Arms of Rott[erdam ?], Chatham, St. David, Exeter, French Ruby, Josiah, Leopard, Loyalty, Magdalen Prize, Plymouth and Success.
Advice-boats: Express, Eagle, Messenger, Swift and Scoutboat.
Store-ships: Suffolk Hagboat, Canterbury, Catherine and Greenfish.
Brigantines: Discovery, Dispatch, Diligence, Fly, Intelligence, Postboy, Shark and Spy.
Hoys: Delight, Forester, Lighter, Marygold, Nonsuch, Sophia, Supply, Transport, Unity Horseboat, Unity and Unity (sic).
Yachts: Charlotte, Cleveland, Fubbs, Henrietta, Isabella, Isle of Wight, Jemmy, Catherine, Merlin, Monmouth, Mary, Navy, Queenborough, Soestdyk, Squirrel and William and Mary.
Pink: Paramour.
Machines: Seahorse, Adventure First smack, John and Martha smack, Owner's Goodwill hoy.
Towboats: two.
Smacks: Royal Escape, Flemish Longboat and Little London.
Ketches: Providence, Martin, Quaker and Roy.
Abstract: 6 first rates, 13 second rates, 42 third rates, 59 fourth rates, 39 fifth rates, 27 sixth rates, 17 fire-ships, 21 bomb-vessels, 12 hulks, 5 advice-boats, 4 store-ships, 8 brigantines, 11 hoys, 16 yachts, one pink, 4 machines, 2 towboats, 3 smacks and 4 ketches. In all 294. Ships now building for his Majesty:— One second rate, 5 third rates, 8 fourth rates and 4 fifth rates. In all 18. Printed. [S.P. Dom., Naval 111, p. 364a.]
Dec. —
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of William Johnston. The petitioner is condemned in Newgate for a felony, the whole evidence being that it was believed he intended to carry off goods from the entry of a house. He prays a pardon. Referred successively to Lord Chief Justice Treby, Mr. Justice Blincoe, and Mr. Baron Powis. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 238, p. 170.]
Dec. —
Kensington.
Warrant for John Allen [or Allien], convicted of piracy, to be inserted in the next general pardon for poor convicts of Newgate, without condition of transportation. [Ibid. 347, p. 124.]
Dec. —
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland to direct John Methuen, esquire, Chancellor of Ireland, to attend at once upon the King in England. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office Letter Book 14, p. 42.]
1697. Anonymous report of opinion on the enclosure, and on the King's offer of troops and naval assistance to Spain. French. [S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 17, No. 22.]
Enclosing:
A copy of a letter in Spanish, dated 31 Jan., 1697 [N.S.] stating that the King of Spain's health has been the cause of the delay in bringing the negotiations to a close; of which a translation into French is appended. [Ibid., No. 22. i.]
[1697.] Statement that the King of France will not consider any agreement concluded till all the Allies consent to peace, and till the Prince of Orange be satisfied. French. [Ibid., No. 23.]
[1697.] Statement of conditions indispensable to the conclusion of an armistice on the part of the Allies. French. [Ibid., No. 24.]
[1697.] " Secret Articles " proposed by the Allies in connection with the peace of Rijswick, with remarks thereupon. French. [Ibid., No. 25.]
[1697.] Statement of proposals by the Allies for the peace of Rijswick, with notes of the views of France thereupon. French. [Ibid., No. 26.]
[1697.] Statement of demands of Great Britain in the peace to be made, including the annulment of the repeal of the Edict of Nantes, and showing the advantage France would derive from the establishment of religious liberty. French. [Ibid., No. 27.]
1697. Statement of the French army prepared for the campaign of 1697. [Ibid., No. 28.]
[? 1697.] Extracts from three letters from d'Avaux, Meyercron and Menken, touching matters connected with the negotiations for peace. French and German. [Ibid., Nos. 29 to 31.]
[1697.] Memoranda [? by the French minister in Sweden] touching the attitude of that court on certain subjects connected with the peace. French. [Ibid., No. 32.]
1697. An act for granting to his Majesty certain duties on malt etc., as well for carrying on the war against France, as for the necessary expense of his Majesty's household, etc.
The persons appointed under the royal sign manual to see the powers of this act put into execution are Thomas Neale, Christopher Montague, Richard Trevor, John Isham, Nicholas Fenn, John Packer, William Glanville, Peter Hume, John Thrale, William Congreve and Dalby Thomas, esquires. The receivers, appointed by the Treasury, of the money and plate to be contributed are Sir John Johnson at the Three Flower-de-Luces in Cheapside, Mr. Hoare, against St. Dunstan's Church, Fleet Street, Mr. Smith and Mr. Shale in Lombard Street, Mr. Mompesson in Birchin Lane, Mr. Wharton, Charing Cross, Mr. William Shepherd in Lombard street, and Mr. John Coggs against St. Clement's church, without Temple Bar. Printed. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 181.]
[1697.] An account of the produce of the glass duty from Michaelmas, 1695 to 17 November, 1696. Printed. [Ibid., No. 182.]
[1697.] A list of the directors of the Bank of England, viz. Sir Thomas Abney, Brooke Bridges, James Denew, Thomas Goddard, Peter Godfry, Sir James Houblon, Sir John Houblon, Abraham Houblon, Sir Theodore Janssein, John Lordell, Samuel Lethieller, Robert Raworth, John Smith, John Ward, Sir William Hedges, and Samuel Heathcott; Sir William Ashurst, Robert Bristow, Charles Chamberlain, Francis Eyles, Nathaniel Gould, John Page, Samuel Lock and Sir John Houblon. The above names are arranged in two groups, each having a number appended [of votes ?].
Left out: Sir John Cope, Sir Henry Furniss, Alderman Tench, James Bateman, Obadiah Sedgewick, Henry Cornish, John Knight, Sir William Gore.
The next in order: Sir William Gore, John Shipman, Peter Delme, Matthew Raper. [Ibid., No. 183.]
[1697.] Notes on various subjects, being extracts from Acts of Parliament, viz. 12 Charles II. c. 30, disclaiming any power in parliament or people to exercise any coercive power over the persons of the Kings of this realm; 13 Charles II. c. 1., disclaiming any legislative power in parliament without the King; 13 Charles II. c. 6, the preamble of an act for declaring the sole right of the militia to be in the King; 13 Charles II. c. 3., the preamble of an act for ordering the forces, etc.
Also an extract from Mr. Fyler's Delosis, printed for R. Clavil, 1697, to the effect that the sanction of the creed of St. Athanasius is holy and good. [Ibid., No. 184.]
[1697.] An answer to a case, lately printed and delivered to several members of the House of Commons by Mr. William Dockwra, merchant, concerning the Penny Post.
By statute 12 Charles II. c. 35. it was enacted that no one, other than the postmaster-general, or his deputies, should carry letters for hire.
The penny post, pretended by Mr. Dockwra to be a new invention, is so far from being such, that it will be made manifest that a scheme thereof was drawn up near twenty years ago from the methods of the post office, and was under the then postmastergeneral's consideration.
Mr. Dockwra was so far from having any order from the King, Duke or postmaster-general, for reducing the penny post into practice, that, when it was found his proposed methods would invade the rights of the post office-general, he received a particular command to the contrary, long before any action was brought. Mr. Dockwra and his partner, Mr. Murray, were sued upon the said statute in two actions, one of which was tried at the King's Bench bar; though the penalties under the act for the time they had practised it amounted to above 5,000l., yet only 100l. was found against Mr. Dockwra at the desire of the King's counsel, and that was forgiven, as the King's only object was to assert his right. A table follows, showing, in two columns, that the practice of the penny post is not inconsistent with that of the general post office, but that their methods are in fact identical. The general post sends out letters from the general post office established in Lombard Street, to be dispersed from " stage towns " appointed in the country, at ten or twelve miles' distance, while the penny post office established in Cornhill, sends letters for distribution to sorting houses appointed in London, Westminster, Southwark and Hermitage, etc., etc.
It is therefore hoped that, since the penny post is, by judgment in law in King Charles II's time, declared to be a part of the postoffice general, which was by a particular act of parliament in King James's time consolidated in the crown, the House will not be for putting it into a private hand. Printed. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 185.]
[1697.] Proposals for a National Bank, setting forth how 3,000,000l. may be raised for the support of the charge of the war, how the mint may be supplied with 3,000,000l. of gold and silver coin [etc.], to which is added a complete catalogue of all the books lately published concerning the coin. London. Printed for Richard Cumberland at the Angel in St. Paul's Churchyard. [Ibid., No. 186.]
1697. Proposals to supply his Majesty with 12,000,000l. or 14,000,000l. (or more if required) for the year 1697, without subscriptions or advancing the present taxes. By A. D. of Gray's Inn, Esquire, and some others, his friends. London. Printed for the author, and sold by Peter Parker at the Leg and Star over against the Royal Exchange in Cornhill, John Waltho at the Cloisters in the Temple, and John Gouge at the Castle in Westminster Hall.
The method proposed is to settle one general national office of credit for the service of the kingdom at the Guildhall in London, with inferior offices in every ward in the city and in every corporate and market town throughout England and Wales, with power to issue bills for what money parliament may grant to the King, to be paid off 2,000,000 per annum, out of the provisions made for that purpose, the whole of the profits being reserved to the nation. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 8, No. 187.]
1697. The form of an agreement to be made between the Commissioners of the Treasury and such persons as are willing to advance money for the exchanging of bills authorized to be issued at the Exchequer for any sums not exceeding 1,500,000l. Printed. [Ibid., No. 188.]
1697. Proposals for various forms of medals proposed to be struck to commemorate the peace of Rijswick. French. [Ibid., No. 189.]
[1697.] Notes on peculiar clauses of precedency in the patents of certain baronets, addressed to — Yard, Esquire, at Mr. Secretary Vernon's office at the Cockpit near Whitehall, viz.
Sir Charles Vavasor of Killingthorpe in Lincolnshire, created baronet 22 June, 1631, with precedence between Mounson and Greseley, created 29 June, 1611.
Sir Hugh Ackland of Devonshire, created 21 January, 1677, with precedence of all baronets created after 1644.
Sir Francis Edwards of Shrewsbury, created 22 April, 1678, with precedence as the last.
Sir James Bowyer of Leightorne in Sussex, created baronet 23 July, 1627; on 18 May, 1677 he surrendered his patent, and took another to himself for life, remainder to Henry Goring of Higden in the same county, with precedence as from the date of the first patent. [Ibid., No. 190.]
1697. Blank form of a pass for a trading ship on a voyage to some port in the French dominions. [Ibid., No. 191.]
[1697.] A clause [prepared] for the bill of additional duties. [Ibid., No. 192.]
1697. Reply to the manifesto addressed by James II to the Allied Protestant Princes. A printed pamphlet of 72 pages. French. [Ibid., No. 193.]
169[7]. Warrant for John Fortrye, a child of Winchester college, to be elected to New College, Oxford. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 163, p. 96.]
[1697.] Three warrants for payment of bills of William Churchill for stationery supplied to the Duke of Shrewsbury's office. [Ibid. 345, p. 527.]
1697.
Whitehall.
Passes for Mr. Arnold Hewet and Mrs. Katherine Joanes to go to Holland [Ibid. 387, p. 81]; for John Bouquet, Michel Volant, Isaac Rouze, and his son Isaac, John Rambonett, James de le Croix and Anthoin Hugot, ditto [Ibid., p. 84]; and for Anne Pieters, a poor woman of Denmark, ditto. [Ibid., p. 102.]
[1697.] An abstract of the Irish Bill for the more speedy discovery of lordships, lands, etc., given and employed to popish and superstitious uses, and for settling such forfeitures in his Majesty. [S.P. Ireland 359, No. 190.]
[1697.] A list of [Irish] Bills that have been approved in Council [in England], and passed under the great seal. [Ibid., No. 191.]
[1697.] Reasons advanced by the judges of Ireland for the Bill against old dormant judgments, bonds, etc.
This law seems more necessary in Ireland than in England, by reason of the frequent rebellions, wherein the houses of the protestants are burned and destroyed, with their writings and evidences. Where there have been such severe wars also, many of the persons, that were living witnesses to payments and discharges, have perished.
Such old debts are for the most part prosecuted by undertakers; they vex the subject and force them into a composition.
Chancery does usually relieve against such old debts, and therefore it may be thought reasonable to ease the subject of the expense and trouble of a chancery suit.
The assignment of such old securities by statute judgment etc. to purchasers to be kept on foot for corroborating their title has rarely been practised in this kingdom; but, if thought of use, a proviso might be inserted that this law shall not extend to judgments or mortgages. It is further to be considered that judgments are the common security of Ireland even for small sums, and there is very seldom satisfaction acknowledged on record.
A note is added by Methuen that the Bill is much desired in Ireland, and, with some amendments, might not be inconvenient. [Ibid., No. 192.]
1697. Warrant for a grant to Charles Maule and Samuel Dopping, esquires, of the office of comptroller of the port of Dublin for their lives [? in reversion after the death of Stephen Stanley, esquire], to whom jointly with William Maule, esquire, now lately deceased, the office was granted for their lives. 15 April, 30 Charles II. [Ibid., No. 193.]