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William III: January 1698

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Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William III, 1698. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1933.

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WILLIAM III.

January 1698

Jan. 1. An abstract of the musters of the first regiment of foot guards, showing the following officers in their respective companies: Captain Gilbert Primrose, Lieutenant George Etheridge, Ensign Anthony de Villendfue; Colonel and Captain the Earl of Romney, Captain Lieutenant Nicholas Strode, Ensign George Clark, Chaplain John Smallwood, Adjutants Charles Lewis, Charles Filks, William Brittain and Charles Povey, Quartermasters John Bennett and George Etheridge, Surgeon Archibald Harris, Surgeon's Mates Nathaniel Edwards, William Moren, Charles Harris and Paul Margeret; Lieutenant Colonel and Captain Henry Withers, Lieutenant William Bretton, Ensign Henry Disaulnais; Major and Captain John Shrimpton, Lieutenant William Newton, Ensign Joseph Ferrers; Captain Edward Hastings, Lieutenant Anthony Hastings, Ensign Henry Smith; Captain John Bristow, Lieutenant Richard Berkley, Ensign George Smith; Captain John Seymour, Lieutenant Thomas Seymour, Ensign Edmund Feilding; Captain Thomas King, Lieutenant Charles Ficks, Ensign Hunt". Manning; Captain John Farwell, Lieutenant William Bodenham, Ensign Thomas Jordain; Captain Andrew Pitcarne Wheeler, Lieutenant David Ward, Ensign James Dansey; Captain Charles Gorsuch; Lieutenants David Eyton and Thomas Hussey; Captain Richard Russell, Lieutenant Thomas Moore, Ensign Edward Colston; Captain John Delavall, Lieutenant Henry Liuppincott, Ensign George Dockwra; Captain Chichester Wrey, Lieutenant Thomas Ferris, Ensign John West; Captain John Maurice, Lieutenant Thomas Poire, Ensign St. Dennis Pujolas; Captain Charles Johnson, Lieutenant John Pickring, Ensign Henry Craffts; Captain F. Sidney Highmes, Lieutenant Gabriel Cripigney, Ensign Jaffrey de Culand; Captain Irby Mountagu, Lieutenant Charles Lewis, Ensign James Howard; Captain William Ashton, Lieutenant Edward Austin, Ensign William West; Captain Edward Willson, Lieutenant John Smith, Ensign William Erle; Captain Christopher Coddrington, Lieutenant Euvertrey Saurency, Ensign Vavasor Cage; Captain James Stanhope, Lieutenant John Croxton, Ensign Henry Goodrich; Captain James Rivers, Lieutenant Matthew Adams, Ensign John Sidney; Captain William Watkins, Lieutenant Allaway Serjeant, Ensign John Winn; Captain Joseph Wightman, Lieutenant John Shutt, Ensign Anthony Pujolas; Captain Lord George Hastings, Lieutenant Paul Trouchey, Ensign Robert Gough; the late Colonel and Captain Yelverton, Lieutenant Walter Raleigh and Ensign Richard d'Avanant. The total number of privates is 1,915. [S.P.8. 18. ff. 1–2.]
Jan. 1. An abstract of the musters of the Coldstream regiment of foot guards, showing the following officers in their respective companies: Colonel and Captain John Lord Cutts, Captain Lieutenant Andrew Bissett, Ensign Richard Steele, Chaplain John King, Adjutants John Wyvell and William Stevenage, Quartermaster Charles Wakelin, Surgeon John Baptist, Solicitor John Acton; Lieutenant Colonel William Mathews, Lieutenant Charles Wakelin, Ensign Croft Pearce; Major William Mathews, Lieutenant William Stevenage, Ensign Richard Gore; Captain Francis Chantrell, Lieutenant Roger James, Ensign John Selwyn; Lieutenant Colonel and Captain Edward Bradock, Lieutenant Edward Morrison, Ensign John Miller; Captain Henry Edgworth, Lieutenant Aur. Cecill, Ensign Samuel Masham; Captain Thomas Clent, Lieutenant David Wollett, Ensign James Allen; Captain Thomas Pearce, Lieutenants Thomas Markham and Henry Rowls; Captain Maurice Thompson, Lieutenant Francis Scawen, Ensign Anthony Vernatty; Captain Henry Morrison, Lieutenant Cornelius Swan, Ensign William Windress; Captain Edmond Rivett, Lieutenant John Willson, Ensign John Wyvell; Captain Richard Cole, Lieutenant Magnus Kempenfelt, Ensign John Whitehall; Captain Richard Holmes, Lieutenants Henry Lawrence and John Attkins; Captain Charles Salisbury, Lieutenant Henry Cartwright and Ensign Thomas Talmache. Total number of privates 928. [S.P.8. 18. ff. 3–4.]
Jan. 1. Extract of a letter from Sir Charles Hedges to Mr. Ellis. I cannot yet give Mr. Secretary a satisfactory account of the French privateer sunk at Ramsgate. All that I can learn is that she was sunk at the mouth of the harbour through stress of weather, and that the inhabitants, having complained to the admiralty court at Dover of the harbour's being stopped by her lying there, are getting an order for removing her. She was of small value, and is now hardly worth the weighing; but I have desired Dr. Oxenden to order his officers to make particular enquiry. If her captain will make it appear that she was sunk by default of any of his Majesty's subjects, he will have satisfaction decreed; but if it happened through stress of weather or his own fault, the King's subjects are in no way liable. I ordered the ship to be released from the seizure of Captain Lapthorne on 3rd November, before I knew of her being sunk, and will do him right as to his damage without delay according to the laws of nations, and unless he had been denied relief in the ordinary course of justice, I conceive there is no ground of complaint to his Majesty. 1¼ pp. [S.P.42. 5. No. 75.] Enclosed, extracts of letters.
(1) From Capt. Lapthorne, commander of the Experiment, Oct. 6, 1697. On 3rd Oct. at 6 in the morning we saw a sail. I gave chace and came up with him, and firing some guns he hoisted French colours, and after firing some shots at me again, he struck. He is a Privateer of about 40 ton and 40 odd hands. He had when I chased him 8 guns. To lighten his ship he flung 4 great guns overboard with his boat. She has ports for 12 guns besides Patereros and is but five years old. The captain tells me he had leave to stay out 14 days. 1 p. [S.P.42. 5. No. 75 i.]
(2) From Capt. Lapthorne to the Lords of the Admiralty, enclosing his lieutenant's account of the prize being sunk. [Ibid. 75 ii.]
(2) From Ja. Wilson, Capt. Lapthorne's lieutenant, Oct. 8, 1697. Being on board La Laurett, prize of Dunkirk, taken by H.M.S. Experiment and brought into Sandwich bay, it blowing hard we were forced into Ramsgate Peere where she is sunk. She is delivered to Capt. Rutter, prize officer at Ramsgate. 1 p. [Ibid.]
Jan. 1.
Kensington.
Commissions to, Mr. William Thompson to be ensign of Captain Freeman's company in the Marquis de Puissar's regiment of foot. [S.P.44. 167. p. 300]; to Mr. Tho. Thacker to be lieutenant in Captain Ingoldesby's company in the same regiment; to John Trelawny of Coldedrinick, esquire, to be Fort Major of Plymouth. [Ibid. p. 301]; Peter Beckford, esquire, to be deputy governor of Jamaica. [Ibid. p. 307.]
Jan. 1.
Kensington.
Warrant for the payment of 500l. to George Stepney, esquire, envoy extraordinary to the Elector of Brandenburgh and other princes of Germany, for his equipage, and the further sum of 5l. by the day for his ordinary entertainment and allowance, to commence from the date hereof. [S.P.44. 347. p. 124 and S.O.3. 20. p. 137.]
Jan. 1. Warrant for the apprehension of Lord Kerry for sending a challenge to the Lord Chancellor of Ireland. [S.P.44. 349. p. 43.]
Jan. 1. Warrant for the apprehension of Brigadier General Richard Ingoldsby for carrying a challenge to the Lord Chancellor of Ireland. [Ibid.]
Jan. 1. Warrant to Lord Lucas, Governor of the Tower of London, to receive into his custody Thomas, Lord Kerry. [Ibid. p. 44.]
Jan. 1. A like warrant directed as above for committing Brigadier Richard Ingoldsby. [Ibid.]
Jan. 1. Warrant for the apprehension of Donnough, Earl of Clancarty, who stands outlawed for high treason and is lately come over from France. [Ibid.]
Jan. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the apprehension of Capt. — Griffith, Abraham Critwell, — Smith, — Jones, and John Gee for suspicion of high treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 46.]
Jan. 2–12.
Brussels.
The Elector Maximilian Emanuel to William III. Your Majesty's letter of the 31st of last month pleased me very much, since you approve my method of putting the troops of the States General into the fortified towns which have been evacuated. As regards a previous letter, written by your Majesty to me, to which you refer, as I did not receive it I have asked Mr. de Hill about it, and he has explained the riddle. I have been informed to–day by the French commander, who is at Luxembourg, that they are prepared to evacuate la Roche on the 20th, Arlon on the 23rd and Luxembourg on the 25th of this month. I have just given orders to our garrisons to advance, but they will not be able to enter those places before the 28th or 29th of this month, and I am sending Verboom to Mastrich, that Major General Dopf may arrange the advance of the Dutch troops in such a way that they may be there at the same time. The Elector Palatine wishes to put in Luxembourg a regiment of dragoons of 800 horse and three battalions maintained entirely at his expense, and I have consented in obedience to the orders of the King of Spain. I must observe to your Majesty that the offer of my troops has not been accepted yet in Spain. The Consulte of the Conseil d'Etat was quite favourable, and the King even decided to despatch it, but I am informed that the Queen has caused delay. Bernès however writes that all will be settled to my satisfaction, and that I shall have news to that effect by a special messenger, but the messenger does not come. This annoys me extremely, as your Majesty will appreciate. Nevertheless I have put my troops in the fortified towns, as your Majesty has been informed. In any event it would be a consolation to me to know that I have the assurance of your Majesty's support and goodwill. I have communicated to Mr. de Hill what has happened as regards the four small towns of Baumont, Chimay, Walcourt and Bouvignes, to which France so dishonestly disputes our claim, and he has undertaken to inform your Majesty. The Baron de Dikfeld arrived yesterday and we shall confer with him about the loan, but I am awaiting Lieut. General de Coehorn before carrying out your Majesty's intentions. The King of France has sent me the announcement of the marriage of the Duke of Burgundy. I must send my congratulations and I have chosen Monestarol for that purpose. Holograph. French. [S.P.8. 18. ff. 5–8.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Attorney General and Solicitor General, summoning them to attend the King at Kensington the same day. [S.P.44. 99. p. 421.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
The same to the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex. His Majesty having commanded that the Earl of Clancarty, outlawed for high treason and lately come privately hither, should be committed to Newgate, I give you notice, that you may take particular care for his safe keeping, he having before made his escape out of prison. [S.P.44. 99. p. 422.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Two warrants to the Keeper of Newgate to receive into custody Donnogh, Earl of Clancarty. [S.P.44. 349. p. 45.]
Jan. 2.
The Hague.
Passes for Mrs. Jane Ringrave; and for John Williams, soldier, late of Capt. Brand's company in the regiment of Col. Keppel in the States service, having his discharge from Lieut. Col. Auer, dated Zutphen, Dec. 4, '97. [S.P.44. 386. p. 9.]
Jan. 3.
Kensington.
Commission to deliver up to the French part of the island of St. Christopher's. By Letters Patent addressed to Christopher Codrington, esq., Captain General and Governor in chief of the islands of Nevis, St. Christopher's, Mountserrat, Antegoa, and the rest of the Leeward Charibee islands in America: reciting that by an article of the Treaty of Peace concluded at Ryswick on the 10th September last it was agreed that islands and colonies taken from either party since the late war should be restored; the King appoints Christopher Codrington his deputy to deliver to such persons as shall be appointed by the French King "all that part of the island of St. Christopher's which was in the actual possession and occupation of the subjects of the said King before the late war and to remove from thence all our subjects with their goods." Memorandum. The foregoing commission was sent to Lord Ambr. Williamson the 25th of January, 1697, to be delivered to the French ambassador at the Hague. [S.P.44. 167. p. 302.]
Jan. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for affixing the Great Seal to the above commission. [Ibid. p. 303.]
Jan. 3. Instructions for Christopher Codrington, esq. Whereas by an instrument bearing even date [there follows a recital of the above commission]: You are upon receipt hereof to give notice to all our good subjects of the obligation we lie under by the said Treaty to make such restitution, to the end they may timely proceed to remove their persons, goods etc. before any demand shall be made from you of the French part of the island, taking care that no just cause of complaint be given by any spoil or devastation. You are to surrender [to the French commissioners] all that part of the island whereof the subjects of the French King were possessed before the declaration of the late war, taking an acquittance, and demanding from the French the former liberty enjoyed by our subjects of fetching salt from the salt ponds, and carrying the same away as well by sea as by land, and on the other hand declaring our intentions of permitting the subjects of the said King the like freedom of entering into the rivers of the Great Road, there to fetch water in such manner as before the late war. Memorandum. A duplicate of the foregoing commission was sent to Col. Codrington, together with the foregoing instructions and a letter from Mr. Secretary the 5th of Feb., 1697. The letter is entered in the Extra Provincial Book. [S.P.44. 167. p. 304.]
Jan. 3.
Wherwell.
Ja. Vernon to Postmasters. The King would have you draw up a state how the matters of the Post Office between us and France now stand, and what is the debt they demand of us and what is to be allowed for the non–payment or the moderating thereof, as also what may be fit to be insisted on, on our side, to make the treaty more equal between us in relation to the conveyance of letters through France, it being his pleasure that Lord Portland have the whole scheme of that affair. [S.P. 44. 99. p. 423.]
Jan. 3. Copy of the Act signed by Isaac Lambe, proctor of John Lambert, of London, merchant, upon which the Decree [see below] was made to discharge the captain and ship from arrest. The proctor made protestation of not receding from any manner of damage sustained by Lambert and owners of the goods seized in the St. John (William Gibson, master) by reason of the capture of the ship by the privateer the Dragon (Francis de Mettre, captain) and carrying the same into Dunkirk, and the undue sale of the goods by the owners of the privateer or by order of the Court of Admiralty of Dunkirk. The proctor alleges that the owner of the privateer has assured Lambert and the other owners that they shall have justice in the Courts of France, and consents to the release. 2 pp. Endorsed, R. Feb. 7. [S.P. 42. 5. No. 76.]
Jan. 3. Copy of an interlocutory decree of the Admiralty Court of the Cinque Ports releasing the ship Dragon, and the captain, Francis de Mitre, from arrest in the action brought by John Lambert. Endorsed, R. Feb. 7. 2½ pp. [Ibid. No. 77.]
Jan. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for the grant to Sir John Crew of Utkeinton, in the county of Chester, and his heirs, of the offices of forester, bowbearer and bailiff of the forest of Delamer: Sir John Crew represented that he and his ancestors had enjoyed these offices ever since the reign of King Henry II, and feared he might have forfeited the same, by omitting through a long and dangerous sickness to sign the Association within the time limited by a late Act of Parliament. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 144.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Lords of the Admiralty. The King having appointed George Stepney, esq., his envoy extraordinary to some princes of Germany, commands a yacht to be ready to transport him to Holland. [S.P. 44. 204. p. 153.]
Jan. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland directing them to order a quo warranto to be brought against the corporation of brewers in the city of Dublin, in respect of exactions and illegal practices under colour of their charter. [S.P. 44. 163. pp. 27–29, and S.O. 1. 14. p. 44.]
Jan. 3. Caveat that nothing pass in relation to Master of the Ordnance in Ireland with the words Master General without first giving notice to the Earl of Romney. [S.P. 44. 75. p. 1, and Ibid. 74. p. 8.]
Jan. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for a pardon for Hilary Renew, William Lewin, and Bernard Lawrence of London, merchants, who have, at several times since war was declared with France, traded with that kingdom, with a design to gain as much intelligence as possible in matters relating to the French fleet and other things of importance, whereof they gave advice constantly. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 126.] The pardon is entered in S.O. 3. 20. f. 138.
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Samuel Britton and Martin Borne, mariners, belonging to the Mary, setting forth that they lie under sentence of death for insisting upon making choice of their ship to serve his Majesty in, which liberty has been all along allowed, and begging for pardon. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 170.]
Jan. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for the insertion of John Norcott in the next general pardon for the poor convicts of Newgate, upon condition of transportation; he was sentenced to death for felony and was reprieved. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 127.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Lord Lucas, Governor of the Tower, to bring Brigadier Ingoldsby to the Duke of Shrewsbury's office at Whitehall, to be examined. [S.P.44. 349. p. 46.]
Jan. 3.
The Hague.
Pass to Terence Murfy, who has served in his Majesty's hospitals in Flanders the space of four years as porter, having his certificate from Mr. Patrick Lambe, M. Perkins, comptroller, T. Lawrence, physician general, and Isaac Teale. [S.P. 44. 386. p. 9.]
Jan. 3–5. Journals of the House of Lords. 1¼ pp. [S.P. 32. 9. ff. 3–4.]
Jan. 3. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 19. Printed. 4 pp. [S.P. 32. 9. ff. 1–2.]
Jan. 4.
London.
Sir Miles Cook to Sir Joseph Williamson. My long silence has not happened for want of a due respect, but I delayed the longer (till I am now ashamed) to be able to take some measures of the proceedings of this Parliament. But, though they have sat so long, they have done so little, that much cannot be said thereof. Indeed the Commons (I think the 2nd day they sat) were very forward in voting down a standing army; and seem to me to be so out of breath, with the haste they made therein, that they have done little since; the reason may be because, till the debt of the nation be perfectly calculated, they can not proceed upon ways and means, so that at the writing hereof I can neither foresee how much must be raised nor how, but by guess I fear there will be little, if any, abatement of taxes this year than was the last. Thursday last my two Lord Chief Justices and my Lord Chancellor gave their opinion in the great cause between the Duke of Devonshire and the Marquis of Normanby and were very clear and unanimous for the dismissing of Lord Normanby's Bill. They built their opinion upon this foundation, viz.: that all the treaties and agreements (as they were called) between Lord Barkley and Lord Normanby (upon which the latter founded his equity) were so loose and imperfect that it could not be said such an agreement as either obliged Lord Normanby to purchase or Lord Barkly to convey, so that, the Duke of Devonshire's contract being legal and the money paid, both in law and equity, the Duke of Devonshire may be said the first purchaser.
The Lords were all this day in polishing a Bill of new treasons sent up by the Commons. I can not undertake to contract the heads: it is not capable of an abridgement, indeed it is pity any part of it should [be] lost. We expect to–morrow Lord Macclesfield will bring in his Bill, both for bastardisation of her children and divorce of his lady (she having for certain within this 2 years had 2 c hildren), but the Bill will not easily pass. And this week the Lords will come to a conclusion when, where and how to try Lord Moone for the death of the last man he killed. Endorsed, R. 23. 98. 2½ pp. [S.P. 32. 9. f. 13.]
Jan. 4.
Doctors' Commons.
Geo. Oxenden [to the same]. I give your Excellency the trouble of this because I can give you a more exact account of the release of the French privateer the Dragon and the captain, Francis Dumitre, at Dover, than Mr. Secretary Vernon can possibly do this post; for at this time Whitehall is all on fire, it being now past 10 o'cl. at night. I can see it from my windows, and my man is just come from thence from helping some friends, and he tells me it came just as far as the chapel before he came away. It burns towards the bridge and new garden. The Treasury Chambers were blown up before he came away, and I heard blowings up just as I write.
I know you have had an account from Mr. Secretary Vernon concerning the Dragon privateer. I am the judge of the admiralty of the Cinque Ports. This ship was arrested by warrant out of that court at the suit of one Lambert in a cause of damage, for that the captain had taken his ship and goods after the time allowed by the articles of peace. The proceedings went against the ship by way of default, in regard the captain pleaded nothing, and only wrote to his owners, so that the merits of his case were not known, until the reprisals made by the French at Dunkirk on Major–General Earl's hostages and some other ships at Dunkirk were made known to the King. Then Mr. Secretary Vernon sent for me, to acquaint me of it, and to know how matters stood, and what was to be done.
I sent for Lambert, who lives in London, and told him to give me his case in writing, which he did, and I found he had no cause of a civil action here against Dumitre nor the ship, in regard he sets forth that Dumitre had carried him into Dunkirk on the 18th of October, and that, according to his commission and the sea laws concerning privateers, the captain had brought the ship into his own admiralty jurisdiction and had committed the matter to be examined and decided by the judges of the Court: and it appeared to me that it was a Dutch ship and the goods partly belonged to the subjects of Spain, and that Lambert's goods were sold by order of the Judge of the Court. Whereupon I immediately acquainted his proctor that I should forthwith give order to release the ship and captain, in regard this matter depended in the Courts at Dunkirk, and the captain had not committed anything against his commission, and that, the goods being sold by the order of the Admiralty Court at Dunkirk, our Courts could not examine, annul or make void their order or decrees. But if injustice was done him there, he must seek remedy by appeal etc. When I had declared this to them, they came the next day and said that Lambert would consent himself that the arrest should be taken off and the ship released. Whereupon I ordered a Court at Dover as yesterday, and that the captain should be brought thither to be released. And this is to assure you that he is released accordingly by the consent of Lambert; for I received a letter from Lambert's own proctor at Dover by this post which has given me an account of it. It was done yesterday.
The Act is to this effect, that Lambert protests not to recede from the damage done by the captain, and the ship Dragon; and the captain offering for himself and owners to answer the damage in the Courts of France, Lambert consents that he be released and the ship likewise: whereupon the Court discharges the captain and ship. Lambert paid the fees of the prison etc., and the decree is by his consent, he hoping thereby to be favoured on his pretences to justice in the Courts of France; and if he states his case aright his goods were unduly sold at Dunkirk.
However, the French have now no pretence to keep the hostages or ships upon this account. I did intend to have given Mr. Secretary Vernon an account of the release of this ship this afternoon in the House, but he went before my letters came, and the fire coming afterwards there was no seeing him, which has made me give this account to your Excellency, who I know will take all care that the hostages and ships be released. Endorsed, Jan. 4, R. 23, 98. 4 pp. [S.P. 32. 15. ff. 1–2.]
Jan. 4. Translation into French of the part of the above letter relating to the case of the Dragon. 1½ pp. [S.P. 42. 5. No. 78.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the same. I write to your Excellency in a terrible confusion, the greatest part of Whitehall being now in a flame. I would not, however, omit acknowledging your letters of the 3rd, 7th and 10th inst. [N.S.], which have been laid before the King. If the French stay only for the releasing of the commander of the Dragon and his ship before they send back Major General Erle's hostage, they will not longer delay it, Dr. Oxenden, judge of the Cinque Ports, having assured me he has sent orders to Dover for setting at liberty both the one and the other. I hope the readiness we show to be the first to gratify them will induce them to send home the six ships detained at Dunkirk, and to do right to the owners.
The enclosed extract of a letter from Sir Charles Hedges will show how the case stands with regard to the French privateer sunk at Ramsgate. If they have anything further to demand of us on that account, you will see where they have their proper remedy, without having recourse to so unjustifiable methods as reprisals.
The draft of the commission for restoring the French part of St. Christopher's is prepared and ready for the King's hand; there will be no delay in sending it to you, but I would know first from the Admiralty in what time we can have an advice boat ready to carry a duplicate of this commission to Colonel Codrington, with such instructions as his Majesty shall think fit to give him on this occasion, that the Commission may not be brought home from France for delivering them possession before he receives his Majesty's pleasure in what manner he would have it done. Endorsed, R. Jan. 23, 98. 2 pp. [S.P. 32. 15. ff. 3–4.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to Sir Jo. Williamson. The Earl of Clancarty being come privately from France, where he has served ever since his escape out of the Tower, he came last Saturday at 10 at night under a false name to Lord Sunderland's house (my lord and lady being gone into the country) and asking to speak with Lady Clancarty's woman, was by her carried up to the young lady's chamber, as in all probability was concerted between them; but the porter of the house upon recollection knowing the Earl of Clancarty, he sent to Lord Spencer to acquaint him with it, and his lordship giving immediate notice thereof to the Secretary of State, a messenger with a guard was sent, who found him in bed with his lady, and brought him to Whitehall. He was kept that night upon the guard, and the next day was committed to Newgate, being outlawed for treason, and attainted by an Act of Parliament that passed the last sessions in Ireland. This was the first time the Earl of Clancarty bedded his lady, they being married very young, and he having afterwards, during the late rebellion in Ireland, where he was engaged, married and owned another wife, who is since dead.
The Lord of Derry [sic], an Irish Baron, having upon some words that passed betwixt him and the Lord Chancellor of Ireland, sent him a challenge since his coming to England, he was on Saturday last apprehended by the Secretary of State's warrant and committed to the Tower, as was likewise Brigadier Ingolsby, who carried the challenge.
Lord Portland intends to part from hence next Thursday in his Embassy to France, having already sent away all his equipage and servants.
Mr. Stepney is on his departure with the character of H.M. Envoy Extraordinary to the Court of Brandenbourg.
A gentleman is come over from France to take a house for Count Tallard, who is coming ambassador from thence; and he is treating about the Duke of Ormond's house in St. James Square.
Yesterday the House of Commons were in a committee of the whole House upon the Bill about hammered money and went through the same. By this Bill a stop is put to the currency of all hammered coin, and leave is given to bring the same to any of the Mints to be recoined, for which they are to be given back weight for weight, and the King to be at the charge of the coinage.
Letters from Dublin of the 28 past give an account that 8 companies of Col. Frederick Hamilton's regiment are landed at Bantry, so that whole regiment is now arrived in Ireland, as likewise that of the Marquis Puissars: of Sir Matthew Bridge's regiment 11 companies and a half are landed there, but only 2 of Brigadier Tiffin's.
About 4 this afternoon a fire broke out at Whitehall in Col. Stanley's lodgings near the waterside, which got such a head that nowithstanding all the care that was taken with playing of engines, and blowing up of part of the buildings, the King's apartment, with the lodgings adjoining, and part of the new long gallery, and the other way the old presence Chamber, and as far as the Chapel are burnt down.
The House of Commons were this day upon the examination of the abuse of the Exchequer Bills, and committed Mr. Knight to the Tower. They sent for Mr. Burton, but he was not to be found. Endorsed, R. 23. 98. 3 pp. [S.P. 32. 9. ff. 5–6.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Newsletter. On Saturday last Lord Kerry and Brigadier Ingoldsby were committed to the Tower [as above]. The quarrel arose upon some words which Lord Kerry took offence at in a cause that was hearing in the House of Lords in Ireland. Brigadier Ingoldsby was examined yesterday before a committee of the Council, and he protested that he did not know the quality and station of Mr. Methuen; their lordships were very well satisfied that he did not do it out of any disrespect to the Government, so the King this day ordered him to be discharged, but Lord Kerry still remains in custody.
The House of Commons sat very late this day, most of their time being taken up with the examination of Mr. Marriot, who in the morning had sent a letter to a member of the House to acquaint him that he was willing to make a full discovery of what he knew relating to the abuse of the Exchequer Bills, and, being brought to the Bar of the House, besides himself he accused Mr. Knight and Mr. Burton of being privy to the false endorsement of them, and that he did most of them by their persuasions. Mr. Knight, as being a member of the House, was committed to the Tower; but Mr. Burton is not yet to be found.
About 4 this afternoon a fire broke out at Whitehall. The fierceness of the fire still continues; it is now past eleven, and God knows where it will end. Endorsed, R. 23. 98. 21/5 pp. [Ibid. ff. 7–8.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Jo. Williamson. This evening a very terrible fire broke out in Whitehall near Lord Portland's lodgings, which in a short time made so great a havoc that, to give a stop to it, they were forced on one side to blow up the Treasury office, and on the other side the Watergate, and the buildings adjoining to the Chapel; all between being burnt down, viz.: the King and Queen's apartment, Lord Portland's lodgings, the Duke of Shrewsbury's office, and all the lodgings on the water side, as far as the water gate: I write this from Mr. Secretary Vernon's office, and am in such a hurry and disorder that I must beg your Excellency's excuse that I can say no more. 1 p. [S.P. 32. 9. f. 9.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Tho. Hopkins to the same, enclosing a "news paper." 1 p. [Ibid. f. 10.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to the same. While I am writing this I see a great part of the Court on fire, all the lodgings in the Stone Gallery, and the Queen's back–stairs and part of the Duke of Shrewsbury's office being already burnt, and the fire little abating as yet for two blowings up.
The Earl of Clancarty was committed to Newgate, where his lady has this day liberty to visit him. This matter with all its circumstances causes much discourse. The Earl of Sunderland is with his lady at Windsor, she being very ill, but intends speedily for Althrop.
The King has not yet parted with the Chamberlain's staff.
Sir Fletw. Shepherd has deceived us, and lives still.
It is now past ten and the fire has lasted 6 hours.
The Treasury is newly blown up, and we [? see] it is stopped that way. The Chapel is gone, and they are about to blow up the Water Gate. God send the rest be saved. Endorsed, R. 23, 98. 4 pp. [Ibid. ff. 11–12.]
Jan. 4. Report by Nicholas Baker on the case of Cecilia Labree, apprehended about Sept., 1696, for uttering counterfeit money. She turned King's evidence. In May last she was found guilty both of coining and filing money. She then gave further information as to coiners to Mr. Packer, J.P. for Middlesex, and the Lords Justices ordered her to be reprieved. Mr. Packer is lately dead, and the informations were in his possession. She informed of two persons, who lived in St. Martin's Lane and have fled; one Saunders, who lived in Surrey, who was tried and acquitted at the last assizes, and one Netter, who stands now indicted. 1 p. [Ibid. ff. 14–15.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Postmasters. Your agent at Harwich must not permit the packet boat to sail till he has received his Majesty's letters, which will not be sent till to–morrow. [S.P. 44. 99. p. 423.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Popple, desiring to know how soon the instructions of the Lords of the Council of Trade, which are to accompany the King's commission for restoring to the French their part of St. Christopher's, will be ready. [Ibid. p. 424.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Admiralty. Orders are to be given for discharging James Mason, a Swedish subject, who was pressed five months since on board H.M.S. Edgar out of a ship from Norway bringing planks to the Thames, upon the representation of the case made by Mons. Leyoncrona, the Swedish resident. [S.P. 44. 204. p. 154.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
The same to the same, requiring an advice boat to be made ready with all expedition to carry the King's orders to Colonel Codrington, Governor of the Leeward Islands. [Ibid.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
The same to [the same], directing two small vessels to be prepared to carry the King's letters to Calais, and return with the Earl of Portland's letters, until such time as the packet boats can be got ready. [Ibid. p. 155.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate to permit the Countess of Clancarty to be with her husband Donnogh, Earl of Clancarty, at convenient hours. [S.P. 44. 349. p. 46.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Lord Lucas, Governor of the Tower, to set at liberty Brigadier Richard Ingoldsby. [Ibid. p. 47.]
Jan. 4.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland, reciting the warrant of July 22 ult. to set a tack to the University of Glasgow of the rents of the archbishop of Glasgow for 19 years, and renewing the same. Cf. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1697, p. 263 [S.P. 57. 16. p. 482.]
Jan. 4.
Kensington.
Warrant for a second reprieve for William Johnson. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 128.]
Jan. 4.
Kensington.
Pass to — Conne to retire from France. [S.P. 44. 387. p. 145.]
Jan. 4. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 20. (Printed.) 6 pp. [S.P. 32. 9. ff. 16–18.]
Jan. 5.
Kensington.
Warrant for a commission constituting John, Lord Carmichael, H.M. High Commissioner, to represent him in the ensuing General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, which is to meet at Edinburgh the — day of January inst. [S.P. 57. 16. pp. 477–9.]
Jan. 5.
Kensington.
The King's instructions to Lord Carmichael.
1. You are to take particular care that nothing be done in the General Assembly prejudicial to our authority or prerogative, and that they treat of nothing but of ecclesiastical affairs.
2. You may give the Assembly assurance of our resolution to maintain Presbyterian Church Government in the Church of Scotland.
3. You are to let them understand that it is our inclination that they apply themselves chiefly to the planting of vacant churches, especially in the north. And you are to hinder the turning of those ministers out of their churches who have qualified themselves according to law, by taking the oaths to us. And for those who have not qualified themselves, it being a civil affair, we shall give directions to our Council concerning them.
4. You are to endeavour, as much as you can, that the Assembly do assume some of the ministers who preached under Episcopacy, who are pious and moderate men and have already taken the oaths to us, or are willing presently to take them and qualify themselves according to law.
5. Since our affairs cannot allow the Assemblies sitting long at this time, we are satisfied there be a commission of the most moderate of the ministers and elders appointed to plant vacant churches and to receive them of the episcopal ministers who have taken, or shall take, the oaths according to law.
6. You may advise with our Chancellor, or any other officers of State or members of the Assembly that you think fit, in matters of difficulty.
7. You are to conclude the Assembly as soon and with as much calmness and unanimity as is possible, and at farthest within 15 days after meeting, and appoint a new Assembly to meet at Edinburgh in the beginning of January, 1699. [S.P. 57. 16. pp. 479–80.]
Jan. 5.
Kensington.
The King to the Moderator, Ministers and Elders of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland. We are so well satisfied with your proceedings at the last General Assembly that we agree to your meeting now, though another time had been more convenient for our affairs. We have again made choice of John, Lord Carmichael, to be our Commissioner, who we know will be acceptable to you. And we doubt not but you will act in such a manner in this Assembly that we shall have new reason to be satisfied with you. And we renew our assurances of our protection and countenance to the Presbyterian Government now settled in the Church of Scotland.
You know it is our inclination, and we do recommend to you to assume the episcopal ministers whose lives and doctrine render them useful to the Church. And likewise the planting the churches in the North with the most prudent and pious of your ministers, and that you send some of your number, who are best qualified, to preach in the remote highland parishes, where ministers are not provided, and where there appears to be much need of a Reformation both from popery and profanity. In all which we expect to hear of your care and performance. [Ibid. pp. 480–1.]
Jan. 5.
Kensington.
Warrant for payment of 500l. to Lord Carmichael as Commissioner to the General Assembly. [Ibid. p. 481.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Lord Ambassador Williamson. An express sent to overtake last night's mail gives me an opportunity to acquaint you with the great ravage the fire has made in Whitehall. Except the banqueting house and the great gate all is burnt down or blown up on the privy garden side, as far as the tower where you keep the papers of State. Those are not yet removed, but Mr. Addison still thinks of doing it, lest the tower may have been damaged by the neighbourhood of such a devouring fire, which is still kept alive in the ruins of the popish chapel. It was once or twice much doubted whether the banquet–house could be saved; if it escapes, it is only preserved by blowing up all near it on that side. The destruction made towards the waterside is that the King and Queen's lodgings, both old and new, are burnt, with the presence, guard chambers, chapel and playhouse, with all the range of buildings beyond it to the end of the Green Cloth office and the lodgings belonging to it. A house of Mr. Lamb's, that lay behind them, was blown up, as also the vicechamberlain's and Sir James Forbes' lodgings.
It was seven this morning before the fire was mastered. It would not have spread so far if timely care had been taken to make large overtures by blowing up in the proper places. The Vane Room should have been laid flat at the beginning, and another gap should have been made from Lord Montague's lodgings to the waterside.
In the proceedings in the Commons against Mr. Knight and Mr. Burton, who have been sent to the Tower and Newgate respectively, I perceived some were in hopes to have found that the commissioners of the Treasury had made advantages by these false endorsements, at least as far as they were concerned in subscriptions towards the circulating exchequer bills; but no such thing appeared.
You will have had an account from other hands in what a cavalier manner Lord Clancarty came over on Saturday last, and consummated his marriage with Lord Sunderland's daughter. Being discovered by Lord Spencer, he was apprehended and sent to Newgate as one outlawed for high treason. The next regular proceeding against him is to charge him with a capias utlagatum, in consequence whereof he must appear at the King's Bench next term to show cause why execution should not be awarded against him.
As to the memorial you sent hither from the French ambassador concerning the negroes taken by Nevill's squadron, his Majesty has received some account from the Admiralty how many of those negroes the several captains own to have taken, and how they disposed of them, and it being said that some of them were brought into England, his Majesty has required an account from the Commissioners for the exchange of prisoners how many of them have been delivered to them, and where they are, and the Admiralty are ordered to inform him how the rest of the negroes are to be recovered, it being his intention that such of them as can be found shall be sent back. Endorsed, R. 23. 98. 3 pp. [S.P. 32. 15. ff. 5–6.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Postmaster General. I send you H.M.'s despatches for Holland, which you are to forward immediately by express to Harwich, and send directions at the same time that the packet boat sail with these letters and the mail as soon as the wind permits. [S.P. 44. 99. p. 425.]
Jan. 5. Deposition (by interpretation) made before George Oxenden in the presence of Henry Dethick, junior, notary public, of Michael Schade, master, and Lawrence Norman, Henry Williams and John Baptist Moran Fangeno, mariners, of the ship Perseverance. This ship was freighted at Ostend to carry Brigadier Zachary Tiffin and his regiment to Cork; she sailed 9–19th Dec. last, and was cast on the sands at Dymchurch in a violent storm next day. They give an account of the loss and plundering of the ship. The crew were "entertained" at the house of Thomas Handfeild, J.P. They lodged on the bare boards, and were given no provisions, but he demanded 4l. of them, and took of them 3l. 4s. The best anchor and cable were seized by an officer for the King's use. The owners of the ship are Mr. Gillett, Treasurer of Newport, John Hunson of Rysele in France and the said Michael Schade, dwelling at Lingen in Westphalia, belonging to his Majesty as Graff of Lingen. 3 pp. [S.P. 32. 9. ff. 19–20.]
Jan. 5. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 21. (Printed.) 4 pp. [Ibid. ff. 21–22.]
Jan. 5. Brief notes of proceedings of the House of Commons. 1 p. [Ibid. f. 23.]
Jan. 5. Warrant to Lord Lucas, Governor of the Tower, to set at liberty Lord Kerry. [S.P. 44. 349. p. 47.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Mayor of Worcester. His Majesty being informed that Grindall Wilson, James Ibbots and Samuel Clark, three prisoners in Worcester Gaol, are able to accuse several persons of clipping, coining, and uttering of false money, he commands me to send you the enclosed list of some of those they have named. You are to enquire into this and secure such as you see just cause for. Several of those named live in the county of Worcester and are not within your jurisdiction. I have written to some of the Justices of that county that they join with you in taking the depositions, and that they assist in apprehending such as inhabit in the county. You are to transmit hither copies of the depositions with the examinations of the parties that shall be apprehended: and for the encouragement of the three above named persons to give full and just accounts of their whole knowledge you should acquaint them that they may hope for mercy according to the sincerity of their confessions, and that you and the other Justices will intercede for them as they shall give you satisfaction therein. You will communicate this letter to Robert Wyld, esq., and such other Justices as shall have notice to advise with you and perform their parts in carrying on this public service. [S.P. 44. 99. pp. 425–427.]
The information which was sent enclosed.
24 December, 1679. Impeached by Grindall Wilson, a prisoner in the gaol for the city of Worcester.
James Ibbots, a prisoner in Worcester gaol, for uttering counterfeit milled money. Thomas Robinson of Dymocke, co. Glouc., smith, for coining of milled money. John Baxter of Bromesgrove, co. Worc., nayler, for counterfeiting and making false milled money and old money. Richard Tayler of Bromesgrove, skinner, for coining milled money. John Elton, of Newent, co. Glouc., weaver, for coining new milled money. William Sheldon, of Bromesgrove, gent., and Richard Tayler, of Bromsgrove, for uttering false pieces of gold. Charles Bignoll of Ripple, brickmaker, for clipping and coining. John Gough and Ann his wife of Twining, co. Glouc., for uttering. Joseph Elton of Newent, blacksmith, for coining. John or William Cherwardine of the city of London, silversmith, for coining 80l. per week, to his knowledge, and uttering the same. Mary the wife of John Syllions in Dymock parish, mercer, for coining and uttering.
Impeached by Samuel Clark.
William Wintour of Dimock, esq., for procuring silver and blanch copper to make counterfeit money and uttering the same. Edmund Marmion of Tewkesbury, John Dee and Robert Dee of Breedon, William Milward of Colberrowe near Litchfield, co. Staff., Thomas Powell of Sutton Cowfield, co. Staff., for clipping and coining. John Fosbrooke of Bewdley, baker, for uttering. Richard Powell of Sutton Cofield, co. Staff., for clipping and coining. — Whodcocke of Sutton Cofield, apothecary, and the wife of Edward Glover of Sutton Cowfield for selling clippings and uttering false money. Thomas Marston of Sutton Cofield for procuring broad money and uttering false money. Joseph Jackson of Hales Owen, co. Salop; William Harris of Hales Owen, smith; William Cutler of Hales Owen, smith; John Cutler of Hales Owen, smith; John and Samuel Westwood of Old Swinford, co. Worc., locksmiths; Richard Perkes, locksmith, George Cooksey and Edward Perkes, all of Old Swinford, for clipping and coining.
If my Lord Chief Justice's warrant be issued, direct it to Joseph Dineley, gent., Francis England, James Brittaine, Thomas Tayler, Thomas Wigsall, John Truelove, Thomas Vale, George Bird, John Jecocks. [S.P. 44. 99. pp. 427–9.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Wyld. I have sent by this post to the Mayor of Worcester [there follows a summary of the above letter]. His Majesty commands that you act herein in concert with the Mayor. You will take to your assistance Edmund Lechmere, William Hancock and Chambers Slaughter, esqs., or such other Justices as you shall think proper, to attend upon this service which is of so great concern to the public. [Ibid. p. 430.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Commissioners for exchange of prisoners. I send you herewith, by his Majesty's command, a list of Irish prisoners to the number of 50, to be transported to France and landed at Dieppe. If all of those named are not to be found among the prisoners in the Savoye and Newgate, you are to make enquiry and find them if possible. [S.P. 44. 99. p. 424.]
[The list referred to.] Jaques Madden, senr., Jaques Madden, junr., Thomas Mead, Laurence Conners, Jaques Black, Stephanus Nagle, Jean Sullivane, François Ridgeway, Waters Sullivane, Pierre Barry, Nich. Flacket, Bryan Dagley, Patrick Cadwell, Guilliaume Fortune, Wouters Clements, Rogie MacMahone, Oliver Peaton, Dennis Leyon, Richardus Conners, Patrick Bailing, Guill. Noel, Jaques le Roye, Edw. Arcdeacon, Jean Welch, Neal O'Neal, Dominicus Gough, Thom. Murfen, Robt. Salmony, Derby Carty, Bart. Ward, Edwd. Birne, Richds. Rowe, Ian Rea, Jean Lingue, Paul Sinnet, Timo. Harrinton, Fras. Staples, Timo. Sullivane, Mattheus Wafer, Richds. Read, Rds. Grace, Phil. Hogan, Pat. Shea, Jaques Highland, Tobias Butler, Jean Bryan, Jaques Barry, Guil. Vaghen, Dan. Sullivane, Timo. Sullevane.
[The above list is headed] Extrait du Protocol de la mediation de sa Majte. de Suede, tenu au Chateau de Ryswick le 10–20 Septre., 1697. [Ibid. p. 431.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. His Majesty commands you to enquire where the French and negroes now are, which were brought to Virginia in H.M. squadron that went lately to the West Indies, and how as many of them as are living may be recovered, to be sent home again, which you are to take care be done as soon as possible, and to give me notice of it. I send you a copy of an account of them which I received from the Lords of the Admiralty. [Ibid. p. 424.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Lords of the Admiralty. I have laid before the King your account of Frenchmen and negroes brought by the West India squadron to Virginia. He intends that as many of them as can be found shall be sent home. Enquiry is therefore to be made where they are to be found, and how they may be recovered. [S.P. 44. 204. p. 155.]
Jan. 6.
Kensington.
Warrant for a further reprieve for Cecilia Labrée. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 128.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate, to permit the Earl of Clancarty to have the use of pen, ink and paper for one time only. [S.P. 44. 349. p. 48.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the apprehension of Major George Holmes, for high treason in compassing the death of the King. [Ibid.]
Jan. 6. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 22. (Printed). 4 pp. [S.P. 32. 9. ff. 24–25.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to Sir Jo. Williamson. I writt my last letter to you in a great deal of hurry, and thought, as every body else did, that the fire was then stopped, but it broke out again next the Council Chamber, and was not quite overcome till towards 7 o'clock the next morning. The King and Queen's apartments, the Presence Rooms, Guard Chambers, Chapel, Great Hall, the new long Gallery, the offices of the Duke of Shrewsbury, Treasury, Council Chamber, Council of Trade, Green Cloth, the new Chapel built by King James, and all the lodgings between the Banqueting House and the Privy Garden, as far as the Paper Office are burnt down. The Banqueting House was in much danger, but, by the care taken, the fire did not reach it. Lord Portland's and the Earl of Essex's lodgings remain standing, but all the other lodgings are down from thence to Lord Wharton's lodgings, as are likewise the Vice–Chamberlain's and Sir James Forbes's; so that in a word all the chief part of Whitehall is destroyed. Where the public offices above mentioned will be placed I can not yet say, but the only proper place that is now left for them, are the lodgings in the Cock Pit.
[Parliamentary News.] The Bill to secure the conspirators now in prison who were concerned in the intended assassination of his Majesty was read the 3rd time and passed; in which there is a clause that such of the same conspirators as shall be hereafter taken and against whom there is one witness, shall be likewise detained by virtue of this Act, to which some opposition was made; and when the question was put, whether the Bill should pass, there were some Noes, and Mr. Brotherton demanded a Division, but their number was so small that every body went out with the Yeas, except Mr. Brotherton, Sir George Hungerford and Sir Edward Williams, who were left alone in the House, for which they were not a little laughed at.
Lord Kerry upon a submissive petition, is discharged out of the Tower. Lord Portland has deferred his departure till Monday next. Endorsed, R. 23, 98. 4 pp. [S.P. 32. 9. ff. 26–27.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
J. Vernon to the same. The King is considering where to place the necessary offices again [after the fire]. I think the Council, Treasury and Secretaries' offices may be provided for in the Princess's lodgings at the Cockpit. I suppose the Green Cloth will provide for themselves in Scotland Yard.
To–morrow there will be a new trial made about the number of forces to be kept up this year; I hope gentlemen will have better considered that matter. Endorsed, R. 23, 98. 1 p. [S.P. 32. 15. ff. 7–8.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to the same. The fire has left nothing but the name of Whitehall, all being down from the gate that goes into the Cockpit in a line to the Thames, and thence along the river side almost to Sir Stephen Fox's lodgings. The banqueting house screened this range of low buildings, and this is the only office now to be used. The King came hither on Wednesday to view the ruins and to consider of some convenient place for the Council Office, Treasury, Secretaries' Offices, Council of Trade and the Green Cloth that have now no being. Endorsed, R. 23, 98. 3 pp. [Ibid. ff. 9–10.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Tho. Hopkins to the same. The dreadful fire I mentioned in my last was not extinguished before six o'clock the next morning; the havoc it has made is almost incredible, and it is much sooner told what is remaining of Whitehall than what is destroyed. There are none of the new buildings left; and of the old nothing besides the Banqueting House, and the Paper buildings of the north side towards Scotland Yard. The Paper Office over the Gate–house is preserved by blowing up the building contiguous to it, but so shattered that it's thought it must be taken down. Our office is the only one left in the House. The Council Office, the Treasury and the other Secretary's Office will, I hear, be kept for the present in the Cockpit.
Mr. Stepney will be going for Holland on his way to Berlin about Monday next. 2 pp. [S.P. 32. 9. f. 28.]
Jan. 7. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 23. (Printed.) 4 pp. [Ibid. ff. 29–30.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Appointment by Charles, Earl of Selkirk, clerk to H.M. Council, Registers and Rolls in Scotland, of John Mitchelson of Middleton, advocate, to be deputy clerk and keeper of the general register, in the place of George Robertson, deceased. [S.P. 54, 1, No. 4.]
Jan. 7.
The Hague.
Passes to Dr. John Powel and Mr. Simon Adams late of the University of Oxon, the former of Lincoln Coll., the other fellow of Magdalene: and "to my Secretary Mr. Delafaye." [S.P. 44. 386. p. 9.]
Jan. 7. Warrant for the apprehension of James Waight and — Bishe for suspicion of high treason. [S.P. 44. 349. p. 50.]
Jan. 7–14. "The Journals of the House of Lords." 3 pp. [S.P. 32. 9. ff. 31–32.]
Jan. 8.
Kensington.
Secret instructions to the Earl of Portland, going as ambassador extraordinary to France. He will assure the Most Christian King of my friendship and of my most earnest wish to live on terms of intimacy and perfect harmony with him, and that I for my part will do all I can with that object, hoping that he will do the same.
And to that end the ambassador will try to ascertain whether it might not be possible to find means of preventing a war, which might result if the King of Spain died childless.
The ambassador will also do his utmost to induce (obliger) the Most Christian King to make King James and his family quit his dominions, or at least to send them as far from his Court and the seacoast as possible.
And the same also above all things as regards the conspirators against my life. At Kensington, this 8 January, 1698.
Endorsed. Copy of the secret instructions for the Earl of Portland this 8 January, 1698. French: printed by Dr. Japikse from the original, I. p. 218, 191 b. [S.P. 8. 18. ff. 9–10.]
Jan. 8.
Kensington.
Commissions to: Mr. Henry Gore to be ensign in Colonel Tiffin's company; Mr. John Dogherty to be chaplain to Colonel Gustavus Hamilton's regiment; and Leonard Thickpenny, gent., to be second lieutenant in Captain John Johnson's company in Brigadier Tiffin's regiment of grenadiers. [S.P. 44. 167. p. 307.]
Jan. 8. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 24. (Printed.) 2 pp. [S.P.32. 9. f. 33.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Postmaster General. His Majesty commands you to give the necessary orders for vessels to be in readiness at Dover for carrying from time to time to Calais his Majesty's letters to Lord Portland, and that the same vessels bring over Lord Portland's packets. And that the masters have special directions to deliver the letters into the hands of one of H.M.'s messengers, who shall be waiting at Calais; and such packets as they bring they shall deliver to Mr. Mackey or Mr. Stock the postmaster at Dover, who is to give a receipt and forward them by express. And the masters are to give receipts at Calais for such letters as the messengers shall deliver to them, and take the messengers' receipts for what they put into their hands. And that there be no delay either to or from France. [S.P.44. 99. p. 431.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Dr. Wm. Dawes, Fellow of the college of physicians in London, and late one of the censors of the college, setting forth that on 30th Sept., 1696, he was chosen one of the censors, and acted as such for twelve months; and not knowing that he was obliged to take any other oaths as censor, but that of performing his office faithfully, directed by the Charter or by laws made under the Charter, yet he has been lately prosecuted by information in the Court of King's Bench for refusing or neglecting to take the oaths appointed by Act of Parliament, constituted instead of the oaths of allegiance and supremacy, made in the 25th year of Charles II; and the petitioner not knowing that any censor of the college ever did take the said oaths of allegiance and supremacy, and that counsel gave opinion that the Act, 25 Charles II, did not require the censors by virtue of that office, to take the said oaths, and the petitioner being well known to be very zealous for his Majesty's service, and having upon other occasions taken the said oaths and subscribed the Association, prays that the Attorney General may be directed to enter a Noli prosequi. Referred to the Attorney and Solicitor General. [S.P.44. 238. p. 171.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate to permit the Countess dowager of Clancarty to be with her son Donnogh, Earl of Clancarty, at convenient hours. [S.P.44. 349. p. 49.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Lords of the Admiralty. On your report as to Samuel Breton and Martin Burn, seamen lately condemned for mutiny, the King directs the latter to be inserted in the next general pardon for poor convicts. [S.P.44. 204. p. 155.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. About 90 men of Sir Matthew Bridge's regiment have put into Plymouth on board a ship, which has suffered considerable damage at sea. As it will take some time before she can be repaired the Suffolk Hagboat, now in that port bound for Ireland, or any other frigate there, is to have orders to receive them on board, and to land them at Cork, Waterford or elsewhere in Ireland. [Ibid. p. 156.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the payment of the extraordinary expenses of James Cressett, H.M. Envoy Extraordinary to the Elector and dukes of Brunswick Lunenbourg, now assisting at the treaty of Pinnenberg, from Sept. 12 to Dec. 12, 1697. [S.P.44. 347. p. 387.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the apprehension of Robert Strickland, esq., for coming out of France without leave, he being on the service of the late King James and his queen. [S.P.44. 349. p. 49.]
Jan. 10. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 25. (Printed in duplicate.) 4 pp. each. [S.P.32. 9. ff. 34–37.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Ld. Amb. Williamson. I am sorry for your return of the gout, and am afraid the weather is not favourable for it.
In answer to your letter of the 4–14th his Majesty commands me to acquaint you that, if the French have no more to say about their instrument, wherein they included the pope, the matter may very well rest there, upon the answers you have already given to it; but in case they press it further, his Majesty does not think fit to defer letting them know that he cannot consent to this inclusion, but rather chooses they should understand it before they have altered the form of nomination, as believing that the more open and fairer way, and for removing any suspicion that he was not from the beginning resolved on that point.
The commission and instructions for delivering up the French part of St. Christopher's are signed by his Majesty, but I have not yet heard when the Admiralty advice boat will be ready to carry them to Colonel Codrington. It is a week since I wrote to them about it; and I have now written again.
Lord Clancarty sent a petition to his Majesty on Sunday by his wife, accompanied with Lady Russell. They expected it would have been read that night at the cabinet council, but it was not. He throws himself upon the King's mercy in a very gentile manner. If he were capable of inditing it, one would have expected he should have judged better for himself before he undertook this journey. After all, his will be a puzzling case.
I am afraid we have not given you much greater satisfaction in our late votes about the army. On Saturday last we were in hopes they would have given themselves a greater latitude, but they could not be brought to consent to a provision for the guards and garrisons otherwise than pursuant to their former vote. It was then hinted that 500,000l. would be necessary for that purpose. When they came to–day into the committee 400,000l. would have been accepted, and they were in a disposition to agree to that sum rather than to 300,000 proposed by Mr. Harley, till Sir Christopher Musgrave moved for splitting it, persuading them to unanimity in a matter of such consequence, which might also make the rest of the sessions easy. It was carried with little or no opposition for 350,000l. If this will not maintain a sufficient force at present, it is thought we may help ourselves by some of the troops that will be left standing till winter, for want of a provision to disband them.
The Czar of Muscovy came hither this morning. Endorsed, R. Feb. 4, 98. 3 pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 11–12.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to the same. The 350,000l. granted the King to–day for maintenance of guards and garrisons was given with a good grace. If well managed it will go a good way towards maintaining a reasonable force, if they do not include ordnance and stores in it, as we hope they may not.
We expect Mons. de Tallard here about a month hence. He is to live in the Duke of Ormond's house in St. James's Square. The King intends to give audience to ambassadors at Somerset House. Endorsed, R. Feb. 4. 98. 3 pp. [Ibid. ff. 13–14.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to the same. The only matter that has occasioned any great debate in the House of Commons this sessions has been about the Land Forces. This came on again last Saturday, and I was very much laboured to have left the Committee to vote what supply they should think necessary, and, had this point been obtained, it would in the next place have been endeavoured to get the Committee to vote a supply of 500,000l., which would be sufficient to maintain 15,000 men, but there was against them a majority of 24, and what was observable was that Mr. Methwen, Lord Chancellor of Ireland, Mr. Molesworth as Privy Councillor there, and Mr. Pelham of the Treasury spoke as well as voted against the Court. 1 p. [S.P.32. 9. f. 43.]
Jan. 11. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 26, in duplicate. 4 pp. each. Printed. [Ibid. ff. 44–47.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
Newsletter. Lord Portland having taken his leave of his Majesty last Sunday night, went hence the next morning early for Dover, where a yacht attends to carry him over to France.
The Court went into mourning last Sunday for the Queen of Poland, duchess of Lorraine, which is to last 3 months, and one half of the time the King will be in purple.
Mr. Strickland, Vice–Chamberlain to the late King James's Queen, being newly come from France, has surrendered himself, and is now in custody of one of his Majesty's messengers.
Lord Raby, leaving his place of one of the grooms of the Bed Chamber, as not proper for a nobleman, the King has given the same to Mr. Jennings, who has attended his Majesty several campaigns in Flanders.
On Saturday last the House of Lords had under consideration a petition presented to their lordships to make an appeal from an order of the House of Lords in Ireland, upon an appeal to them from the Chancery there, in a cause between the bishop and city of Londonderry, concerning some lands; and their lordships before they proceeded on this matter appointed a committee to enquire into former precedents of this kind.
On Saturday the Commons went into a Committee of the whole House upon the Supply etc., and it was moved that it should be an instruction to the Committee to consider of the charge of the Guards and Garrisons for the year 1698. Others approved of this motion, but desired these words might be added: Pursuant to the resolution of the House the 11 Dec. last; and then the debate ran whether the question should stand, as first proposed, which left a latitude for the Committee to vote such a sum as they should think necessary or whether the words last proposed, which limited them to provide only for such a number of troops as were on foot in the year 1680, should stand and be part of the instruction to the Committee. The House sat till almost 7 o'cl. when the question being put, it was carried by 188 against 164 that these words should be added.
The Czar arrived here last night. The King's barges were sent to Gravesend to bring him up, but he chose to come in a private barge, having with him 3 persons of quality of his retinue, and Vice–Admiral Mitchell; and went to the house provided for him in Norfolk Street, which stands very conveniently, because he can go out of it privately by water.
The squadron designed for the Mediterranean is fitting out with all diligence and will in a short time be ready to sail.
The Commons were this day in a Committee of the whole House to consider of a supply for the Land Forces. It was argued that the 6 Scotch regiments, which were on foot in the year 1680 (though in the Dutch pay) ought to be included in the number to be kept up by the resolution of the 11th Dec. last. At last they came to lump the Supply. Some proposed 500,000; others 400,000 and others 300,000l., and in conclusion Sir Christ. Musgrave by way of compromise, proposed 350,000, as sufficient to maintain 2,000 horse, 2,000 dragoons and 6,000 foot, which the House gave into, and so it passed unanimously. This is to be for the year 1698. Endorsed, R. Feb. 4, 98. 4 pp. [S.P.32. 9. ff. 38–39.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
Newsletter. This day the Earl of Ranelagh reported that the address touching the Militia had been presented to his Majesty, who gave order for the looking out all papers relating to that matter.
The House of Lords have committed Lord Mohun to the Tower, in order to his being tried at Westminster Hall for killing Capt. Hill sometime since.
The Czar is arrived here: he lodges at a house in Norfolk buildings by the waterside. 1 p. Endorsed, R. Feb. 4. 98. [S.P.32. 9. ff. 40–41.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
Tho. Hopkins to Ld. Ambassador Williamson, a letter containing news as above. 1 p. [Ibid. f. 42.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Lords of the Admiralty. The yacht appointed to carry over Mr. Stepney is to await at Rotterdam the coming of Lord Lexington, the King's envoy extraordinary to the Emperor, who is returning home from Vienna. [S.P.44. 204. p. 156.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
The same to the same, ordering the discharge, upon representation made by Mons. Leyoncrona, of Clement Barnes, a Swedish subject, who 21 months since was pressed on board H.M.S. Lennox out of the Hannibal, a Zealand privateer. [Ibid. p. 157.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. Martin Burn only is to be pardoned, the sentence pronounced by the court martial on Samuel Britton to be duly executed. [Ibid.]
Jan. 11.
Kensington.
Commissions to Closworthy Gowan, clerk, to be chaplain to Colonel John Mitchelburn's regiment; and to — Despech, surgeon, to be surgeon to Sir George St. George's regiment. [S.P.44. 167. p. 307.]
Jan. 12–22.
Dover. (6 a.m.)
Lord Portland to William III. I have received your Majesty's letter and the enclosure for Mr. le Daufin. I thank your Majesty most humbly for the assurances of the continuation of favours which I shall always try to deserve, or at least I hope that I shall not show myself unworthy of them, since I am as sensible of them as if I were still able to benefit from them as in the past.
The yacht arrived last night at 10: the wind is fair; my horses and coach were put on board yesterday; I am just on the point of starting.
Col. Hussey, who is going to France, as your Majesty knows, and who had written to France by your Majesty's permission, the day before yesterday received from France this answer from Lord Middleton, from which your Majesty will see that it is supposed that the King of France will procure this payment not only through him but even as it were from his hands, which cannot possibly be and cannot be allowed; what troubles me is that I do not know how I can take this man further than Calais, after what Lord Middleton has communicated to him so positively. French. Holograph. Printed by Dr. Japikse, I, p. 219, No. 193. [S.P.8. 18. ff. 11–12.]
Jan. 12.
Kensington.
The King to the bishop of London, about collecting money for the poor. Taking notice of the hardships which the poorer sort of our subjects in and about our city of London suffer; we recommend and we require you to take care for publication to be made in all the parish churches within our said city, lines of communication and weekly bills of mortality, the Lord's day next following, that the churchwardens or overseers of the poor, do the week following collect the benevolence of charitable people, at their dwellings, towards the relief of the poor, and that the ministers do effectually excite their parishioners to a charitable contribution: and to cause the sums so collected to be paid into the Chamber of London to be distributed as the Lord Mayor and you shall direct: wherein we expect you should have more especial regard to the poor weavers or other tradesmen. And that our own example may not be wanting our pleasure is that you call upon our Commissioners of our Treasury for such sum as we have directed to be paid to that end. [S.P.44. 163. pp. 99, 100.]
Jan. 12.
Kensington.
The King to the Lord Mayor of London, [reciting the letter of the same date directed to the bishop of London] and to the end our intentions may be more effectual we recommend the same to you, that by your encouragement our subjects may be reduced to a more than ordinary demonstration of compassion and liberality. [Ibid. pp. 101, 102.]
Jan. 12.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland to proceed in the assessing and collecting of £8,000, lapse money, to be paid to Lionel, Earl of Orrery. Printed in the Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. XIII, p. 221–3. [S.O.1. 14. pp. 46–51.]
Jan. 12.
Kensington.
Warrant for, and docquet of grant of, letters patent to Francis Pousset, Andrew Brieux, John Goudet and David Barrau for making black silk crape and white silk crape. They represented that there is no difference between those they can make and those that come from Italy. [S.P.44. 347. f. 130 and S.O.3. 20. f. 138.]
Jan. 12. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 27. (Printed.) 4 pp. [S.P.32. 9. ff. 48–49.]
Jan. 13–23.
Dover. (7 a.m.)
Lord Portland to William III. Just when I thought I was leaving yesterday morning the wind turned to south–east and fell to calm; so I kept back this express hoping the wind would change, as it has done this morning, and I am just going on board.
I am much grieved by what I hear about the sum voted by the Committee for the maintenance of the troops. Providence will direct affairs for the good of your Majesty, of religion and of the nation, when it seems that men are working for their own destruction. I humbly beg your Majesty to think about sending me someone who can make known in England the true state of affairs, and in whom members of Parliament may have more confidence than in what I write, which will always be regarded as coming from a man attached to your Majesty, who only says what your Majesty wishes. French, unsigned, holograph. Printed by Dr. Japikse, I, p. 220, No. 194. [S.P.8. 18. ff. 13–14.]
Jan. 13. [Newsletter.] The opposite party could not carry their point to–day in a committee of Ways and Means. They thought to have made all things give way to the raising of money for disbanding the Army, but they were seasonably put in mind of the deficiencies that stood first in the King's speech, and the Act was read to them which declared that if the Exchequer Bills were not paid off with this year's funds, what remained uncancelled should be satisfied out of the first Aids to be given this year, and they were kept so close to it that they were fain to give the precedency to this Resolution: That a supply be granted to his Majesty, which together with the funds already settled for that purpose shall be sufficient to answer and cancel all Exchequer Bills, issued or to be issued, not exceeding 2,700,000l.: and this they were told was the way not only to maintain their credit, but to do the thing they aimed at, viz.: disbanding the Forces. It was pretty visible what some gentlemen aimed at, to engross the best funds and apply it to the paying of the Army, and to leave other matters to shift as they could. When the question was carried it was readily yielded to that theirs should follow, viz.: That a supply be granted to his Majesty for the speedy paying and disbanding the Army: but it will hardly now be so speedy as they first designed it, especially if they fail of another project they have, which is to begin with paying off and dismissing the common soldiers, who have but little due to them. The officers and Quarters they think may forbear longer, especially the former, being kept as they intend for some time upon half pay.
Now it is resolved that Exchequer Bills shall be all satisfied, a bill will be brought in with remedies for keeping down the discount, which was running to an excessive rate, insomuch that the last subscription was not like to be paid in. 1¾ pp. [S.P.32. 9. f. 50.]
Jan. 13. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 28. Printed. 4 pp. [Ibid. ff. 51–52.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Mayor of Dover. You may discharge David Jolly, an Englishman, detained for coming from France without a pass. He cannot stay long in England by reason of an Act, passed both Houses of Parliament, without special leave.
Your charge for detaining persons that came out of France without leave, viz.: 3s. and 3s. 6d. a day for each man's entertainment comes to 15l. 1s. 6d., besides prison fees, which seems unreasonable, but reducing their entertainment to 1s. a day a man, which is enough, and leaving the prison fees as they were the bill comes to 8l. 19s. 6d.; and if you like that I will lay it before the King. [S.P.44. 99. p. 432.]
Jan. 13.
Kensington.
Licence to Tho. Lee, esq., High Sheriff of Cheshire, to live out of that county. [S.P.44. 163. p. 103.]
Jan. 13.
The Hague.
Pass to Gilbert Blecke (?), merchant of Rotterdam, to go to England. [S.P.44. 386. p. 9.]
[Jan. 14.] An Act against corresponding with the late King James and his adherents. Printed. [S.P.32. 11. ff. 354–357.]
Jan. 14–24.
Calais.
Lord Portland to William III. Before I could go on board yesterday morning, the wind turned to south–east: however, not to lose time, I started and arrived here last night before ten o'clock; the governor, Mr. de La Tour, received me with his coaches, and took me to stay with him, showing me such marked attentions that it was plain that he had had special orders from the Court. I am now leaving for Boulogne and to–morrow go to Montreuil, where I shall stay for Sunday, and shall resume my journey on Monday morning, so I hope to be in Paris on Friday in accordance with your Majesty's orders.
It is snowing heavily here and is colder than in England. French, holograph, printed by Dr. Japikse, I, p. 220, No. 195. [S.P.8. 18. ff. 15–16.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to Sir Joseph Williamson. Lord Portland arrived at Dover last Tuesday in the evening, and was complimented by the Mayor and Aldermen in their Formalities. He stayed there till yesterday morning, for want of a fair wind, when he set sail for Calais.
The Czar of Muscovy continues very private in his house near Norfolk Street. His Majesty sent his Vice–Chamberlain to compliment him upon his arrival, and intends to go and see him. But the Czar desires his Majesty will come with very few attendance. The King's officers attend him at present, but he will not suffer them to treat him with any manner of ceremony, and does not care to be seen by anybody. He has a mind to go to Portsmouth to see the ships, and some of the King's yachts are to carry him thither.
Yesterday the Commons were in a Committee of the whole House upon the business of the Supply, and particularly had under consideration the deficiency of the Capitation Tax, and the tax upon land of one shilling in the pound, which are the fonds appointed for paying off the Exchequer notes. They debated likewise about providing money immediately to pay off the forces that are designed to be broke, in order to ease the kingdom as soon as possible of the charge now lying upon them.
[This day] the King before he went to the House of Lords made the Czar a visit at his house in Norfolk Street, going privately in Lord Romney's coach. Endorsed, R. Feb. 7. 98. 2½ pp. [S.P.32. 9. ff. 53–54.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
R. Y[ard] to the same. The gentlemen in the House of Commons that are for disbanding the Army are resolved to hasten it all they can. All the debate yesterday was which should take place, the question for making good the deficiency of the fonds for paying the Exchequer Bills, or that for giving a supply for paying off the Forces. And though they at last gave the precedency to the Exchequer Bills, yet their intention is that the first money which is raised shall be applied for paying off the Forces that are to be disbanded. When this matter about the Army was debated last Tuesday an account was given the Committee that his Majesty had already discharged above 50,000 men that were in the pay of this kingdom the last summer, and that there remained on foot about 36,000: of these I believe about 10,000 will be sent to Ireland, and the regiments that were there before will be broke; and if, of the other 26,000, only 10,000 are to be kept up here, it follows that 16,000 must be broke; perhaps Scotland may take some, but I believe 5,000 will be the most. It is reckoned the supply of 350,000l. given for the next year will maintain 5,000 horse and 5,000 foot. Had it been insisted on, it is generally believed 400,000l. would have been obtained, but some gentlemen gave it up too soon. 1 p. [Ibid. f. 55.]
Jan. 14. Tho. Hopkins to the same. Yesterday morning the Cockpit was viewed in order to the fitting up some apartments, for the keeping some of the offices which were burnt in the late dreadful fire; and sufficient conveniencies are found there for the Secretary of State, Treasury and Council; and likewise an apartment for the King when he comes to town. 2 pp. [Ibid. f. 56.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Newsletter, with news as above. 1 p. [Ibid. ff. 57–58.]
Jan. 14. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 29. (Printed.) 4 pp. [Ibid. ff. 59–60.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to Lord Ambr. Williamson. The Czar is very much incognito here, and above all things desires to be so. All his servants sit at table with him, except his cook and one more; and it is no difficult thing to see him at table, to one that will wait there as one of the servants ordered to attend; but if anyone takes particular notice of him, he will rise from table and retire, as he has done once or twice already. The King visited him this morning in Lord Romney's coach, before he went to the Parliament to pass bills.
The Commons have resolved that 20,000 acres in the New Forest shall be enclosed for the use of the Navy. Endorsed, R. Feb. 7. 98. 3 pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 15–16.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
J. Vernon to the same. I hear from the Admiralty that the advice boat for St. Christopher's is fitting up in the river, but till she be ready to sail I cannot send you the Act for the delivering up St. Christopher's. I must own I am not well satisfied with this delay.
The King visited the Czar this morning attended only by the Earls of Rivers, Rumney and Albemarle. Endorsed, R. Feb. 7. 98. 1 p. [S.P.32 15. ff. 17–18.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Lord Mayor of London. I have received your letter with two enclosed advertisements about Mr. Barratt. I had such another note brought me this morning by one who said he found it in the street and I intended to enquire of Dr. Oxenden, if he had come to the House of Commons, into the character of the man. But now I find that so many of these papers are scattered abroad, I know less how to judge of the information. I think if you send to Doctors Commons, and hear nothing amiss of this Peter Barratt, it will be sufficient to let him know what papers are thrown about to disparage him, and you will see how he clears himself. [S.P.44. 99. f. 432 v.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John, Earl of Bath, setting forth that he exhibited an information for perjury in the King's Bench against Robert Greepe in the name of Sir Samuel Astry, H.M. Attorney and Coroner, and judgment was given for the defendant. The petitioner desires a writ of error returnable in Parliament. Granted. [S.P.44. 238. p. 172.]
Jan. 14–24. "The Journals of the House of Lords." 3 pp. [S.P.32. 9. ff. 61–62.]
Jan. 15.
Kensington.
The King to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland. We have considered the state of the fonds for the maintenance of our forces, which you caused draw in August last, by which we understand that the troops which were then established might have been subsisted till 1st Nov. next. But we having made a new establishment, and being also resolved to provide for several of the officers of the disbanded regiments, you are therefore again to lay before us the state of our fonds with regard to the present establishment and other exigences that have occurred, that necessary orders may be given.
We are pleased with your diligence and pains in stating and clearing the accounts of several of the Commissaries and tacksmen. It is absolutely necessary that you perfect and finish what is yet left undone, and you are to cause all legal diligence to be used for bringing in the balances, without regard to the pretensions of these [sic] concerned, except when they are founded in law, which you are to cause to be discussed and determined by our Exchequer. We particularly remitted to you to report your opinion concerning the abatement demanded by Lord Belhaven and his partners, tacksmen of our Excise. We have received no answer. You, with those of the Exchequer, will make your report with diligence, that we may give our determination.
We are also informed that our Sheriffs and others have been very negligent in making the Æquies, so that this branch of our revenue has been ineffectual these several years. You are therefore to give orders to our Advocate and Solicitor to use all diligence against those concerned for making up the Æquies.
We find by your letter that the question that has arisen betwixt you and the Auditors has put a stop to the auditing of their accounts. We have considered the matter, and seeing the Auditors can only be obliged to state and clear the Treasury accounts, and are not concerned with those of particular tacksmen or commissaires, we therefore appoint that you state these accounts, and grant receipts or discharges to those concerned as you find cause; and, that you may be free from all apprehension of danger from what has been done by the former lords of the Treasury, we declare that where there are precepts, warrants, or receipts granted by them, they are to be answerable, conform to the determination of the Auditors. But you are not to be liable nor accountable. But in all other cases, which have not been determined by them, you are to do as you shall find just, and for which you are to be accountable. And, as soon as you have stated those accounts, you are to transmit them to the Auditors, that what concerns our Treasury may at last be brought to clearness. [S.P. 57. 16. pp. 483–4.]
Jan. 15.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Privy Council of Scotland, reciting that the two regiments of foot commanded by Lord Lorn and Colonel John Buchan had been ordered to sail from Flanders for Scotland, directing that as soon as they shall land they shall be disbanded. The warrant empowers the Privy Council to recommend the payment of 8 days' subsistence to each of the private centinells of the regiments. [Ibid. pp. 484–5.]
Jan. 15.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland, requiring them to state the arrears owing to Mr. David Nairn for salary as Treasurer Clerk during the time he exercised that office, and to cause the same to be paid out of the first and readiest of the Æquies to be made by the Sheriffs. [Ibid. p. 485.]
Jan. 15. [Newsletter.] The House of Commons were taken up this day with a complaint against the Commissioners of the Admiralty, upon a petition of some of the captains whose ships had been taken during the war: for which they had been tried by a court–martial and acquitted. And the Lords of the Admiralty had stopped their pay when their ships' companies were cleared off, a copy of which order was annexed to the petition, and perhaps too hastily allowed to be authentic by Coll. Kendall, and therefore they would have fixed a vote upon it of arbitrary and illegal, that they should go to punish men after they were cleared upon trial. But Mr. Montague set it right again by proposing the examination should be referred to a committee. Sir Robert Rich said the short of the matter lay in this, that since there was not money sufficient to pay off all the ships and commanders at a time, whether should have the preference those who had suffered their ships to be taken, or those whose reputations were never questioned but had always acquitted themselves with courage and fidelity. Some would have had the examination at the Bar of the House, but the case did not seem to require it. 1 p. [S.P. 32. 9. f. 63.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Humphrey Trafford of Trafford, in the county of Lancaster, esq., and Humphrey, his son and heir apparent, an infant, by the Earl of Rivers his guardian; setting forth that Sir Cecil Trafford, knt., in the year 1652, did settle all his estate in the counties of Lancaster and Chester, after his decease, to the use of Edmd. Trafford, his eldest son, for life, remainder to his first and other son and sons in tail male; remainder to Cecil his second son for life, with like remainder; to your petitioner Humphrey the father, for life, remainder to his first and other sons in tail male; with like remainder to John, Henry and William Trafford his other sons; remainder to the right heirs of the said Sir Cecil. That the said Sir Cecil and his 2 sons, Edmd. and Cecil, are dead without issue, and the whole estate by virtue of the said settlement is now vested in the petitioner, Humphrey the father, for life, remainder in tail male to the petitioner Humphrey the son. That the petitioner, Humphrey the father, did heretofore sustain great losses; that his creditors did by virtue of a commission of Bankrupt seize his estate and raised 900l. per annum for several years past. That the petitioners cannot otherwise provide for themselves, or rescue the estate from the present difficulties than by advancing 4,000l. The petitioners pray for a warrant to the Justices of Lancaster for the passing or suffering of a common recovery of the premises, to enable the raising of 4,000l. for the purposes aforesaid, without any other alteration of the uses of the said settlement. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 172.]
Jan. 15.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Elizabeth, the wife of Edward Huntley, gent., setting forth that a sentence had been given in favour of a pretended will or scroll of Edith Pinfold, widow, deceased, to the prejudice of the petitioner; and desiring a commission of review under the Great Seal, with a clause for new matter to such judge as his Majesty shall think fit. Referred to the Lord Chancellor. [Ibid. p. 174].
Jan. 15.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland for a patent for a grant to Dorothy, Baroness Dowager of Upper Ossory, of several parcels of land in the Barony of Upper Ossory and Queen's County for 99 years. Printed in the Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. XIII, p. 226. [S.O.1. 14. pp. 52–53.]
Jan. 15.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords of the Admiralty for the payment to Dame Anne St. George, wife of Sir Thomas St. George, knt., Garter King at Arms, of a pension of 250l. per annum from Lady day, 1697, which was granted to her by Letters Patent of 17 Charles II, in consideration of the services of her father, Sir John Lawson, then decd. [S.P.44. 347. p. 131.]
Jan. 15.
Kensington.
Warrant for, and grant of, letters patent to Thomas Savery, gent., for a new invention for raising of water and occasioning motion to all sorts of mill work by the impellent force of fire, which will be of great use for draining mines, serving towns with water, and for the working all sorts of mills where they have not the benefit of water nor constant winds. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 172, and S.O. 3. 20. f. 152.]
Jan. 15. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 30. Printed. 4 pp. [S.P. 32. 9. ff. 64–65.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Recorder. [As to] the petition of John Hanway, William Wade and Richard Hanway, if they be found guilty of manslaughter, the burning in the hand is to be respited till his Majesty be informed of the case. You will accordingly signify to the judge who shall sit upon their trial. [S.P. 44. 99. p. 433.]
Jan. 16.
The Hague.
Passes to Lord Reay, alias Mackay, a captain in Col. Macgill's regiment in the service of the States General, as certified by Mr. Bowy, the English minister at the Hague; and to Mr. John Mackenzy, chaplain in Lieut.–Genl. Murray's regiment in the service of the States; and to Peter Bransby, Richard Fuller and Wm. Sweetapple, three of the Marquis of Tavistock's servants, bringing a note from Mr. Hicks the chaplain. [S.P. 44. 386. p. 10.]
[Jan. 16.] Jo. Hickes to —: being the note above referred to. [S.P. 32. 11. f. 1.]
Jan. 17. [Newsletter. House of Commons.] This day was spent in a committee about the disbanding the army. It was resolved to give the same bounty money and allowances to the non–commissioned officers and soldiers which have been given to the regiments that are already disbanded.
That 250,000l. be raised and employed on account towards disbanding the army. That a provision be made to give all the commissioned officers who are natural born subjects of England half pay till they are fully cleared off and paid or otherwise provided for.
The great debate was on the last words of being otherwise provided for, which was moved by Coll. Godfrey and seconded by Mr. Pelham, and would have been carried by a great majority if they had divided upon it. It was endeavoured to be shifted off by putting, instead of it, that they should be otherwise rewarded.
Sir Edward Seymour having asked the question whether any of the officers were the worse for their service, Sir John Hotham answered very bluntly that the officers had spent more honorably in their employment than he had got in his.
This being said in a committee could not be taken notice of there, and therefore it was moved the Speaker should take the Chair in order to have the words reported. But it was opposed, since reflections were grown so common of late. It was thought it might be pardoned a young member who had not been used to speak.
Sir Edward Seymour went away, before the committee rise, and was sent for, that the commands of the House might be laid upon them both not to prosecute this to a quarrel, which the Speaker is now ordered to signify to them.
While they were looking for Sir Edward Seymour, Mr. Duncomb entertained the House with his answer to the reasons Sir Stephen Fox gave the other day why he was turned out. 2 pp. [S.P. 32. 9. f. 66.]
Jan. 17. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 31, in duplicate. Printed. 4 pp. each. [Ibid. ff. 67–69.]
Jan. 17.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland for a commission under the Great Seal of Ireland to give power to Sir Richard Pyne, Chief Justice of the King's Bench;—Lord Berkeley, Master of the Rolls; Sir John Hely, Chief Justice of the Common Pleas; Robert Doyne, esq., Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer; Sir Richard Cox, a judge of the Common Pleas; Sir John Lyndon, a judge of the King's Bench; Sir Henry Ecklin, a Baron of the Exchequer; Sir John Jeffreyson, a judge of the Common Pleas; Thomas Coote, a judge of the King's Bench; Nehemiah Donnelan, a Baron of the Court of Exchequer; Sir John Topham, LL.D., Sir John Coghill, LL.D., Wm. Mollineaux, LL.D. and Richard Stone, Masters of the High Court of Chancery or three of them, whereof Sir Richard Pyne, Lord Berkeley, Sir John Hely, Robert Doyne, Sir Richard Cox, Sir John Lyndon, Sir Henry Ecklin, Sir John Jeffreyson, Thomas Coote and Nehemiah Donnelan to be always one, to hear and determine causes in the Court of Chancery, as the like power was granted to Commissioners in the 5th W. and M., during the absence of the late Sir Charles Porter, then Chancellor of Ireland. The warrant recites that the King had lately required the attendance at Kensington of John Methuen, Chancellor of Ireland, and had required the Lords Justices to cause a commission to be passed under the Great Seal of Ireland to commit the keeping of the Great Seal to Edward earl of Meath; Francis earl of Longford; Murrogh viscount Blessington; or to any two of them during pleasure. [S.O. 1. 14. pp. 44, 45.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Lords of the Admiralty. At the request of the Turkey company orders are to be given to the commander of the ship appointed to carry Sir James Rushout, his Majesty's ambassador, to Constantinople, to receive on board Lord Paget, now ambassador there, with his family, if he thinks fit to return by sea. [S.P. 44. 204. p. 158.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Treasury, recommending Owen Banahan and John Inwood for some allowance for their subsistence on account of service "as evidences in convicting and outlawing several considerable persons, who have been and are in France." There is further use of them on account of the late Act of Parliament, relating to persons come from France without leave. Mr. Henry Baker can give an account of the allowance they had formerly. [S.P. 44. 99. pp. 433–4.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Richard Simpson, master and part owner of the Bridgeman sloop, setting forth that the petitioner, in his passage between Harwich and the Brill, before the peace was concluded, took a small privateer of Dunkirk, called La Flesh, mounted with 6 guns, and carried her to the Brill, where she is declared prize. Prays his Majesty to give him the vessel and her furniture, with the benefit of the Act Gunnage [sic] (although he had no commission or letter of mart) for his having performed the capture and for his services in transporting the mail several times between England and Holland this last year, without requiring any security for the hazard of his vessel, usually given to all other vessels upon the like occasions. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 173.]
Jan. 17.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the officers and private horsemen of the six youngest troops reduced out of Brigadier Wolseley's regiment of horse in Ireland; setting forth that, after several years services upon the Establishing the Forces in Ireland, these six troops were reduced and broke, without being paid, notwithstanding his Majesty's order to the contrary, having only a small part of their due with daily promises of the remainder. Now they, being reduced to great extremities and informed that their arrears are due upon the English establishment, and not on the Irish, since there is no fund there for the payment, and that [sic] they had applied to the Parliament in Ireland who had made an address to his Majesty in favour of the petitioners. Desiring that speedy provision and payment may be made to the petitioners, their case being very singular, they being the only troops broke since the reduction of Ireland. Referred to Charles Fox, esq., and Lord Coningsby, Paymaster General of the Forces in Ireland. [Ibid. p. 175.]
Jan. 18.
London.
G. S. Champneys to [Sir J. Williamson]. Lord Sunderland designed going from Windsor (where he has been almost these 3 weeks) as this morning to Altrop. They talk here of great alterations at Court but with what reason time must shew, viz.: Lord Shrewsbury to be Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Lord Romney to be Lord Chamberlain, Lord Ormond to have Romney's guards, and Lord Albemarle to have the Duke of Ormond's regiment of horse. The Whig party name Mr. Methuen, Chancellor of Ireland, for secretary in Lord Shrewsbury's place, but the other party say he has shown so little abilities in Ireland that he can expect getting nor continuing nothing more than master of Chancery, in which, by his practise and custom, nothing is expected from him. The King said on Sunday that he never was so teased about anything so much as petitions and requests in behalf of that little spark Lord Clancarty. The King sent yesterday to the Princes[s] to notify his desire of coming to chapel at St. James's, till White Hall shall be refitted, and likewise to have the privilege of seeing company in the drawing–room before church, which must be complied with.
Lady Macclesfield is to be heard by her counsel on Tuesday next against my lord's bill of divorce. Lord Howard of Escrick, since his being ordered by the peers to waive his privilege, has sent to his lady by Lord Carlisle to offer her terms, viz.: half her jointure yearly, free from his debts, and 500l. to pay her charges, which her friends advise her to accept of.
The Czar of Muscovy goes on Thursday next with Lord Romney to Windsor for some days, and the King goes there to shoot on Saturday. Your fine heads say Lord Albe– stands Lord Clancarty's friend to balk Lord Port– of that estate in Ireland, Lord Peterborough has some new great projects, as he says, but what I know not. Lord Cornbury has locked his lady up for some time past and suffers not to stir out.
There being 100l. due to me from Sir Charles Bickerstaff which he is willing to pay me out of the money in your Excellency's hands, which since the time of your passing your accounts in Chancery, which Mr. Sloan says was two years ago, is 105l., I desire your lordship would order it to be paid here. I shall by that means be paid which otherwise I shall not. I have not stirred in Lady Katharine's affairs since your last letters, but wait Lady Katharine's orders.
Some gentlemen, just now come from Kensington, say the King has promised Lord Clancarty's pardon. Endorsed, R. Feb. 7, 98. 2 pp. [S.P. 32. 9. ff. 70–71.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to Lord Ambr. Williamson. As the easterly winds have hindered the letters from going to Holland, so I fear their continuance will freeze up the rivers so that letters cannot come hither, if it be as cold there as it is here and has been for four or five days, to an unusual degree, with much snow.
On Saturday night the Earl of Burlington, aged 87 years, died, and has left to the new Earl 22,000l. a year, and 4,000l. a year to Mr. Hen. Boyle.
Report has given the Chamberlain's staff to several lords within this week, and now Lord Lonsdale is come to town, people will needs have him to have it.
The Parliament have with much ado been induced to allow the officers, his Majesty's native subjects, half pay till they are provided for, but nothing to foreigners. Endorsed, R. Feb. 7, 98. 3 pp. [S.P. 32. 9. ff. 72–73.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
Tho. Hopkins to Ld. Ambassador Williamson. [After a report of Resolutions of the House of Commons] Lord Banbury has petitioned the King for his writ of summons to Parliament, and his Majesty has referred his petition to the House of Lords. 2 pp. [S.P. 32. 9. f. 74.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
Newsletter [to the same]. By an express from Lord Portland we have an account that he arrived at Calais last Thursday about 9 at night. The governor of the town and the principal inhabitants were ready on the pier to receive him; he was conducted to the governor's house in the governor's coach, and two other coaches carried the gentlemen of his retinue. He was saluted by the magistrates, and supped and lodged at the governor's house, his retinue being lodged in private houses thereabouts. The next morning he left for Boulogne. It was believed he would have the same kind reception in other places where he passed.
Yesterday the House of Lords had under consideration the exorbitant fees of the lawyers, occasioned by the late very expensive trials between the Earls of Bath and Mountague, and they appointed a committee to prepare heads for a Bill to regulate the same, and to prevent vexatious delays in suits of law.
Mr. Robert Strickland, who came lately from France, is obliged to return thither, pursuant to the late Act of Parliament. Endorsed, R. Feb. 7, 98. 3½ pp. [Ibid. ff. 75–76.]
Jan. 18. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 32. Printed, in duplicate. 4 pp. each. [Ibid. ff. 77–80.]
Jan. 18. Votes of the House of Commons. 1 p. [Ibid. ff. 81–82.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Ld. Ambdr. Williamson, referring to an enclosure for an account of parliamentary proceedings. Endorsed, R. Feb. 7, 98. 1 p. [S.P. 32. 15. ff. 19–20.]
Jan. 18.
Kensington.
Proceedings upon the petition of Charles Knowles to the King, claiming the title of Earl of Banbury. Referred to the House of Lords. (Printed in the Journals of the House of Lords, Vol. 16, p. 204.) [S.P. 44. 238. pp. 176–178.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Lords of the Admiralty. As soon as the Fubbs yacht arrives from France with the Duke of St. Albans, the commander is to sail with the first opportunity to Dieppe, to wait for the Duchess of Richelieu and bring her to England. [S.P. 44. 204. p. 158.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Mayor of Dover. John Lambden, whom you have committed to prison for coming out of France without leave, is to be discharged. [S.P. 44. 99. p. 434.]
Jan. 18.
Kensington.
Additional instructions to Lord Carmichael, H.M. Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church, allowing him to continue the Assembly for 8 days longer than the time fixed, if necessary. He is to appoint the next General Assembly to meet at Edinburgh on Jan. 20th, 1699, but, if they desire it, he may appoint it to meet in June or July thereafter. [S.P. 57. 16. p. 486.]
Jan. 18.
Kensington.
Docket of the warrant for a charter giving to Alexander Duff of Drumure the town and lands of Easter Kindeass and "pertinents thereof above written extending to a three pound land of old extent in the parish of Nigg and sheriffdom of Ross, reserving to Margaret Mackenzie relict of Gilbert Robertson of Kindeass her life rent right of the towns lands and others foresaid." Proceeding upon the resignation of Colin Robertson, now of Kindeass, heir served to Gilbert Robertson his father, and upon two decrees of adjudication: with a novo damus and a change of holding from waird to taxt ward. [Ibid. p. 487–8.]
Jan. 19.
Whitehall.
Post warrants to Mr. William Ferrers and his servant and a guide to go to Dunstable Market Street, Northampton, Rothwell, Kettering and Harborough. [S.P. 44. 387. p. 146]: and to Mr. Pringle, Deputy Secretary for Scotland, and Mr. Carr, with a guide, to go to Edinburgh. [Ibid.]
Jan. 19. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 33. (Printed.) 2 pp. [S.P. 32. 9. f. 83.]
Jan. 20. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 34. (Printed.) 6 pp. [S.P. 32. 9. ff. 84–86.]
Jan. 20. "Proceedings in the House of Commons." Preparatory to the Debate that is to come on to–morrow about the grants since December, 1696, a motion was made by Sir Wm. St. Quintin that an account be likewise laid before the House of all the grants since the Revolution, which being ordered Sir Joseph Tiley made a further motion that an account be brought of all other grants in the two late reigns down to the 29th of May, 1660, which was opposed as clogging the enquiry they were upon, and justified to be as necessary and beneficial to be looked into as any late grants. There was a division upon the Question, which was carried in the affirmative by 162 against 119. Mr. Montague then acquainted them, since they were considering how the public charge might be eased by restoring to the Crown whatever had been unduly taken from it, he would assist in it as far as any man, whatever loss he might sustain by it in particular, and proposed it as a matter worthy their enquiry, what had been paid and allowed on account of interest to the Receivers of the Customs and Excise since the year 1670, which was ordered to be brought in, and it seems principally to regard Mr. Duncombe. Mr. Sloan moved that Sir Francis Child should give an account for what use he had received 12,500l. that is charged as paid to him on the last year's account. This they say is the money the Lord Chamberlain Dorset received for his staff, and that was likewise ordered.
Since the account of grants from the time of the Revolution will require some time to prepare it, the consideration of what they have before them already is put off to this day sennight, and I believe will hardly be carried on now in the manner it was intended. 1¼ pp. [Ibid. ff. 87–88.]
Jan. 20.
Kensington.
Commissions to George Watkins, esquire, to succeed Captain Alexander Gibson, deceased, in Colonel Gibson's regiment of foot. [S.P. 44. 167. p. 307]; Luke Spicer, esquire, to be captain lieutenant of Colonel Gibson's company; Peter Morin, gent., to be lieutenant of Captain Rigby's company; Thomas Simons, gent., to be lieutenant of Captain Petit's company; David Gibsone to be lieutenant of Major Handaside's company; Bryan Stapleton, gent., to be ensign of Captain Hargrave's company; William Levingston, gent., to be ensign of Captain Brexton's company; Francis Gibsone, gent., to be ensign of Captain Foulkes' company; Joseph Gabriell La Font, gent., to be ensign of Captain Smith's company; John Muniss, gent., to be ensign of Captain Rigby's company; Peter Heart, gent., to be ensign of Captain Boyd's company; David Heart, clerk, to be chaplain, William Durham, gent., to be adjutant; Humphry Haven to be ensign; all in Col. Gibson's regiment. [Ibid. pp. 308, 309.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of William Evey for Letters Patent for an invention for altering, blanching, whitening and making pale hairs and curling the said hairs of human growth. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 182.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to Sir Jo. Williamson. In the House of Lords yesterday they heard Lady Macclesfield's counsel concerning the Bill brought in by the Earl of Macclesfield for a divorce. Counsel insisted to have the matters Lord Macclesfield charges her with left to be tried according to the usual methods prescribed by the law. To which Lord Macclesfield's counsel answered and shewed former precedents, as well as the equity and reasonableness of proceeding by Bill in such an extraordinary case. And after they were withdrawn the House presently ordered that Lord Macclesfield's counsel shall be heard to–day (according to their former order) to make out the facts alleged in the Bill.
The Commons were on Wednesday in a committee of the whole House upon the Bill for reducing the discount of the Exchequer Bills, which is to be not above 2½ per cent.
The Czar continues at his house in Norfolk Street. He has been to see a Play, and other curiosities in town, but at all times endeavours, all he can, not to be known.
The Commons were in a committee upon the Supply, and have agreed on the deficiencies of the last year's Funds, viz.: the deficiency of the 3 shillings Aid at 407,000l., the Capitation 940,000l. and the one shilling Aid at 129,000l. and on Monday next they will proceed on the consideration how to raise the Supply to be given for making good the said deficiencies and other services of the next year. Endorsed, R. Feb. 7, 98. 2 pp. [S.P. 32. 9. ff. 89–90.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
R. Y[ard] to Sir Jo. Williamson. When the business of the Exchequer notes was before the House of Commons last Tuesday, Mr. Montague told them that he believed he should in ten days be able to open a new scene to the House, which would very well deserve their looking into: what 'tis I do not yet know, but in all probability it may be to retort some things upon those gentlemen, who at first were very zealous in prosecuting this affair, and are now as indifferent and willing to let it fall, which is attributed to their not having found what they looked for.
The House of Commons are very intent upon enquiring into the grants, which I believe was at first levelled against some particular persons, wherein they have missed their aim, for now this enquiry is to be carried as far as 1660, which concerns so many, that 'tis probable they will fix upon none. We shall see next Thursday, when this matter comes on again, what will be made of it.
The House of Lords have now before them the affair of Lord and Lady Macclesfield: their counsel have pleaded these last two days, and it will now be quickly seen whether the Lords will proceed upon the Bill, or send the cause back to Doctors Commons, as my Lady desires, where it may hang long enough.
The Lords examined this day my Lady's woman and another, who proved her first child, which was a daughter, and went by the name of Anne Savage; she did not live long. 1¼ pp. [Ibid. f. 91.]
Jan. 21. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 35. Printed. 4 pp. [Ibid. ff. 92–93.]
Jan. 21. Accounts of proceedings in the House of Commons. [Ibid. ff. 94–5 (1 p.) and ff. 96–97 (1 p.)]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to Lord Ambr. Williamson. We have no letters from Holland since 11/21 inst., and believe the frost so great on that side that the boats cannot come out. It is here one of the severest seasons that has been felt a long while.
You will see by the Votes of yesterday how far back they are resolved to look in the matter of grants, but it is supposed that the largeness of the extent will diminish the view, and that thereby they will lose the sight of them altogether.
The House, in a committee of the whole House, have resolved to–day to give 1,476,000l. to make good the deficiencies of the last session of Parliament.
The King has yet granted no licences for persons to stay here who have been in France, or in the service of the late King, or the French King, and, it is presumed he will allow them but to few, and that numbers of them will be obliged to quit the kingdom by the first of next month, which is the time set by a late Act of Parliament.
To–morrow the Commons will be again upon the business of Knight and Marriot, it having been put off for some days at the desire of the Chancellor of the Exchequer, he informing the House that he had somewhat extraordinary to offer to them in that matter, which he should be ready with by to–morrow. Endorsed, R. Feb. 7, 98. [S.P. 32. 15. ff. 308–309.]
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Dr. Thomas Burwell, Dr. Richard Forless and Dr. Tho. Gill, fellows of the College of Physicians in London, and late three of the Censors of the College. [The petition is similar to that of Dr. Dawes of Jan. 9th, v. supra.] Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 179.]
Jan. 22. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 36. (Printed.) 4 pp. [S.P.32. 9. ff. 98–99.]
Jan. 22. [Proceedings in the House of Commons.] This was the day appointed for Mr. Montague's laying before the House what he had further to offer relating to the examination about the abuses in Exchequer Bills, when he began to open and proposed some persons to be called to the Bar and examined in order to the detecting an ill practise in the late Cashier of the Excise. Mr. Duncomb took notice he was pointed at, and said this was an artifice made use of to screen those who were real offenders, that he did not say it to reflect on the Treasury, there being some there he had great honor for, intimating that it was only owing to some of them that the discovery of the false endorsements were brought to light, and as if they had been brow beat for it, against which aspersion they all justified themselves, and he being called upon to prove or tell whom he had it from, he named Mr. Wardor, the clerk of the Pells, who is lately dead.
Mr. Montague declined going on with his information till the House were satisfied there was no design to screen anybody, and therefore moved they would first proceed with Knight and Burton, but this being insisted on, as the business of the day, Mr. Humes, Fernes and Peters were called in and examined. Humes, as one employed to comptrol the Tellers offices, gave an account of Exchequer bills paid in from the Excise in May last, particularly 3,000l. and 10,000l. paid in by Mr. Duncomb as the balance of his accompt upon going off. Fernes, who is clerk to Mr. Carew the Teller, said Mr. Duncomb's agent was to have paid in 3,000l. to his office, and would have done it in Exchequer bills, but when he refused it, since they could not then have passed through the revenue, it appeared that payment was made in Mr. Palmes office to his clerk Mr. Peters. Mr. Duncomb argued that could not concern him since he had cash lying in Peters hands, and he knew nothing of his making payment in Exchequer bills; which Peters owned and said he had the bills from Mr. Pauncefort which he would have paid to Fernes, and he refusing it he supplied it another way.
The like answers perhaps may be given for the 10,000l., but it being late that enquiry is put off till Monday. In the meantime the House shewed no inclination to take Peters into custody as was moved. 2 pp. [S.P.32. 9. ff. 100–101.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Mackie. I have nothing to oppose against your coming to town if such pressing occasions require it. In the enclosed packet is a letter of the King's. You will therefore despatch a boat with it immediately, and let it not be delivered at Calais but to a Messenger if there be any on the place or soon expected. [S.P.44. 99. p. 435.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
The same to the Postmaster General. I send you a packet for Lord Portland, under Mr. Mackie's cover, in which is a letter of his Majesty's. You will send it immediately by express, and I desire an account from Dover when it arrived. [Ibid.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of George Smyth, esq., of North Nibley, co. Gloucester, setting forth that he, being a justice of the peace for the county, has, for three years past, chiefly applied himself in his station to the discovery and prosecution of clippers and counterfeiters of coin, the late common and most dangerous pest of the kingdom, and that he has undergone the danger of many false accusations, both before a committee of the House of Commons, during the last session, and before the late Lords Justices and the Privy Council. But because his reputation could not be thus ruined, the person who was his chief accuser before the said committee, one Edward Wintour, brother of Capt. William Wintour, now in Worcester Gaol upon a fresh impeachment for counterfeiting the new coin, did attempt to murder the petitioner, though a magistrate, in the open streets of Gloucester. He prays for such employment as to his Majesty's wisdom and bounty shall seem meet. Referred to the Lords of the Treasury. [S.P.44. 238. p. 184.]
Jan. 22.
Kensington.
Warrant for, and licence to, William Evoy, to stay in England or the English dominions; he went into the French king's dominions since the 11th December, 1688, without a licence and has since returned into England. [S.P.44. 347. p. 133, and S.O.3. 20. f. 139.]
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate to set at liberty Richard Conden, committed for having served as a soldier under the French King. [S.P.44. 349. p. 50.]
Jan. 23.
Kensington.
Proclamation reciting the provisions of "An Act made this present session of Parliament, intituled, An Act against corresponding with the late King James and his adherents": that it is thought necessary, that no person may pretend ignorance of the Act, that public notice be given thereof. The King therefore publishes this proclamation declaring that all persons found offending shall be prosecuted and punished with the utmost severity; and he charges his subjects that they do no ways conceal, harbour or entertain persons whom they shall know to be offenders, but endeavour to apprehend them, as they will answer the contrary at their perils. Printed. [S.P.45. 13. No. 157.]
Jan. 23.
The Hague.
Pass to Mr. John Vaughan, a merchant of London. [S.P.44. 386. p. 10.]
Jan. 24–25. [Account of proceedings in the House of Commons.] Jan. 24: It was expected this day that some notice would have been taken of what passed between Mr. Smith and the Speaker. It being then late when it was moved that Mr. Peters should be taken into custody, and opposition was made to it, on account that he had been summoned as a witness; it running into a debate, the Speaker interrupted it unless candles were called for, which question Mr. Smith would have diverted, saying he had something to offer by way of compromise. The Speaker, being a little impatient to make an end for that night, repeated his compromising in an exposing way, insomuch that Mr. Smith told him he should learn more manners, and when the House was up, the question being carried against candles, Mr. Smith told the Speaker, if he treated him no better, he would pull him by the nose. The friends of both had threatened they would complain to the House; but, two nights passing between, it was considered there had been passion on both sides, and therefore no mention was made of it.
When they went into the Committee of Ways and Means Mr. Harlay proposed laying 18d. per pound upon land, which he said would raise 750,000l., whereof 500,000l. might be applied to the paying of deficiencies or any other use and 250,000l. for disbanding the army. That method was disliked since it would affect credit, it being already enacted that the deficiencies shall be charged on the first Aids given: but Mr. Pelham's way was taken, of adding to the loan of 600,000l., they had already voted, the sum of 250,000l., and declaring the whole should be repaid within the year, by which means he thought money might be raised and the Forces in a great measure disbanded before the Bill could be prepared. There were hints given as if they would lay hold on forfeitures and old and new grants, to be made use of as a Fund for some of the charges before them.
Jan. 25: The House sat till 8 this evening upon the examination of the Exchequer Bills paid in by Mr. Duncomb into Mr. Palmes office. Peters, the clerk, gave evidence that he paid in 10,000l., being the balance of his account, in Exchequer Bills, endorsed with one name, which he thought had passed through the Revenue till he found they were refused by the Trustees, and then Mr. Duncomb would not take any part of them again but said he must look to it for he had tallies for his discharge, so that those Peters put off he lost the discount of, and those that he left in the office, when he went out, were turned into Specie Bills. After the witnesses were heard there was a long debate whether Mr. Duncomb should withdraw, or that time should be allowed him for his defence, as he desired. He had been often pressed to declare from whom he received those Exchequer Bills, and whether they came to his hands endorsed. Some, who shewed a kind of willingness to allow him time, declared they could not consent to it while he stood out in contempt and would not answer that question. Which he did at last very unadvisedly and in such a manner as made him appear more guilty than perhaps could ever have been proved. He said he had the Bills of De Costa, a Jew, who endorsed them, that he advised the Jew to put his own name to them, but that he would not do. He was present when the Bills were endorsed, and they asked Peters whether they would pass so. After that he withdrew to prevent the Question being put for it, and then it held but a very little while to put the other Question, that for his contriving and advising the false endorsements of Exchequer Bills and paying them into the Exchequer in discharge of what he had received of the Duties of Excise, when he knew they had not passed through the Revenue, that he should be committed to the Tower. 3¼ pp. [S.P.32. 9. ff. 104–105.]
Jan. 24.
Kensington.
Warrant for a licence to Samuel Garth, doctor of physick, who went into the French King's dominions, since 11th Dec., 1688, without licence, and since returned without licence, to stay in England or other the King's dominions. [S.P.44. 351. p. 1.]
The like warrant for John Smith, esq.; John Errington, esq.; William Evoy; George Mathew; Joseph Haley; Viscount Fitzwilliams; Richard Fitzwilliams, esq. [ibid. pp. 2–3]; Morgan Ryan, esq., George Haviland, coffee man, and William Walsh, who have been in arms under the late King James in Ireland since 13 Feb., 1688 [ibid. p. 3]; Margaret Chilton; Mathew King; Will. Farmer; the Earl of Antrim, who has been in arms, etc.; Anne Bagnall and her 5 children; John Shipen; Lord Geo. Howard, who has been in arms, etc.; Robert Fielding, esq. [ibid. p. 4]: Thomas Clopton; Geo. Talbot, who has been in arms under the late King James in Ireland; William Raftor; Bartholomew Isaac and Joseph Pattenson, who have been in arms, etc.; Nicholas Plunket; John Digby; Francis de la Rue, gent. [ibid. p. 5]; Walter Butler; John Brady; Sir John Southcott; Francis Povy, gent. [ibid. p. 6]; Mary Knight; Dorothy de Beaucleare; Catherin Rockly; Thomas Belasyse, esq.; Tho. Kavanagh, gent., who has been in the late King James service in Ireland and went into the French King's dominions [in the margin] stopt [ibid. p. 7]; Thady Meagher and Dorothy his wife; Thomas Prendergrast, esq., who went into the French King's dominions and has been in arms, etc.; Col. John Corbett who has been in arms, etc.; Richard, Lord Bellew, and Captain Thomas Panton, who have been in arms, etc.; Jervis Parker [ibid. p. 8]; Lord Kerry [ibid. p. 9]; Cha. Duke of St. Albans; Cha. Duke of Richmond [ibid. p. 14]; Henry Curwen, esq. [ibid. p. 16]; James Gough, who has been in arms, etc. [ibid.]; James Murrey [ibid. p. 17]; Humphry Borlase, esq.; James Coleman [ibid. p. 18]; Phillip Stapleton [ibid. p. 21]; John Egan; John Fulham; Richard Langhorne [ibid. p. 22]; Lyster Blunt [ibid. p. 24, and S.O.3. 20. f. 138 v. seq.].
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir William Morley, Knt. of the Bath and Bart., desiring a writ of error. Granted. [S.P.44. 238. p. 180.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Robert Williamson of London, merchant, setting forth that he had petitioned, in the nature of a petition of Right, for 60l. per annum due to the petitioner upon an assignment under a patent granted to Sir Robert Viner by K. Cha. on the hereditary revenue of the Excise. That in 3 W. and M. judgment was given for the petitioner, but the Attorney General brought a writ of error on the judgment returnable in the Exchequer Chamber, and in 8 Will. III the judgment given in the Court of Exchequer was reversed. He prays for a grant to bring a writ of error returnable in Parliament. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [Ibid. p. 191.]
Jan. 24. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 37. (Printed.) 4 pp. [S.P.32. 9. ff. 102–103.]
Jan. 25./Feb. 4.
Versailles.
Louis XIV to William III. The letter which the Duke of St. Albans delivered to me, and what he said on your Majesty's behalf give me real pleasure, and I am much obliged for your congratulations on the marriage of my grandson (fils) the Duke of Burgundy. Signed Louis. Endorsed, Au roy de la Grand Bretagne Monsieur mon frere & cousin. Two seals. French: printed by Dr. Japikse, I, p. 233, note 2. [S.P.8. 18. ff. 17–18.]
Jan. 25. List of his Majesty's English Forces according to their respective precedency.
Horse.
Present Colonels. First Colonels.
Troop of Granadr. Guards. E. of Oxford.
Three Troops of Guards. Sr. John Lanier.
Royall Regiment. E. of Peterborough.
Majr. Genl. Lumley. E. of Plymouth.
Majr. Genl. Leveson. Scots, E. of Arran.
Colonel Wood. D. of Shrewsbury.
Colonel Langston. E. of Scarborough.
Earl of Arran. Ld. Cavendish.
Brigadr. Wyndham. E. of Macklesfeild.
D. of Schonburg.
E. of Macklesfeild.
Dragoons.—The Royall Regiment, Colonel Lloyd's, the Earl of Essex's.
Foot.—First Regiment of Guards. Coldstream Regt. of Guards. Royall Regiment. Brigadr. Selwyn's Regt. Major General Churchill's. Brigadr. Trelawny's. Brigadr. Fairfax's. Colonel Colenbines. Colonel Seymour's. The Royall Regt. of Fuziliers. Colonel Webb's Regiment. Major Genl. Steuart's. Sr. Bevill Granvill's. Sr. John Jacob's. Colonel Tidcomb's. Colonel How's. Colonel Colt's. Colonel Stanley's. Colonel Collingwood's. Major Genl. Erle's [in the margin] Luttrell. Colonel Mordaunt's. Sr. Hen. Belasyse's. Duke of Bolton's. Brigadr. Ingoldsby's. Colonel Coote's. Colonel Brudenall's. Colonel Saunderson's. Major Genl. Erle's.
Colonel Gibson's Equal in Rank being of the same raising.
Coll. Northcote's
Coll. Farrington's
[S.P.8. 18. ff. 19–20.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to Lord Ambr. Williamson. The King's gracious temper has prevailed upon him to grant licences to stay in England to a great many persons, who have been in France or borne arms under the French King, or the late King, so that we have our hands full of them. They are obliged to give security for their good behaviour while they stay here.
On Saturday last the Chancellor of the Exchequer accused Mr. Charles Duncombe in the House of Commons of being privy to the practice of false endorsements on Exchequer Bills; the matter was warmly debated, but, no candles being voted, it was put off till to–day. [S.P.32. 9. ff. 106–107.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to the same. Mr. Warder, clerk of the Pells, being dead, Colonel Strangways, a west country gentleman, has produced a patent of K. Cha. 2d. granting him this office (which is worth about 2,000l. a year) in reversion, but the Lords of the Treasury have given it to Mr. Pelham, brother to Mr. Pelham of the Treasury, who has taken possession of it accordingly. 3pp. [Ibid. ff. 108–109.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
R. Yard's newsletter to the same. To see Mr. Duncombe sent to the Tower for making false endorsements on Exchequer Bills and paying them into the Exchequer as received in the Excise, whereas he bought them at 7 or 8 per cent. discount, must needs surprise people. He had nothing to say for himself, and his friends as little for him. As he is in the same circumstances with Burton and Knight, so in all likelihood he will run the same fate. 1 p. [Ibid. ff. 110–111.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Ambassador of the States General. With reference to your note concerning the ship St. Christo, captured by the French at Carthagena, recaptured by a warship of the States General, brought to England and stranded at Rye; his Majesty commands me to reply, every possible favour has been granted as regards the goods found in the ship, those which were products or manufacture of this country were exempted from import duty. If the guns or goods are to be transported orders will be given for the guns to be free from duty, and a part of the duty on the goods will be refunded, according to law, but the duties on the goods sold in this country are fixed by Act of Parliament, so his Majesty cannot free them, but will give orders for a rebate proportionate to the damage the goods have suffered by water or otherwise. French. [S.P.44. 99. p. 436.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Ld. Ambassador Williamson. I send you by this post the commission for the surrender of St. Christopher's, which his Majesty would not have longer delayed on this side, though the Admiralty have not yet prepared an advice boat for carrying the duplicate with the instructions to Colonel Codrington. They are pressed again, and I wish that may stir them up to a quicker dispatch. In the meantime his Majesty wishes you could find some reasonable occasion for delaying the delivery of the commission to the French ambassador, that our duplicate may be the first sent away, but he would not have it look as it were done designedly. The instrument must be delivered rather than give occasion of complaint, as if that article were not observed. His Majesty chooses rather that it be sent to you than Lord Portland to gain more time. I write this after having been in the House of Commons till 8 at night, it having taken so much time to dispose of Charles Duncomb to the Tower. Endorsed, R. Feb. 8, 98. 2 pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 21–22.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Admiralty. As the Eagle advice boat, designed by you to carry the King's orders to Colonel Codrington, Governor of the Leeward Islands, cannot be ready till the end of the month, the King would have some other boat got ready to sail forthwith. [S.P.44. 204. p. 159.]
Jan. 25.
Kensington.
Warrant [for a licence] to Sir Nicholas Butler, who went into the French King's dominions since 11 Dec., 1688, and is since returned, to stay in England or other the King's dominions. [S.P.44. 351. p. 15.]
A like warrant to John Brown [ibid.]; John Martin; Robert Shaw; Capt. Henry Kelly, who has been in the service of the late King James in Ireland since 13 Feb., 1688; Francis Williamson; John Alexander; Elizabeth Bishop [ibid. p. 16]; Lord Longdale; Marmaduke Longdale, esq.; Martha Lowe; John Darrell; Philip Conner; John Mackey, esq. [ibid. p. 17]; James Tracy; Luke Mathews. [Ibid. p. 18, also S.O.3. 20. f. 138 v. seq.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of James Van Daalen, burgher of Amsterdam, setting forth that he, being informed the city of Exeter intended to make their river navigable, came hither to undertake the same by using a new invention made known to his Majesty last year at Loo, and for his finding out the invention prays for letters patents for 14 years. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [S.P.44. 238. p. 180.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the Earl of Romney [setting forth] that the inhabitants of the town of Greenwich have applied to him to obtain a grant for a public market, to be held two days in a week, on Wednesday and Saturday, for ever; and also an old barn and some ruinous buildings, called the King's Stables, with the adjoining waste, containing from N. to S. 600 ft. and in breadth from E. to W., 200 ft. or thereabouts, with reasonable duties to be taken for the conveniency and liberty to erect market stalls and sheds for that purpose. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [S.P.44. 238. p. 182.]
Jan. 25.
Kensington.
Warrant that the Dean of the Cathedral Church of York and his successors shall be residentiary. As the statutes leave the number of residentiaries uncertain, it is ordained that there shall be five and no more. [S.P.44. 347.p. 134.]
Jan. 25–31. "Proceedings in the House of Lords." Endorsed, "for Sir Joseph Williamson." 2 pp. [S.P.32. 9. ff. 117–118.]
Jan. 25. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 38. (Printed.) 6 pp. [S.P.32. 9. ff. 112–114.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall.
Newsletter, giving the Resolutions of the House of Commons. Endorsed, R. Feb. 8, 98. 1 p. [Ibid. ff. 115–116.]
Jan. 26./Feb. 5.
Paris.
Lord Portland to William III. Marshal de Bouflers and the Duke de Grammont came to see me on my arrival last Friday night and were extremely civil; I told them your Majesty had hastened my departure; that I had arrived without my baggage, which had been delayed at Homfleur by the frost and the head wind, so that perhaps I should be obliged to postpone my entry, and therefore my public audience, for some time; but that it would be impossible for me to carry out your Majesty's orders unless his Most Christian Majesty would admit me to a private audience, which I particularly desired. They assured me in reply that my zeal would be most agreeable to the King and that my wish would be granted on the first opportunity, as the King had said to them, when leaving Versailles that very day to come to see me, that any attentions which they or others of the Court might pay me would be gratifying to him; that they would go to Versailles on Saturday, and on Sunday there was the ceremony of the Knights of the Order of St. Esprit, which is held on the four great feasts, and that they were sure I should have an audience on Monday morning.
On Saturday I sent Mr. Prior to present my compliments to the Marquis de Torcy at Versailles: my message to him was to the same effect as what I had said to these two gentlemen, and I sent him a copy of my letter of credence. On Sunday the Marshal and the Duke de Grammont came back to town and told me the King had been much pleased with the zeal I had manifested; that he wished to see me as soon as possible; that on Monday he was taking medicine, but he wished to give me an audience on Tuesday as soon as he was dressed. Thereupon I went there yesterday morning to the Marquis de Torcy, who took me to the King, whom I found in his closet. After I had delivered your Majesty's message in a complimentary manner, he replied, with every assurance of sincerity, that he wished to keep the peace and to live in close union and friendship with your Majesty, and that nothing would be lacking on his part that could contribute to that end; that he was certain, after your Majesty's assurances, that peace would be preserved. After thanking him for these gracious utterances I said that it had been impossible for your Majesty to remain in any doubt of his goodwill after his assurance that the war, which your Majesty had been obliged to make upon him, did not in any way diminish his esteem or friendship now that peace had been restored. The King replied that what Marshal de Bouflers had said to me was by his order and would always represent his real feelings, that certainly during the war all possible damage had been done on either side, but that we must forget the past and only think of doing good in future. Then without waiting a reply from me he said many kind things about me. I thanked him, and prayed him, as your Majesty had been kind enough to employ me, to be so good as to accept me. He replied that your Majesty could not have sent anyone more welcome: and after saying many other kind things he added, "Certainly, Sir, it is delightful to be an envoy (ministre) when your royal master and I are in such close agreement."
I had no opportunity of discussing any business. In withdrawing I asked his leave to formally wait upon him on his return from Marli, in anticipation of my public audience, to which he replied that I could do so, and that he would be very pleased.
Afterwards I had an audience of Mr. le Daufin and of his sons the three princes, of the Duchess of Burgundy, of Monsieur, and of Madame who received me with delight, which she did not hide, saying aloud that now that peace had been made she could show her sympathy for your Majesty, and calling on all who were present to witness that she had never concealed her feelings during the war. Then I was taken to dine with the Marquis de Torcy, where I found the Archbishop of Rheims, Marshal de Bouflers, the Dukes de Grammont and de Chevreuse, the Marquis de Gièvre, the Comte de Tallard, Mr. le Premier and many others of the chief people of the Court. I cannot describe to your Majesty how anxious all the people of quality here are to express their high opinion of you. The King went to Marli last night and will not return before Saturday, when I shall go again to Versailles to pay my respects. The Duke of St. Albans took leave yesterday just before my audience; he will depart the day after to–morrow. Portland.
Please pardon the innumerable erasures: I have been writing late at night and have not had time to write it again. French, holograph. Printed by Dr. Japikse, I, pp. 221–224, No. 197. [S.P.8. 18. ff. 21–26.]
Jan. 26.
Kensington.
Warrant [for a licence] to William Plowden, esq., who went into the French King's dominions since 11th Dec., 1688. [S.P.44. 351. p. 9.]
The like warrant for James Oswald, student; Anthony Preston, Viscount Gormanston, who has been in arms under the late King James in Ireland since the 13 Feb., 1688; Almerick, Baron of Kingsale, who has been in arms, etc.; Lord Kilmare, who has been in arms, etc.; John Gazain Taylor; Henry Howard, esq.; Benedict Leonard Calvert, esq.; Charlwood Lawton, esq.; Charles Sturton, esq., who has been in arms, etc.; Dr. Tho. Lane, who has been in arms, etc.; Edmund Mallone, esq., who has been in arms, etc.; Henry Morgan; Edward Robson; John Williams; Arthur French, esq., who has been in arms, etc.; Col. Henry Lutterel, who has been in arms, etc.; Robert Scarisbrick; Thomas Drew; Peter Galberry; Mary Temperly; Mary Valois; William Smith; the Countess of Sussex; the Lady Barbara Lennard; Anne Cane; Richard Rudyard; Charles Newey; Henry, Lord Dover; James Hacket, esq.; John Ward; Denish Kelly, who has been in arms, etc.; Henry Carter; John, Lord Trimlestowne; Dr. Nicholas Shee, who has been in arms, etc.; James Jones; Edward Rice, esq.; Francis Terne, gent.; Jeremiah Tinker; Capt. Darby O'Bryan, who has been in arms, etc.; John Smith; Majr. John Eames, who has been in arms, etc. [ibid. pp. 9–14]; Robert Clarke; Sir Edward Southcot [ibid. p. 15]; Mathew Cooper [ibid. p. 16]; Elizabeth Arundell; Alice Scot [ibid. p. 17]; Mary Audly; John Baker; William Cook; Wm. Close [ibid. p. 18]; Adam Colclough; Donnogh Molony, who has been in service of the late King James in Ireland, etc.; Felix Rouse; Daniel Gwynn, who has been in arms, etc.; William More, who has been in arms, etc. [ibid. p. 19]; Morgan Griffin, who has been in arms, etc.; Susannah Bray; Charles Kelly; Honor Fitz Gerald; Mr. Geo. Wilson; Edward Wilson; Philip Bell [ibid. p. 20]; Major Charles King, who has been in arms, etc.; Dr. Thomas Riddle; Cha. Howse [ibid. p. 21]; Jeremiah Hollyhand, who has been in arms, etc.; John Pluncket [ibid. p. 22]; Dominic Moren; John Evers, who has been in arms, etc.; Samuel Boulton; Dr. Daniel Nolan [ibid. p. 23]; Mary Isaac; Anne Lasenby; Anne Selby [ibid. p. 24]; James Oxburg [ibid. p. 37]; Capt. Edmund Fitz Gerald, who has been in arms, etc. [ibid. p. 38]; Charles Bertie, esq. [ibid. p. 46]; Daniel Wastney. [Ibid. p. 50, also S.O.3. 20. f. 138 v. seq.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Richard Coote, esq., desiring a writ of error. Granted. [S.P.44. 238. p. 180.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Robert Rickards; setting forth that he had brought his action against the defendant, Henry Corneforth, for impounding his cattle, and judgment was given for the defendant; praying a warrant for a writ of error returnable in Parliament. Granted. [Ibid. p. 181.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John, Earl of Bath; setting forth that he exhibited a writ of error for perjury in the King's Bench against Philip Mellen als. Mellens als. Mellim in the name of Sir Saml. Astry, H.M. Coroner and Attorney, and judgment was given in the said information for the defendant, and praying for a warrant for a writ of error returnable in Parliament. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [S.P.44. 238. p. 181.]
Jan. 26. Caveat that nothing pass in relation to a writ of error against a judgment given for Lord Gormanston in a cause between his Lordship and Col. Coote without first giving notice to Lord Gormanston at — in the Hay Market.
Memorandum. This Caveat was withdrawn the same day. [S.P.44. 75. p. 1.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
Certificate that Matthew Prior, esq., secretary to the Extraordinary Embassy to the Most Christian King, kissed the King's hand and departed out of his presence in order to that employment on the 9th inst. [S.P.44. 348. p. 4.]
Jan. 26. A similar certificate for William, Earl of Portland, his Majesty's Ambassador Extraordinary to the Most Christian King. [Ibid.]
Jan. 26. Warrant to Peregrin, Marquis of Carmarthen, colonel of the first marine regiment, for the quartering of the two marine regiments of foot in various places. [S.P.44. 167. p. 309.]
Memorandum of a like order to Sir Cloudesly Shovell, knight, colonel of the second marine regiment. [Ibid. p. 310.]
Jan. 26. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 39. In duplicate. (Printed.) 4 pp. [S.P. 32. 9. ff. 119–122.]
Jan. 27.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Privy Council of Scotland, reciting that the two regiments of dragoons commanded by Viscount Teviot and Lord Jedburgh had been ordered to march into Scotland to be upon establishment there; that there is no fonds for maintaining more regiments of dragoons in Scotland: and directing therefore that the regiment commanded by Lord Carmichael should be disbanded "how soon any of the foresaid regiments arrives in Scotland." [S.P.57. 16. p. 488.]
Jan. 27.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland. By the establishment of 1st Dec. last we acquainted you with the number of regiments of dragoons and foot we thought needful for the security of that kingdom, since which we have ordered several regiments to be broke. Now we think it necessary to condescend upon the particular troops and regiments we are resolved should be established, viz.: the troop of Guards commanded by the Earl of Argyll; the Royal regiment of dragoons commanded by Viscount Teviot; the regiment of dragoons commanded by Lord Jedburgh; the regiment of foot guards commanded by Major General Ramsay; the regiment of fusiliers commanded by Colonel Row; the regiment of foot commanded by Major General Collier, and the regiment of foot commanded by Brigadier Maitland. None of these regiments was to be received upon the pay of Scotland before the 1st inst., but for preserving the fonds the more entire such of the regiments as were not then, or are not yet, arrived in Scotland shall only be entered on the establishment from the time of arrival. [S.P.57. p. 489.]
Jan. 27.
Kensington.
Docket of the warrant for a charter, giving to Ludovick Grant of that ilk the lands and barony of Drumnagair in the parish of Aberluthnet and sheriffdom of Kincardine: also the lands of Kirktown of Aberluthnet and the lands of Ballandro comprehending the mains of Ballandro, Whytfield, Johnshaven with the harbour and white fishing in the parish of Benholm and sheriffdom aforesaid: and the lands of Innerbervie called Sillieflett with the harbour of Gourden with the white fishing and salmon fishing: and the lands of Halgreen "above specified" with 20s. Scots yearly forth of the stone of Benholm. [Ibid. p. 490.]
Jan. 27.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland, requiring them to take a backbond from Ludovick Grant, declaring the above grant to be only in security of 230 guineas due to him by William Rait of Halgreen. The warrant recites that by "our signature of this date we have, as a mark of our royal favour, disponed to Ludovick Grant of that ilk, in consideration of his constant zeal and affection to our service, the lands of Drumnegar and others belonging to William Rait of Halgreen, and now fallen in our hands by recognition." [Ibid. p. 491.]
Jan. 27.
Kensington.
Warrant to the same, reciting that the King, by commission dated March 30 ult., appointed Colin Ramsay to be commissary of Artillery in Scotland; that he is informed that this office is omitted in the new establishment; and requiring that Colin Ramsay be continued in pay, conform to his commission. [Ibid. p. 492.]
Jan. 27.
Kensington.
Docket of the warrant for a gift in favour of — of all escheatable goods which pertained to John Robertson, late Dean of Gild of Edinburgh, "the time of his denunciation to the horn," or acquired by him since, now fallen into the King's hands through his being upon Dec. 18th ult. denounced a rebel. [Ibid.]
Jan. 27.
Kensington.
Warrant [for a licence] to Mary, Duchess of Norfolk, who went into the French King's dominions since 11 Dec., 1688. [S.P.44. 351. p. 15.]
A like warrant to Tho. Fagan; Geo. Bamfield, who has been in arms under the late King James in Ireland [ibid. p. 15]; George Smith [ibid. p. 17]; Dr. John Day [ibid. p. 19]; David Arnell; Edward Richardy; Sir Drury Wray, who has been in arms, etc. [ibid. p. 21]; James Chirch; Cha. Knowles, esq., commonly called Lord Banbury [ibid. p. 22]; Dominic Sherbourn, who has been in arms, etc.; William Staveley. [Ibid. p. 23, and S.O.3. 20. f. 138 v. seq.]
Jan. 27.
Kensington.
Warrant to William Parsons, esq., lieutenant–colonel of the regiment of foot commanded by Brigadier Thomas Fairfax, to call a court–martial and to be president of the same.
Memorandum. His Majesty's pleasure is that no sentence of death be executed till an account be given to him in pursuance of directions in the 52d. Article of War and his pleasure declared. In the margin. For holding a court–martial in Brigadier Trelawyn's regiment. [S.P.44. 167. p. 311.]
Jan. 27.
The Hague.
Pass to the Sieur Constant de Rebecque, Secretary to the Comte de Frize, commander in chief of his Majesty's forces late in service on the upper Rhine, with nine other of his servants in attendance on the Comte. [S.P.44. 386. p. 10.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Edward Shurburne, knt., setting forth that he was by Letters Patent, in 15 Charles I, constituted clerk of the Ordnance (after the decease of his father enjoying the same) during life, notwithstanding which, in December, 1688, he was by warrant of the Lords Commissioners then sitting at Guildhall, directed to Lord Lucas, Governor of the Tower, without cause shewn, or being so much as nominated therein, forced out of his habitation and dispossessed of his said place.
That at the time of his exclusion there was due to him upon his Patent Fee of 2s. per diem the sum of 748l. 10s. as appears by certificate of Sir Robt. Howard, Auditor of the Exchequer, besides the sum of 300l. upon debenture due in the office of the Ordnance.
That ever since he has behaved with peaceable submission and paid all taxes and impositions whilst he was able.
And praying that the matter be referred to the Master and Officers of the Ordnance, that he may pay his debts and be relieved from his starving condition. Referred to the Earl of Romney and the Board of Ordnance. [S.P.44. 238. p. 183.]
Jan. 27. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 40. (Printed.) 6 pp. [S.P.32. 9. ff. 123–125.]
Jan. 27 & 28. 27 Jan. [Proceedings in the House of Commons.] This day Mr. Duncomb petitioned the House for a longer time to put in his answer, and that he might have the assistance of counsel. It was thought fit to prolong the time till Tuesday next, and from thence some argued that counsel could not be denied him, he being to defend himself against a heavy charge; but the generality were against his having counsel at this time, though it might be necessary when they should proceed against him by Bill or Impeachment; now they were only on the Enquiry to know how the first stood, which he had given so full an answer of that they did not know any further answer from him was necessary, tho' it was ordered, which was thought too hastily done. However they resolved he should not have counsel, and, because they would not put a negative upon it, it went off with a previous Question, and Mr. Speaker in pursuance of the sense of the House is to acquaint Mr. Duncomb that he was at liberty whether he would send any answer or not.
28 Jan. De Costa, a Jew, whom Mr. Duncomb mentioned, attended the House this day, and gave them an account that he received the 4th of May 7,000l. in Exchequer Bills for remittances; on the 11th of May he sold them to Mr. Duncomb at 5 per cent. discount. They were not then endorsed, but Mr. Duncomb telling him it was necessary, and that it was no matter what names were put, he signed them in his own name, some with his partner's name, and then, reconsidering it, he put fictitious names, but he was sure there were no brewers names, nor could he imagine they were to be paid in to the Exchequer for excise.
His answers being satisfactory he was discharged.
One Huddleston, Receiver of the Taxes for Westmorland, was brought to the Bar, and it was proved against him that he brought Exchequer Bills here to the value of 3 or 4,000l. and paid them into the Exchequer in discharge of what he had received in the country on account of the Land Tax and the Window Duty. He is committed to the Gate House, and his son, who is an officer in the Custom House, appearing to be concerned in the transaction, is ordered to be taken into custody. 2 pp. [S.P.32. 9. ff. 126–127.]
Jan. 28.
Kensington.
A proclamation prohibiting his Majesty's subjects to enter into the service of foreign princes and states. The proclamation recites that the King has been informed that divers of his natural born subjects, as well mariners as others, daily depart this kingdom and betake themselves to the service of foreign princes without licence: he prohibits all persons, being his natural born subjects, from listing themselves in the service of any foreign prince; commands that they do not withdraw from his realms to enter foreign service without licence; and declares that offenders will be proceeded against. Printed. [S.P.45. 13. No. 159.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Lords of the Admiralty, directing two yachts to be sent to Rotterdam, to bring over the Count de Bonde, the Swedish ambassador, and the Envoy of Brandenburg respectively. [S.P.44. 204. p. 159.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
The same to Ld. Ambassdr. Williamson. Your letters of the 20th, 24th and 31st inst. [N.S.] arrived to–day, so that I have not yet had an opportunity of laying them before his Majesty, to receive his pleasure what further satisfaction should be given to the Danes upon their cavil about Hamburg. I perceive the Swedes have their eye upon what they are doing, and intend to insist they should have the same right done them in regard to their pretensions to Bremen.
We are now in an infinite crowd of such as petition for leave to stay in England that they might not incur the penalties of the late Act. Some are refused, who have not behaved themselves as they ought to have done, particularly many of the Irish officers, who have no pretence for their being here but that they were included in the Articles of Limerick. They are here in such numbers, as if they were waiting for an opportunity to retrieve their old game, but I hope this law will disperse them. Endorsed, R. 31. 1¼ pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 23–24.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to the same. The wind being come to the westward, and the river pretty free of ice, Mr. Stepney intends to embark to–morrow morning at Deptford, and the yacht that carries him has directions to bring over Lord Lexington.
Among the multitude of petitioners for licences to stay here the Earl of Ailesbury was one, but his Majesty having refused him, as he had much reason to do, he is gone, or going to Flanders. Five regiments of foot and two of horse are to be forthwith sent to Ireland, and as many regiments there disbanded, but whose is not yet known. 3 pp. [S.P.32. 9. ff. 128–129.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to Sir Jo. Williamson. The House of Lords having heard all Lord Macclesfield's evidence, a petition was presented for Lady Macclesfield desiring time to answer, for that Mr. Don, who was clerk to Sir Richard Mason her father, and a material witness for her, is at present in Wales. Their lordships allowed her a fortnight.
On Wednesday the Commons were in a committee of the whole House, and a doubt having been made whether the Exchequer Bills now current were to be paid off and sunk on the Malt Fonds preferably to the Malt tickets, and a debate arising thereupon, it was at last resolved that the Exchequer Bills are to be paid off by the Capitation and One Shilling Aid, the Fonds given for that purpose, and that what the same fall short will be made good by Parliament, and that the Malt tickets are to be discharged and paid off by their own Fund, to witt the Duty on Malt, which has made the Malt tickets much better in people's estimation than they were before.
Lord William Pawlett and Mr. Hammond being on Wednesday together in the Court of Requests, and the first speaking some words, which Mr. Hammond thought reflecting on Dr. Birch, and making thereupon an unhandsome answer, Lord Pawlett went away and desired the other to follow him, and they went to St. James Square, where they fought, and Mr. Hammond was wounded in the thigh, but not dangerously.
The Benjamin and Tonquein, two ships belonging to the East India Company, are arrived in the Downs from India. Endorsed, R. 31. 3½ pp. [Ibid. ff. 130–131.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
R. Y[ard] to Sir Jo. Williamson. The House of Commons are resolved to proceed in their enquiry into the public abuses, and to make examples of those persons they find concerned in them. Dacosta the Jew was before them to–day, and has fixed the matter upon Mr. Duncomb, that the false endorsements on the Bills he paid into the Exchequer were made by his direction. They talk of proceedings against him as well as Burton and Knight, by Bill, and setting good fines upon them according to their several estates.
Lord Macclesfield has plainly enough proved what he charges Lady Macclesfield with, and it is believed she will not go about to disprove his allegations, but will rather recriminate and shew his ill usage of her, and perhaps in the conclusion will be as willing as my lord to have a divorce. Endorsed, R. 10/31. 1 p. [S.P.32. ff. 132–133.]
Jan. 28. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 41. Printed. 6pp. [Ibid. ff. 134–136.]
Jan. 28. Newsletter. Notes of proceedings in the House of Commons. 1 p. Endorsed, R. 31. [Ibid. ff. 137–138.]
Jan. 28.
Kensington.
Warrant [for a licence] to John Bourk, commonly called Lord Bophin, who has been in arms under the late King James in Ireland since 13 Feb., 1688. [S.P.44. 351. p. 15.]
A like warrant to Alexander Boyle [ibid.]; Edward Talbot, gent. [ibid. p. 20]; George Shepard, who went into the French King's dominions [ibid. p. 21]; Edward Lee, who has been in arms, etc.; Henry Fall. [Ibid. p. 23, and S.O.3. 20. f. 138 v. seq.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of Newgate to permit — Watkins, a chirurgeon, to have access to the Earl of Clancarty, to let him blood, he being indisposed. [S.P.44. 349. p. 50.]
Jan. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland, reciting that the King by signature dated April 23rd ult. changed the holding of the lands of the Duke of Queensberry, of Turnmure, etc. [Cal. S.P. Dom., 1697, p. 134] "from simple ward to taxt ward"; that the signature is not yet expede, and does not contain any particular warrant for filling up the taxt ward duties in the blanks. The warrant authorises the passing of the signature in the ordinary form, and further requires that the Duke be discharged from the by–gone taxed relief duties and the blench duties payable to the King out of the dukedom and estate of Queensberry "preceding the date of these presents." [S.P.57. 16. p. 493.]
Jan. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant to the same in favour of Mr. Walter Birnie for the payment of arrears of pension. Cf. Cal., S.P. Dom., Mar. 3, 1692. [S.P.57. 16. p. 493.]
Jan. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant for nominating and presenting Mr. Robert Ramsay, one of the professors of philosophy in the old college [on a loose sheet otherwise called St. Salvator's College] in the University of St. Andrews, to the office of Provost and first master of the College, the office being vacant through the decease of Mr. Alexander Monro. [Ibid. pp. 495–6.]
Jan. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant appointing Brigadier James Maitland governor of the fort called Fort William. [S.P.57. 16. pp. 496–8.]
Jan. 29.
Kensington.
Warrants for patents, granting the dignity of a baronet to Sir Thomas Stuart of Cultness, sometime Lord Provost of Edinburgh, and to — Dumbar of Durn. [Ibid. pp. 498–9.]
Jan. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant appointing Sir Alexander Monro of Bearcrofts and George Munro, his son, as two commissaries of the Commissariot of Stirling. The warrant recites that the deceased Archibald Monro, second son of Sir Alexander Monro, had undoubted right to the office, and that Sir Alexander is willing to accept George, his eldest son, in place of Archibald. [Ibid. pp. 499–500.]
Jan. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant granting to — Lord Rae a pension of 300l. from the Post Office of Scotland; taking into consideration the eminent services of the deceased Lieut. Genl. Mackay, his uncle, and of several others of his near kinsmen, who lost their lives in H.M. service in the late wars against the French, and particularly calling to mind the ready assistance given by Lord Rae and his friends and vassals to H.M. forces commanded by Lieut. Genl. Mackay in his expedition against the rebels in arms in the highlands of Scotland, in the year 1689. [Ibid. p. 500–1.]
Jan. 29.
Kensington.
Warrants giving a pension of —l. to John, Earl of Carnwath, and a pension of 150l. a year to Sir Alexander Bruce of Broomhall, [Ibid. p. 502.]
Jan. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant appointing Daniel Campbell, tailor in Edinburgh, to be the King's master tailor in Scotland, with the privilege of being exempted from bearing burthen, or watching and warding within burgh with the rest of the neighbours conform to the 275th Act of the 15th Parliament of King James VI, and with liberty to work at his trade in the royal burgh of Edinburgh and all other royal burghs. Nothing herein shall derogate from the gift of the office of Purveyor and provisor of the cloth and making the gowns to the King's Beadmen yearly on the King's birthday. [Ibid. p. 502–4.]
Jan. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant [for a licence] to Daniel Harvey, who has been in the French King's dominions since 11 Dec., 1688. [S.P.44. 351. p. 22.]
Jan. 29. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 42. (Printed.) 6 pp. [S.P.32. 9. ff. 139–141.]
Jan. 29.
Feb. 1.
"Proceedings in the House of Commons," for Ld. Ambr. Williamson.
29 Jan. This day the House were settling the arrears due to the army, which amount to 1,250,000l., besides which there is about 100,000l. in arrear for the Irish service, and the Commissioners of the Treasury are to lay before the House how the Supplies given every year came to fall short.
1 Feb. The House have been this day upon Knight, Duncomb and Burton. After it had been ordered that Mr. Edwards and Taylor should examine the Exchequer Bills that are sunk, to see if any of them are falsely endorsed, it being hinted that enquiries should not be multiplied, to hinder the prosecuting those that were already detected, Mr. Harly proceeded to open what would be fit to be done with them, and preferred proceeding rather by Bill than Impeachment, which was generally approved of. 1½ pp. [S.P.32. 9. f. 142.]
Jan. 30./Feb. 9. Lord Portland to William III. I have been to Versailles again to–day to present my respects to the Most Christian King, from whom I received every possible mark of honour, and everyone at Court was most anxious to show respect for your Majesty. But it seems to me that they are trying to flatter me by giving me personally a welcome which I can only receive on your Majesty's account: moreover the English followers of King James are admitted to the Court every day, even in my presence, and to–day I met there the Duke of Berwick, Lord Midleton and many others; and they avoid discussing business with me, hinting that, as the King had allowed me to come to Court and had received me with such marked kindness, I had better not discuss business before my public audience. This increases my distrust and will force me to ask that the Most Christian King's gracious assurances and promises may be carried into effect without delay; for if I let things go on like this, without showing that in my view such behaviour is incompatible with a professed desire to establish and maintain union and a good understanding, and if I get into the habit of seeing such people at Court every day, perhaps they will make this an excuse for making difficulties about the requests which your Majesty has commanded me to make. I don't think I shall be allowed to see Made. de M[ainteno]n; I saw the Comtesse de Grammont to–day, who would wish me to do so, but so far as I could understand this lady [? Madame de Maintenon] and she are on the side of the Court of St. Germains, the former by a conscientious scruple and a pretence of pity. I have not yet heard that my baggage has even reached Rouen, and, when it gets there, it will take at least a week to get here. This will greatly delay my entry and public audience and is very embarrassing. On returning to–night from Versailles I received three English posts of the 17th, 21 and 22nd and your Majesty's letter of the 21/31. I am greatly vexed that my name has again been mentioned in the House of Commons, but I must be patient and I can easily be so, as far as I am concerned, for what affects your Majesty affects me much more and distresses me; but your Majesty says with good reason that it is most difficult to judge how this mood of the House of Commons will end. May Providence guide it and make it decide to do what is useful for your service. The Duke of St. Albans leaves to–morrow, and I am giving him this letter, as I think that is the safest way. French, holograph. Printed by Dr. Japikse, I, pp. 224–225, No. 198. [S.P.8. 18. ff. 27–30.]
[On a separate sheet in another hand, which appears to have been at one time annexed to the above letter.] From what I have written your Majesty will judge, better than I can, what is to be expected. Appearances are as good as possible. But I don't count on that, unless words are followed by deeds, and as to this I can say nothing until we get to business. French. [S.P.8. 18. f. 31.]
Jan. 30.
Kensington.
Warrant [for a licence] to James Sloane, esq., who went into the French King's dominions since 11 Dec., 1688. [S.P.44. 351. p. 18.]
[A like] warrant to Sir William Compton [ibid. p. 24]; William Rice, who has been in arms under the late King James in Ireland since 13 Feb., 1688 [ibid.]; Fra. Courson; Humphry Trafford [ibid. p. 24]; James Butler, who has been in arms, etc.; Tho. Nugent, who has been in the late King James's service in Ireland, etc.; Tho. Joy; Lt. Wm. Mannering and Captain Bellew who have been in arms, etc.; Philip Kettle; Timothy Beaghn, who has been in arms, etc.; Reginald Graham, esq.; Edward Sommerset [ibid. p. 25]; Jane du Four; Alexander Rigby; Richard Masey; Thomas Hawkins; William Rand; Captain Loftus Duckingfield; Thomas Burdin; Cornelius Lampard and William Mortagh, who have been in arms, etc.; Edward Erington [ibid. p. 26]; Thomas Erington; William Erington; Robert Bryean; William Phillips; Richard Tregagle; Henry Scudamore, who has been in arms, etc.; Eleanor Cockerom; Anthony Garain; Peter Garain; Tho. Tailor [ibid. p. 27]; John Coleman; John Pulman, who has been in arms, etc.; Anthony Vane; Anthony Kempff, who has been in arms, etc.; John Bellasise; William Amies; Henry Rogers; William Beale, who has been in arms, etc.; Michael Smith [ibid. p. 28]; Hugh Scally, John Conway and Daniel Woods, who have been in arms, etc.; Henry Gerard; George Laylor; Peter Morris; William Bromfeild; Andrew Smalwood; Robert Shepheard, Owen Fitz Simons and Captain Edmond [or Edwd.] Keeting, who have been in arms, etc. [ibid. pp. 29, 30]; Henry Backster; James Tallant, who has been in arms, etc.; Charles Walwin; Thomas Wailek, who has been in arms, etc.; Robert Bodine; Henry Caps; Mary Cossens; Bendick Bamber [ibid. p. 30]; John Cantrill; Charles Dunster; John Blackmore; Francis Milton, who has been in arms, etc.; Unitia Caps; Richard Cherry; George Latton; Edward Callender; John Stephens [ibid. p. 31]; Henry Moore; Sir Richd. Moore [ibid. p. 32]; Cesar Gage [ibid. p. 35]; Sir Edward Carteret; Sir Francis Andrew [ibid. p. 37]; Edmond Browne; Sir John Magrath, Bart.; James Penredick [ibid. p. 38]; Joseph Fox and Tho. Murphey, who have been in arms, etc.; John Caddick; Charles Banbridge, who has been in arms, etc.; Philippa Elmston; Richard Howard, who has been in arms, etc. [ibid. p. 39]; John Duddell; John White; Sir Thomas Gascoigne; William Nelson; Mathew Norris; Elizabeth Pluncket [ibid. p. 40]; Richard Jones; Margaret Cromwell; Dorothy Hurst; John Hepborn; Stephen Creagh; George Barcas [ibid. p. 41]; Charles Parker [ibid. p. 42]; Ralph Hardwick, gent. [ibid. p. 46]; Captain John Fitz Gerald, who has been in arms, etc. [S.P.44. 351. p. 48; and S.O.3. 20 f. 138 v. seq.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Lords of the Treasury, transmitting the petition of Captain Richard Long, commander of H.M.S. Rupert Prize and signifying the King's pleasure that they should enable him to perform his voyage as desired, it being for the King's service. [S.P.44. 99. p. 437.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Council of Trade. The enclosed list of five ships proposed by the Lords of the Admiralty for service in the West Indies has been laid before the King, who commands me to transmit it for your consideration whether it be a sufficient squadron. [ibid.]
Jan. 31.
Kensington.
The same to the Mayor of Canterbury. I have received from George Sayer, esq., the information of John Bullock and John Peirce sent him by you concerning David Jolly alias Davis, who appearing thereby to be a very dangerous person I have issued a warrant to have him brought before me. [Ibid. p. 438.]
The humble petition of John Crawford, Captain Lieutenant in the regiment of Scots Fusiliers under Col. Archibald Row.
About 14th August, 1688, the petitioner with some gentlemen returning home from a fair at Corspherne in Galloway, in the kingdom of Scotland, were pursued by Roger Dun and Hugh Howatson with some others their accomplices, and in a rancounter, begun by them, Dun and Howatson happened to be killed, but neither of them by the petitioner.
The regiment, in which the petitioner has served since the King's accession, is now ordered into Scotland. And, though the petitioner has several times been in Scotland, he has not been prosecuted for this matter; but, being now to reside there, he is afraid of trouble and danger, by reason of the rigor of the laws of Scotland in such like cases. He asks a pardon so as to be freed from prosecution, and to be able to continue in the King's service.
Jan. 31.
Kensington.
The King, having considered the above petition, orders that there be no criminal process or indictment against Crawford, until he has had full information and his further pleasure be known. He reprieves Crawford for 13 months, requiring the Privy Council to order him his liberty, and to give him their protection. [S.P.57. 16. p. 504–5.]
Jan. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Treasury of Scotland to cause Cornet Thomas Rae to be received amongst the invalids, at 2s. 6d. a day. [S.P.57. 16. p. 505.]
Jan. 31.
Kensington.
Commissions to John Barnes, gent., to be ensign to Colonel William Northcote's own company; John Davis, gent., to be ensign to Captain Christopher Dalston's company in Colonel William Northcote's regiment. [S.P. 44. 167. p. 310.]
Jan. 31.
Kensington.
Warrant [for a licence] to Mrs. Hannah Brownsworth, who went into the French King's dominions since 11 Dec., 1688. [S.P. 44. 351. p. 32.]
[A like] warrant to Edmund Lery; Richard Bowers; Thomas Salkeld, who has also been in arms under the late King James in Ireland since 13 Feb., 1688; Elizabeth Hughes; John Digby [ibid.]; Geo. Bradshaw, who has also been in arms, etc.; Daniel Butts, esq.; Richard Fonnies Griffith, esq.; Lady Anne Lawson; Greenhill Dudley; William Harrald; Elizabeth Basset Coffyn, and Mary her daughter; John Terry, who has been in arms, etc. [ibid. p. 33]; George Toby Guiguer; John Nelson; Tho. Forster; Margaret Carlton; Elizabeth Conley; Bartholomew Conley; William Barfoot, who has been in arms, etc.; Agatha Gilmore [ibid. p. 34]; Jane Strachan; Tho. Blake; Briget Horton; Lucy Derham; Francis Charas; Edward Butler; William Wood; William Gore; Tho. Parsons [ibid. p. 35]; Stephen Feild, and Samuel Gawen, who have been in arms, etc.; William Bowman; Edward Burdit; Henry Barker; Mary Hooper; Mr. Walter Hastings; Wm. Goold, who has been in the service of the late King James, etc.; James England and John Lanton, who have been in arms, etc.; Walter Hastings [ibid. p. 36] Thomas Rud; Simon Digby and Thomas Cusack, who have been in arms, etc.; Edward Pierce; Thomas Johnson; John Brooks; James Paisible and Mary his wife [ibid. p. 37]; Fra. Sheldon; Mrs. Agnes Jolly; William Bland; John Hambleton; Tobias Bowles [ibid. p. 38]; Lieut. William Lony, who has been in arms, etc. [ibid. p. 39]; John Ryley, who was in arms, etc. [ibid. p. 41]; Mary Alexander; Thomas Swinburn, gent.; George Throckmorton; Edwd. Gibbon, John Brodt and James Leece [ibid. p. 42]; Edward Fenwick; Jeremiah Peirce; Robt. Dowdall; George Hilton, gent.; Edward Giffard; John Galway, gent., who has been in service under the late King James in Ireland, etc. [ibid. p. 43]; Thomas Guybon; Richard Trevanion, gent.; Lord James Howard, who has been in arms, etc.; Edward Conron, who has been in arms, etc.; Ralph Widdrington and Mary his wife; William Barnes, gent. [ibid. p. 44]; Elizabeth Hiddinson; Edmund Dalton; John, Lord Kingston of Ireland, his wife and two children; Daniel Gery, who has been in the service of the French King since 13 Feb., 1688; Charles Cross; Elizabeth Price; David Bourk, who has been in arms, etc. [ibid. p. 45]; Capt. James Barry; William Wilmore; Robert Cham; Capt. James Fitz Gerald, who has been in arms, etc.; Ralph Tempest; Alexander Strachan [ibid. p. 46]; John Seagrave, Theodore Price, Tho. Newcomin, and Lieut. Col. Arthur Dillon, who have been in arms, etc.; Walter Trafford, gent.; Charles Trinder, esq.; Garret Coghland and Lt. James Coghland, who have been in arms, etc. [ibid. p. 47]; Richard Lawley, esq.; Henry Curson [ibid. p. 48]; Peter Saltmarsh to return; Mary Poole; Anne Crompton; Peter Lyon [ibid. p. 49]; Henry Prince [ibid. p. 50]; Mr. Theodore Price, who has been in arms, etc. [ibid. p. 56, and S.O.3. 20f. 138 v. seq.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant to receive into custody, at Canterbury, David Jolly alias Davis for high treason in compassing the death of the King. [S.P. 44. 349. p. 51.]
Jan. 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the apprehension of —Johnson aliasHarrison. [Ibid.]
Jan. Docquet of the appointment by the King of Prince George of Denmark; Thomas, Archbishop of Canterbury; John, Lord Somers and forty–seven persons more (being all of H.M.'s Privy Council), whereof any three to be a quorum, to be Commissioners for hearing appeals in Causes of Prizes. [S.O.3. 20. f. 138.]
[Jan. ?] The Earl of Sunderland to the King. "Your displeasure is of all things the most grievous. I deserve pity upon many accounts. That I beseech you to withdraw, and forgive my failings and dispose of me for ever as you shall think fit. God Almighty preserve you for ever." 1 p. Dated "Thursday." [S.P.8. 18 ff. 32–33.]
[Jan. ?] The Earl of Sunderland to the King. Sure, Sir, you cannot think I want zeal for your service, affection for your person, or veneration for the admirable qualities the whole world allows you. Neither am I so foolish as not to see the great advantages of the station you placed me in, which consequently I should never have left, if I had thought the difficulties I laboured under could ever have been removed, or if I had had presumption enough to have imagined your Majesty would have concerned yourself for me so much beyond what I deserved. But, being as it is, I will endeavour to satisfy you all the ways I can, and hope to find means of serving you again if you continue to expect it. In order to which I think two things necessary; that no occasion should be given to people to imagine I can return to business; and that, if your Majesty does at any time speak to the Whigs of me, you will seem to believe them concerned for what I have done, and much my friends, as truly they generally are. When it is proper for me to return, a few days may finish what I will then offer to your Majesty, if affairs continue near the posture they are now in. Till then I most humbly beg your compassion. Dated "Sunday." 2 pp. [S.P.8. 18. ff. 34–35.]
[Jan.]
Windsor.
The Earl of Sunderland to the King. I received your Majesty's letter of the 7th with all the respect and gratitude possible, and your pardon with joy. If any of my thoughts are worthy of your inquiry, Mr. Guy will acquaint you with them, which I dare not presume to do, but only beg leave to name my Lord Clancarty to you, thus far, that I hope you will do with him that which is best for your affairs, but I cannot but wish that that may be mercy, upon the account of his being the first since the peace who designed to surrender himself, which cannot be drawn into precedent. I most humbly beg your Majesty's pardon for this boldness. Dated "Winsor Tuesday." [S.P.8. 18. ff. 36–37.]
Jan.
Kensington.
Commission to Nathaniel Potter, gent., to be lieutenant in Captain Clifford Whitchcott's company in Colonel Tho. Saunderson's regiment of foot. [S.P.44. 167. p. 309.]
Jan.
Kensington.
Warrant [for a licence] to Barbara Brown and Mary, Barbara, Elizabeth Brown her three children, and Eliz. Roper, her niece, who went into the French King's dominions since 11 Dec., 1688. [S.P. 44. 351. p. 22, and S.O. 3. 20. f. 138 v.]
[A like] warrant to Tho. Bartram [ibid. p. 23]; Walter Kennedy, who has been in arms under the late King James in Ireland since 13 Feb., 1688 [ibid. p. 24]; Capt. Henry Courtney, who has been in arms, etc. [Ibid. p. 38.]