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William III: May 1698

Pages 224-278

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William III, 1698. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1933.

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May 1698

May 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the keeper of the Gatehouse to receive George Powell into custody. The warrant recites that Powell had assaulted with his sword drawn in a coffee house — Davenant, without any apparent provocation, with intention as seemed to kill him, and did likewise draw his sword upon Lieut. Coll. — Stanhope, one of the officers of H.M. first regiment of footguards, who interposed to save Davenant from danger: and that Powell could not or would not find security for keeping the peace. [S.P.44. 349. p. 70.]
May 1.
Kensington.
Commissions to Henry Devennish, esq., to be exempt and eldest captain of the second troop of guards [S.P.44. 167. p. 321]; Mr. William Hussey to be exempt and captain of the same. [Ibid. p. 338.]
May 1.
The Hague.
Pass to Wm. Legdse, servant to the Ctsse. de Dona. [S.P.44. 386. p. 15.]
May 2.
Windsor.
R. Y[ard] to Ld. Ambr. Williamson. We have been here since Thursday, and are like to stay till towards the end of this week, and I believe his Majesty will pass most of his time in this place till he goes for Holland, probably towards the end of July. His horses are already sent away.
We reckon the House of Commons will have finished this week the Bill for laying a duty on coals; which they reckon will bring in about £100,000 a year, but they have not yet agreed for how many years they will give it. The Bill for the Poll Tax will be likewise hastened, and this they reckon at about £600,000. As for the Bill about the grants I hear no talk of it at present, so it is probable it will be dropped at last. Endorsed, R. 16, 98. 1 p. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 89–90.]
May 2.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Archbishop of Canterbury. Sir George Markham, M.P. for Newark, having presented the enclosed petition to the King from that corporation, on behalf of one they desire may succeed in that vicarage when it is vacant, I am to send their request to your Grace, to consider whether the person proposed be fit to be recommended by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. [S.P.44. 99. p. 497.]
May 2.
Kensington.
Commission for Mr. James Shipton to be chaplain of Major General Stewart's regiment. [S.P.44. 167. p. 333.]
May 2. Warrant to take into custody Dinah Mason for high crimes and misdemeanours. [S.P.44. 349. p. 98.]
May 2. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 118. Printed. 2 pp. [S.P.32. 10. f. 161.]
May 2–7. Journals of the House of Lords for Sir Jos. Williamson. 3¼ pp. [Ibid. ff. 162–163.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to Sir Joseph Williamson. Lord Cornwallis died on Friday morning. Yesterday the Commons in a committee went through part of the Bill for settling the trade of Africa, and ordered that several goods pay 10 p. cent. to the Company for maintenance of their forts and castles, and that red wood shall pay 5 p. cent. only, as being used by dyers. Endorsed, R. 16th, 98. 1½ pp. [Ibid. ff. 164–165.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
Newsletter [proceedings of the House of Commons]. Endorsed, R. 16, 98. ½ p. [Ibid. ff. 166–167.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
Tho. Hopkins to Lord Ambassador Williamson. The King, I hear, will return to Kensington to-morrow or next day. The enclosed is a letter from my lord Chancellor, which makes me presume to trouble you with it, that it may be forwarded to Aix la Chapelle. Endorsed, R. 16, 98. 1 p. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 91–92.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to the same. I have acquainted Mr. Secretary that the yachts with the Czar arrived at Helvoetsluys the 5th at night.
His Majesty stays at Windsor till Thursday, though I believe he wishes himself at Kensington to-night, it being very cold, and having snowed for several hours without intermission; which is so rare, that it may seem incredible at this season. The Spanish galleons have been seen near the Terceras, so that we may hope they are safely arrived in Spain. Endorsed, R. 16th, 98. 3 pp. [S.P. 32. 15. ff. 93–94.]
May 3.
The Hague.
Pass to John Fenlison, Scotchman, late of Capt. Lee's company in Col. Brewer's regiment, left sick at the hospital in Bruxells, bringing a certificate from one of his officers there named Frazier. [S.P. 44. 386.p. 15.]
May 3.
[Whitehall.]
Pass to James Lawson to embark for Turkey. [S.P. 44. 387. p. 153.]
May 4–5. Procedings in the House of Commons. 4 May. A proposal of the East India Company was presented to the House by Sir John Fleet, their Governor, to offer a loan of £700,000, upon such a fond as Parliament should think fit for paying both principal and interest: that the money was to be raised by new subscriptions into their Stock, which they would value but at 80 p. cent., in consideration whereof they should be established by Parliament for 31 years, exclusive of all others. This was referred to a committee which sat immediately, in order to the determining whether the proposal were to be accepted or not.
A debate arose whether the trade to India would be most advantageously carried on by a joint stock. When they were ready for the Question, it being doubtful which way it would have been carried, Mr. Montagu made them another proposal, how a much greater sum might be raised, and that trade might be managed free from the objections of monopoly, by settling a perpetual fund of £160,000 p. ann., upon which two millions might be borrowed at an interest of 8 p. cent.; the subscribers to which loan should, for their further encouragement, have the sole benefit of the trade to the East Indies, each of them to carry it on for any sum not exceeding their subscription: that the present Company should be as free to subscribe as any others, and should then still keep their property in their forts, which none else should resort to, otherwise than as they had their permission. He said by this means it would best appear whether that trade were carried on to the greatest advantage by a joint stock or not; and whether it were of any security to trade to have forts in the Mogul's dominions. He had made the best enquiry he could whether the raising such a sum might be depended on, and he found great probability of it. He hoped they would think the proposition worth considering, and take another day for entering into the debate of it; which is accordingly appointed for to-morrow.
5 May. The House went this day into a committee to consider the proposals made by Mr. Montagu yesterday; which he repeated as a matter he had heard discoursed of, that seemed to carry a fair show; and, if it succeeded, would be very advantageous; but he submitted it to their judgment, and did not pretend to be otherwise answerable for it. He did not doubt but they would see how the money should be raised before they closed with it; for he should be loath to see them embark in any proposal which should fail them, as that of the Land Bank did.
Some members, who were of the East India Company, represented what a hardship it must be upon them, if they must be obliged to raise £700,000, only for the privilege of carrying on their trade, which they are in possession of by a charter granted them in pursuance of an Address of the House of Commons, which they have no way forfeited. Others thought they were no more entitled to the sole trade of India than if they had no charter. And there seemed no greater difficulty in this proposal than whether the money could be had, and for making that trial the Question proposed was, that the House should be moved to enable a committee to receive proposals for settling the East India trade; which is referred to the committee of Ways and Means, for the quicker despatch.
A motion was made to-day that a paper, delivered formerly by Sir Tho. Cook to the Commissioners of Accounts, containing an account how he had laid out £10,000 of the Company's money, which they received sealed up, and presented it in the same manner to the House, where it has lain these three Sessions, should now be opened and read; which is ordered for to-morrow. It was moved with an intention to revive the remembrance of what the Company was formerly guilty of, in bribes and corrupting of members.
6 May. Sir Tho. Cooke's paper, that was sealed up and left in the clerk's hands, was opened this day and read. It contained a general account of what he had disbursed for the Company, but there was nothing to satisfy anyone's curiosity, since there were no particulars in it but what had been known and talked of before. It was only ordered therefore to lie on the table, though some moved for a day to consider it.
The House then went into a committee of Ways and Means, it being considered that the way to know whether they could be assured of raising two millions upon the East India trade, according to the proposal they had before them the last two days, was to find out a fond of £160,000 p. an.: and it was proposed that it might be done by doubling the duty upon salt, which was accepted without any division; not but that it was liable to many objections; but it was obvious nothing else could be found less grievous or that would be charged more equally. One of the difficulties is intended to be obviated; which is that this great imposition upon salt is like to drive the victualling trade into Ireland. [S.P. 32. 11.ff. 238–240.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to Mr. Bridgeman, sending advices received from Paris concerning sea preparations made in divers ports of France, to be laid before the Lords of the Admiralty. [S.P. 44. 204.p. 176.]
May 4.
The Hague.
Pass to Simon Patrisse and Dan. Sagtell of Capt. Zeedt's company in Col. Gullenstiern's regiment in his Majesty's service, with discharges from the colonel dated Namur, July 8, '98 [sic]. [S.P. 44. 386.p. 16.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Dyne. I have your letter of yesterday, giving me notice of Bromfield's and Blackmore's coming from France without licence, and their being in custody at Battell. I have sent a warrant to bring them here to be examined. Have they been searched for papers? I hope they have. I desire to know in what vessel they came over, and if it were privately. [S.P. 44. 99.p. 498.]
May 5. Warrant to take into custody Originall Bromfield and Richd. Blackstone, for suspicion of high treason. [S.P. 44. 349.p. 77.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to Lord Ambassador Williamson. The House of Commons were on Wednesday in a committee upon the Supply, and Sir John Fleet, Governor of the East India Company, made a proposal that the company would lend the king £700,000 (to be raised by a new subscription) upon reasonable interest, and a fund to be settled by Parliament for repayment of the same, provided a charter be granted to the said company by Act of Parliament, for the space of 31 years, exclusive of all others; which proposal was debated in the committee for some time, when Mr. Montague made another proposal, viz: that a perpetual fund should be provided sufficient to pay the interest of 2 millions at 8 p. cent., which would amount to £160,000 per annum; that 2 millions being subscribed on this fund, the subscribers alone should have liberty to trade to the East Indies; that the company, if they would, might come in likewise upon the same foot, or else they might trade apart for themselves as at present, provided they subscribed as a company. This was taken into consideration, and the further debate adjourned till yesterday, when the same committee sat again, and had some debate about this matter but came to no resolution. But the House being resumed it was given as an instruction to the committee for their next sitting, that they should receive any proposals about settling the East India trade; of which and the rest of their proceedings yesterday the printed Votes give an account.
His Majesty returned last night from Windsor, having dined at his house at Hounslay.
[This day] in the House of Commons the paper which Sir Tho. Cooke delivered to the Commissioners of Accounts upon oath in 1695 was opened and read, but contained no more than what he had about that time informed the Parliament, concerning several sums of money that had been distributed by him for the service of the East India Company. This paper being read there was nothing more said about it.
Then they went into a committee for the Supply and resolved to double the duty upon salt, which is now made 3s. 4d. the bushel. This last duty will raise about £150,000 a year, and is intended as a fund, to borrow a good sum of money at interest. There was nothing more said to-day about the East India Company, but the committee is to receive any further proposals that shall be offered to them, concerning the same. Endorsed, R. 19th, 98. 2¾ pp. [S.P. 32. 10. ff. 168–169.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to the same. Last night his Majesty returned from Windsor to Kensington in good health, and it is said will go back thither on Thursday, and give audience there to the French ambassador.
The East India Company offered to advance £700,000 to be established by Act of Parliament, but, that not being relished, another proposal was made of lending two millions at 8 p. cent., to be advanced by subscribers to a new Stock for trading to the East Indies, which is to be examined by a committee on purpose, and the resolve of doubling the duty upon salt, which is already 20 pence per bushel, was made for a fonds to pay the interest of the two millions, if that proposition takes place.
A commission is drawn up, and ready for his Majesty's signing, empowering your Excellency to make a new Triple League, which will be sent you by next post. Endorsed, R. 19, 98. 3pp. [S.P. 32. 15.ff. 95–96.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
R. Y[ard] to the same. Two proposals have been made concerning the East India trade. I believe neither of them will be accepted, for the House does not seem inclined to close with the company's offer, and the other proposal is thought impracticable: so they will rather settle a fund of interest, on which they may borrow a good sum of money at 8 or 10 per cent.
Lord Portland is expected here in a fortnight or three weeks, and Lord Jersey is called upon to be going about the same time, but he cannot be ready so soon.
The French ambassador will make his public entry here on Monday sennight, and the Thursday following will have his public audience at Windsor, whither the king will return in 6 or 7 days.
The ambassador's equipage is not very extraordinary, not going about vying with Lord Portland, who has indeed made a very great expense in his embassy.
The Duke of Shrewsbury's health mends every day in the country. We talk still of the King's designing to go for Holland in August. Endorsed, R. 19th, 98. 1 p. [Ibid. ff. 97–98.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
Newsletter. The Earl of Athlone is arrived here from Holland. Endorsed, R. 19th, 98. 1 p. [S.P. 32. 10.ff. 170–171.]
May 7–17.
Paris.
Lord Portland to William III. The last letters which I received from your Majesty were of 22 Apr.–2 May from Kensington, and I have not been in a hurry to write since my last of the 8th, because the King has been at Marly, and I had nothing at all to tell you. As he was to return on Thursday, the day before yesterday, I went to Versailles the same evening to supper with the King. He asked if I intended to stay the night, and said that he wished to speak to me the following morning. I went to his levee and he made me come into his closet, and told me that Count Tallard had given him an account of an audience which your Majesty had given him before you left for Windsor, and of the change you had made in the alternatives, and said that, though quite inclined to arrange matters with your Majesty, he must repeat once more that there were some things which he could not do: that your new proposals left very little for the Dauphin as compensation for the rights which he would have to renounce: that they made the Emperor too important in Italy, and gave too much to him who had the least right: and if a fortified place were ceded in the Indies to the English or Dutch they would be made masters of those countries, though they asked for nothing there but the security of their trade, which they might secure by a treaty, as also in the Mediterranean, where they would be in possession of all the trade, if they were masters of Minorca and the fortified places on the African coast. [He said] that he was much inclined to keep the negotiation secret, and, with that object and to facilitate the matter, he was pleased that you had told Count Tallard that I should be your commissioner. He then said many kind things, and that, as to the difficulty or delicacy your Majesty might feel in partitioning the inheritance of the king of Spain, in his lifetime, without the Emperor's knowledge, there was no cause for it, as in any event one could always tell him that, after the death of the late king of Spain, the Emperor had done the same thing in 1668, by a secret treaty with France, of which he would give me an extract.
On these points I replied in the first place, as to the things which he told me he could not do, that there were much stronger reasons which prevented your Majesty from doing what was wished, since, over and above your Majesty's interest, you were obliged to take care to do what the two nations would find to be evidently in their interest and in the interest of their trade, as otherwise it would be impossible in future to make them engage heartily in a war, into which they might be driven after the death of the king of Spain, to guarantee and secure what might be agreed upon now. [I said] that the power of the Emperor did not make us jealous, and ought not to make the princes of Italy jealous, since Spain, or he who would be king of Spain, united with the forces of France, would be strong enough to support them against every other power; and that on the contrary their jealousy of the Emperor would always attach them, along with the Pope, to the interests of the king here. [I said] it was a good thing to make treaties for the security of trade, but that, as times change, and princes are mortal, we had so often seen treaties broken that prudence required that one should have fortified places to guarantee them, without having to depend entirely on the good faith of another or upon papers.
As to the Indies [I said] that Havana was merely a fortified place, and the islands had no mines, which were all on the coast or mainland; so what was asked could only be a burden and of no advantage, except for the protection of trade; like Minorca in the Mediterranean, without which it was impossible for us to let a ship winter or take shelter in that sea. As to Ceuta and Oran, these fortified places barely secured the passage of the Straits, and I was surprised that apparently your Majesty had not mentioned Gibraltar. I told him that it was useless to speak of the restitution of Luxembourg, or of not increasing the barrier; that those countries must be put into a position to stand alone and to cover the States adequately. [I said] that, though the Emperor had made a separate treaty with France, that could not be an example for your Majesty: that your wish to be closely united to his Majesty, and the scheme to secure the peace of Europe, must be the strongest reasons to induce you to enter into these engagements. I admitted that the treaty of 1668 might serve to refute reproaches that might be made, and I thanked the King for what he had said about me personally.
The King then ordered M. de Torcy to let me read his answer to Count Tallard to what he had written about his audience with your Majesty. He told me that your Majesty had also spoken of the removal of King James. I replied that he saw that, in accordance with his wish, I had not recurred to that and some other matters, but that I regarded it as an absolute contradiction; and I thought it impossible to do anything till these stumbling blocks were removed. Moreover I have been informed from St. Germains that they have been discussing there whether it would not be better to withdraw to Avignon. I do not know yet the reason for this discussion nor the result.
His Majesty laughingly told me that your Majesty had made fun of the proposal to give the Milanese to the duke of Savoy, and that you had said, Sire, that you could not understand why he interested himself in this duke, since he would certainly play one of his usual tricks on the first opportunity, whereupon the King laughed heartily.
Count Tallard has expressed himself as quite satisfied with his reception, and with the last audience which your Majesty gave him. He wrote that you told him that if you entered into these proposals you would become completely French, whereupon the King said: "In that case his interests must be mine; I trust that he will never need my help, but you may tell him that he can always count upon it." He then told me that he wished me to write to your Majesty that he made an offer to the king of Spain of troops for the defence of Ceuta and Oran, of ships for their transport, or anything else necessary for the defence of those fortified places; that I must beg you not to be jealous on that account. That it was only to prevent those fortified places, so necessary at this juncture, from falling into the hands of the Moors.
He also mentioned the change which he had proposed in the alternatives, but I will not talk about that, as Count Tallard will have already communicated it to you. I need only remark that I observed that his Majesty wanted to give us the Emperor as a neighbour, whom he himself had represented to us as so formidable. I have not yet been furnished with a copy of this fresh proposal, although promised; apparently that my courier may not be the first to bring it. I am fully convinced, Sire, that if your Majesty remains very firm on all the points in question, you will get satisfaction on the majority, if not all. I believe they are genuinely anxious to enter into a bond with you.
They are making frivolous difficulties about the release of the French prisoners. (fn. 1) Although M. de Torcy assured me, two months ago, that they would be released and that the orders had been issued, they won't do it unless Jennings be released previously. Thereupon I refused to write and made a great complaint. I beg your Majesty to speak strongly about it to Count Tallard, and similarly on behalf of Lord Galway and Mr. Mesnart, and to just show him that you are interested in the Prince de Vaudemont. Otherwise it might be imagined that I am moved by private friendship to intervene in such matters.
I have just received your letter from Windsor of the 2–12, with the two enclosures from the Pensionary, by which I shall be guided, after I have had time to read them again, as they are very long. I beg you once more not to give way too soon, but to let those here see firmness as well as your favorable reception of Count Tallard, with which he is so pleased. I forgot to say that the King has said to me over and over again: "If we come to a good understanding, the King of England and I, the rest of Europe will adopt our views." I shall have my farewell audience next Tuesday, and I shall then make as much haste as possible.
The King did not wish me to go to Marly before the 5th June, when all the fountains will be complete, but now that you have stated that you want the business to pass through my hands, I hope that he will himself hasten my departure, if he wants the matter to be concluded. Anyhow, after the audience of the King, I must have twenty audiences of the princes and princesses. Then I must visit and receive the visits of ministers; and then taking leave of the most important personages, which I cannot avoid, will take me more than a week; so, even if I curtail the time spent in visiting the gardens and houses in the neighbourhood, more time will be spent than I could wish.
I have obtained an order for the restitution of your Majesty's property and for quashing the judgments and orders in the form I desired. I admit that I would have much preferred, in your Majesty's interest, that Lord Jersey could have arrived before I leave, and have been introduced to many people, and so win their confidence, which otherwise he will not possess for a long time.
Lord Manchester is here and will leave for England in a few days.
I have been to Fontainebleau; your Majesty would like it, and the natural surroundings are beautiful. It is very well placed for hunting; the rocks there are very difficult, but so many roads and paths have been made that one can follow the hounds everywhere. On my return I saw Veaux-le-Vicomte, where the garden and park are very fine. I am in some difficulty about the damasks; there are none that are handsome or really Italian, nothing but Cramoisis, absolutely none of two colours, moreover they are dearer than in England or Holland. I have been to look for some with Mr. d'Odijck who thinks, as I do, that you would do better to buy some in England. We do not like the style of the beds and they would certainly not be to your taste, but there will be time enough to get your orders before I leave; but I shall not buy any unless I find finer ones. Moreover I have not seen any handsome brocatelles or flowered materials (étoffes d fleurs) for furniture, but I will look again when I have more time. As more furniture is sold than new furniture made, the dealers are not provided with stuffs of this kind.
I am sending herewith a petition for Mr. Rapin. I don't know whether his request is suitable and opportune; if not I beg your Majesty's pardon. The burgomasters of Rotterdam have written to me about the vacant places: they are much afraid lest Bidlo may aspire to be a member of the Vroedtschap, but as the Pensionary has recommended to your Majesty those whom they wish, I think that that is already settled. I have spoken to Mr. Heemskercke about your Majesty's business. He is very pleased that your Majesty wishes to employ him, but we find that the business will take a man's entire time, and he will give him all the help possible. So I think you will be obliged to send one of your Council, and I think Mr. Vryberghe will be the most capable.
Parliament seems to make very little progress with business. I don't know how they can think themselves so safe, when they have discontinued the proposed disbandment here, and are keeping so many troops in service. Portland.
Paris, the 17th May.
The weather continues very cold and wet. They have never had a worse spring.
French, holograph, cf. Dr. Japikse I, p. 305, No. 241; Grimblot I, p. 489. [S.P.8. 18.ff. 200–209.]
With the foregoing:
(i) A copy of Lord Portland's demands from France, on behalf of England, with marginal notes of the French answers. Printed by Dr. Japikse I, pp. 311–319, No. 241b. On f. 214v. is an extract from an Edict of December, 1689, Arts. 7 and 8, concerning the estates of French Protestant émigrés. Printed by Dr. Japikse I, p. 318, note 3.
On f. 215 is a copy of the letter of M. de Torcy to Lord Portland dated Versailles, 8 May, 1698, in which he states that he encloses the replies requested, and an order signed by the King to put the King of England in possession of all the property to be restored according to the treaty. Printed by Dr. Japikse, No. 241 a, I, p. 310.
On the same f. 215 there is a note that Lord Portland had presented two other notes; (1) claiming the release of some English prisoners detained in French ports: (2) claiming the release of English vessels captured since the Peace. These notes had been sent to M. de Pontchartrain as being a naval matter belonging to his department. He had promised an early reply. French. [S.P.8. 18 ff. 210–215].
May 7–17.
Paris.
(ii) A note, unsigned, ascribed by Dr. Japikse to Jean de Robéthon. The note states that his Majesty will see from a note annexed. written by Ambassador Heemskerke to Lord Portland, that some one must be sent to deal specially with the affairs of Orange and Burgundy. 3 pp. French. Printed by Dr. Japikse, No. 242, I, pp. 321–322. [S.P.8. 18. ff. 216–217.]
May 7–17.
Paris.
(iii) The letter from Heemskerck to Lord Portland, above referred to. French. Printed by Dr. Japikse, No. 242 a., I, p. 322. [S.P.8. 18. ff. 218–219.]
May 7.
Stockholm.
J. Robinson to Lord Ambassador Williamson. I have little more to return than the enclosed copies of my two last to Mr. Secretary Vernon, in one of which you will find the reason why [I] trouble you with the Swedish passport for his Majesty's falconers. Above what I hear of Monsr. Lillierot's relations hither I have a letter from the B. de Heeckeren, who gives me good hopes of the speedy success of the negociation on foot at your place, and conclude, from what your Excellency writes, that things are to be concerted between this king and the States, and then laid before his Majesty for his accession, as was done in the year 1681. Endorsed, R. 20–30. 1 p. [S.P. 32. 10. ff. 172–173.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Col. Dudley. I have your letter of yesterday with the two enclosed from Henry Rogers to his son. It is visible they are a gang of coiners and should be secured. I am sorry there should have been delay in looking after John Rogers, to whom these letters are directed: I hope it is not too late. I send this therefore by express, that John Rogers be searched for and secured: as also the other person, Morgan, whom he went with into that island; for this infection of false coining is spread so far that we ought to go as deep into the discovery as possible.
I have signed a warrant to take up the father this evening, according to the directions of one of these letters, and I will endeavour to find out the rest of the relations which he mentions. [S.P. 44. 99. p. 499.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
The same to the Attorney General. I mentioned to you yesterday an information brought against Sir George Wheeler, a prebend of Durham, by one Shere, who married his daughter, whereupon Sir George has been taken up, and is still in the custody of a messenger. The Lords of the Council have met twice or thrice upon this examination, and thought I should transmit the papers to you for opinion, whether Sir George Wheeler should be committed, bailed or discharged. [Ibid. p. 500.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Lords of the Admiralty. Four Danish gentlemen having been recommended to the King by H.R.H. the Prince of Denmark, for his leave to go to sea on board some of H.M. ships now bound to the Mediterranean, the necessary orders are to be given for receiving Eggert Christian Knut and Adam Levin Knut on one ship, and Christian Moth and Wilhelm Ulfelt on another. [S.P.44. 204. p. 176.]
May 7.
Kensington.
Warrant for a grant of the dignity of a baronet of England to John Rogers, senr., of Wisdome in the county of Devon, esq. [S.P.44. 347. p. 173.]
May 7.
Kensington.
Warrant to create Samll. Stebbing, gent., Rouge Rose pursuivant of arms extraordinary. [Ibid. p. 175.]
May 7.
Kensington.
Warrant for the denization of John Berionde and Francis Andre, merchants. [Ibid. p. 183.]
May 7. Warrant for the apprehension of le Chevalier Blancard, for suspicion of high treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 71.]
May 7.
Kensington.
Licence to Thomas Thornton, esq., sheriff of the county of Northampton, to reside out of the county. [S.P. 44. 163. p. 105.]
May 8.
Kensington.
Warrant for a licence to John Oliver, 'our master mason,' to print a book translated by him from the Italian, entitled Iconologia, written by Cesar Ripa of Perugia, wherein are expressed various images of Virtues, Vices, Arts and Disciplines, illustrated by figures engraven in copper; with an exclusive right of printing the book for 15 years. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 174.]
May 8.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland to cause tents to be made for officers and soldiers. Printed in Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. XIII, p. 327. [S.O. 1. 14. p. 73.]
May 8.
Kensington.
Warrant [for a licence] to Tho. Selby, who has been in arms under the late King James in Ireland since 13 Feb., 1688. [S.P.44. 351. p. 51.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of George Furnase, merchant, setting forth that he has been always well affected to H.M. government "in promoting his interest upon loans in the city of London," and has been concerned also in clothing the army. He formerly traded in bone lace but has now left the same off, and proposes to trade no more, being desirous to live quietly and free from the prosecutions of informers. He implores pardon. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 205.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Francis Eyles, merchant, on behalf of Francis Bond, esq., president of the Council of the island of Barbados, setting forth that upon the death of the governor, Col. Russell, he took upon him that trust and performed it ever since: that his Majesty allows half the salary to the commander-in-chief during the absence of the governor: that the petitioner has been at much more charge than the allowance and never received anything. He prays the usual allowance of £600 p. ann. per privy seal, payable out of the 4½% from the Governor's death. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P.44. 238. p. 206.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the French hatters, refugees, showing that the English hatters have commenced a vexatious suit against them, to hinder their living by their profession; and desiring his Majesty to order a stop to the same and to recommend them to the charity of Parliament, that they may be free from the charges. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [Ibid. p. 207.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Mary Nevill, widow of Admiral Nevill. Her husband died in the service, and left her affairs in great disorder. She prays for a pension. Referred to the Admiralty. [Ibid. p. 209.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Lords of the Admiralty. Orders are to be given to the commander in chief of the Newfoundland convoys to make the best agreement he can with any fishing vessels bound direct for England, to bring home from thence the soldiers and the train. [S.P.44. 204. p. 179.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
The same to Col. Dudley. I have received your letter of the 8th, with the enclosed from John Rogers to his father. I am very glad you have met with him; and we have been as diligent on our side, having, by the directions you sent me, taken up the old Rogers and his wife, as also the wives of Morgan and the young Rogers, who have been examined and are still in custody. The young man, I perceive, pretends to be very innocent, and writes to his father to obtain his liberty from me. Before I can consent I must be satisfied of his sincerity, and therefore desire his examination may be taken. As to his knowledge of the two Morgans and the two Birds, one whereof is in Exeter gaol and the other fled, and what he has heard of their being concerned in coining. I find you have kept copies of the old man's letters. I desire the son may be examined upon the particulars therein mentioned; who the 'Alderman' is, and who the 'Will:' was that was sent to sea, and who the gentleman is that lodged one pair of stairs at the Old House, who would procure the collector's place for young Rogers, if Morgan miscarried; and let him be asked who recommended Morgan to that employment. You may imagine that we do not put these questions to him that we stand in need of his information after we have heard what the four others can say; but I would try his ingenuity, by which one may best judge of his innocence. Let his examination be taken upon oath, and, if you find him deal candidly with you, you will defer committing him to gaol till you hear again from me. [S.P.44. 99. pp. 501–502.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Treasury, enclosing a copy of a report of Sir Cloudesly Shovell, Mr. Dummer, and others, deputed to survey the harbour of Dover. The King orders that £450 or £500 be spent for the immediate repair of the north pier, pending further consideration of the other works proposed. [Ibid. p. 502.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. Having laid before the King remarks of the Council of Trade upon proposals made to them for the discovery of a silver mine in America, and the proposal of the undertakers, the King thinks it reasonable they should be allowed £200 each, to enable them to proceed on the work as therein mentioned: you are to consider of a fit person to be sent with them to see the experiment made upon the place, in order to satisfy his Majesty that there are such mines. [Ibid. p. 503.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
The same to the Council of Trade. Concerning the proposal of discovering silver mines in America, the three undertakers should have each £200 to enable them to make the voyage. As to the discovery of the places where the mines are to be found, the King would have it made only to himself, and then he will order the payment of the money, and the perfecting an agreement with the undertakers.
The King has sent directions to the Admiralty that the commander of the Newfoundland squadron is to agree with the masters of ships going under his convoy, at the best rates he can, for the passage of the soldiers and officers of the train to be brought from Newfoundland. [Ibid. p. 504.]
May 9. Warrant for the apprehension of Paul Brooker and — Bird, for suspicion of high treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 77.]
May 9.
The Hague.
Pass to Mr. James Fenlison of the university of Leyden, Scotchman. [S.P.44. 386. p. 16.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Hill. I have laid your letter of the 15th inst. before the King, who is pleased to grant Mr. Barlow a licence to return, which you will give him notice of, for if I knew where to write to him yet I should choose rather that the first communication of it came from you. I hope it may set others upon making their application to you, not by downright soliciting and importunity, but by their endeavours to deserve it, which they have opportunities enough for, especially now there is such a resort of the St. Germains tribe into those parts. Since it is not very easy to remove them, it would be worth while to know what they are doing. Methinks some of those, who shew such an impatience for returning into their country, should be willing to do something for the service of it; and they will see we are not hard hearted, when they will give any proofs that they are friends to the government. If you please you may make a trial by Cusack, whom you mention. They say he is a man of some parts. If he will shew that and his honesty together, he may not only be recalled but further considered, according to the service he shall do.
We have had a rumour as if there were another assassination concerting, and that their cut-throats are to come over, some from Dunkirk and some by the way of Ostend. We hear likewise of a rendezvous of Jacobites at Dunkirk, as if something were forming there. You that are so much nearer the place may be better enlightened in it. I wish you could likewise detach some of your suitors and turn them in among them from time to time, that we may be rightly informed whether there be any [truth] in these alarms or not. If you find any capable and willing to undertake it, I desire you will supply them with what is necessary for their journey, and I will repay it. I will get Mr. Barlow's warrant signed the next time I attend the King, as also one for Mr. Abell, whom you will please to acquaint therewith. 2 pp. [S.P.32. 10.ff. 174–175.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to Lord Ambassador Williamson. This day the House of Lords read the Bill a second time for indemnifying such of the commissioners of the excise who omitted to subscribe the Test and take the oaths on account of their being made commissioners for the Malt Tax, who are particularly named in the Bill; and it being likewise said in it that the other inferior officers of the excise, who had made the same omission, should be also indemnified on the same account, objection was made against these last words, as being too general, and occasioned some debate, but at last the Bill was committed for Friday next.
His Majesty has given to Col. Godfrey the place of Master of the Jewel Office, vacant by the death of Mr. Montague, who died lately at Venice. Endorsed, R. 23, 98. 3 pp. [Ibid. ff. 176–177.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to the same. The Dutch ambassador here is making a turn home, upon what occasion I cannot tell. Some of his Majesty's hunting horses and dogs are sent for Holland, and we think he will go thither himself, as soon as the parliament is up.
Subscriptions are taking in London and at the Exchequer for raising the two millions for trading to the East Indies, and I am told £900,000 is already subscribed.
The Earl of Portland is to have his audience of leave to-day, and is expected home suddenly. The Earl of Jersey is ambassador extraordinary too.
Your Excellency's new commission goes away this post. Endorsed, R. 23d, 98. 3 pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 99–100.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
R. Y[ard] to the same. The undertakers have got about £700,000 subscribed, and are confident they shall procure the rest. These subscribers are to have the sole trade to the East Indies, whether singly or in a company is not yet explained: nor do they yet speak out what they intend to do with the old East India Company. In the meantime the latter complain of the hardship put upon them, that, after the losses they suffered in the war, they must now be undone, when they might have hoped to recover. People are much divided in their opinions about the matter. Endorsed, R. 23d. 98. 1 p. [Ibid. ff. 101–102.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Tho. Hopkins to the same. The East India Company having the last week made a proposal to the Commons of lending the King £700,000 upon some good fond at a moderate interest, provided they might be established for 31 years by Act of Parliament, exclusive of all others, the House thought fit to go into committee to consider of the same. After a long debate Mr. Montague made a new proposition, viz.: that an undoubted fond should be thought of to secure the interest for two millions to be raised at 8 per cent.: which would amount to £160,000: that the contributors to this should have liberty to trade to the East Indies and none others: and the present company, if they pleased, might subscribe as a company. This took very much with the House, and next day they resolved to double the duty upon salt, as a fond to pay the interest of the two millions; and, for these three or four last days, they have been very busy in several parts of the town taking subscriptions. The House has done little to-day besides reading the Bill of Grants the first time. It is to resume to the Crown the 4th part of their real value. I believe it will not pass. Endorsed, R. 23, 98. 3 pp. [Ibid. ff. 103–104.]
May 10.
General Post Office.
The Commissioners of the Post Office to [Ja. Vernon]. Being informed that part of our memorial concerning the Spanish ambassador's pacquet was not so thoroughly explained, we acquaint you that, according to the best enquiry we can make, the said pacquet coming from Spain was not reckoned amongst the Spanish letters, but that there was a distinct account kept between the postmaster of France and the Spanish ambassador here for the same; and the port between Madrid and Paris was paid by the Spanish ambassador residing at this Court, and not set down in the accounts betwixt the two offices, nor included in the 39,200 livers which we computed, by a medium, was yearly paid to the postmaster of Paris for conveying the English frank letters.
We should be glad Monsr. Pajot would not insist upon that exception, it being liable to be made ill use of, by having other letters than the ambassador's go under that cover; and therefore, if his Majesty thinks fit, we will direct Mr. Aglionby to endeavour to come to an agreement with Monsr. Pajot for the 36,000 livers per annum, without any exception at all of the Spanish ambassador's pacquet. But if Monsr. Pajot cannot be brought to comply therewith, then it may be more advisable to pay him a certain rate by the ounce, for bringing the pacquet from Madrid to Paris, "then leave him to make an agreement with the Spanish ambassador, for in that case the said pacquet would come in the Paris bag, and we be entitled to receive only two shillings by the ounce, whereas in the other case we shall receive near four shillings by the ounce over and above the port to be paid to the postmaster of Paris for bringing it thither."
If the King shall think fit that we shall proceed to conclude the Treaty upon these conditions, we must desire you will likewise know his Majesty's pleasure as to the term of this new Treaty, whether it shall be indefinite as the last was, concluded between Lord Arlington and the Marquis d' Lovois, or for a certain term of years. In our opinion the latter might be more advisable, because, if upon experience it shall be found disadvantageous, there may be an opportunity of endeavouring to procure better terms. Signed, R. Cotton. Tho. Frankland. 2 pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 178–179.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Newsletter. A committee of the Lords sat and examined several French refugees newly come from France, and the committee is of opinion to address his Majesty in their behalf. Endorsed, R. 22d, 98. 1p. [Ibid. ff. 180–181.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Commissioners of Customs. I send a translation of a letter given me by the French ambassador, to whom the master of a vessel, cast away some time since near Milford, complained that the money he sold the wreck for, which he was carrying out, is seized. I recommend he be used with favour. Probably his fault was occasioned by ignorance. [S.P.44. 99. p. 505.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Capt. John Norris; setting forth that he and several others, officers and captains, are liable to prosecutions and suits, in the Court of Exchequer and elsewhere, for taking several prizes in the expedition to Newfoundland, and praying that Noli prosequis or cessat processsus be entered. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [S.P.44. 238. p. 207.]
May 10.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland, reciting that Denis Daly of Carrownekelly, co. Galway, esq., counsellor at law, represented to the King by petition that he, being comprised in the articles of surrender of the town of Galway and deputed by the town to treat with the Earl of Athlone for the surrender of the town, preferred his claim to the articles, before the then justices and council, and was on a full hearing adjudged to be comprised: that pursuant to the adjudication his outlawries were reversed and he has ever since been in possession of his estate: that, besides the provision made by the articles for pardoning those comprised, the Earl of Athlone by instrument dated at the camp at Galway 26th July, 1691, promised him his estate and a pardon, as appears inter alia by a certificate of the Earl of Athlone dated at Cockleberg 10–20 Aug. 1697; that he asks a pardon.
The warrant requires the Lords Justices to pass letters patent under the great seal of Ireland containing a free pardon. [S.O. 1. 14. p. 65.]
May 10.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland for the pay and subsistence of the supernumerary forces in Ireland. Printed in the Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol XIII, p. 328. [Ibid. pp. 71–3.]
May 10.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the same for the payment of allowances to disbanded officers of the 10 regiments broke in Ireland in 1698. Printed in the Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol XIII, p. 329. [Ibid. pp. 96–7.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to Captain Richard Long, forwarding the King's instructions of 30th April. [S.P.44. 204. p. 178.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Admiralty. A yacht is to be provided to carry the ambassador of the States General of the United Provinces into Holland. [Ibid. p. 180.]
May 10–16. The Journals of the House of Lords, for Sir Joseph Williamson. [S.P.32. 11 ff. 247–248.]
May 10. Journal of the House of Commons. [Ibid. pp. 249–250.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the payment of the extraordinary expenses of the Earl of Pembroke, lord privy seal, one of the ambassadors extraordinary and plenipotentiaries for the late treaty of peace, from the 11th April to 23rd December, 1697. The first item 'For fees paid for passing the tallies already received in the several offices, and fees paid at my lord Chamberlain's Wardrobe and Jewel Office £159 19s. 6d.' is referred to the Lords of the Treasury. [S.P.44. 347. p. 176.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant to receive into custody Elizabeth Lewis, for suspicion of high treason. [S.P. 44. 349. p. 71.]
May 10. Pass to Mr. John Wyche, Mr. Edward Tregena, and servants, to embark for Holland or Flanders. [S.P.44. 387. p. 153.]
May 11–21.
Paris.
Lord Portland to William III. I wrote to your Majesty before, that I believed they had some design here on Spanish America, and I have much more reason to think so now, because I was told yesterday that they think here that the squadron, which you are fitting out for the Mediterranean, might be intended for the West Indies: that they have resolved here to anticipate you: that with this object vessels loaded with men and munitions have been sent to those parts: that the ships fitted out at Brest, to the number of seventeen, would follow them in whole or in part: that, instead of M. de Cotlogon, who it was said was to take them to Toulon, it is to be M. de Nesmont who will command them, and he will have orders to go to the Gulf of Mexico, to try to obtain possession of the Spanish strongholds; and for fear lest that might bring on them a new war, they wish to remain armed. in order to be so much the more formidable. Unless there were some reason as important as this, it would be difficult to understand why they should delay the disbandment so long, incur such great expense, and try to amass so much cash; which they keep in the treasuries, instead of paying the large sums which they owe. For according to all well informed persons they have more than 60 millions accumulated. It is very important for them to be able to obtain possession of the bullion from the Indies, and as it is equally or more important to your Majesty to prevent that, I have lost no time in telling you what has come to my knowledge. I shall not fail to make the most exact enquiries, in order to keep you informed, but things are done so secretly that it is very difficult to find out anything.
Paris 21 May, 1698. Portland.
I send annexed the list of ships which they are fitting out in France, and of their pretended destination. Their number is large. I shall not fail to do all I can to discover, if possible, how they will be employed.
French, holograph, cf. Dr. Japikse I, p. 322, No. 243. [S.P.8. 18. ff. 220–221.]
May 11–13. Journal of the House of Commons: 11 May. Upon the 2nd reading this day of the Bill to lay an imposition on beneficial grants, a debate arose whether the Bill should be committed. Some of the lawyers opposed it, as containing great hardships on account of those lands that had passed through settlements and purchases, with other exceptions about the estates of minors and mortgages.
Mr. Lowndes, who drew the Bill, shewed how many of these inconveniencies would be avoided; and thought that, if the charge to be laid were moderated to the five or six part of the real value, 5 or £600,000 might be raised, and few or none would find themselves aggrieved; since they would find their recompense in the improved value of their estates after their confirmation in Parliament. The objections to the Bill aiming at putting a distinction between the grants of King Charles II and those since the Revolution, the House was otherwise inclined, and therefore the Question for committing the Bill was carried without a division.
12 May. The House was this day in a committee upon the Bill of grants, and have altered the imposition to be laid to the 6th part of the value. The committee is like to sit several days upon this Bill. The paragraph they now left off at, was that about the Fee Farm Rents, which will require a particular consideration; for, though they were allowed to be alienated by Act of Parliament, yet it was originally intended for the discharge of the debts of the Crown; and those that have been so passed away will not be charged now; but other of the Fee Farm Rents having been granted away upon fictitious tallies, only those grants will be liable to the new imposition.
13 May. The House, being this day in a committee of Ways and Means, Sir Rowland Gwynn moved that the duty should be increased upon lustrings and alamodes imported; which was done rather for the encouragement of the Lustring Company and the manufactures here, than that any other advantage was expected from it. And accordingly it was resolved that the foreign lustrings should pay the double of what they are charged at in the Book of Rates.
Mr. Montagu moved the committee that they would consider providing a sufficient fond for £160,000, to answer the interest of two millions at 8 p. cent., taking notice that there was a great probability of raising the sum, and the goodness and sufficiency of the fond must be a great encouragement to the subscriptions.
The Commissioners of Excise gave the House an account that what they had laid upon salt could not be computed at above £100,000 p. ann. Then Mr. Neal proposed that there should be an additional duty on sugar, to raise the remaining £60,000 p. an., and it was said that two pence per pound upon fine sugar, and a penny upon coarse, would raise £100,000 p. ann.; and, if there was a surplus more than they wanted for a fond, they had occasions enough to apply it to.
This duty was opposed as ruinous to the plantations, and the rather since the impositions intended to be borne by the consumptioner were in effect all turned upon the planter. It was answered, since tobacco paid five times its value, it was not to be doubted but sugar would bear some lesser proportion, especially when a drawback was allowed for sugars exported, and methods might be proposed for easing the planter. However, some moved for leaving the Chair without any Question to be put, but it was carried in the negative by 69 against 49. Then the Question was carried, without a division, that a duty should be laid upon sugar, over and above what it pays already, but what that duty shall be is reserved to be considered. [S.P.32. 11. ff. 251–252.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Lords of the Treasury. The King desires that £300 be paid forthwith to the Earl of Macclesfield, for a particular service, without account. [S.P.44. 99. p. 505.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Peter Fermont, native of Lyons, owning his having been guilty of trying an experiment for diminishing of gold. He is condemned, but is persuaded that there are circumstances in his case that are worthy of compassion. He prays for a reprieve. Referred to Lord Chief Justice Holt. [S.P.44. 238. p. 208.]
May 11.
Kensington.
Warrant for the grant of the office of Master or Treasurer 'of our jewels 'unto Cha. Godfrey, esq., in the place of Henneage Mountague, esq., deceased, with the fee of £50 per ann., and other profits, in as full a manner as Sir Fra. Lawley, Henneage Mountague or others. [S.P.44. 347. p. 177.]
May 11. Warrant for the apprehension of — Shuttleworth, for suspicion of high treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 71.]
May 11. A like warrantfor — Thurmand, and her papers. [Ibid. p. 80.]
May 11.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland, reciting that Nicholas French of Abbart, co. Galway, represented, by petition to the King, that his son Nicholas, deceased, before the late rebellion, contracted a debt with the viscountess-dowager of Lanesbrough, who is since married to Denny Muschamp, esq.: that Denny Muschamp in Aug. 1693, took possession of the petitioner's estate on account of the debt contracted by his son: thereupon the petitioner went to Dublin, in 1693, to sue Muschamp: that, to avoid the suit, Muschamp, in 1693, procured the petitioner to be indicted of high treason at Kilmenum, co. Dublin, seventy miles distance from the petitioner's house, in a time of peace, when none were indicted, and without the knowledge of the Justices, law officers or Council: that Muschamp likewise procured the petitioner to be outlawed: that all this was done unknown to the petitioner, who never had any military employment and has had no civil employment for many years: that the Justices and Council in Ireland, being convinced of the truth of the petitioner's case, caused a saving clause for the petitioner to be inserted in the Bill for hindering the reversal of outlawries, which is now in the Act: that the petitioner prays the King in compassion to his great age and family to cause his outlawry to be reversed.
The warrant requires the Lords Justices to admit the petitioner to bring a writ of error, that the outlawry may be reversed. [S.O.1. 14. p. 66.]
May 11.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland, reciting that Francis Blake of Moyne, co. Mayo, represented to the King, by petition, that he never bore employment, civil or military, in the reign of the late King James, except that of a justice of the peace, which he continued to exercise without our commission for the preservation of his protestant neighbours for some time after the abdication of the late King, which he did at the earnest desire of the protestants: that he maintained several protestant families during the rebellion: that for such his behaviour and his constant inclination to an English government he suffered very much in his fortune: that Martyn Blake, his son and heir apparent, was made prisoner for corresponding with our army, and had suffered for the same, had not the success of our arms at the battle of Aghrim set him free: that Martyn Blake bore no employment or was any way concerned in the rebellion: that neither the petitioner or Martyn is indicted or outlawed, but in regard the petitioner exercised the employment of justice without our commission, and that his dwelling house lay in the remote parts in the Irish quarters, which was last reduced to our obedience, where his son Martyn always lived with him: that the petitioner sought pardon for him and his son for the said offence: that the King is satisfied by reports of the truth of the allegations.
The warrant directs the Lords Justices to pass letters patent under the great seal of Ireland containing a free pardon to Francis Blake and Martin Blake his son. [Ibid. p. 68.]
May 11.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland for the payment to — Lowther, widow of John Lowther, late one of the commissioners of revenue of Ireland, of £77 5s. 3d. as royal bounty. Cf. Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. XIII, p. 334. [Ibid. p. 69.]
May 11.
The Hague.
Passes to Duncand Fisher, Scotchman, late of Capt. White's company in Col. Hamilton's regiment: and to Willm. Abel and Archbald Williams of the same regiment, bringing their discharge dated Bruges, April 30, '98. [S.P.44. 386. p. 16.]
May 12–22.
Paris.
Lord Portland to William III. The day before yesterday I had my farewell audience of the King and the royal family, and I shall try to see the other princes and princesses and the ministers as soon as possible, and then I shall spend some days, as your Majesty has permitted me to do so, in visiting the houses in this neighbourhood. On Monday I was at Meudon, which is very fine and extensive, that is to say the park and gardens, for the house is not. Monseigneur did me the honours most graciously, and walked with me in the gardens or drove with me in the park all day till sunset. He has asked me to go wolf hunting with him next Monday. The King wants me to go to Versailles on Sunday to visit Marly, where the fountains are now complete. The weather has been so bad here yesterday and to-day that I have been unable to go out of town to see some gardens, as I had intended. I hope to be able to leave in less than a fortnight. Mr. le Prince will go to Chantilly and will await me.
I have written the letter, enclosed, about a matter of which I am not certain, but so important that I did not wish to fail to let you know what I had heard. Perhaps I shall soon learn more, and I shall let your Majesty hear as soon as possible. Certainly the disbandment, now that the king of Spain has recovered, is not postponed for so long without some design, nor would they keep such great sums in cash for no reason, when they owe so much.
Paris, the 22 May. Portland.
I received a letter from Mr. Vernon last night, and kept back the post to answer.
French, holograph, printed by Dr. Japikse I, p. 325, No. 245. [S.P.8. 18. ff. 222–223.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Lords of the Admiralty. The yacht that carries the Earl of Sandwich over to France, is to stay for the Earl of Manchester and bring him over. [S.P.44. 204. p. 180.]
May 12.
Kensington.
Warrant for the confirmation of the election of John Denis, B.A., to be a junior fellow of Trinity College, Dublin. The warrant recites that Dr. John Richardson, late bishop of Ardagh, by will, gave to the college land in the county of Longford for the maintenance of fellows and scholars in the college, and that so much of the land is now in the peaceable possession of the college as will afford a competent maintenance for one fellow. [S.P.44. 347. p. 178 and S.P.44. 151. p. 23.]
May 12. Warrant for the apprehension of Lewis Martin Piere, for suspicion of high treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 73.]
May 12.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland, reciting that Francis Forster of Rathorpe, co. Galway, represented to the King by petition that, in the time of the late rebellion, Sir Charles Porter and Lord Coningsby, then Justices of Ireland, by the King's command issued a proclamation, dated 7 July, 1691, encouraging all then in arms to submit, and promising that all officers, who would come in and bring with them their regiments or a considerable part and submit within three weeks, should be pardoned: that the petitioner, being then captain of a troop of dragoons in the enemies quarters, submitted within the term and brought with him a considerable part of his troop: that the petitioner was during the rebellion very kind to his protestant neighbours, and was never indicted or outlawed: that he prays a pardon.
The warrant directs the Lords Justices to pass letters patent under the great seal of Ireland containing a free pardon. [S.O.1. 14. p. 67.]
May 12.
Kensington.
Warrant [for a licence] to Richard Thompson, who went into the French King's dominions since 11 Dec., 1688. [S.P.44. 351. p. 51.]
[A like] warrant to William Barlow, esq., who went into the French King's dominions and [has been] in arms under the late King James in Ireland since 13 Feb., 1688. [Ibid.]
May 12.
Kensington.
Licence to Stephen Gwynn and Richard Grice, two mathematical boys of Christ's hospital, to enter the Czar of Muscovy's service. [S.P.44. 387. p. 153.]
May 12.
Kensington.
The king's Latin pass to Lord Sandwich, with his lady, and servants, to go to France. [Ibid.]
May 13.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to Lord Ambassador Williamson. On Wednesday the House of Lords were in a committee upon the Bill concerning the New Forest, and had a debate of several hours upon a clause concerning inclosures to be made there.
The Commons read the second time the Bill obliging all persons that have beneficial grants, since the year 1660, to pay a 4th part of the value. There was some opposition made to it, but at last it was committed without a division.
The new subscription according to the enclosed Preamble goes on, and there is already subscribed a million towards the two millions that are to be lent upon a fund of perpetual interest at 8 p. cent., provided the subscribers have the sole trade to the Indies.
The King intends to go to Windsor on Tuesday next, where the French ambassador will have his public audience the Thursday following. Endorsed, R. 27th, 98. 3 pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 182–183.]
The Preamble referred to above.
The Preamble to the subscription now on foot for obtaining the East India trade. If the Parliament shall think fit upon the advance of a loan upon an interest of eight p. cent. p. ann., to be paid out of an undoubted fond, to grant the sole trade to the East Indies, China, etc., to such persons, their assigns etc., as shall subscribe and advance the said loan, in proportion to what sum each person shall so subscribe and advance, exclusive to all others, with such privileges and powers as may be necessary to carry on the said trade, we underwritten do propose to engage ourselves severally in raising the said loan, according to the sums each of us do hereby subscribe, and to pay the same in ten payments in twenty months' time. 1 p. [Ibid. ff. 184–185.]
May 13.
Kensington.
Newsletter. This day the subscriptions towards the settlement of a new East India Company amounted to one million; whereupon the book was shut up, that the present East India Company may have time to consider what sum they will advance towards the 2 millions to his Majesty. Endorsed, R. 27th. 1 p. [Ibid. ff. 186–187.]
May 13. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 128. Printed. 2pp. [Ibid. f. 188.]
May 13.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to Lord Ambr. Williamson. Newsletter. Endorsed, R. 27. 2 pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 105–106.]
May 13.
Whitehall.
R. Y[ard] to the same. The subscriptions go on very well: there is this evening above £1,100,000 subscribed. The old company stand and look on and complain of the hardships, but offer nothing—further than they did the last week, which was to raise £700,000 upon a fond of interest, provided they might be established by Parliament; but they were out-bid by their adversaries.
The King intends to go to Windsor on Tuesday, by which time the Bills for the poll and the coals will in all probability be ready for the royal assent. Endorsed, R. 27, 98. 1 p. [Ibid. ff. 107–108.]
May 13.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Lords of the Treasury. The King has allowed Mr. Richard Fisher £100 for services performed, and for his present subsistence. [S.P.44. 99. p. 506.]
May 13.
Kensington.
Recommendation of Thomas Burroughs for a child's place in the Charter House. [S.P.44. 162. p. 76.]
May 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the keeper of Newgate to receive into custody Aubrey Price, charged with tendering a forged or counterfeit Exchequer bill, and suspected of forging the bill. [S.P.44. 349. p. 72.]
May 13.
Kensington.
Warrants for the apprehension of Robert Shales, Jane Wiseman, — Parry, for suspicion of high treason. [Ibid. p. 73.]
May 14. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 129. Printed. 2pp. [S.P.32. 10. f. 189.]
May 14, 16 & 17. [Notes of proceedings in Parliament.] 14 May. The Lords have thrown out the Bill against Knight. There were but five that appeared to be for it, viz. my lord Steward, Duke of Boulton, Earl of Peterborough and 2 of the Bishops.
16 [May]. His Majesty came to the House of Lords and passed 28 Bills, public and private; the chief was for laying a duty upon coals.
Sir Rowland Gwynn brought into the House of Commons the articles of impeachment against Goudet and some other Frenchmen, charging them with holding correspondence with his Majesty's enemies, with trading with France during the war, with bringing silks from thence, and carrying wool thither, and conveying persons backward and forward that went on treasonable designs.
17 May. The House, being in a committee upon Ways and Means, Sir Tho. Littleton put them in mind where they left off last time in laying a duty upon sugar. Mr. Culliford proposed that the duty should be 2d. per pound upon white sugar and a penny upon brown. But Coll. Kendall laid open the condition of the sugar plantations, what losses they had sustained by the war, how many of their men were swept away by sickness and earthquakes, how many plantations were desolate, and concluded that, if this tax were laid, the whole sugar island[s] must be ruined, and that beneficial trade lost to the nation; which he thought inevitable, since, upon laying a lesser duty, in K. James' time, viz.: of three farthings only upon white sugar, and one farthing upon brown the consequence of it at Barbados was that many of the sugar works were neglected, and the planters removed to other places; so that their militia, which before the duty consisted of upwards of 7,000 men, was soon after reduced to half the number. Even that Parliament was sensible of the inconveniences before they were felt, and the King sent them a message that, if the tax they had voted should prove so prejudicial, he would stop the gathering it. But the mischief ensued without the relief; and if a greater burthen were now laid, to be continued to a perpetuity, the plantations would be irrecoverably lost. Since experience shows that these duties are always thrown upon the planters, and this proposed would amount to £130 per cent. of the prime cost. The committee were tried whether they would come to a more moderate duty, and the Question was put upon three halfpence upon white sugar and a halfpenny upon brown, but it was carried in the negative by 71 against 59. It remains therefore to seek for another fund to supply what this was designed for. 3 pp. [S.P. 32. 10. ff. 190–191.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Deane. I received your letter of this day, enclosing an information of Simon Tetter, which he offers to make against Mr. John Mackie. The like was made by him some time since before a justice of the peace, who bound Mr. Mackie to appear at the Sessions, as he did, and I thought the business had been terminated there. [S.P.44. 99. p. 506.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Cocks, servant to H.M. council chamber by warrant, setting forth that Charles II granted to Benjamin Coleing and Nath. Cocks two [places of] keepers of the council chamber, and there are two reversions after the determination of the interest of either of them. By the death of Nathaniel Cocks one of the places is become void. Charles II granted the petitioner one of the places when void, and that no other should have a warrant before him. The petitioner has attended in his station for 21 years, in hopes of succeeding his grandfather and brother, who died in possession of the place. Both the reversions, your petitioner is informed, are become void, and the said place wholly at the King's disposal. He prays a grant of the place pursuant to his late Majesty's warrant. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 212.]
May 14.
Kensington.
Warrant [for a licence] to William Purchase, who went into the French King's dominions since 11 Dec., 1688. [S.P. 44. 351. p. 51.]
[A like] warrant to Nath. Boyce [Ibid.]
May 14.
Kensington.
Commission for Gilbert Abbot, late lieutenant of Colonel Gibson's regiment, to be lieutenant in Captain Peter Godby's company in Brigadier Fairfax's regiment. [S.P. 44. 167. p. 327.]
May 14.
Kensington.
Warrant for the revocation of the pardon of Henry [in the margin Jno.] Hardy, dated the 3rd of April last. [S.P.44. 347. p. 179.]
May 14.
Kensington.
Warrant to insert Tho. Edwards in the next general pardon for the poor convicts of Newgate, without condition of transportation: he had voluntarily confessed himself guilty of piracy. [Ibid. p. 217.]
May 14. Warrant for the apprehension of Edmund Lee, for suspicion of high treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 74.]
May 14.
The Hague.
Pass to Mathew Bernard, coming from the hospital of Breda. [S.P. 44. 386. p. 16.]
May 14.
Kensington.
The king's pass to Blagne Yarbourg, esq., with Will. Walsham his governor, to travel to France, Italy, etc. [S.P. 44. 387. p. 153.]
May 15.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Lords of the Admiralty. The Earl of Manchester is expected at Calais on Tuesday next. One of the yachts waiting there for Lord Portland is to bring him and his retinue over to Dover, returning afterwards to Calais in pursuance of former orders. [S.P. 44. 204. p. 181.]
May 15.
Kensington.
Commission to Mr. William Garvan to be lieutenant of Captain Robert Rookwood's company in Sir Henry Belasyse's regiment. [S.P. 44. 167. p. 345.]
May 15. Warrants for the apprehension of — Knight and — Davis, for suspicion of high treason. [S.P. 44. 349. p. 72.]
May 15.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Commissioners for Trade. The King directs the Earl of Romney to consider with the Commissioners for Victualling of some fit person to be employed as storekeeper of the provisions and ordnance stores that are ordered to Newfoundland.
The King is satisfied with your reasons for continuing the Admiralty passes according to the treaty with Algiers. [S.P. 44. 99. p. 509.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
The same to the Postmaster General. The King would have the [postal] treaty concluded upon the foot of our paying 36,000 livres p. ann. in lieu of all accounts, except for the Spanish ambassador's packet, which the King would likewise have an agreement made for at a certain rate by the ounce. The term of the treaty should be left indefinite, as it was in the former treaty between the Earl of Arlington and M. de Louvois. [Ibid. p. 510.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
The same to the Earl of Romney; as above, with reference to the appointment of a storekeeper. [Ibid. p. 510 B.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to the Lords of the Admiralty. The King directs that the amount paid by Colonel Gibson for the purchase of the ship, and his other disbursements, shall be discharged either by sale of the molasses and tobacco lying at Plymouth, or out of the remainder of the bill of credit that was put into Sir Henry Ashurst's hands. [S.P. 44. 204. p. 183.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Edward Jones, shewing that he served John Laughton, citizen and goldsmith of London, as an apprentice for 3½ years, and then served in the Earl of Lumley's regiment for four years. He was lately discharged, and, minding to follow his employ, applied to the Mayor for his freedom, as is usual in such cases, but he not only refuses his request but has entered an action against the petitioner. He prays a reference to the Attorney or Solicitor to report what may be done. Referred accordingly. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 213.]
May 16.
The Hague.
Passes to Laur. Williamson and Dan. Robinson, seamen, belonging to a Scotch vessel called The Swan of Andernesse, the master Donald Macklin, coming from Cadiz for Holland, cast away on the coasts of Frizeland. [S.P. 44. 386. p. 16.]
May 16. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 130. Printed. 4 pp. [S.P. 32. 10. ff. 192–193.]
May 16.
Whitehall.
Newsletter. Yesterday the Lords took into consideration Mr. Burton's Bill, and, as I am informed, they resolved to present an address to his Majesty, that he, together with Mr. Duncomb and Mr. Knight, may be prosecuted at Westminster Hall.
Yesterday the French ambassador made his public entry; 18 footmen in red liveries with gold lace, and two gentlemen and six pages on horseback went before the King's coach, in which was his Excellency, the Earl of Macclesfield and Sir Charles Cotterell, master of the ceremonies; there were three of the ambassador's coaches, whereof two with eight horses each. A splendid entertainment was prepared for his Excellency at the house appointed for the reception of ambassadors. 1 p. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 194–195.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
Tho. Hopkins to Lord Ambassador Williamson. Newsletter. Endorsed, R. 31, 98. 1 p. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 109–110.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to the same. The French ambassador's entry was so much below the expectation people had, and so disproportionate to what the Earl of Portland had done at Paris, that nobody is satisfied; and what encreases their discontent is that the ambassador was observed to make a great bow to a number of Jacobites, that were got together at the Dog Tavern, on Ludgate Hill. One thing was extraordinary on our side, that I do not remember to have seen before at an ambassador's entry, that is, two heralds riding on horseback in their coats of arms, and the Swedes are not pleased that they had them not too.
The King intended to have gone to Windsor to-day, but has put it off till to-morrow, and designs to return on Saturday. There is great hopes that the Duke of Shrewsbury will overcome his indisposition.
The French ambassador has not above six gentlemen with him, if so many, and the Swede has 15 noblemen, and has got a great deal of reputation here. Endorsed, R. 31, 98. 4 pp. [Ibid. ff. 111–112.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
R. Y[ard] to the same. Yesterday Count Tallard, the French ambassador, made his public entry. He was received at Greenwich by the Earl of Macclesfield and Sir Charles Cottrell, master of the ceremonies, and brought in the King's barge to the Tower, where Lord Lucas, the governor, complimented him, and the great guns were fired as usually. From thence he was conducted in the King's coach through the city. Being come to the house appointed for his entertainment he was complimented in the King's name by Viscount Dursley.
I am going again to Windsor to attend his Majesty. Endorsed, R. 31, 98. 2 pp. [Ibid. ff. 113–114.]
May 17.
Kensington.
[Additional instructions to Richard Long, commander of H.M.S. Rupert Prize.] If you find it necessary for the service to leave your ship for three or four months, or less time, to go into the country in search of such treasure as you are employed to find, you are hereby authorized to go, with as many as 20 armed men, besides two artists in metals, and to dispose of five barrels of powder to the Indians, in order to induce them to assist you in your undertaking.
The period for redelivery of the King's ship in London is prolonged to two years from the date hereof.
In case of your taking up any wreck on behalf of the Duke of Schonberg and Leinster, you may stop at any English colony, and ship any part of such wreck on board any King's ship or merchantman bound to the port of London. [S.P.44. 204. p. 181.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to Captain Long, forwarding the above instructions. [Ibid. p. 182.]
May 17. A copy of the examination of Edward Ivie, alias Jones, late of — in London, who saith that he hath been acquainted with John Jenings in England upwards of five years, which Jenings was once footman to the late Duke of Monmouth; that Jenings often came to the deponent's house in London, and about four years since came to his house and walked with the deponent in the garden, and took out a handful of guineas which the deponent took to be current; that Jenings desired him to utter as many as he could: the deponent, looking on the guineas shewn to him, told Jenings that he believed they were good, and so they seemed until Jenings offered to sell them for 12 or 14 sh. a piece. The deponent told Jenings the guineas exceeded any that Chanlor made, whereupon Jenings replied that Chanlor was a fool to him that made the said guineas, who was a person that lived near Hampton Court and was near neighbour to Jenings, and named his name, being the son of a widow woman, but the deponent forgets the name, and said that he and the other person joined stocks together and had a convenient house for coining, and desired the deponent to put in £100 into the stock and to come sharer with them. He said that he used to utter them in the country in exchange for a pint of wine, and desired the deponent to go into the country with him to utter the guineas. Jenings, when the deponent knew him, was a married man and lived with his wife near Hampton Court, the wife he believes is still living. When Jenings offered the counterfeit guineas Elizabeth Jones, widow, was present.
He further deposeth that he hath known Edward Brady, late of St. Ann's parish in London, upwards of four years past. Brady made it his constant business to utter counterfeit guineas and counterfeit English money. He has several times seen him utter such false coin. That Brady told him he had it from one Cogswell and from a doctor that lived at the glass house in Lambeth, and as the deponent believes from one Chanlor. The deponent believes Brady has uttered to the value of several thousand pounds, having practised it for several years. John Gibbons, now porter at Whitehall gate, very well knows the truth of this. One Jacob a goldsmith that lived in Shoe Lane used to buy the filings of clipped money from several clippers. Price, a watchmaker that lived near Charing Cross, used to make the tools for edging counterfeit guineas. Gibbons corresponds with a great many clippers and coiners, and used to receive several sums of money from them as contributions for conniving at them, and was wont to solicit for any of them when they were in restraint. The deponent well knew one Samuel Jackson in England, who was a clipper and coiner. Jackson lodged in the deponent's house in London, but coined and clipped in some other house. He hears Jackson is lately come into this kingdom together with George Emerson, Joseph Forster, and other eminent coiners and clippers from England, who the deponent believes go by other names in this kingdom. Saith that John Hicks late of little Chelsy in England and his wife Mary Hicks and his daughter Mary were eminent clippers in London, having seen them often clip English shillings, half crowns and crowns, all milled money. He very well knows one Challenor, who lived near Charing Cross, who used to coin gold pistolls and guineas. He likewise knoweth one William Deane, that belongs to the Royal Oak lottery in London, to have been a clipper and coiner, likewise Thomas Deane, and one Bedford, formerly a life [?] guardman in this kingdom. Brady is a highway man and Gibbons used to furnish him with horses to go abroad to rob.
Sworn before Ri. Pyne, Tho. Coote. Endorsed, Edw. Jones's Examn. about coiners and clippers. R. 2 June. Addressed to Sir Richd. Pyne, Ld. Chief Justice of Ireland. 3 pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 196–197.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Carteret. You have leave to come again to England about your private occasions. [S.P.44. 99. p. 507.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
The same to Capt. Long. I send you herewith instructions from his Majesty, additional to those you received from me lately. You will now proceed upon your expedition. [Ibid.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Treasury. I am to put you in mind of a bill of £2,800 drawn by Mr. Robinson, payable to Mr. Cowper. It should be paid forthwith, the King's service being concerned. [Ibid. p. 508.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. I am to send you enclosed copy of a letter from the Admiralty concerning a vessel bought by Col. Gibson, and employed to bring provisions, etc., from New England to Newfoundland, with a letter from Col. Gibson giving an account of his buying the ship for H.M. service, and upon what credit he freighted her with provisions and other things then wanting at Newfoundland, the ship being still unpaid for, and the master and ship's company in arrear for their wages. You are to consider this matter and give order for discharging what is due on account of the ship, either by the sale of such goods as she brought to Plymouth (except the shoes and stockings which his Majesty would have reserved for the use of the soldiers at Newfoundland), or by the remainder of the bill of credit that was put into Sir Henry Ashurst's hands for the carrying on of that service. [Ibid. p. 509 B.]
May 17.
Kensington.
Warrant to create Rowland Frith, esq., Mowbray herald of arms extraordinary. [S.P.44. 347. p. 180.]
May 17. Warrants for the apprehension of John Haynes and James Minifee, for suspicion of high treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 80.]
May 17. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 131. Printed. 2 pp. [S.P.32. 10. f. 198.]
May 17–23. Journal of the House of Lords, for Sir Joseph Williamson. 2 pp. [Ibid. ff. 199–200.]
May 18–28.
Paris.
Lord Portland to William III. By my last letter I sent to your Majesty the notices (advis) I had received of possible designs on the Indies, which may be useful as warnings; since then I have received the notices I now enclose, which give reason for thinking that they have some other object than the pretended one.
Last week when I was at Versailles, on the 20th, I made serious complaint to M. de Pomponne and M. de Torcy about their positive refusal to release the prisoners unless Jennings were released at the same time, a request which I refused to make to your Majesty, and I added that in this fashion it was impossible to treat about anything: that I was writing about what happened, and that I saw that, in spite of the assurances given and the good reception I had had, they did not wish to keep to the treaties or the pledge given to me, and that doubtless your Majesty would take steps accordingly. I likewise complained of the refusal to restore the property of Lord Galway, who, according to them, is in the same position as all the French protestants who have left the country with the King's leave. I spoke as strongly as possible without becoming too acrimonious.
On the same day Marshal de Villeroy told me that he was ordered by the King to inform me that his Majesty very much wished to show me Marly himself, but that other ambassadors were so jealous that he had ordered the Marshal to take me there: that the King knew I was to hunt with the Dauphin on Monday next, and that he had himself arranged that the Marshal should entertain me at dinner at Versailles early on Sunday: that after dinner he would take me to Marly and then I could return to sleep at Versailles, to go from there to the meet on Monday morning. I did as had been arranged, and I have been to Marly, which is the most delightful garden I have seen. Your Majesty would like it extremely. The designs are quite original, and the water engines are very elaborate and costly. On my return in the evening the King conversed with me at supper, and asked me what I thought of all the places especially noteworthy.
To-night I received the letters from England of the 22nd, by which you inform me that the French ambassador told your Majesty the same things that I had written to you. I asked the King if he had any orders to give me on this subject, and he replied that he had not yet received Count Tallard's letters, and that he intended to take medicine the following day, so I could go to the hunt.
Before leaving I went to his apartment to speak to Marshal de Villeroy, and as he knew I was there, he made me come in for a quarter of an hour, although he was still in bed. I then went to the meet and we hunted a wolf, which was shot after a chase from 11 o'cl. till 7. Then Monseigneur drove me in his carriage to supper at Meudon. It happened, on sitting down to table, that the Grand Prior of France, whom your Majesty knows, claimed to precede me. Everyone, I saw, was surprised; and I could not prevent it, because I did not expect it. So the best I could do, I think, was not to seem annoyed at the time.
The following morning, which was yesterday, I returned to Versailles, as it is the day on which foreign envoys generally go there. The King said that he had not yet received letters from his ambassador. I asked him to allow me to speak to him. He said, if I would wait, he would see me. I thanked him for all his assurances of sincere friendship, as you ordered me to do, and then I said that I was most grateful for all his kindness to me, and that I would always do my utmost to strengthen the union between your Majesties. I begged him not to let my zeal for your affairs cause me to forfeit his esteem, as I only sought what his Majesty desired, and I said that I was deeply grieved to see that, while he gave me so many assurances of his good intentions, business did not follow a similar course. I asked him to allow me to speak frankly on the aspect of affairs. I said that if that displeased him, the slightest word would make me silent; and, as he allowed me to speak, I represented to him how little likely it seemed that I could render service or accomplish what he wished, if I had nothing but forms and soft words to show as proof of his Majesty's sincerity. I besought him to reflect himself what the King, my master, would conclude, when it appeared that in so many matters, big and little, he received but scant consideration, and but slight regard was paid even to treaties and promises. I said that on my return everyone would laugh at me instead of believing me. I mentioned the matter of the prisoners, who (1) were to be released by the cartel for the land forces or by the agreement concluded and observed as regards the seamen. (2) [I said] that by the Peace Treaty, or when it was concluded, a solemn obligation to release them had been assumed on either side, as had been done by your Majesty long ago: (3) that I had again demanded their release on my arrival: that M. de Torcy— who was present—had promised it to me in the King's name: that he had told me that orders had been issued to that effect; that I had reported the matter to your Majesty, but that I saw nevertheless that their release was refused me point blank, unless I promised at the same time to release Mackdonnel and Jennings, who are criminal or condemned prisoners and quite different from the others. The King said that we could get the prisoners back by promising to release the two others. I replied that I would never give this promise, as your Majesty would apparently disavow it. The King said that if I promised to exert myself to obtain their freedom he would take that as a sufficient promise, as he was sure I should succeed. I assured him I would exert myself, but I begged him not to consider it a promise, as I did not want to promise anything doubtful. Thereupon the King, after thinking awhile, said: "Well, I will free them for you, and will give the orders at once, even for the one at the galleys." After I had thanked him I replied that, after the promise he had made me, I could tell him that, when M. de Torcy promised me to release the prisoners, I had written to your Majesty that the Most Christian King much desired that Jennings should be set free, and that you had graciously granted it to me long ago, but that I had not liked to tell him this: that it was a manifestation of your Majesty's desire to meet the King's wishes and of my eagerness to obey his orders. The King seemed very pleased at this and said: "I do not ask that that should be known or that it should appear as a condition: my orders will be issued at once for the release of the prisoners."
I then spoke to him about the matter of Lord Galway. I represented that he was not in the same position as the other refugees; that he was included in the meaning of the Peace Treaty: that he was innocent, and unfortunate in having incurred his Majesty's displeasure through false reports of his behaviour; to which he replied: "On this you will find me firmer." However, he entered into some discussion of the matter; but, for fear of a refusal, I asked him to take time to kindly think the matter over and not to give me an immediate answer. Then I related what had happened to me at Meudon with the Grand Prior, and said that I had overlooked it out of respect for Monseigneur; after all his kindness I had not wished to cause scandal or to embarrass him; and I asked his Majesty if he approved of that. He said he did not; that M. de Vendôme did not rank as a prince of the blood; and he asked if I wanted satisfaction. I said that it did not seem necessary, and that his statement sufficed for your Majesty, but for myself it might expose me to a charge of negligence, and I submitted to the King's judgment. The King then asked whether it would not suffice if he expressed to Monseigneur his strong disapproval of the Grand Prior's behaviour, and required him to say so to those who had been present. I assented and thanked him most humbly: and the King then again took the opportunity of saying most kind things to me in my private capacity.
I forgot to say that I have also been successful about the Prince de Vaudemont's business and am greatly delighted, the more so as Madame de Lillebonne thought very badly of it and was beginning to despair, and his secretary too who is here, but M. de Pontchatrain has done me honest and generous service in the matter.
M. de Tallard has orders to follow your Majesty to Holland, if you allow it. An engineer, who told me that he had been sent to this country, came to see me and gave me this letter. The other communication (advis) is from a man who knows the business, and I have agreed that he shall give me more from time to time. I have had to write this letter like a diary, that you may understand better what I have been doing these last few days. I shall hasten to finish my business and discharge my indispensable duties in order to leave this place; but some of those I must visit are at Versailles, and others live so far from here and are so numerous that I fear it will take me longer than I should wish. Holy Days cause me great loss of time. To-day is the Fête de Dieu, and so much attention is paid to form here that I could not pass through the streets on these days of great processions without running the risk of some tiresome rencontre. So many people of the highest rank have shown me attentions which I must acknowledge, at least by taking leave of them, that I don't know when I shall have finished, which troubles me, as I am impatient to rejoin your Majesty.
Since the return of the Comte de Roussi I have jokingly shown that I had observed the behaviour of the Marquis de Duras and the Marquis de Lorge. They could endure it no longer. The former, who is in waiting and has been ill for some days, made me a lot of poor excuses at Versailles, and the other also on coming to see me. The Duke de la Rochefoucaut is in the country. Portland.
Paris, the 28 May.
I beg your Majesty's pardon for all my erasures. I cannot write my letter again, though I fear it will be scarcely intelligible.
French, holograph, cf. Dr. Japikse I, p. 325. No. 246. [S.P.8. 18. ff. 224–233.]
May 18. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 132. Printed. 2 pp. [S.P.32. 10. f. 201.]
May 18–20. Proceedings in Parliament. 18 May. The House considered the Lords' amendment to the Bill of Religion, which leaves out that clause that makes those only liable to the penalties of this Bill who make profession of or were educated in the Christian religion, whereby the Jews would have been forced to leave the kingdoms, since they would otherwise have been exposed to have lost all their debts and not been capable either to sue or make a will. But the House did not think fit to come up to that severity with them, but to leave them under the toleration they enjoyed at present, and therefore they disagreed with the Lords by a visible majority, so that there was no need of dividing the House.
The House then went into committee of Ways and Means of supplying the duty of sugar that was laid aside yesterday. Several things were proposed but nothing resolved on. Some would have had a duty upon tallow and suet, others would have laid it on soap at a penny per pound each, but the great objections to both were the discouragement it would bring on the woollen manufacture, which used great quantities of those commodities; besides the first would require so many officers to collect it that it would eat up the profit. The committee seemed better to approve of laying a penny per pound upon candles. It was likewise proposed to lay a duty upon hats, but the proposition not having been digested nor any computation made what it would amount to, or what methods should be taken for collecting it, the committee rose without coming to any resolution.
19 May. The House were this day in a committee upon Ways and Means. Mr. Montague acquainted them the subscription was in so great forwardness that they might expect the two millions would be raised if a sufficient fund were settled, but, if they thought to provide it out of such inconsiderable duties as were proposed yesterday, they would find themselves disappointed. Mr. Smith spoke to the same effect, but neither of them proposed anything. Sir Wm. St. Quentin moved that the duty upon sugar might be considered again. For though they had put a negative upon the lesser sum that was proposed, yet he hoped it would not be irregular to proceed to the bigger sum, which he would likewise moderate, and therefore moved that three farthings per pound should be laid on brown sugar and nine farthings on white. Mr. Lowndes put it into another method which was more than the halfpenny and less than three farthings; and proposed that brown sugar should pay five shillings a hundred, and white 15 shillings. This brought on the debate again whether the Plantations were able to bear it. But many could not believe that sugar would fall in its price proportionably to the tax, and there being no other duty so effectual or less liable to objection, and Lord Conningsby moving that it might only be for two years, since in that time the first eight pence upon salt would expire, which might then supply the place of sugar, if the inconveniences appeared that were represented, the Question for laying 5 sh. and 15 sh. upon brown and white sugar was carried by 89 against 86.
20 May. Sir Thomas Littleton made his report this morning about sugar, but it seems it was concerted last night that duty should be given up as being hazardous whether it could be carried, and it was of too great consequence to run the risk whether the Plantations should be undone by it, and there it was resolved to make up the fonds another way, viz., by proposing that the former 8 pence upon salt, which determines in December come twelve month, should immediately be applied to this fond, and, to supply as well what the fund would want at present as hereafter, the additional duty upon stamped paper should be added to it, to take so much of it only as would complete the £160,000 p. annum. And because there would be still a failure for 18 months, till the 8d. upon salt was free, it was intended that the amount thereof should be rather taken out of the subscriptions than to lose time in brangling about new fonds. When the Report of the sugar therefore was brought to the Table and read the first time, it was desired the 2nd. reading might be deferred till the committee had met and considered whether anything else might not be thought of, and this not to be taken but in case of the last necessity. The House was so bent upon laying aside the sugar that they would do it immediately while they were sure of a majority. Mr. Montague however had time to explain what he thought they might take instead of it, and then the Question about agreeing with the committee for laying a duty upon sugar was put and carried in the negative. The House then went into a committee of Ways and Means. [Mr. Montague] acquainted them that some were attending with a proposal for a subscription, which was already carried above £1,200,000. They were called in, and Mr. Sheppard with several other merchants presented it. The proposal was read, with some of the subscribers' names, which was that, in consideration of an undoubted fond of 8%, to have the sole benefit of the trade to India and China exclusive of all others, and with such liberties and privileges as were fit for the carrying on that trade, they obliged themselves severally to answer the sums they had subscribed. Some queries were made upon it, what were those liberties they expected and under what regulations they proposed to trade ? To which it was answered that those regulations ought to come originally from the Parliament, who would consider how that trade should be settled to the best advantage of the nation, that the present business was only to find out the fund. Then Mr. Montague proposed what is above mentioned of salt and stamped paper, which was agreed to in three several Resolutions, that the 2 pence and 8 pence upon salt and the additional duty upon stamped paper should be granted to his Majesty towards raising 2 millions redeemable by Parliament, which is to be reported to-morrow.
In the debate there was a great deal said about the present East India Company, that the subscriptions were purposely stopped to see whether they would come in. Some doubted whether they were able, and others doubted whether they were willing; but it was argued that no injustice was done them, since it was never thought of in Parliament to establish the company nor was ever anything resolved of in Parliament in favour of this company, though it had been declared that the trade would be best managed by a joint stock, and when there were some regulations once proposed in Parliament concerning that trade, the company refused them till such time as their charter was forfeited by an omission of their own, and they were obliged to take out a new one; and they are now determinable at the King's pleasure, upon allowing them three years to bring home their effects; which Mr. Montague saw no inconveniency in, if it were still complied with.
There were likewise discourses about monopolies, which those who were for the new settlement declared they did not intend to establish so as that there should be but one buyer and one seller, but would have the subscribers at liberty to trade as they thought fit.
The House of Lords were this day upon the appeal that the Bishop of Londonderry brought into the House of Lords there against a decree of Chancellor Methuen's; and the Lords have declared that all the proceedings in that appeal are null and void, and that the Court of Chancery in Ireland ought to proceed as if no such appeal had been brought. 5½ pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 202–205.]
May 18.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Lords of the Treasury. [Referring to the complaint of the master of the French vessel mentioned in his letter of the 10th inst. to the Commissioners of Customs.] What relief may be given to the French master? [S.P.44. 99. p. 508.]
May 18.
Kensington.
Warrant [for a licence] to Fra. Arundell, esq., who went into the French King's dominions since 11 Dec., 1688. [S.P.44. 351. p. 51.]
May 18.
Kensington.
Warrant for a gift to — of the place of one of the ordinary macers of Council and Exchequer in Scotland, in the place of James Irving, lately deceased. [S.P.57. 16. p. 561–2.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Popple. You will acquaint the Commissioners of Trade that upon the application of the Hudson's Bay Company to have a man-of-war to convoy the ships they were sending to that Bay, the King directed they should lay the reasons for their demand before the Lords of the Cabinet Council and the Lords Commissioners for Trade. I have given notice to the Lords of the Council to meet at your office on Saturday. [S.P.44. 99. p. 511.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Gravesend. I have your letter of this day that you sent to Mr. Ellis at my office, together with letters taken about Kennet Mackenzy and Robert London, two men that Capt. Henry Nash had found on a vessel outward bound. They seem dangerous persons, and I have sent a warrant to bring them here. [Ibid.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Treasury: transmitting the Solicitor General's opinion about discharging the recognizance for Cardell Goodman's appearance at the King's Bench; for report whether the bond should be discharged. [Ibid. p. 512.]
May 19.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Privy Council of Scotland to further adjourn Parliament from June 28th prox. to July 12th prox. [S.P.57. 16. p. 563.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the apprehension of Charles Hereford, Edward Hunt and Hugh Tootell, for suspicion of treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 76.]
May 19. A like warrant for John Harris of Stockwick. [Ibid. p. 80.]
May 19. Warrant to receive into custody Charles Hereford, Edward Hunt and Hugh Tootell, for suspicion of treason. [Ibid. p. 81.]
May 19. Warrant to apprehend Henry Tapsfield, for suspicion of treason. [Ibid. p. 98.]
May 19. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 133. In duplicate. (Printed.) 2pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 206–207.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to Lord Ambr. Williamson. My lord Privy Seal put in his bill of extraordinaries very lately, as the Earl of Jersey did some time since, and I am humbly of opinion the sooner your Excellency sends yours the better; the Lords of the Treasury having at this time, as I am told, the debt to the King's ministers abroad under consideration. I have already sent you a copy of the Earl of Jersey's, which is in the usual form. My lord Privy Seal's is not, nor is it much matter in what form they are dressed, only he put in an article for passing of tallies, which was not allowed absolutely, but referred to the Lords of the Treasury.
I am told the King designs to give, as of his royal bounty, to his ambassadors that made the peace, the plate they had out of the Jewel Office.
The French ambassador had his audience yesterday at Windsor, and spoke so low that nobody could hear him besides his Majesty, and was very brief too. He was conducted by the Earl of Stamford. Endorsed, 2 June. 3 pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 115–116.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Lords Justices of Ireland. Col. Dongan sets up a pretention to his brother the Earl of Limerick's estate, by virtue of his father's will, and the Earl of Athlone desires that the validity of the title may be examined while he is in these parts. I am to send you the enclosed petition of Col. Dongan, that you should consider his pretentions and, upon advising with H.M. counsel learned in the law, report to the King your opinion of his title.
I have your letter of the 14th, with a list of officers enclosed, and shall move his Majesty that commissions be ordered accordingly. [S.P.44. 99. p. 512.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
Newsletter. We have advice from Dover that Lord Manchester landed there yesterday. There is now subscribed about £1,200,000. Endorsed, R. 2 June. 2 pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 208–209.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
Newsletter. The Earl of Manchester, H.M.'s envoy extraordinary to the republic of Venice, arrived here this afternoon. Endorsed, R. 2 June. 1 p. [Ibid. ff. 210–211.]
May 20. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 134. (Printed.) 2 pp. [Ibid. f. 212.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
Tho. Hopkins to Lord Ambr. Williamson. Lord Athlone set forwards this day for Ireland, where he designs to stay about a month. Endorsed, R. 2 June–23 May. 1 p. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 117–118.]
May 20. Warrant to apprehend John Auriol and John du Maistre, merchants, for suspicion of treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 98.]
May 21 & 24. Report of proceedings in the House of Commons. 21 May. Sir Thomas Littleton reported the Resolutions of yesterday about the fond for the two millions.
Mr. Methuen, the Chancellor of Ireland, acquainted the House with a book lately published in Ireland, whereof one Molineux, a Master of Chancery in that kingdom, entitles himself the author, treating of the state of Ireland in relation to their subjection to the Parliament of England, that many copies thereof had been brought over hither in order to be published, though it were not yet done. He read some passages out of the book which deny the dependence of Ireland upon the Parliament of England, or that they were bound by the laws enacted here further than they thought fit themselves; and if they had submitted to any such laws, as they did to that about establishing the new Oaths, it was more by a voluntary tacit consent, as finding it suited to their present circumstances, than by any compulsion, or that it was of itself binding. He acquainted the House that this was the private opinion only of the author; that the gentlemen of Ireland, who were here, were scandalized at it and had complained of it to the King, and the rather since the author had presumed to dedicate his book to his Majesty; and his Majesty had given orders that the author should be enquired after and prosecuted. However, he thought it became him to lay it before the House, if they would take any further notice of it. The book was ordered to be brought to the Table, and a committee was appointed to examine it and report what they found amiss in it; and not only to enquire who was the author, but likewise what proceedings have been in Ireland that might encourage one to undertake such a work and presume it would be acceptable. This was added upon some gentlemens observations that the doctrine broached in this book seemed to have taken some root in Ireland, and had shewed itself to be more than a private opinion.
It was likewise ordered that there be an Address made by the House, to desire his Majesty would order the author to be found out and punished; for, though they were told his Majesty had already done it, and they did not doubt it, however, in a matter of this consequence, they should not enough assert the rights of the Parliament here, if they did not move for it by an Address.
24 May. The House were this day in a committee, and a petition of the East India Company was read that was referred to them from the House, setting forth the charter that was granted them in pursuance of the regulations settled in Parliament, and desiring that they might be supported.
Many things were said in behalf of the Company, and against proceeding to any new settlement of the East India trade till it appeared upon what regulation it was to be done, and whether they were not to be subjected to a new monopoly instead of an old one. Mr. Montague explained how he understood the trade might be settled by coming as near to a free trade as the thing was capable of, which in his own judgment he should prefer, but as there were divided opinions, some being for a joint stock and others for trading separately, he thought both might be gratified and the public receive no prejudice, since by that means a monopoly would be avoided and there would be more than one market. After that he proposed the following resolutions which were agreed to, viz:—
That his Majesty should be empowered to appoint Commissioners to receive subscriptions for 2 millions, at an interest of 8% and in consideration of the sole benefit of the trade to the East Indies exclusive of all others.
That the subscribers should have the liberty to trade in proportion to their subscriptions, and those that would not trade themselves might transfer their interest to any other person.
That his Majesty may be empowered to incorporate those of the subscribers who should desire the same. That the regulations for this trade shall be settled by Parliament.
There was a great opposition made to the Resolution about incorporating, which was proposed to be done with such powers and privileges as should be agreed on by the subscribers and be approved by his Majesty in Council. But the committee did not think fit to put the power out of their own hands, lest the haste and necessity of having the money might give the subscribers an advantage, in insisting on something that might not be fit to be granted. And it was particularly insisted that care ought to be taken to prevent the ruin of the home manufacture by the importation of silks, which could not be done but in Parliament, by laying higher duties on those imported silks. It was resolved therefor to make two Resolutions of it.
The state of the present Company was fully stated; and [it was] considered that no injustice would be done them, if three years were allowed them for bringing home their effects according to the reservations in their charter, in case they did not think fit to come into the subscription. And this is like to be the determination concerning them, which will not hinder the subscribers in the mean time to be trading to India. 4 pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 214–215.]
May 21.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Earl of Romney, Master General of the Ordnance. The King has thought fit, now that peace is concluded, to dismiss the train of artillery that served during the late war in Flanders, and also the several trains that were employed in service at sea. Yet, in order that such persons, who have served faithfully during the war, may have some reasonable provision made for their subsistence in time of peace, and with a view also of having a train of artillery in greater readiness to march upon any occasion for the necessary defence of the King's dominions, the King directs that a small train of artillery shall be retained, composed of such persons as have served well in the war, and approves the annexed scheme of establishment, amounting to a total of 4,482l. 10s. yearly. Vacancies occurring by death or otherwise are to be filled with other such persons, who cannot at present be provided for, or such others as shall apply themselves to study mathematics, and duly qualify themselves to serve as engineers, fire-workers, bombardiers or gunners. [S.P.44. 167. p. 327.]
Annexed is the draft of the establishment of a regimental train of artillery, to consist of field officers and 4 companies of gunners, with engineers, etc., as follows: a colonel at . . . per annum; lieutenant-colonel, major and comptroller, with additions to their pay on the old establishment of 55l. 5s., 50l. and 45l. 5s. respectively; adjutant, 60l.; each company to be composed of a captain, 100l.; first lieutenant, 60l.; second lieutenant, 40l.; two gentlemen of the ordnance, paid in the first company on the old establishment, in the others 40l. a year each; two sergeants at 1s. 6d. a day; 15 gunners paid on the old establishment; 15 gunners more at 12d. a day. The train to have six engineers at 100l. a year, and four sub-engineers at 50l.; two firemasters at 100l.; 12 fireworkers at 40l.; and 12 bombardiers at 36l. 10s. Total annual cost: 4,482l. 10s. [S.P.44. 167. p. 329.]
May 21.
The Hague.
Passes to Wm. Meesters, esq., storekeeper of the Ordnance in England, with a clerk and 2 servants, going to England by way of Calais: and to Richard Jones, servant to Mr. Meesters, going with his master's baggage from Rotterdam. [S.P.44. 386. p. 16.]
May 21.
Kensington.
Pass for Jacob Alary, Eva Sherfill (?) his wife, Fra. Augier and Susan Gib, subjects of Orange, to go to Orange. [S.P.44. 387. p. 153.]
May 21.
Kensington.
Warrant to insert William Jennens in the next general pardon for the poor convicts of Newgate, without condition of transportation: he was convicted of high treason, being taken in actual rebellion upon the high seas. [S.P.44. 347. p. 181.]
May 21.
Kensington.
Warrant for the appointment of Geo. Kenion, esq., to be Recorder of the borough of Wigan, in the county palatine of Lancaster. [Ibid. p. 182.]
May 21. Warrant for the apprehension of Capt. — Butler and — Conory, for suspicion of high treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 74.]
May 21. A like warrant for Pierie Dryland. [Ibid. p. 78.]
May 21. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 135. (Printed.) 2 pp. [S.P.32. 10. f. 213.]
May 22.
Kensington.
Warrant for the presentation of Anthony Addisson, clerk, B.D., to the vicarage of St. Helen in Abington and the chapels of Radley and Drayton in the county of Berkshire and diocese of Sarum, void by the death of Dr. James Canarius, and in the gift of the Crown. [S.P.44. 347. p. 181 and S.P.44. 151. p. 24.]
May 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the apprehension of Capt. John Carroll and — Dunn, for suspicion of high treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 74.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Lords of the Treasury. I am to send you the enclosed report of the Admiralty in favour of Captain Lang, and what he may deserve for the information he gave against several ships that were brought in and condemned as prize, that you may report whether the recompense, to be given Captain Lang, may not be ordered out of the proceed of what the prizes were sold for. I am also to send you the copy of an account from the Admiralty of a French pinnace brought into Dover, with a small quantity of brandy on board. Both are to be restored, if there be no sufficient ground for detaining the pinnace. [S.P.44. 99. p. 513.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
The same to the Council of Trade. Concerning the duties upon linen made in Saxony, which you think should be lessened by Parliament, being now so high as to amount to a prohibition, the King would have you consider what duties those linens may well bear, and what equivalent may be offered to Parliament to replace the abatement: that the Customs which are appropriated may not be diminished,: wherein you will advise with the Commissioners of Customs. [Ibid. p. 514.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Admiralty. I send you the copy of a letter from the master and carpenter of H.M.S. Rupert Prize, now going to America, concerning their wages, that you may give the necessary directions therein. [S.P.44. 204. p. 184.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Robert Webb, on behalf of himself and the children of John Webb his elder brother, late nursery and pond keeper in St. James's Park, showing that John Webb was nursery and pond keeper of St. James's Park for near 40 years, and died lately. The petitioner was his executor, and has since taken care of that business, for which he is out of pocket. There is above £500 due to the deceased for furnishing meat for the fowle etc. He desires his brother's place, notwithstanding the pretence of one Hearne to have bought the reversion; which his brother had no right to sell. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P.44. 238. p. 214.]
May 23.
The Hague.
Pass to John Nieman, soldier, late of Capt. Kenique's company in Col. Harlsteyn's regiment in the service of the States General. [S.P.44. 386. p. 16.]
May 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the keeper of Newgate to receive into custody William Connory, sent for high treason, for having been in arms under the late King James in Ireland since the 13th Feb., 1688, and being now in England without licence. [S.P.44. 349. p. 75.]
May 23. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 136. (Printed.) 2 pp. [S.P.32. 10. f. 216.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Lord Ambr. Williamson. The great business now in hand is the settling the project for raising two millions. There was a good deal of debate about it this day in the House of Commons, and much was said on behalf of the old East India Company, who greatly complain of the hardship put upon them by this new proposal; but at last the House came to the resolutions contained in the enclosed paper. It is meant that such of the subscribers as desire it, shall be incorporated by the King's charter, and carry on their trade in a joint stock; and others, that would rather manage their trade themselves, may do so, for so much as they subscribe, or may sell their licenses to others; and, as for the old Company, they may subscribe as others do, and trade apart for so much. This is calculated to please everybody; whether it will, or not, I cannot pretend to judge. There are different opinions about it; in a few days I may be able to give you a clearer account of this matter. Endorsed, R. June 8. 1p. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 119–120.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to Sir J. Williamson. It is not doubted but his Majesty will follow his horses and dogs to Loo, as soon as possibly he can for the parliament: but when they will rise is very uncertain, though the Votes of this day concerning the new East India Company look as if they had a mind to despatch, and be gone. Though the old Company will yet make some struggle, before it is quite knocked on the head, as it will be, by its successor.
There is to be a solemn resignation of the late King of Sweden's Garter and other ensigns of the Order. It is believed they will soon after be given to the present King of Sweden.
M. Gerstorffe, the King of Poland's envoy, is going from hence, but is to reside at The Hague, and transact his master's affairs with the States. It is said the State of Venice is sending an ambassador hither, to thank his Majesty for interposing his mediation for a peace with the Turk.
The matter of postage between us and France is upon the point of being settled. Endorsed, R. June 8th. 3 pp. [Ibid. ff. 121–122.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to the same. The King having been pleased to grant a pardon to Lord Clancarty, upon condition that he forthwith depart the kingdom, he was discharged accordingly out of prison, and is gone for Hamburgh.
[Yesterday] the Lords heard a cause between the Bishop of St. David and the Register of his diocese. The latter complains that the bishop had received several fees belonging to him, and that he could not obtain satisfaction of him, by reason he stood upon his privilege. And their lordships ordered that the bishop should waive his privilege. Endorsed, R. June 8. 2½ pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 217–218.]
May 24. The bearer hereof, Richard Ellis, was my servant, and he lived with Lord Oxford before he came to me. Signed, Barloe. Endorsed, Capt. Barloe's certificate for his man. 1 p. [Ibid. f. 219.]
May 24. The Journals of the House of Lords for Sir Joseph Williamson. 2½ pp. [Ibid. ff. 220–221.]
May 24. Lord Chief Justice Holt's report about Fermont; diminishing guineas. In obedience to your Majesty's command by Mr. Secretary Vernon I humbly inform your Majesty that Peter Fermont, a Frenchman, was tried before us at the last sessions at the Old Bailey for diminishing of 2 guineas. There were 2 witnesses, viz: Dallowne and Geering, both Frenchmen.
Dallowne swore that about the beginning of February last he met Fermont at a coffee house. They being strangers accidentally fell into discourse, upon which Dallowne told him that he had a receipt for making vinegar. Thereupon Fermont told him that he had a secret for making a water which would diminish coined gold, and that it might be so exactly done that 20 pence in each guinea might be taken and it could not be perceived; and that great profit might be made, and if Dallowne would procure a treasurer or banker to furnish 500 guineas he would enter into some agreement for the doing thereof. Upon that design Dallowne and Fermont had several meetings between that time and Thursday, 24th February, and then, upon Dallowne's undertaking to bring one that should furnish Fermont with the guineas, Fermont writes a receipt of the water in Dallowne's Table Book with his own hand, of which two of the ingredients were aqua fortis and salammoniac.
Fermont gave Dallowne a guinea to buy these ingredients, which he did. And Dallowne having acquainted Geering with this matter, he appoints him to meet him next day at St. James's Park, where Dallowne acquaints Fermont that Geering was to furnish him with guineas. Thereupon Geering and Fermont entered into a treaty. Geering should furnish 400 guineas, and Fermont should have all the profit as long as he stayed in England, which was to be about 5 weeks; and when he went to France he would communicate this secret to Dallowne and Geering, and they should have the profit, paying £30 a month to Fermont. But it seems, before Geering would trust Fermont with the 400 guineas, he desired that he would make an experiment with 2 guineas that Geering furnished; to which Fermont agreed. Whereupon Geering delivers 2 guineas to Fermont, one of King Charles II's coin, the other of King William's and Queen Mary's, and, Geering enquiring how he should know that these were the same guineas, Fermont directed him to observe the C of Carolus. Thereupon Fermont and Dallowne parted from Geering and went to Dallowne's lodging, where the water was prepared: and being heated the guineas were put in, and being taken out they seemed to be well washed and the impression not defaced: yet upon being weighed the one wanted four shillings and the other near four. Dallowne complained they were too much diminished; then Fermont answered that the guineas were too few for the quantity of the water. The guineas were produced in Court and weighed.
Geering swore the same as to treaty and agreement in St. James's Park, and that these guineas were the same which Fermont had from him; and that he knew that of King Charles to be the same by the C, and was positive as to that of your Majesty's and the late Queen's, tho' they had been ever since Saturday, the 26th of February (on which day Fermont was apprehended), until the 30th of April last, in the hands of Mr. Secretary Vernon, and then by him delivered out in order to the prosecution.
Fermont, the prisoner, in his defence did urge that Dallowne was not a man to be credited, because he did endeavour to persuade some persons to swear falsely against one Camilly, a French dancing master, viz: that he should say, upon the bonfire that was made upon the surrender of Namur, that, if he had an hot iron, he would run it into King William's guts, and at another time, a little after the plot for assassinating the King was discovered, that the English were fooled in a plot, and that he with 500 men could have done the business, and promised that if they would swear it they should have a share of Camilly's estate. This matter was deposed by the witnesses he produced. And a French minister did declare that Dallowne was a man of an ill reputation, yet knew no ill thing of him, but only spoke as he had heard.
It was proved that, when the Act was made about punching the hammered money, Dallowne did say that it would not be effectual, for he had a water that would diminish the money so that it could not be perceived, but God forbid that he should do it. Though the prisoner made use of this evidence to lessen the credit of Dallowne, yet the Court observed it that thereby it must be inferred that Dallowne knew the secret before he was acquainted with Fermont.
The prisoner brought several witnesses to prove his being of the Protestant religion. Diverse French merchants testified that they knew him and had received money from him in payments, which they said was very good. They also testified that he was a man of good reputation, and that he was descended of a Protestant family at Lyons and was of a good estate.
It was also given in evidence that he had hired a coach to go to Dover in 3 or 5 days after the 24 of February in order to embark for France, and that therefore he could not propose the staying 5 or 6 weeks.
The prisoner said that the writing of the receipt of the water in [the] Table Book by him was at the desire of Dallowne, who pretended that he was purblind, and that Dallowne dictated.
Dallowne being asked his way and manner of living, said he was a French refugee and came from France in 1685, and has since been in your Majesty's service, and now was a reformed officer.
This is the substance of the matter as near as I can recollect. It hath been urged by some in his behalf that both Dallowne and Geering did design to ensnare him and then to discover him. It may possibly be true that they had an intention to discover him, and its probable that Dallowne did know the secret before he was acquainted with Fermont.
All which I humbly submit to your Majesty's great wisdom. Signed, J. Holt. 2½ pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 222–223.]
May 24. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 137. (Printed.) 2 pp. [Ibid. f. 224.]
May 24.
Kensington.
The King grants licence to Sir Humphry Edwin, knt., Lord Mayor of London (he having lately had a dangerous fit of sickness), to remain out of the City during the term of 10 days together, or for a day or two in a week. [S.P.44. 163. p. 106.]
May 24. Warrant for the apprehension of Capt. Griffin, Wm. Berkenhead, and — Johnson, alias Harnisch, for high treason in compassing the death of the King. [S.P.44. 349. p. 78.]
May 25./June 4.
Paris.
Lord Portland to William III. The day after I wrote my last letter to your Majesty, of the 28th, M. de Torcy came to me here from the King, and communicated to me the letter which he was writing to Count Tallard, in reply to the account which he had given of what had passed at his last audience with your Majesty; of this I will say nothing, as you will have heard it all from himself before now.
It seems to me they really want to come to terms, but to cause all the delays and raise all the quibbles of which this government is capable, and we shall have to stand firm and yield nothing to begin with, even if you should think of making some concession in the end.
As yesterday was the ordinary day for going to Versailles I went to the King's levee, and told M. de Torcy that I had nothing to say to the King to require an audience, unless the King had some commands to give me. A moment afterwards he said that the King wanted to speak to me, and that he would usher me in.
His Majesty spoke to me of what M. de Tallard had written, and of the orders which he had given him. I absolutely rejected the suggestions made; to give us only St. Domingo in the Indies, and the fortified places in Africa at the entrance to the Mediterranean. [I said] that the former was not fortified, and by reason of its situation could be of no use to us; and that Cuba was separated from the mainland, exactly in the same way as the other, and we should have no footing there (ou nous n'aurions point de pied); and that, as for the Mediterranean, the fortified places in Africa would be of no use to us for entering, if we had no harbour further in, to shelter our ships from storms and to winter in. To this the King replied that he was not well acquainted with the Indies, but, since this matter had come up, he had studied the map. [He said] that he who was master of Havana commanded the entrance to the Gulf of Mexico, and could stop the trade of the possessor of the Indies when he pleased; and in like manner whoever had Port Mahon, and was powerful at sea, would control the Mediterranean trade; and he concluded by saying that we must wait for your answer to what his ambassador would say to you.
I am sorry to hear that the King has commanded Count Tallard to refuse Lord Galway's affair, merely giving the jointure to Madame de Ruvigny. But, if your Majesty insists, I am sure you will get satisfaction: there are many people who are well disposed towards him, even in the Government. The matter of Mr. de La Forest, as to which I was promised everything, has not yet been put through, and I fear that they will let it drag on till I go, so as to do nothing afterwards; so a word from you on both subjects, to express your surprise to M. de Tallard, would have a good effect.
I told the King that I contemplated leaving in a week, but that I should be very sorry to stay so long in Paris without seeing him, so I would not ask to take leave of him yet; and he replied most kindly that he would be very pleased to see me as long as possible, and I withdrew.
I visited M. de Pomponne and M. de Torcy, and gave them the note about the Burgundy property of which your Majesty has never been in possession, but of which you ought to be in enjoyment according to the wording of the Treaties of Munster, Nimeguen and Ryswick. I did not want to mention this till I had got possession of the other property; because I feared, if they were taken together, I should be met with quibbles and delay in a matter which did not admit of either. As the words are very clear, and the reason too, these gentlemen took it very well, and did not seem surprised; and this is a matter to be arranged with the Commissioners after I leave. I have hastened the departure of the Commissioners for the trade with England. M. de Torcy told me that Mr. d' Herbeaux would leave first, and would have left long ago if M. de Tallard had not written that he had been told in England that it was useless for him to come now, as, after you left for Holland, nothing could be done in this matter.
The day after to-morrow there will be a review of the lifeguards and the mousquetaires, which I should much like to see; but, as King James will be there, I would not venture to go. I learnt yesterday evening that the King will go on the day of the review to Marly, and will stay there ten days, which puts me in a difficulty about my leave-taking. I mentioned this to Marshal de Villeroy, who will tell me to-morrow how I am to get out of it. My compliment to the King in the matter of the release of Jennings was a little marred, as your Majesty, according to your last letter, had already granted it to Count Tallard.
The Duc de Maine and the Comte de Toulouse are coming in state to-day to return my visit, and the Prince de Condé is coming to dine with me shortly. He leaves to-morrow for Chantilly, where he has invited me to go. He will stay there till I come. I am sorry I shall not be able to see Liancourt, which is close to it. As the Duc de la Rochefoucauld has been, and is now, so distant with me, I don't think I need go there. On my way back I shall spend a day seeing Dunkirk. I enclose a letter from the Prince de Vaudemont from Genoa; it was reported at Court yesterday that he had arrived at Milan. Portland.
Paris the 4th June.
French, holograph, cf. Dr. Japikse I, p. 331, No. 248; Grimblot II, p. 18. [S.P.8. 18. ff. 234–239.]
May 25. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 138. (Printed.) 2 pp. [S.P.32. 10. f. 225.]
May 25–27. Notes of proceedings in the House of Commons, for Sir Joseph Williamson. 25 May. In committee Mr. Montague proposed several regulations for the new settlement of the trade to India which were agreed to. The first was that the subscribers should have that trade, exclusive of all others, for ten years, and until the same shall be redeemed by Parliament. This admitted of a long debate, some insisting that the subscribers should not have the sole privilege of the trade beyond ten years, though the fond was not then redeemed and the two millions repaid, but after that should only have the benefit of their interest. But it was demonstrated none would subscribe upon those terms. However, they would have it put into two Questions, and, there being a division upon one of them, it was carried in the affirmative by 109 against 73. The other Resolutions were:—
That whoever subscribed £500 should have a vote, and none should have above one vote.
That all the ships trading to India should deliver the goods they bring back in England and not elsewhere, till they were exported again.
That no subscriber, who shall be incorporated, shall trade otherwise than in the joint stock of the corporation whereof he is a member.
That 5% ad valorem shall be paid by the importer upon all the returns of goods from India, the said duty to be accountable to the subscribers towards defraying the charge of ambassadors to India, and other incidental charges relating to the trade, and the remainder to go to the benefit of the subscribers.
Mr. Norris proposed there might be a regulation for the benefit of the manufactures here, and that it might be by laying an additional duty upon all manufactured goods brought from India. It was thought that so general an imposition would discourage the subscription, but that it would be fit to lay about 20% upon wrought silks, and it was further [explained] that it neither was intended, or could be, to restrain the Parliament from laying such duties as they should think fit hereafter upon East India goods, as they found it best for the advantage of the kingdom. They came therefor to this Resolution:—
That a further duty of 22 pence per pound weight should be laid upon all wrought silks imported from India, which will make the whole duty on those silks 8 shillings the pound weight.
It is ordered that these Resolutions be reported to-morrow in order to the bringing in a Bill pursuant to them.
[May] 26th. The Resolutions about the settlement of the East India trade were this day reported and agreed to, but not till after some hours debate, which brought the whole matter under consideration.
"It was endeavoured to gain time that the Company should be heard and their charter looked into. The whole was at last decided by a division of the House upon an amendment and was proposed in the first Resolution as to the term for which the trade should be enjoyed by the subscribers, the same thing being endeavoured and was proposed yesterday to allow the trade but for ten years, whether the 2 millions were then repaid or not, but it was carried for agreeing with the committee by 126 against 99."
The rest of the Resolutions were agreed to without any opposition, till it came to the last that lays 22 pence the pound weight upon wrought silks. This the Norfolk members and some others were for recommitting, as not thinking the duty high enough for what they apprehend to their manufacture by the importation of silks. Besides they thought that other Indian commodities should be charged further. The Resolution however was agreed to; it being the general sense of the House that they have the power, either now or hereafter, of laying such duties both on silks and other goods from India as they shall think fit.
It is ordered that a Bill be brought in pursuant to these Resolutions.
[May] 27th. The House in committee of Ways and Means took into consideration the providing for the Civil List, and making good the £700,000 per ann. for that purpose. Mr. Montague proposed the manner it might be done, viz: that the revenue of the hereditary and temporary Excise might be cleared of the incumbrances they are charged with, amounting to about £600,000, which revenue being cleared, with the Post Office and other small branches, might be computed at £500,000 p. ann. To make up the other £200,000, he proposed that the double subsidies, computed at £250,000 p. ann., which are granted and engaged till December, 1699, should after that time be granted to his Majesty for life; the remainder of those particulars, as far as they shall exceed the £700,000, to be reserved to the disposal of the Parliament and applied to the sinking of Exchequer Bills. And, since there would be £200,000 still wanting in each of the two years till the double subsidies were clear, he proposed that £200,000 should be taken out of the first ½ part of the subscriptions to the two millions, and the like sum out of the latter part of the subscriptions; and that the Excise should be cleared out of the fonds they had given this year. And in order to effecting this he concluded with a motion that the double subsidies should be granted to his Majesty, for his life, from December, 1699.
The committee shewed a great disposition to pay their respect to his Majesty that the Civil List might be fully provided for; and the little opposition that was given was rather as to the manner of it. The Question that was afterwards put was turned rather more advantageously, so as to comprehend the whole Civil List at once: which was, that the double subsidies should be granted to his Majesty, in addition to the Excise, the Post Office and the small branches, to make up a revenue of £700,000 p. ann. for his Majesty's life; which was passed nemine contradicente. And a second Question was afterwards passed, that what the said revenue yielded above £700,000 should be disposed of in Parliament.
This has been done in so particular and extraordinary manner that it may be said his Majesty has his revenue settled in the manner of a rent charge. 3¼ pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 226–227.]
May 25.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland for payment of £2,871 to Edward, Earl of Jersey. Cf. Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. XIII, p. 346. [S.O.1. 14. p. 69.]
May 25.
Kensington.
The same to the same for a pension to James Du Borda, as late a lieut.-col. of foot. Printed in Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. XIII, p. 346. [Ibid. pp. 75–6.]
May 26.
Kensington.
Pass to Lord George Reay, to travel to France, Italy, etc. [S.P.44. 387. p. 154.]
May 26. Warrant for the apprehension of Richd. Horseley, for suspicion of high treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 76.]
May 26. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 139. (Printed.) 2 pp. [S.P.32. 10. f. 228.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to Lord Ambassador Williamson. There has been another great trial between the Earls of Bath and Montagu, concerning the late Duke of Albemarle's estate, which began yesterday morning and lasted all day, the whole night, and till 11 this morning. The jury gave their verdict for Lord Montagu.
There was yesterday a great debate in the House of Commons about the East India business, and at last it was resolved by 126 against 99 to agree with the Resolutions of the committee; what will become of the old Company I know not. Endorsed, R. June 9, 98. 3¼ pp. [Ibid. ff. 229–230.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Hill. [Copy.] I am sorry to see what effect our Lace Act hath had in those parts and I hope [the] thing is not yet without remedy. But what they complain of is not new, being only the putting a law in execution that was before in being, and even that is not to take place before December next; before which time a new Parliament will have met, and in probability will give what redress is necessary. Since it may not be so proper to be repealing a law as soon as ever it is made, and if in the meantime they will suspend their prohibition till this Act pinches them, I hope the matter may be accommodated.
I am very glad you overcome your own temper so far as to give rogues a hearing, while they are telling you what their comrades are doing. Now there is such a swarm of rogues in that country one must submit to the uneasiness of enquiring after them, and the rather since the rumour increases of assassinations designed. I would much rather be satisfied there is no such thing, but, if any are so desperate, it highly concerns us to have notice of them, that their villainies may be prevented. You will find, as I do, that the pretenders to discoveries are very apt to impose, and yet one must make use of them in hopes of finding one that is ingenious among twenty rogues. 11/8 pp. [Ibid. ff. 231–232.]
May 27. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 140. (Printed.) 2 pp. [S.P.32. 10. f. 233.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to Sir J. Williamson. I send you a copy of the Earl of Pembroke's bill of extraordinaries lately given in. It is not in the usual form, but was allowed by his Majesty's command: only the first article about tallies was referred to the Lords of the Treasury, who will certainly not pass it.
It is thought the late King of Sweden's Garter will be given to the Duke of Newcastle. The Parliament, it is believed, will rise in about a fortnight. Endorsed, R. June 9. 98. 2 pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 123–124.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
Tho. Hopkins to the same. The business of this session of Parliament is now drawing towards an end, and [we] hope it will have as happy a conclusion as could be expected, considering the many difficulties we have laboured under.
Yesterday a trial began in the Common Pleas, between Lords Montagu and Bath, which lasted all night (according to the usual manner) until 12 this morning. At last the jury, without going from the bar, brought in a verdict for Lord Montagu. Endorsed, R. June 9, 98. 2 pp. [Ibid. ff. 125–126.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of William Mathews, esq., lord of the manor of Topsham, co. Devon, on behalf of himself and others the inhabitants: shewing that the town of Topsham is populous, and a port conveniently situated for trade, that no fair is kept in Easter week within thirty miles of it, nor market on Thursday within twenty miles, for want of which trade and commerce are much discouraged, H.M. customs and revenues obstructed, and the inhabitants ill supplied with provisions and necessaries. The petitioner prays his Majesty to grant him and his heirs letters patent for holding a fair in the town on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday in Easter week yearly, and likewise for the market there on Thursday in every week, for the sale of all sorts of commodities. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [S.P.44. 238. p. 215.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of William Page for letters patent for a new instrument, which he had invented, for boiling liquors in any wooden vessel, no fire coming near the same, which is useful for all woollen and linen dyers. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [Ibid. p. 216.]
May 27.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords of the Treasury in Scotland, to state and pay the considerable arrears of the pension of £200 which the King had granted to Mary Johnston Lady Bogie, Helen Johnston Lady Graden, and Eupham Johnston daughter to the deceased Sir Archibald Johnston of Wariestoun, and to Mary and — Johnston, relict and daughter to Thomas Johnston son to the said Sir Archibald. [S.P.57. 16. p. 563–4.]
May 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the keeper of Newgate to receive into custody Anthony Cavanear, sent for high treason for having been in arms under the late King James in Ireland since the 13th Feb., 1688, and being now in England without licence. [S.P.44. 349. p. 75.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Commissioners of Customs. I send a translation of a memorial, given me by the secretary of the Spanish embassy, concerning two ships of St. Sebastian, laden, as he alleges, with Navarre wine, seized by your officers as being French wines. You will enquire, and if the lading is Spanish, you will order the ships to be discharged. [S.P.44. 99. p. 515.]
May 28. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 141. (Printed.) 2 pp. [S.P.32. 10. f. 234.]
May 29.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Archbishop of Canterbury. At Lord Wharton's desire I presented the enclosed request to his Majesty on behalf of Mr. Hen. Hibbons, that he may succeed Mr. Dod in the parsonage of Marsh Gibbons, co. Bucks. I am to send it for consideration by your Grace and the other Ecclesiastical Commissioners. Besides the great character Lord Wharton gives of this gentleman he says he has a warrant by him, which was formerly signed for presenting Mr. Hibbins to this very living, but out of friendship to Mr. Hampden he would not proceed further in it. [S.P.44. 99. p. 514.]
May 29.
Kensington.
Warrant for the reprieve of Lt. John Reed, convicted at the last Assizes at Chester of the murder of Lt. Tho. Spencer, until his Majesty receive an account how the fact appeared upon the trial. [S.P.44. 347. p. 184.]
May 30./June 9.
Paris.
Lord Portland to William III. After I sent my last letter, of the 4th inst., Marshal de Villeroy came to see me, and said that the King would have very much liked me to see his guards, but he quite appreciated what I had intimated to him, that I should not absent myself from the review for love of King James, but that, out of respect for his Majesty, I would not come; for fear of doing anything which might give him pain, particularly when King James would be with him. He also told me that the King would not return from Marly before Saturday night, which forces me to postpone my departure for some days; which I much regret, but it cannot be helped, and I shall have to cut short the days, which your Majesty allowed me, for visiting houses and gardens.
Yesterday I received your Majesty's letter of the 24–5. I had spoken already myself, as ordered by you, on the new alternatives, and I will do so again when I take leave, which I hope will be on Sunday. After that I shall aim at leaving the following Tuesday or Wednesday, in order to be with your Majesty as soon as possible.
I sent my son to the review with orders not to approach King James or the Queen, or the English in their suite, if he knew any of them, but everybody has remarked that both the one and the other honoured him, by bowing to him even from a distance.
I suppose that the ministers wrote to Count Tallard that the letter addressed to him would be shown to me, and this led him to speak as of a thing accomplished, for I have already informed your Majesty how it took place. I am much delighted that you have graciously shown yourself satisfied with my conduct, where uprightness will always be my rule, when other qualities may be lacking.
The day before yesterday I received the King's gift, which is very fine. It is his portrait set in diamonds. I don't know yet what it cost him, nor at what it will be valued by the talk of the Court, but the jeweller to whom I showed it values it at 32 or 33,000 francs.
I shall put a stop to my big expenses after to-morrow, and have my baggage packed, ready to leave with me. Portland.
Paris, the 9th June, 1698.
French, holograph, printed by Dr. Japikse I, p. 333, No. 249; cf. Grimblot II, p. 24. [S.P.8. 18. ff. 240–243.]
May 30.
Kensington.
Warrant for a grant to John Bromfield, gent., of the office of ranger alias riding forester of the New Forest, in place of John Burrard, gent., lately deceased; with the usual fee of sixpence by the day, to be paid at the Exchequer in lieu of the like fee heretofore payable out of our revenue of the county of Southampton, and other rights as John Carey or John Burrard enjoyed the same. [S.P.44. 347. p. 184.]
May 30. Warrant for the apprehension of Edward Butler, for having been in arms under the late King James in Ireland since Feb. 13th, 1688, and continuing in this realm without licence. [S.P.44. 349. p. 78.]
May 30. Warrant for the apprehension of — English, for high treason, for having been in France since 11th Dec., 1688, and returned into this realm without licence. [Ibid.]
May 30.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Anne Norton: showing that he [sic] lately purchased an estate in Leicestershire, that one Mr. Turner, upon pretence of an assignment of a recognizance from Anne Norton, brought a scire facias upon the same in the Petty Bag office in Anne Norton's name, and caused summons thereupon to be given to all his tenants in order to extend the said purchased premises, and notwithstanding he pleaded to the scire facias yet he has signed and entered up judgment against the petitioner as by default: and praying a writ of error. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [S.P.44. 238. p. 216.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
Upon the report of the Attorney General, the petitioner's prayer was granted. [Ibid. p. 217.]
May 30. Warrant for the apprehension of John Mathews, for high misdemeanour. [S.P.44. 349. p. 78.]
May 30. Warrant to search the lodgings of — Griffin for treasonable papers, and to seize them with the person in whose custody they are. [Ibid. p. 79.]
May 30.
The Hague.
Pass to Morgan Jones, sent over hither by the Ct. d' Aversberg with some hounds for the Ct. de Straetman. [S.P.44. 386. p. 16.]
May 30. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 142. (Printed.) 2 pp. [S.P.32. 10. f. 235.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to Lord Ambr. Williamson. The King of Sweden, I am told, might have had the Garter, if he had pleased, but that he would not ask it, because he would not have his banner hang below the King of Denmark's.
The young Lord Cornwallis is made Lord Lieut. of Suffolk in his father's room.
Several of the gentlemen, who went out with the Earl of Portland, are returned, but we are not to expect his Excellency these 10 or 12 days yet.
I do not hear anything further of his Majesty's giving the plate, etc., to his ambassadors that were at Ryswick, though I am told my lord Privy Seal and the Earl of Jersey do hope they shall obtain it.
The King is extremely pleased at the settling his private revenue upon [him] for life nemine contradicente, and it is indeed a very noble gift. Endorsed, R. June 13, 98. 3 pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 127–128.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to the same. Yesterday was held at Kensington a Chapter of the Order of the Garter, where the ambassador of Sweden presented the George and Garter of the King of Sweden, deceased, according to what has been formerly practised on the like occasions.
The House of Lords this day passed the Bill against Blasphemy and Profaneness, having receded from the amendment they made thereon, concerning the Jews, and by which they were made liable to the penalties of the same Bill.
At the Chapter of the Garter held yesterday, the Duke of Newcastle was elected a knight companion in the place of the late Earl of Peterborough. Endorsed, R. June 13, 98. 2¼ pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 236–237.]
May 31. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 143. (Printed.) 2 pp. [Ibid. f. 238.]
May 31–June 7. The Journals of the House of Lords, for Sir Joseph Williamson. 2 pp. [Ibid. f. 239.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Commissioners for Trade. Sir Edmond Andrews having desired leave to resign his government of Virginia, to return to England about his own affairs, the King has declared Colonel Francis Nicholson to succeed him. You will prepare a commission and instructions for Mr. Nicholson to be Governor of Virginia accordingly. Cf. Cal. S.P., America and West Indies, 1697–1698, No. 528. [S.P.44. 99. p. 516.]
May 31.
Kensington.
Warrant for a commission to Charles, Lord Cornwallis, to be Lord Lieutenant of the county of Suffolk. [S.P.44. 347. p. 183.]
May 31.
Kensington.
Warrant to insert David MacDonnell in the next general pardon for the poor convicts of Newgate, without condition of transportation: he was convicted of high treason, being taken in actual rebellion upon the high seas. [Ibid. p. 185.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the payment of the extraordinary expenses of Paul Methuen at Lisbon for one year, from 9th March, 1696–7: the account includes, £150 for entertainment of the Courts of Portugal and foreign ministers at the public rejoicing for the peace, being in a neutral Court and the first occasion I had of any public solemnity. [Ibid. p. 186.]
May 31.
Kensington.
Warrant [for a licence] for James Hills, who went into the French king's dominions since 11 Dec., 1688, to return. [S.P.44. 351. p. 52.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the apprehension of Rowland Huffenden, Joshua Rigglesden, and Simon Gilbert, for high treason for having been in France and returning into England since 11th Dec., 1688, without leave. [S.P.44. 349. p. 77.]
May. Docquet of a pardon to Donough McCarthy, late Earl of Clancarty, of all treasons etc. [S.O.3. 20. f. 146]: of the grant of a baronetcy to John Rogers, sen., of Wisdome, co. Devon; of the denization of John Berionde and Francis Andre, merchants [ibid. f. 147]: of the presentation of Anthony Addison, B.D., to the vicarage of St. Helen in Abington (with the chapels of Radley and Drayton) co. Berks. [Ibid. f. 147. v.]
Docquet of a licence to Lord James Cavendish, who went into France since 11 Dec., 1688, to return to England or other the King's dominions [ibid. f. 148]: the like to Edmund Dormot: Eliz. Newland: Henry Grahme: Thomas Ireland: Richard Thompson: William Purchase: Nathaniel Boice: Francis Arundell, esq.: Thomas Selby: William Barlow. [Ibid.]
May. Warrants for the apprehension of William Bourh and Anthony Kempff, for suspicion of high treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 76.]

Footnotes

  • 1. i.e. English prisoners detained by the French.