BHO

William III: July 1698

Pages 334-369

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William III, 1698. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1933.

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July 1698

July 1.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Hill [copy.] I have read to the King your letter of the 3rd inst. I have not yet heard that any of the three persons mentioned have applied for a licence: when they do, I hope they will choose some other hand than mine. I am afraid I shall have enough to answer for countersigning some of the licences, and I would not have the load of having procured them.
His Majesty thinks you take the point of the interdict very right. The Imperialists have appeared very much unconcerned at the continuance of it. They now seem to wish for a qualified minister of his Majesty's at Madrid, and yet they go but awkwardly to work in clearing the way to it. (fn. 1)
Baron Simioni sent his secretary to me with one who calls himself Mr. Wolsely's steward, and says he is come to solicit the payment of some debts Mr. Wolsely left unpaid at Bruxelles, amounting to 8,000 florins. I asked the secretary who would pay the debts of Don Pedro de Ronquillos. To that he only shrugged his shoulders. I know not whether they will meet with a much better payment from Mr. Wolsely's relations, and I question whether he hath not received all that is due to him from the Treasury.
I do not doubt but the foreign ministers have spread their complaints abroad against the late message about their chaplains; but yet I suppose they will keep a better decorum for some little time at least. They are certainly under a very extravagant mistake, if they really think, as some I hear pretend, that their privileges extend to the protection of English and Irish priests, whom our laws declare traitors.
The Lords have sat till past 9 to-night, opposing and maintaining the 2 millions Bill; but I hear they have at last ordered it a second reading, so that we may see it pass about Tuesday next. 2 pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 315–316.]
July 1.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to Lord Ambr. Williamson. The Bill for the new East India Company was to be read [in the House of Lords] the second time to-day, after the hearing of counsel; which seems to be rather to observe forms than to any other purpose, the Commons having tacked two Bills together, that the money might carry the company along with it, which latter might otherwise have been left in the lurch. Endorsed, R. 14, 98. 3 pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 157–158.]
July 1.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to the same. There being notice taken of the great numbers of his Majesty's popish subjects who resorted to the chapels of foreign ministers, and that they entertained English and Irish priests for their chaplains, his Majesty has directed that the foreign ministers should be acquainted how contrary this is to the laws of the kingdom. They answered that they would write to their masters about it.
Mr. Bridgman having desired to quit his place of one of the secretaries of the Admiralty, Mr. Berchet, who was before his colleague, is now sole secretary. I know no other reason Mr. Bridgman has for leaving this employment but what he says himself, that he could not bear the fatigue of it. It is said the King will be going for Holland about the 20th inst. Endorsed, R. 14, 98. 1 p. [Ibid. ff. 159–160.]
July 1.
Whitehall.
Newsletter. The three regiments of foot ordered for Ireland, viz: Fairfax, Greenville and Columbine, are now preparing for their embarkation.
This day the House of Lords heard the East India Company's counsel against the Bill for raising the two millions, as also counsel for the Bill, which took up several hours; and, after they were withdrawn, their Lordships had a long debate whether the Bill should be read a second time, which was resolved in the affirmative by 17; there being 65 for the Bill and 48 against it, including proxies. Endorsed, R. 14, 98. 2 pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 317–318.]
July 1–5. Journal of the House of Lords. 2 pp. [Ibid. ff. 319–320.]
July 1 and 2. Votes of the House of Commons. Numbs. 171 and 172. (Printed.) 2 pp. each. [Ibid. ff. 321–322.]
July 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Mr. Robt. Saunders, setting forth that Mr. Philip Owen obtained a special verdict against him in the Court of Common Pleas, since affirmed in the King's Bench. He prays a writ of error returnable in Parliament. Granted. [S.P.44. 238. p. 236.]
July 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Nehemiah Grew, doctor in physic, F.R.S., fellow of the college of physicians in London, setting forth that he invented the way of making the salt of the purging waters perfectly fine, and, with the approbation of the Royal Society and of the college of physicians, published a treatise in Latin of the nature and use hereof, whereby it may become the like general medicine in all other parts of the world, and praying a grant of letters patent. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [Ibid.]
July 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Adams, setting forth that Benjamin Alford, John Thomas and Mary Young have been for several years slaves under the king of Fez and Morocco; having received advice that they have agreed to give the king for their ransom 130 gun barrels and 2,000 gun locks, which are now bought, the petitioner prays a licence to put them on board one of the ships bound for the Mediterranean. Referred to the Admiralty. [Ibid. p. 240.]
July 1.
Kensington.
Commissions to, Mr. Benjamin Colinbine to be cornet of the colonel's troop in Major-General Leveson's regiment of horse [S.P.44. 167. p. 331]; Robert Brudenall, gent., to be adjutant to the regiment of foot commanded by Brigadier Fairfax [ibid. p. 334]; Mr. Roger Myvod to be adjutant of the second troop of horse guards; Mr. William Theophilus Wildigos to be brigadier of the same troop [ibid. p. 338]; Richard Morris, gent., to be lieutenant to Lieut. Col. George Carpenter's troop in MajorGeneral Richard Leveson's regiment of horse; Mr. John Brown to be surgeon of the second troop of horse guards. [ibid. p. 347].
July 1. Warrant for the apprehension of — Courtesell and — Morris for high treason, for going into the French king's dominions since 11 Dec., 1688, and returning without licence. [S.P.44. 349. p. 82.]
July 3.
Kensington.
Licence to Mr. Thomas Heskett, who went into the French king's dominions since 11 Dec., '88, to return. [S.P.44. 351. p. 57.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Heron. The enclosed petition of Capt. Dickenson having been laid before his Majesty this evening at the Cabinet Council, I am commanded to make enquiry whether the Royal African Company have given occasion to this complaint by refusing to stand to the reference they had consented to, while their Bill was depending in the two Houses of Parliament, which I believe you can inform me, and therefore I desire it may not be delayed. [S.P. 44. 99. p. 530.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Treasury. The King commands me to send you enclosed copy of a letter from the Admiralty on behalf of Capt. John Hartnell, that you may consider it and be as favourable to him as the case will admit. [Ibid.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
The same to the Earl of Romney. The Commissioners of Trade have represented that there is no powder remaining at the island of Bermudos; and that, 'they not being in a condition to furnish themselves,' ten barrels should be sent from the office of Ordnance, with a small quantity of cartridge paper, and two or three colours for the forts, which are likewise wanting, and, as they say, are usually provided by the office of Ordnance. (Cf. Cal. S.P. America and W. Indies, 1697–8, No. 708.) [Ibid. p. 531.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords of the Admiralty. A yacht is to be made ready forthwith to convey Count Bonde, the Swedish ambassador extraordinary, from the Thames to Hamburg. [S.P.44. 204. p. 186.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of James Isaacson, esq., William Coward, doctor in physic, Robt. Peter and Richard Carter, gentlemen, setting forth that they did about 2 years since invent and set up a new undertaking for supplying the defects of jointures by raising a stock of money, by way of mutual and voluntary contribution for a provision for widows, by securing the payment of £500 in ready money, or settling a real security for payment of £50 p. ann. on widows relict during their lives after the death of their husbands, called the Friendly Society of the joint stock of assurance for widows, which undertaking has been found to be of good and public use; and therefore praying an office may be erected, to be called the Office of insurance for widows by a friendly and mutual contribution, and that the said office may be granted to the petitioners and the persons concerned with them, to be exercised in such manner and subject to such rules and directions as has been used hitherto, and shall be directed and thought reasonable by his Majesty. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [S.P.44. 238. p. 239.]
July 4. Order by the House of Lords "that the order made on the 27th of January, 1696, for vacating all written protections, shall be forthwith printed and published" etc. Printed in the Journals of the House of Lords, XVI, p. 341. (Printed.) [S.P. 45. 13. No. 158.]
July 4. Journal of the House of Lords. (E. Huntingdon.) 1 p. [S.P.32. 10. f. 323.]
July 4. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 173. (Printed.) 2 pp. [Ibid. f. 324.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Caveat that nothing pass concerning a grant of the Pallace or Marshallsea Courts until notice be given to the duke of Devonshire. [S.P.44. 74. p. 8. and S.P.44. 75. p. 2.]
July 4.
The Hague.
Pass to John Gordon and James Mill, soldiers, late of Capt. Campbell's company in Lord Lorne's regiment, with a pass from Brigadier Belcastel, dated Ghent, June 28, '98. [S.P.44. 386. p. 17.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Hill. I have sent to Gravesend to enquire whether Read's ship be arrived and who is come in her; and, if there be any persons there who are come over contrary to the Act, that they may be secured.
I have read your letters to his Majesty but have no directions concerning Lady Strickland or her son. I hope they think of some other way of laying their petitions before his Majesty. I have already acquainted you for what reasons I think myself improper for it.
I hope you will stave off any retaliations upon our woollen manufacture. We have reproached one another for the late law they complain of, and in probabilty may retrieve it at the next Parliament. I look upon this as good as gone; though it be prorogued only at present, a dissolution is soon expected and that the writs issue for a new one. I suppose within a fortnight you may be expecting his Majesty on that side. (Copy). 1 p. [S.P. 32. 10. f. 325.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
The same to Capt. Nash, or other surveyor, at Gravesend. A ship called the Charity, one Read master, is coming from Dunkirk. You will search her and examine those on board. If you find Mackenzy, Capt. Harris, Nelson, White, Roper, Hereford, Mr. Perkins and his sister, and one Edwards, you will secure them and their papers. [S.P. 44. 99. p. 532.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to Lord Ambr. Williamson. Though the King has only prorogued Parliament for a month, it is believed they will be dissolved before that term, and the writs be sent down immediately after; to prevent the disorders that usually happen, when the competitors treat in the country, which cannot now be done after the Teste of the writs.
His Majesty will be speedily going for Holland, it is thought the 15th inst., though he has not yet declared himself on that subject.
The earl of Sunderland is expected next Thursday. The duke of Shrewsbury is much better, but I do not hear that he will come up before his Majesty goes. Endorsed, R. 19, 98. 3 pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 161–162.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to the same. The King will now appoint commissioners to take the new subscriptions, and I hope the two millions will be raised, considering how great a service it will be to the public. Everybody reckons the King's departure for Holland will be about the 21st inst. Mr. Blaithwayt is to attend him as formerly. Endorsed, R. 19th, 98. 1 p. [Ibid. ff. 163–164.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to the same. The duke of Newcastle, who was lately elected a knight of the Garter, is to be installed at Windsor on Thursday next in the usual manner. 2¼ pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 326–327.]
July 5. The King's speech to Parliament. (Printed.) 3 pp. [Ibid. ff. 328–329.]
July 5. List of the House of Commons. "Parliament summoned '95, as found July 5, '98." 11 pp. [Ibid. ff. 330–337.]
July 5. Votes of the House of Commons. Numb. 174. (Printed.) 4 pp. [Ibid. ff. 338–339.]
July 5. Warrant for the grant of the dignity of a baronet of England to Samuel Clarke, of Snailwell in the county of Cambridge, esq. [S.P. 44. 347. p. 211.]
July 5. Warrant for the apprehension of Stephen Smith and William Browne, for suspicion of treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 82.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Lords of the Treasury. I am to remind you of the petition of the widow of Clement Oxenbridge, who formerly had the management of the Post Office. You are to report whether it be fit to continue the allowance granted to her husband in consideration of the great sums expended by him in the settling of that office, as appears by a copy of the report enclosed of the present commissioners of the Post Office. [S.P.44. 99. p. 532.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir John Fleet. I am to enquire of you what the East India Company's intentions are as to their coming into the subscriptions pursuant to the late Act of Parliament. I desire to know where I may see you to-morrow morning, and I will come to you at what place and hour you appoint. [Ibid. p. 533.]
July 6.
Kensington.
Warrant to swear and admit Reinhard Vincent, Baron d'Hompesch, into the place of master of the hart-hounds and buck-hounds, with the fees, etc., as James de Gartigny, esq., held the same. [S.P.44. 347. p. 213.]
July 6.
Kensington.
Licence to Mr. Rowland Bellasis, who went into the French king's dominions since 11 Dec., 88, to return. [S.P.44. 351. p. 56.]
July 6. Post warrant for Sir Ch. Carteret, and two servants, to go to Milburne Port in Somersetshire. [S.P.44. 387.p. 154.]
July 7.
Kensington.
Proclamation dissolving the present parliament, which now stands prorogued to August 2nd next, and making known the King's intention to give directions to the Lord Chancellor for the issuing of writs for calling a new parliament, which shall begin on Wednesday, August 24th next. (Printed.) [S.P. 45. 13. No. 162.]
July 7.
Kensington.
The King to the Lords Justices of Ireland, upon the Address of the Commons about wool, etc., [reciting the Address of the English House of Commons respecting the woollen and linen manufactures in Ireland, voted on June 30, printed in their Journals, XII, p. 338] requiring them to 'enjoyn all those employed by us in Ireland to use their utmost diligence to hinder the exportation of wool from thence, except into England, and to discourage the woollen manufactures and encourage the linen manufactures in Ireland.' [S.P.44. 163. pp. 111–112.]
July 7.
Kensington.
The King to the Lords Justices of Ireland about the dependence of Ireland upon England, [reciting the Address of the English House of Commons respecting the constitutional dependence of Ireland, voted on June 30, printed in their Journals, XII, p. 337], and requiring them to give 'orders to prevent anything of the like nature for the future and the pernicious consequences of what is past, by punishing and discountenancing those that have been guilty thereof, and to take all necessary care that the laws which direct and restrain the Parliament of Ireland in their actings be strictly observed, and to discourage all things which may in any degree tend to lessen the dependence of Ireland upon England.' [S.P.44. 163. pp. 113–114.]
July 7.
Kensington.
Warrant confirming the election of Samuel Heathcot, gent., as town-clerk of the borough of Derby, in the room of John Bagnold, esq., deceased. [S.P.44. 347. p. 210.]
July 7.
Kensington.
Warrant for a grant of letters patent to Nehemiah Grew, doctor in physic, for inventing the way of making the salt of the purging waters perfectly fine, in large quantities and very cheap, so as to be commonly prescribed and taken as a general medicine. [Ibid. p. 212.]
July 7.
Kensington.
Warrant for a grant of letters patent to Edmund Heming, gent., for a new engine for sweeping the streets; also a new invention very useful for artillery-carriages, waggons and carts; also a new engine for mending the highways, throwing all the rising ridges into the ruts. [Ibid. p. 215.]
July 7.
The Hague.
Passes to Nich. Murray of Capt. Tankard's company in Col. Hough's regiment, being left in the hospital at Bruxels, and to James Take, late of Capt. Lyndsey's company in Col. Hamilton's regiment, being taken prisoner and carried to Geneva. [S.P.44. 386. p. 17.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to Lord Ambr. Williamson. A proclamation was ordered last night in council, and is published to-day, for dissolving Parliament, and calling a new one, which is to meet on 24th prox. The Teste of the writs will be on Wednesday next. This is very quick work: it is thought to prevent the inconveniences that usually happen at competition drinkings, which might be more dangerous in his Majesty's absence. The King goes to Windsor to-morrow and returns on Monday, and, as far as one can guess by his way of speaking, will set out for Holland this day sevenight.
The earl of Sunderland came to town last night, and was at the levee this morning. It is said he will not publicly appear in business again. Endorsed, R. 23, 98. 3 pp. [S.P. 32. 15. ff. 165–166.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to the same. The Lords Justices are not yet named. I believe they will be the same as last year, except Lord Sunderland, who I conclude will not enter again into any public station. Mr. Montague will be added to this commission, and it is expected he will have some honor conferred upon him; but it will be an Irish or Scotch title, that he may still continue in the House of Commons, where he [has] done his Majesty so much service. Endorsed, R. 23, 98. 1 p. [Ibid. ff. 167–168.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to the same. Everything is now preparing for his Majesty's departure for Holland, which it is said at Court may be in 8 or 10 days. His Majesty intends to go to-morrow to Windsor, but will return again the next day in the evening. Yesterday the Duke of Newcastle was installed at Windsor in the usual manner; and afterwards gave a splendid entertainment to the knights, and other persons of quality who assisted at the ceremony.
The Duke of Ormond is going for Ireland, and a yacht is appointed to carry him over. Lord Sunderland came to town yesterday.
His Majesty last night in council declared his pleasure for dissolving the present Parliament, and his intention to give directions for writs to issue for calling a new Parliament, to meet the 24th of August next. 1¼ p. [S.P.32. 10. f. 340.]
July 8.
St. James's.
J. Pulteney to Mr. Secretary Vernon. By direction of the Master General a search having been made into the Ordnance books for an account in what manner foreign ships of war coming into any of his Majesty's ports or passing by any of his Majesty's forts or castles used to be saluted before the late war, and whether any distinction hath formerly been made between ships of war belonging to the French king and those of other kings and princes, by the enclosed papers you will find what that search has produced, which, together with the original letter from the principal officers of the Ordnance upon that occasion, you will by the earl of Romney's direction herewith receive. [Ibid. ff. 341–342.]
July 7.
Officers of Ordnance
Annexed,
Officers of Ordnance to Mr. Pulteney. We can find nothing relating to any instructions as to saluting foreign men-ofwar before the year 1688, when an establishment touching salutes by guns to be observed in the navy was confirmed in council the 13th of July. There were other instructions of the 28th of September following, to be observed by governors, captains, etc., of castles, forts or blockhouses. The instructions of 1689 for land service, a printed copy whereof you have herewith, are agreeable with what was established in the reign of the late king. The 2nd article refers to the sea instructions. We have written to Portsmouth and Plymouth for information as to the practice before the war. Signed, C. Musgrave, Wm. Boulter, John Charlton. 2 pp. [Ibid. ff. 343–344.]
Annexed,
Copy of "An establishment touching salutes by guns to be henceforth observed in his Majesty's royal navy"; which had been made 22 June, 1688. Endorsed, Regulations about salutes at sea, 1688 to 1698. 6pp. [Ibid. ff. 345–350.]
July 8.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland to pay to the earl of Jersey, one of their number, one third part of the allowance of £6,952 6s. 8d. p. ann., and one-third of the deficit of certain fees. (Printed in the Calendar of Treasury Books, XIII, p. 379.) [S.O.1. 14. pp. 78–9.]
July 8.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the same for a grant of forfeited lands to William, earl of Rochfort, appending a schedule. (Printed in the Calendar of Treasury Books, XIII, pp. 379–382.) [Ibid. pp. 80–85.]
July 8.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the same for a grant of forfeited lands to Sir Edward Byron, appending a schedule. (Printed in the Calendar of Treasury Books, XIII, pp. 382–3.) [Ibid. pp. 86–7.]
July 8.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the same to accept a surrender from John Butcher of a grant of quit-rents, and to pass a fresh grant to him of quit-rents in Queen's County. (Printed in the Calendar of Treasury Books, XIII, p. 383.) [Ibid. pp. 88–9.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
The King's approbation of Sir Thomas Felton, Sir Thos. Spring, Sir John Castleton, Sir John Duke, Sir Robert Kemp, Sir Dudley Cullum, Sir Gervis Elwis, Sir Thomas Barnardiston and Sir Robert Rich, baronets, Sir George Winnive, Sir Richard Gipps, Sir John Robinson, knights, the hon. William Maynard, Charles Fox, John Harvey, Henry Poley, Compton Felton, Anthony Crofts, Henry Heveningham, Samuel Barnardiston, Richard Norton, James Colthrop, John Cornwallis, John Thurston, Thomas Glemham, Samuel Clarke, William Cropply, Charles Whitaker, Richard Allen alias Anguish, Tho. Neale, Roger Kenington and Richard Porter, esquires, to be deputy lieutenants of the county of Suffolk; and of Charles Whitaker, John Wade, Richard Pupplet and Charles Wright to be deputy lieutenants of the town and hamlets of Ipswich. [S.P.44. 167. p. 335.]
July 8.
Kensington.
Commission for Mr. Lewis Boniface to be ensign in Brigadier Belcastel's regiment. Memorandum.—Mr. Van Hals desired it might be given out with a blank for the company. [Ibid. p. 336.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the keeper of the gaol at Bedford. John Hall and another Irishman and a woman, who refuse to discover their names, have been lately taken and committed to your custody for dispersing counterfeit Exchequer bills. You are to keep them apart, and not to permit anyone to speak with them, except this bearer, Mr. Lionel Herne, who is sent to examine them. [S.P.44. 99. p. 533.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Christian Callow, Joan Browne, Jane Browne "etc.," poor convicts of Newgate and under sentence of death, praying they may be inserted in the next general pardon. Referred to Sir Salathiel Lovell, knt., Recorder of London. [S.P.44. 238. p. 241.]
July 9.
London.
Sir Miles Cooke to Sir Joseph Williamson at The Hague. You will by the prints of this post receive the news of the proroguing of the Parliament, in order (as some say) to a present dissolution; though I hope (for many of their sakes) they will have convenient time given them (as we give hares law, before we start the greyhounds) for them to refit, and a little provide against their creditors; for in so long a service of their country, and absence from home, they must needs have contracted great debts and (I think) ought to be protected as long as this Parliament can last. Against the next there is more eating, and drinking, and riding, and writing, than against any Parliament that I can remember, and more competitors than ever were known. In some counties a dozen declare for the sheire. But in Glostersheire we have but halfe a dousen, viz: Sir Ralph Dutton and Mr. Stevens (last chose), Sir Richard Cocks, Sir John Guise, Jacke How and Thom. Chester (as yet the odds of the bets run for the two later).
You will see by the King's Speech what an encomium he gives the last Parliament; that they ought to be the emulation of succeeding Parliaments. But for my part (almost all fownds for raising of money being anticipated) I fear hereafter (unless they be admirable chimists) they will hardly be able to find out ways and means to raise another 6 millions (which will be as much wanted as the last). For the last 2 millions rose very heavily, by ruining the old East India Company, against which 22 of the Lords' House have in their books entered a bitter protestation.
The French smugglers were fined according to their respective substance, and not altogether according to their crimes; though the two first that were fined, one of them £10,000 and the other £3,000, proved to be most guilty as well as most rich. But the £19,500 will make a good progress in the building of Greenwich Hospital, to which it is given upon the advice of both Houses of Parliament.
My lady Manchester is, we fear, now fatching her last breath. Mr. Montagu will be a mournful widower, were there no other wives to be had. I hear he will speedily be an Irish viscount, but still of the House of Commons, where he will be wanted at the helm. We talk of many removes (up and down) and there will be a general rout amongst the Commissioners of Excise.
[P.S.] Your friend Mr. Sloane hath escaped a scouring by shifting off the report of the last free conference. Endorsed, July 9. R. 25, 98. 2pp. [S.P.32. 10. f. 351.]
July 9.
Kensington.
Licence to Sir Christopher Wren, knt., surveyor general; reciting that he 'hath not only with expense of much time and charge but also with great truth and exactness, according to the rules of art, delineated, described, and accurately engraven on copper several designs of the cathedral church of St. Paul's, London, as it is rebuilt and to be finished, and is proceeding to complete several other views and ornaments of the said church, and also the several parochial churches of London rebuilt since the conflagration in 1666, together with several of our royal palaces, viz: Winton, Hampton Court, our royal hospital of Chelsey and Greenwich, with all other as well public as private works, designed by the said Sir Chr. Wren, which are or shall be hereafter performed by his care and conduct'; and granting to him the exclusive right of printing and publishing the delineations and descriptions for 15 years. [S.P.44. 347. p. 383.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Hyacinth Darcy, setting forth that in the beginning of the late troubles in Ireland he, to preserve his house and stock, and at the request of his protestant neighbours to preserve them from Rapperies etc., raised a company of foot, which was never in any service, but upon his Majesty's accession to the throne and declaration in April, 1689, promising pardon and enjoyment of estate to such as should lay down their arms, dispersed the company and lived peaceably at home submitting to H.M. government and taking the oath of allegiance. He is neither indicted nor outlawed and prays pardon. Referred to the Lords Justices of Ireland. [S.P.44. 238. p. 241.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Patrick French, esq., of Cloghballimore, co. Galway, setting forth that he was very serviceable in the late troubles in Ireland, as appears by annexed copies of original papers of General Ginckle. Upon the surrender of Galway the said general promised, in his Majesty's behalf, that the petitioner should have his estate in consideration of his good services. An estate of about £70 or £80 p. ann. in debts and mortgages belonged to the petitioner, and was in his possession all the time of the said surrender and has continued so ever since, which came to him as brother and heir to Chr. French, who died in the rebellion, but was neither indicted nor outlawed. The said estate is the considerable part of his substance, but by the late Act, for confirming outlawries etc. in Ireland, those that died in rebellion are attainted, and the petitioner therefore in danger of losing what he enjoys in right of his brother. He prays a grant of the forfeiture of his said brother and a commission of enquiry. Referred to the Lords of the Treasury. [Ibid. p. 242.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Nicholas Arcedeckney, of Carrowmore, co. Galway, gent., setting forth that he bore neither civil nor military employment since April 10th, 1689, except that of marshal of the said county, which his protestant neighbours desired him to undertake for their preservation and to suppress robbers and Rapperies, as appears by certificate; and that he submitted and took the oaths of allegiance as soon as his Majesty's arms reached his habitation, where he continued during the war and without offence. He prays a pardon. Referred to the Lords Justices of Ireland. [Ibid. p. 243.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Richard Power of Ballindrumney, co. Galway, setting forth that he has had no employment in Ireland since April 10th, 1689, military or civil, but that of justice of peace, which he made use of in the late war for the preservation of his protestant neighbours, as appears by an annexed certificate. He submitted as soon as he could come under his Majesty's protection. He prays a pardon. Referred to the Lords Justices of Ireland. [Ibid. p. 244.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Robert French of Rahastane, esq., setting forth that before the late war, and at the time of the siege and rendition of Galway, he was a native, freeman and alderman thereof, and was employed in H.M. service by the Earl of Athlone, and that his lordship, upon the rendition of the town, gave it under his hand and seal that the petitioner should have the benefit of the said articles as appears by the original paper. That he had no employment during the late war in Ireland, only that of a justice of peace, which he had by commission before King James's abdication, and exercised it afterwards for the preservation of his protestant neighbours. He has been an equal sufferer with the protestants by the loss of his estate, which he purchased under the Acts of Settlement by the pretended Act of Repeal. He prays a pardon. Referred to the Lords Justices of Ireland. [Ibid. p. 245.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Mathew Bridges, knt., setting forth that about 25 July, 1683, Mr. Robt. Bridges, of Dublin, borrowed of Mr. Patrick Dowdall the sum of £700, and prevailed with the petitioner to become bound with him for payment, with interest. Part of the principal and all the interest was paid about 1688. Dowdall became a forfeiting person, being concerned in the late rebellion. He prays a grant of the forfeiture of the sum of £400 remaining unpaid, his losses in Ireland being very great in consequence of the rebellion. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid. p. 247.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Col. Tho. Butler, setting forth that he, being very young at the breaking out of the late troubles in Ireland, was prevailed upon to accept a command in the Irish army, and at the surrender of Limerick went to France. In March, 1694, he quitted that service and presented himself to the Duke of Ormond in Flanders, hoping thereby to be admitted to his Majesty's favour. He has lived peaceably ever since in Ireland. He prays a pardon. Referred to the Lords Justices of Ireland. [Ibid. p. 248.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Aonora Dempsey, widow, setting forth that James Dempsey, her husband, in consideration of a marriage portion, had with her in the year 1665, did article with Mr. Tho. Brown, her father, to purchase and settle lands of inheritance in Ireland to the value of £500 a year; whereof £200 should be for her jointure, and the residue to the use of James Dempsey for life with remainder in tail to the issue of the marriage; and he was by the articles obliged to settle a considerable personal estate on the petitioner; for performance whereof he gave Tho. Brown judgment in debt for £10,000, which still remains on record in Ireland unsatisfied. James Dempsey, soon after, purchased a small estate in Ireland, to the value of £120 p. ann., as part of her jointure; and further, in 1682, lent at interest to the late Lord Santry £900, on mortgage of some lands in co. Meath, which he lent, in the name of Tho. Brown and Patrick Allen and Michael Chamberlayne, in trust for her, if it should be so declared by deed duly executed before 25 Dec., 1685; "but, that being omitted by neglect, the mortgage in strictness of law is become forfeited to your Majesty; Michael Chamberlayne and James Dempsey being since both outlawed for high treason." She prays a grant of the said mortgage and interest on trust for her children. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P.44. 238. p. 252.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Lieut. Maurice Warren, setting forth that his father, John Warren, was seized in fee of the lands of Kilane Ballylein Ballynally and Vrny Ballan and Congyer Coppah Water Garryart Auchclare Collinseegan Ballykinen Luniagh and Ballure in co. Carlow worth £70 p. ann. All the petitioner's family were protestants, except the father and one brother now in France. His eldest brother was a captain in Earle's regiment, and died at Dundalk. The petitioner has faithfully served in the army during the war, and is now lieutenant in Coote's regiment, and is actually in possession of the estate, being all that is left to the family. Though the petitioner's father was not outlawed, yet his brother, who is in France, is (if alive) become attainted by a late Act of Parliament; and, he being elder than the petitioner, the patrimony, though he was never seized, will become forfeited. The petitioner prays for a grant and confirmation of the estate to himself, notwithstanding the forfeiture of his brother, if alive. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid. p. 257.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Capt. Tho. Burke, setting forth that he commanded a party of men in the castle of Tyaquin, and, after the battle of Aghrim, being summoned to surrender the same and promised the benefit of the Lords Justices' proclamation of 7 June, 1691, he thereupon surrendered the castle and submitted. The Earl of Athlone afterwards confirmed to the petitioner under his hand, on the back of the proclamation 'annexed to the petition,' all the advantages promised by the same, which promise he has lately certified under his hand. This certificate 'is likewise annexed.' Mr. Clarke, then Secretary of War, also certifies the same, by 'his letter annexed.' The petitioner is neither indicted nor outlawed. He prays for a pardon pursuant to the said proclamation. Referred to the Lords Justices of Ireland. [Ibid. p. 264.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Peter Blake of Corbally, co. Galway, setting forth that he never bore any employment during the late war in Ireland; other than that of a justice of the peace, which he did at the request of his protestant neighbours for their protection. He was never indicted or outlawed; and [is] therefore capable of his Majesty's mercy, pursuant to the proclamation of 22 Feb., 1688. He prays a general pardon. Referred to the Lords Justices of Ireland. [Ibid. p. 268.]
July 9.
Kensington.
Warrant to the privy council of Scotland, reciting that the King is informed that the earl of Tullibardine has, since his last coming to Scotland, been present at council and exchequer: that the King had only nominated him to the privy council and exchequer as principal Secretary of State, 'which office he has now dimitted.'
Notice is to be given to the earl that he is no more a member of the privy council or exchequer. [S.P.57. 17. p. 39.]
July 9.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland to divide £15 between John Pollock, John More and Robert Stobo, serjeants, and to enrol them amongst the invalids. [Ibid. pp. 39–40.]
July 9.
The Hague.
Passes to Willm. Hendricks, an Irishman, of Capt. Quein's company in Col. Keppel's regiment in the States' service, having a discharge from the colonel, dated Zutphen, Feb. 25, '98: and to Thomas Mackbalester, Scotch soldier, of Capt. Preston's company in Col. Lauder's regiment in the States' service, with a discharge dated Breda, May 31, '98. [S.P.44. 386. p. 18.]
July 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the apprehension of Thomas Sherman and — Sherman his wife, for suspicion of high treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 82.]
July 10.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Attorney General [sending a draft of a privy seal for determining the East India Company within three years, to be settled with the Solicitor General, and to be brought to the Council on Wednesday]. Mr. Lowndes has drawn it as if the three years were to be accounted from the date of the privy seal, but Mr. Montague thinks it would be more agreeable to the Act of Parliament if they were reckoned from the 29th September next. [S.P.44. 99. p. 534.]
July 10.
Whitehall.
The same to the Solicitor General, to the like effect. [Ibid.]
July 10.
Whitehall.
The same to the Recorder of London. I have laid your report about the women convicts before the King, who commanded me to speak with you on this subject. [Ibid. p. 535.]
July 10.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland, reciting that Henry Crofton of Longford, co. Sligo, has represented to the King by petition that he is expressly provided for by the articles made for the surrender of Sligo, and that he, being a captain of foot in the Earl of Clanricard's regiment and in Galway with the regiment at the time of the surrender thereof, is likewise included in those articles: that he, being thus doubly entitled to our pardon and the enjoyment of his estate, preferred his claim to the Articles of Galway for despatch, in order to have his outlawry reversed, there being then no claim heard to the Articles of Sligo, but that upon a hearing he was adjudged not to be comprised within the Articles of Galway by the mistake of one witness, who said that the petitioner was a prisoner of war at the time of the surrender of Galway, though re vera he was not, 'as appears by affidavits annexed to his petition': that thereupon he petitioned our then Justices and Council of Ireland for a re-hearing, which they did not comply with, but ordered the petitioner to come on his claim to the Articles of Sligo which give him equal benefit; that no claim has yet been heard to the Articles of Sligo, and the petitioner is the only person that claims the benefit thereof: that upon his representation of these matters to our late justice, Sir Charles Porter, he, upon a report from our Attorney General there, did by an instrument under his hand order that the petitioner should not be molested in the enjoyment of his estate on account of his outlawry, and further that upon his petition to you and our Council of Ireland for a saving in the Act, lately passed for hindering the reversal of outlawries, you ordered a proviso to be inserted for the reversal of the petitioner's outlawry, which proviso is now in the Act: that he prays us to order the reversal of his outlawry.
The warrant directs the Lords Justices to admit Henry Crofton to bring a writ of error for the reversal of the outlawry. [S.O.1. 14. pp. 79–80.]
July 10.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the same, reciting that Edward, Lord Athenry, and John Kelly, son and heir of Lieut. Col. John Kelly, decd., have by petition to the King represented that the petitioner, Lord Athenry, and Lieut. Col. John Kelly, being outlawed on account of the rebellion, are both provided for by the articles for the surrender of Boffin, which have been ratified by us, and, by express names, are thereby to enjoy their estates and to have a general pardon: that our present parliament in Ireland have, in an Act lately passed for hindering the reversal of outlawries, provided for the reversal of the outlawries of Lord Athenry and Lieut. Col. Kelly: that the petitioners pray us to order the reversal, and to grant a pardon to Lord Athenry.
The warrant requires the Lords Justices to admit Edward, Lord Athenry, to prosecute a writ of error for the reversal of his outlawry; and to admit John Kelly to do the same to reverse his father's outlawry; and to pass letters patent containing a free pardon to the former. [Ibid. pp. 89–90.]
July 10.
Kensington.
Royal warrant for the payment of £20 'to the gentlemen of our Chapel Royal, in lieu of three deer which of custom we have been pleased yearly to grant unto them.' [S.P.44. 347. p. 216.]
July 11.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Lords of the Treasury. The Swedish ambassador apprehends some difficulty in carrying out the plate that he brought for his own and his lady's use. He may be allowed this liberty. [S.P.44. 99. p. 535.]
July 11.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Benjamin Ayloffe. I am to speak with you and some of the Russia Company in relation to the persons concerned in the contract with the Czar about importing tobacco into Muscovy. [Ibid. p. 536.]
July 11. Warrant for the apprehension of Mary, wife of Tho. Johnson, for suspicion of high treason, and likewise to search for and seize a counterfeit copper plate and seal for printing and sealing Exchequer bills. [S.P.44. 349. p. 83.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Hill. I have laid your letters before his Majesty that he may see how disingenuously as well as injudiciously some of our foreign ministers have writ to their principals. I believe we shall hear the same from other places, but I took care the same night to get all our ministers rightly informed. I very much suspected these catholic ministers would send over extravagant accounts, and I told them so after the post was gone; but they denied it, and said they had only related the bare fact. We have done nothing more yet to exasperate them. I think they have been modester ever since in admitting people to their chapels; they open wickets now, instead of folding doors. I tell them the King takes it for granted that none of them doth entertain any of his subjects for their chaplains; but if any such be found here there is no protection will rescue them from the law.
I hope to get Mr. Cusack a licence and that we may live in a good correspondence together here. But, that you may see with what care these indulgences ought to be granted, I send you enclosed the copy of a letter writ by one that solicited you for your interposition; wherein he sends an account to St. Germains what he designed by asking this favour, and who put him upon it. His friends here, who were very importunate for him before, now make their excuses.
I see no likelihood that his Majesty will be going sooner than Tuesday next.
Our marechall of the ceremonies, Monsr. De Bas, hath had an old controversy with Monsr. Fonseca, and complains that no justice can be had against him in that country. I know not how the laws are executed there, but I think the gentleman is very honest and of our acquaintance, and therefore I believe you need only speak to him and he will do what is fair.
I have heard nothing more from Baron Simeoni about Mr. Wholseley's debts. However I will enquire whether anything be due to him from the Treasury. 2½ pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 352–353.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
The same to the Attorney General. With reference to the enclosed letter of the Postmaster General, concerning taking away the mails and destroying of letters, the King commands you to prepare such a proclamation as is therein mentioned for reward or pardon to the discoverer. [S.P.44. 99. p. 536.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
The same to the mayor of Chester. I have yours of the 9th inst. Care shall be taken speedily to remove Joy, Jennings and Brady to this town, and to bring the four parcels with them.
As to the charges the sheriffs of your city have been at, you may send me an account, if there be no other way. [S.P.44. 99. p. 537.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Leigh at North court in the Isle of Wight. I have yours of the 4th inst. concerning Mary Hobbes and her deposition against James Taylor of Bridgewater; and, finding by discourse with the warden of the Mint that her evidence will be very useful against Taylor and Vandavat, I have sent a messenger to bring her here. [Ibid.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to Lord Ambr. Williamson. The King went on Saturday to Windsor, and returned to Kensington the next day. To-morrow the council is to meet, when the writs for a new Parliament will be ordered to be sent out, and they are to bear date the same day.
The commission appointing persons to take the new subscriptions to the 2 millions will be opened on Thursday, and the subscriptions begun. The horses and equipage of his Majesty's servants are now shipping. Endorsed, R. 25, 98. 1 p. [S.P. 32. 15. ff. 169–170.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to the same. His Majesty intends to go towards Holland on this day sevenight at furthest, but it is not yet said who he will leave in the government; as soon as I know I shall give you notice of it, as likewise of the secretary who is to attend them. We are very doubtful of the king of Spain's health. Endorsed, R. 25, 98. 3 pp. [Ibid. ff. 171–172.]
July 12.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland, reciting that Robert Feilding, esq., has by petition to the King represented that he is outlawed in Ireland on account of the late rebellion: that he is thereby debarred from the recovery of several debts due to him on mortgage: that he prays us to order the reversal of the outlawry pursuant to a proviso in the Act lately passed for hindering the reversal of outlawries.
The warrant requires the Lords Justices to admit Robert Fielding to prosecute a writ of error for the reversal of the outlawry. [S.O.1. 14. p. 80.]
July 12.
Kensington.
Licence to Piercy Markham, gent., who went into the French king's dominions since 11 Dec., 88, to return. [S.P.44. 351. p. 56.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Caveat that nothing pass relating to a pardon for Edward Wicks, alias Deacamb, a convict in Newgate, without notice to Mr. Adrian Goodyer at Mr. Gwens an attorney in Ship Yard in Bartholomew Lane. [S.P.44. 75, p. 2.]
July 12.
Kensington.
Warrant to insert Christian Callow, Jane Browne, Elizabeth Smith, Elizabeth Low, Elizabeth Barenclough, Mary Tayler, Mary Sheppard, Ann Richardson and Elizabeth Hall in the next general pardon for the poor convicts of Newgate, with condition of transportation. They had been sentenced to death at the Old Bailey for various offences. [S.P.44. 347. p. 224.]
July 12.
Kensington.
Warrant for a pardon to Peter Barrailleau and Dinah Mason, of all treasons and offences by reason of their having traded or corresponded with France since the beginning of the late war. [Ibid. p. 234.]
July 12. Warrant for the apprehension of Mary Hobbs, for suspicion of treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 83.]
July 13.
Kensington.
Warrant for determining the charter of the East India Company: reciting, that by letters patent, of 28th Sept., 6 William and Mary, it was directed that if it should appear that two charters in the said letters patent mentioned, bearing date the 7th of October and 11th of November then last past, or any other charters granted to the company, should not be profitable to the Crown or realm, then, upon three years warning to be given to the company, the said letters patent and other charters should cease and determine, and the company after the three years should not continue to be a corporation.
The King by the advice of the privy council gives the company the required warning, and declares that after the end of the three years the company shall not continue to be a corporation. [S.P.44. 347. p. 219.]
July 13.
Kensington.
Warrant for the grant of the dignity of a baronet of England to Thomas Powell of Broadway, co. Carmarthen, esq. [Ibid. p. 216.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the payment of certain sums expended by Sir Paul Rycaut, resident for his Majesty with the Hanseatic towns of the Lower Saxony, from Jan. 1, 1697–8, to July 1, 1698. [Ibid. p. 227.]
July 13.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland for granting the dignity of a baronet of the kingdom of Ireland to Thomas Vesey, esq., eldest son of the Archbishop of Tuam. [S.O.1. 14. p. 90.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Mary Piggatt, setting forth that her husband, being captain of dragoons in Londonderry during the siege, lost his goods and cattle, to the value of £700, by the enemy, to his ruin, "as appears by certificate, and your petitioner and 5 children, being in great want, must perish without his Majesty's relief." Referred to the Treasury. [S.P.44. 238. p. 249.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Col. Cornelius Wood, setting forth that upon his petition, 3 years ago, his Majesty referred him to the government of Ireland to report what might be done for him in the estate of one Levalline of that kingdom; the King having promised the petitioner a grant of that estate. (fn. 2) But as it has not yet been recovered into his Majesty's possession, he could not proceed further, but still has hopes. He prays for a grant of the said estate when recovered or to be reprized out of the land 'in the annexed schedule,' if no title can be made out to his Majesty for the estate of Levalline. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. 44. 238. p. 250.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Henry Almut, esq., setting forth that Christian Smaittle brought an action in ejectment against him and others in the King's Bench, and obtained judgment, affirmed in the Court of Exchequer upon a writ of error. He prays a writ of error returnable to Parliament. Granted, July 14. [Ibid. p. 251.]
July 13. Cassandra Roberts to Sir Joseph Williamson at The Hague. She asks for a loan, to purchase her freedom and to settle her in the world again: and offers the lease of a house at Tunbridge Wells. Endorsed, R. 28, 98. Mrs. Roberts. 1 p. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 354–355.]
July 14.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland, reciting that Charles II by letters patent, dated at Dublin, 21 Aug., 1677, granted to Sir Robert Southwell, John Percivall and William Blathwayt the offices of clerk of the Crown, of prothonotory and clerk of the common pleas and keeper of the writs etc.; to hold during the lives of the said Percivall and Blathwayt, and of the survivor after the determination of former patents granted to Philip Savage and Richard Ryves: that Ryves is dead and Savage in possession, that Percivall is deceased, and Southwell and Blathwayt surviving patentees have surrendered their interest.
The warrant directs the Lords Justices to pass letters patent granting the said offices to Edward Southwell, esq., to hold for life, after the death of Philip Savage or the determination of the former patent granted to Savage and Ryves. [S.O.1. 14. pp. 90–1.]
July 14.
The Hague.
Passes to Alexander Blair and Joshua Tatlock, soldiers, both of Lord Strathnaver's regiment in garrison at Maestricht under command of Major Wood, from whom they bring discharges; and to Alexander Ouill, Scotchman, taken prisoner at Dyxmuyde and making his escape to Strasburg and thence to Cologne, with a passport from the States' Resident there. [S.P.44. 386. p. 18.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
Post warrant for John Verhaest, harbinger yeoman to his Majesty, for two post horses from London to Margate. [S.P.44. 387. p. 154.]
July 14.
Kensington.
Warrant for the pardon of Lieut. John Reed of murder, concerning the death of Lieut. Thomas Spencer. [S.P.44. 347. p. 218.]
July 15.
Kensington.
Newsletter to Lord Ambassador Williamson. His Majesty on Wednesday at council gave orders for issuing out the writs for calling a new Parliament, which were put under the great seal that afternoon, and will be despatched to the several counties with all expedition.
The same day the charter for settling the East India trade by a joint stock was read and approved in council, and his Majesty ordered that notice be given to the old company to dissolve them after the expiration of 3 years.
That afternoon the East India Company held a general court, and it was proposed to them that powers should be given to the select committee which consists of 52 persons, or the major part of them, to subscribe in the name of the company towards raising the two millions, or not to subscribe, as they shall judge most for the company's interest; which was agreed to.
The books for taking the new subscriptions were opened yesterday in London at Mercers Hall, where was all day a great crowd of subscribers.
There is much talk of an alteration in the commission of the excise, but I know nothing of it with any certainty.
The two persons that were lately chosen sheriffs of London having fined, the Common Hall met on Tuesday last to proceed to a new election, and made choice of Mr. Samuel Shephard and Mr. Gilbert Heathcott, who its thought will fine likewise.
We have an account of the death of the Marquis of Worcester by an unfortunate accident, who riding abroad in his coach in the country, the horses were frighted and fell a running, and he thereupon leaping out of the coach the wheels run over him and killed him.
The King has put off his departure for Holland till the beginning of the next week.
The new subscriptions go on with such success that this evening there was subscribed above a million. Endorsed, R. 28, 98. 2½ pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 356–357.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to the same. To-morrow morning is a great council at Kensington, and then we suppose the Lords Justices will be named. Endorsed, R. 28, 98. 2 pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 173–174.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Charles, earl of Macclesfield, and John Harrington of Kelston in Somerset, esq., setting forth that Sir James Harrington and his brother Sir Robert, ancestor of the petitioner John Harrington, having by Act of Parliament, 1 H. 7, been attainted of high treason for joining with Richard the 3rd, and all their estate in fee simple or tail forfeited to the Crown, it being found by divers inquisitions that Sir James was seized in fee of divers manors and hereditaments in the counties of York, Lancaster and Westmorland, all the estate of Sir James so forfeited was granted to Sir Edward Stanly, who had married a daughter of that family, and to the heirs male of his body, but the reversion of all except as therein is excepted was in the 13th of H. 8th granted to one James Harrington and the heirs male of his body, which letters patent were surrendered to the Crown and vacated in the 6th of Queen Elizabeth, and a new grant taken to Stephen Harrington and the heirs male of his body, with remainders over to his two brothers, who all joined in a surrender of that grant, which was likewise vacated in the 12th of Queen Elizabeth, and a new grant was taken to John Harrington, great-grandfather of the petitioner John Harrington; but the estate tail granted to Sir Edward Stanly not being determined till the 23rd year of the Queen, of which the petitioner's ancestor seems not to have had notice, several purchasers under the said Sir Edward Stanly, or his son, with full knowledge of the reversion in the Crown, were suffered to continue the undue possession of that estate without interruption till the reign of King Charles I, when the petitioner's father made an agreement upon a valuable consideration to surrender his interest to the Crown; several of the possessors of the premises were prosecuted in the King's name, of which some offered compositions, and it appeared that others had no title; but, the troubles coming on, neither the Crown nor the said petitioner's father had opportunity to recover the possession, and soon after the Restoration the late earl of Macclesfield, since deceased, father of the petitioner the present earl, obtained a grant of the premises from his then Majesty to hold to himself, his executors, administrators and assigns, for 51 years from 1st Aug. in the 16th of that king, rendering to the Crown the 8th part of the improved yearly value of what should be recovered at the expense of him the deceased earl; in pursuance whereof the deceased earl expended great sums of money and prosecuted divers suits in the Court of Exchequer, but was defeated from having any effect of such suit, because of the entail, to which the other petitioner is heir.
Now forasmuch as the petitioners are agreed to surrender all their right in the premises by fine or otherwise, as his Majesty shall think fit, and that it is contrary to law and reason that the remainder in the Crown should be of no benefit or effect to the Crown or patentees, may it please your Majesty to accept a surrender of the premises, and to grant the petitioners or either of them such an estate and interest therein as your Majesty shall think fit. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P.44. 238. pp. 262–4.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Attorney General. I send you the case of Col. Rice, for opinion whether he falls under the late Act of Parliament against corresponding with the late King. [S.P.44. 99. p. 538.]
July 15.
Kensington.
Warrant for a grant to Sir Thomas Travell of the place of lieutenant of the island and captain of the castle of Portland, co. Dorset, with the nomination of 13 persons under him in the said castle for the more sure custody thereof, viz: two porters, six gunners and five soldiers; the said captain to receive a daily fee of 16d., the head porter 8d., the under porter 6d., the master gunner 8d., every other gunner and the five soldiers 6d. apiece: to hold the said place during pleasure, in as ample a manner as Wadham Strangways and Bonham Strangways, esqs., held the same. [S.P.44. 167. p. 336.]
July 15.
Kensington.
Warrant to George Clarke, esq., judge advocate general, for the holding of a court martial to try Captain Wolfran Cornwall of the royal regiment of horse under command of Aubrey, earl of Oxford, on a charge of making false musters: the court to consist of such officers as can be conveniently summoned, any six of whom, with the president, shall form a quorum. Major-General Henry Lumley shall be president. The court is authorised to take information by affidavits and also to hear witnesses; and shall give judgment and sentence according to the articles of war, putting the sentence into execution according to the rules and method of military discipline. [Ibid. p. 339.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Post warrants for William Blathwayt, esq., his Majesty's Secretary at War, from London to Margate: Sir Bevill Granville, knt., from London to Pendennis, and thence to Bideford or nearest passage to Ireland: Adam Cardonnel, esq., from London to Margate: Sir Tho. Travell, knt., from London to Weymouth and thence to Sherburne. [S.P.44. 387. p. 155.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Pass for Captain Devenish, 'gent. of the horse to the Baron de Simeoni, envoy extraordinary from the Elector of Bavaria,' two of his grooms and six horses, to Holland or Flanders. [Ibid.]
July 15.
The Hague.
Pass to Richard Evans, groom to Mr. Richausse one of the King's equerries, having brought out of England [sic] to Monsr. Slingerland, as appears by a note from Monsr. Eschacht, his Majesty's Stalmaster here. [S.P.44. 386. p. 18.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Post warrant for Mr. Richd. Burnley, to go to York. [S.P. 44. 387. p. 142.]
July 15. Warrants for the apprehension of William Brookes, — Cooper and — Essex, for suspicion of treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 83.]
July 16.
Kensington.
Warrant reciting that the Elector of Hanover and duke of Zell have directed the history of the House of Brunswick to be written; and directing the keeper of the records of the exchequer at Westminster to permit Frederick August Hackman, employed by them for that purpose, to search the records for matters relating to the family of Brunswick and take copies, to be attested if he should desire it. Memorandum. 'A like warrant and of the same date was directed to the keeper of the records in the Tower of London.' [S.P.44. 347. p. 304.]
July 16.
Kensington.
Licence, granting to William Briggs, doctor in physic and the King's sworn physician in ordinary, the exclusive right of printing and publishing, for 15 years, a large volume, containing an anatomical description of all the parts of the human body, with a new discovery of their wonderful schematisms, "which being finished by him with the approbation of several eminent physicians of our royal college in London, he intends to print and publish, with necessary tables and figures for the illustration thereof, cut and engraved by the best masters exactly as they appear to the eye." [S.P.44. 347. p. 378.]
July 16.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of George Dodington, paymaster to the Earl of Orford, treasurer of the navy, setting forth that it has been an ancient usage, and is now practised in the treasury office of the navy, for the agents of the treasurer of the navy to retain to their own use 12d. in the £ of all deductions, viz: slop-clothes, deadmens-clothes, tobacco, chest etc., abated on the ships or yard books etc., except abatements for embezzlements, or loss of stores, or to make good victualling and money imprested on account of wages, and likewise except what belongs to the chest at Chatham, which now allows but 4d. in the £. Several persons of late years have disputed the allowing the 12d. in the £, threatening to bring him before Parliament for insisting on the custom. If this perquisite should cease this employment will become a further charge to his Majesty, there being little or no other compensation for all the charges, pains and hazard.
He prays for a confirmation of the perquisite during pleasure. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P.44. 238. p. 253.]
July 16.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Jane Fox, widow of Bryan Fox late surgeon of the Sussex, setting forth that her husband was cast away with Sir Francis Wheeler. The petitioner was forced to pay £118, since his death, for his chest of medicines. She has a child and mother-in-law to provide for. She prays for payment of the £118, or other relief. Referred to the Admiralty. [Ibid. p. 266.]
July 16.
Kensington.
Warrant for a grant to George Golding, esq., of the office of provost martial of Jamaica, as fully as John Blancard, esq., held the same. [S.P.44. 347. p. 230.]
July 16.
Kensington.
Warrant for a grant to Lawrence Booth of the office of constable of the castle of Chester for his life, upon the surrender of letters patent of 2 Charles II, whereby Thomas Hunt was appointed constable. [Ibid. p. 231.]
July 16.
Kensington.
Licence to Lady Marina Philips and her two servants Elizabeth Catway and John Murphey, who went into the French king's dominions since 11 Dec., 1688, to return. [S.P.44. 351. p. 57 and S.O.3. 20. f. 154 v.]
July 17.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Oliver Martin, esq., setting forth that he never was in arms or employment, civil or military, in Ireland, except that of a justice of peace, which he took at the desire of his protestant neighbours, to whom he was very serviceable during the late rebellion, 'as appears by certificates annexed,' Though he was not in any wise concerned in the rebellion, yet he was indicted and outlawed for high treason. He was employed by the earl of Athlone at the siege of Galway, and was declared by the earl, by an instrument under his hand, to be comprised in the Articles of Galway, but his claim to the same has been of late brought into doubt. He is advised to put himself upon the King's clemency, without any strict reliance on the Articles. He prays the King to order him to be declared within the Articles, or to pardon him; he also prays a grant of his forfeited estate, and that no commission of enquiry for his Majesty or seizure do in the meantime issue.
Referred to the Lords Justices of Ireland, to examine the allegations, and, if they find the petitioner's case to be such as is represented by the certificates of the English protestants, they are to inform the King by what method his favour may be shown to the petitioner by a pardon and the grant of his forfeiture, without making a breach into the settlement of that kingdom: his Majesty intending that the settled method of proceeding upon claims relating to the Articles of Galway shall not, upon such petitions as these, be changed or evaded. And in the meantime [no] proceedings to the petitioner's prejudice are to be had against him. [S.P.44. 238. pp. 255–256.]
July 17.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Richard Smith, quartermaster, Richard Pitman, corporal, Thomas Smith and Morgan Morgans, able seamen, late belonging to the Portsmouth galley, on behalf of themselves and the rest of the crew, setting forth that they served in the galley 6 years (for which 4 years' wages is now due to them) in which they took 36 prizes, and had several commanders killed in engagements. The galley was taken off of Beachy in October, 1696, by 4 of the enemies' ships, for which the commissioned officers were tried and mulcted their wages, and the petitioners' wages are also stopped by the Admiralty, though they obeyed command and quitted not their posts, 'as appears by affidavits.' They pray that their wages be paid. Referred to the Admiralty. [Ibid. p. 260.]
July 17.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Francis de Souligné, grandson of Mr. Duplessis Morney, setting forth that he came out of France for his religion, about 15 years since, stripped of all. Before the late happy revolution in England he employed himself in Holland to translate into French such English books as represented the ill conduct of the late king, which were afterwards turned into several languages, which he did gratis, out of a mere affection to the good cause. Being afterwards come over into England with his Majesty upon the late expedition, he was allowed the pay of a reformed lieutenant of foot, viz., 2 shillings a day, which, because of its smallness and 28 months in arrear, has reduced him to great straits. He has notwithstanding all the while written several works very useful to the State, among others that which demonstrates the Desolation of France. He is at present upon another work for the service and honour of the government. He prays the King to grant him a subsistence to relieve him from his misery. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P.44. 238. p. 265.]
July 17.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland, reciting that George Stanton of Galway, merchant, had represented to the King by petition that he was not in any civil or military employment during the rebellion, but lived peaceably in his own house in kind regard to his protestant neighbours; that he conformed to our declaration of 22 Feb., 1 W. & M., and delivered up the castle of Annaghdown in obedience to a proclamation issued by our then justices of Ireland of 7 July, 1691, and was very active and instrumental in preventing a party of the rebels getting into the town of Galway, by the early notice that he caused to be given to our general of the enemy's designs: that after delivering up the castle he immediately repaired to our camp before the town of Galway, where he advised the surrender of the town on the Articles then proposed: that he is neither indicted or outlawed: that he prays a pardon.
The warrant directs that letters patent be passed containing a free pardon to George Stanton. [S.O.1. 14. pp. 91–2.]
July 17.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the same, directing letters patent to be passed containing a free pardon to Patrick French of Cloghballymore, co. Galway, who represented by petition that he is adjudged to be within the Articles for the surrender of Galway, and that the earl of Athlone, by instrument dated at the camp at Galway, 27th July, 1691, certified that the petitioner submitted, in obedience to the proclamation of 7 July, 1691: that during the siege of Galway he assisted in delivering up the town. [Ibid. pp. 92–3.]
July 17.
Kensington.
Warrant for a grant to Richard Colinge, gent., son of Benjamin Colinge, esq., of the office of keeper of the King's council chamber, for his life, with the usual wages of 2s. 6d. a day, after the surrender of two former grants of the same office, one to John Hanson, gent., by letters patent of 24 Nov., 26 Charles II, and the other to Charles Shepherd, gent., by letters patent of 26 Nov., 29 Charles II. [S.P.44. 347. p. 225.]
July 17.
Kensington.
Warrant to approve the election of Thomas Powell, esq., to be Recorder of the borough of Oswestry, in the room of Christopher Brayne, esq., deceased. [Ibid. p. 229.]
July 17.
Kensington.
Commissions to, Mr. John Whitehall to be ensign to lieut. col. John Newton's company in Colonel Seymour's regiment; Mr. William Bradbury to be ensign to lieut. col. Richard Coles' company in Lord Cutts' Coldstream regiment of foot guards. [S.P.44. 167. p. 338.]
July 17.
Kensington.
Pass for Anthony Lulen, a subject of the King, to go from Geneva to France, and thence to England. [S.P.44. 387. p. 156.]
July 18.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords of the Admiralty. For rendering the service of marine regiments more useful to the navy, the King has thought fit that the regiments of foot commanded by Colonels William Seymour, Edward Dutton Colt and Henry Mordaunt be formed into marine regiments, according to the annexed establishment; with pay upon the establishment of the navy from the 31st inst. The two present marine regiments are to be reformed into one regiment, to be commanded by Colonel Thomas Brudenall. Care is to be taken, in recruiting and reforming, that such supernumerary men of the two existing marine regiments, as may be wanting and fit for service, shall be forthwith turned over into the other three regiments. Such non-commissioned officers and privates as shall be disbanded are to be first paid their arrears and other pretensions; they are to be permitted to carry with them their clothes and accoutrements, and the sergeants their swords, and to be allowed 14 days' subsistence as conduct money, with the usual passes to carry them to their respective homes. The regiments are to be mustered frequently, so that only the effective men may be paid for, till they are fully completed, when they are likewise to be mustered as is usual. The pikes belonging to the three regiments and the supernumerary arms in the other two regiments are to be returned into the King's stores, proper fire-arms being delivered out in place of the pikes. Lists are to be prepared of the officers of the two marine regiments fittest to be commissioned in Colonel Brudenall's regiment, and of those to be disbanded, the latter being allowed half-pay as reformed officers. [S.P.44. 167. p. 341.]
Appended:
Warrant for the establishment of four regiments of marines from 1st August next, given under the King's hand at Kensington, 18 July, 1698. Each regiment to have one colonel, with two servants to be allowed as private soldiers, one upon the rolls of each of the two youngest companies, and no more, at 12s. a day; a lieutenant-colonel at 7s.; a major at 5s.; a quarter-master, to do also the duty of adjutant, at 4s. a day; total: 511l. per annum.
Each company to have a captain, besides two servants to be allowed on the muster rolls of the company, and no more, 8s. a day; first lieutenant, besides one servant, 4s.; second lieutenant, besides one servant, 3s.; two sergeants at 1s. 6d.; two corporals at 1s.; one drummer at 1s.; 58 private soldiers at 8d.; total: 1,088l. 18s. 4d. per annum.
The charge of one regiment of 13 such companies: 14,666l. 18s. 4d.; charge of four regiments, with a clerk of the cheque at 20s. a day and one deputy at 10s., 59,215l. 3s. 4d.
Memorandum. The money saved from the pay of the marine soldiers, for the time they shall be at sea and borne upon the ships' books, is to be applied to the halfpay of the reformed officers of the present marine regiments and to the lessening the charge of this establishment. [Ibid. p. 343.]
July 18.
Kensington.
Warrant for the regulation of subsistence to be paid weekly for the use of the marine regiments in proportion to the effective numbers that shall be from time to time on shore, viz., a colonel, 2l. 2s.; lieutenant-colonel, 1l. 4s. 6d.; major, 17s. 6d.; quartermaster and adjutant, 14s.; captain, 1l. 18s.; first lieutenant, 14s.; second lieutenant, 10s. 6d.; sergeant, 6s; corporal and drummer, 4s. 6d.; each private, 3s. 6d. Total charge for the four regiments, with the clerk of the cheque at 10s. a day and his deputy at 5s., 755l. 9s. [S.P.44. 167. p. 345.]
July 18.
Kensington.
Royal warrant reciting that there has hitherto been allowed to Sir Charles Hedges, knt., judge of the High Court of Admiralty, in consideration of his attendance on and reports to the King and privy council, etc., the sum of £400 p. ann., which has been paid him out of monies supplied for the contingent service of the office of High Admiral: that the allowance is to be continued, but instead of placing it as it was before on the first article of the ordinary estimate of the Navy, it shall hereafter be brought under the head of pensions in the said estimate: and directing accordingly. [S.P.44. 347. p. 233.]
July 18.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Lords of the Treasury. The £500 allowed to Mr. Paul Methuen, envoy extraordinary at Lisbon, on account of his equipage, has not yet been paid him. The King is very well satisfied with his services in that Court: and the said sum is to be paid. The allowance is so much the more reasonable since the late envoy, his father, made no demands for the charge of his return from Portugal, nor has anything been given the son for carrying him thither. [S.P.44. 99. p. 538.]
July 18.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The King has approved the enclosed bill of extraordinaries of Mr. William van Huls, his Majesty's Court post, being willing to make him an allowance for an extraordinary attendant to carry the letters between Kensington and Whitehall. [Ibid. p. 539.]
July 18.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of Trade. The King has appointed Colonel Nathaniel Blakeston to be governor of Maryland. His commission and instructions are to be prepared accordingly. (Cf. Cal. S.P., America and West Indies, 1697–8, No. 679.) [Ibid. p. 540.]
July 18.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Francis Blundell, bart., setting forth that he appeared with an early and active zeal for his Majesty's service; that he made a discovery of certain lands 'in an annexed schedule,' and is ready to make out the King's title to the same as also to other lands in Ireland, which are forfeited and concealed. One fourth part will, by virtue of his Majesty's proclamation, come to the petitioner for the discovery. He prays for a grant of the King's [title] to the lands in the schedule, as also [of] his Majesty's title to such other lands as he shall discover to be forfeited and concealed; only that he may receive £400 p. ann. out of the same for a term of years. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P.44. 238. p. 254.]
July 18.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Capt. Temple Briscoe, setting forth that he had agreed with Mr. Thomas Weston for the office of marshal of the Four Courts in Ireland, and for the surrender of Weston's patent. He prays his Majesty to accept a surrender, and to grant him a patent of the office for life. Referred to the Lords Justices of Ireland. [Ibid. p. 258.]
July 18.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Edward, earl of Meath, setting forth that the King, in consideration of his great losses by the late rebellion in Ireland, granted him the lordship of Lea, forfeited by Sir Patrick Trant; but, the same having been mortgaged before to protestant creditors, he has received no benefit. He therefore petitioned for other lands, and the petition was referred to Ireland, but before a report could be made the lands desired were given away. He prays an equivalent out of such forfeited estates as he can discover in Ireland. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid. p. 259.]
July 18.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland for a patent, granting to Thomas Prendergast the forfeited lands mentioned in a list annexed.
Appending, the list above mentioned. (Printed in Calendar of Treasury Books, XIII, pp. 395–6.) [S.O.1. 14. pp. 93–5.]
July 18.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the same to grant to Thomas, Lord Coningsby, the office of Vice-Treasurer and Receiver General and Paymaster General of the Revenues, Ireland. (Printed in Calendar of Treasury Books, XIII, p. 397.) [Ibid. pp. 108–112.]
July 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the payment of the extraordinary expenses of George Stepney, esq., envoy extraordinary to the Elector of Brandenbourg, from March 30 to June 30, 1698. The expenses include the item: 'I had his Majesty's orders to attend the Elector of Brandenburg in his progress to Prussia, which journey for myself and family stood me in £119.' [S.P.44. 347. p. 218.]
July 18.
Kensington.
Warrant for a grant of the dignity of a prebendary in the cathedral church of Worcester, void by the death of Dr. Edward Reynolds, late archdeacon of Norfolk, to Sir William Dawes, bart., 'one of our chaplains in ordinary.' [Ibid. p. 223 and S.P. 44. 151. p. 25.]
July 18.
The Hague.
Pass to Richard Roger, belonging to his Majesty's stables in England, having brought over some horses to Loo, and delivered them to Mynhr Wulfruell (?), the King's Stalmaster there.
Memorandum: that on the same day James Kier of Capt. Bruce's company in Lord Strathnaver's regiment, commanded by Major Wood, bringing a discharge from the major quite different from several brought to us lately, his Excellency gave orders that no more passes should be granted upon it for the future. J.S. [S.P.44. 386. p. 18.]
July 18.
Whitehall.
Post warrant for Mr. Lewder Spiesmaker, one of his Majesty's servants, to Margate. [S.P.44. 387. p. 155.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant for payment of the extraordinary expenses of William, earl of Portland, ambassador extraordinary to his Most Christian Majesty, from Jan. 10, 1697–8 to June 19, 1698. [S.P.44. 347. p. 232.]
July 19.
Kensington.
Warrant for a grant to Henry d'Overquerque, junr., Master of the Horse, son and heir of Henry d'Overquerque, senr., of the dignities of a baron, viscount and earl of England, by the title of baron of Alford, viscount of Boston and earl of Grantham, all in the county of Lincoln, with the usual fee of £20 p. ann. for the better support of those dignities: with remainder in default of heirs male of his body to Cornelius, Maurice, and Francis, the second, third, and fourth sons of Henry d'Overquerque, senr. [Ibid. p. 235.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
R. Y[ard] to Lord Ambr. Williamson. The King went from Kensington about 3 o'cl. this morning for Margate, where he proposes to embark this evening; and the wind being very fair, we hope he may be in Holland to-morrow. The earl of Albemarle has been ill for several days, but intends to follow his Majesty in a few days.
The subscriptions for raising the two millions went on beyond all expectation, and were completed on Saturday. The next thing will be for the subscribers to meet and choose their directors or trustees, to manage the affairs of the new company in a joint stock, pursuant to the charter granted. All the subscribers have declared their desire to enter into a joint stock, except 4 or 5, and except the old company, who have subscribed £315,000, and seem resolved to trade apart for so much. Though it is very likely matters will be adjusted between them and the new company.
The French commissioners for trade being arrived, his Majesty has appointed commissioners to treat with them.
On Saturday the king declared in council the Lords Justices.
The Lords of the Admiralty have thought fit to make a retrenchment in the constant expenses of the Admiralty and navy.
The agreement for settling the posts between England and France, as formerly, being ratified by his Majesty and the French king, the first mail will be sent to France on Monday by way of Dover, and so continue twice a week as heretofore.
The King, before he went away, signed a warrant for altering the commission of excise, but it is not yet known who are put out or put in. Endorsed, R. Aug. 3, 98. 2½ pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 175–176.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Lords of the Treasury: transmitting a letter of Sir Rowland Gwynn, chairman of the late committee of parliament, to whom the petition of the Lustring Company was referred, relating to services done, upon that and other occasions, by Capt. Rycotier, Mr. J. Ford and Mr. Beverton: to consider what may fitly be done for their gratification. [S.P.44. 99. p. 542.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of B. Woodroffe, D.D., principal of Gloucester Hall in the university of Oxford, setting forth that Gloucester College, formerly depending for its revenue on 14 religious houses, was, upon the dissolution of the same, reduced to the state of an hall without any remaining revenue, but is designed to be again erected into a college by the charity of some people, and endowed, if his Majesty approve thereof: and praying a charter of incorporation. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor General. [S.P.44. 238. p. 256.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Barnewell, esq., commonly called lord baron of Tremlestown, setting forth that upon former application his case was referred to the Lords Justices of Ireland, and by them and the Attorney General of Ireland reported, and transmitted to England. Likewise the Lord Chancellor of Ireland has reported the case, with his opinion that the petitioner is a fit object of mercy. He prays an order for a noli prosequi on the indictment against him for high treason in Ireland, and a pardon. Referred to the Lords Justices of Ireland. [Ibid. p. 260.]
July 20.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Attorney General. Parliament is to meet in Ireland about the middle of September: you will report as soon as may be upon the bills that have been sent from Ireland. [S.P.44. 99. p. 542.]
July 19.
Kensington.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland, reciting that Walter Blake of Oran, co. Galway, gent., by petition to the King, represented that he was a captain in one of our enemies' regiments of foot within the town of Galway at the time of the surrender, but he being then a prisoner of war could not come to submit to the governor of the town within the time limited, but that as soon as he was enlarged, though he had liberty to go to Limerick, yet he submitted: that he has no real estate but what he may expect from his father now living, whose heir he is in case he were capable of enjoying the same, which otherwise his father will settle on some of his younger sons: that he is neither indicted or outlawed, and that he has "only one child to his son which he desires to deliver to be educated as we shall direct, could he secure unto him the said estate which would descend unto him": that he prays a pardon.
The warrant directs that letters patent be passed granting a free pardon to Walter Blake. [S.O.1. 14. p. 101.]
July 19.
The Hague.
Passes to Mr. John Davis, a native of Spain, but of English extraction, going into England to look after some estate belonging to him there, being recommended to me on the part of Don Quiros, the Spanish ambassador here: and to Mr. Robert Tutwell, a native of Italy, but of English extraction also, upon the said recommendation. [S.P.44. 386. p. 19.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
Post warrant for Charles Coachman, messenger, to Margate. [S.P.44. 387. p. 155.]
July 19.
Kensington.
Warrant for the reprieve of Peter Godby, esq., captain of a company in the regiment of foot commanded by Thomas Fairfax, brigadier general, to be tried at the next assizes for Berkshire concerning the death of William Noble, his lieutenant; in case he be found guilty of manslaughter. [S.P.44. 347. p. 228.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Sir Gab. Roberts. I should have acquainted you, when you called here this afternoon, that before your representation is brought to the council, it will be considered by the Commissioners of Trade, to whom the King has referred it for their opinion whether it be for the advantage of the kingdom in general that the obligatory clause be totally left out of the new charter, or how far it might be qualified for the best improvement of trade and the greatest exportation of the woollen manufacture. The signification of the King's pleasure will be sent to them to-morrow, and you will do well to satisfy them in this particular. [S.P.44. 99. p. 540.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
The same to the Council of Trade. Referring to your report upon Colonel Fletcher's petition, the King gives no directions.
The Earl of Bellomont having given an account that there is a clause in the commission granted to Mr. Nanfan, lieut. governor of New York, which makes him subject to his lordship's authority only during his residence in that province, he thinks it may be prejudicial if that should not be altered, and the commission be made more conformable to that which was formerly given to Col. Nicholson, when he was appointed lieut. governor under Sir Edmd. Andros. Lord Bellomont proposes that he may have power to change his lieut. governor and constitute a new one; which arises from the distrust he has of Mr. Nanfan, though he is his relation and was recommended by him. You will report your opinion and make such alterations in the lieutenant governor's commission as you think proper.
Lord Bellomont having desired a pardon of piracy for Edwd. Taylor and Saml. Burgess, his Majesty would know your opinion.
The King intends to send commissioners with the ships that are ordered to Madagascar for suppressing the pirates in the East Indies, and to empower them to offer pardon to such as submit. You will consider it, and prepare instructions for the commissioners. (Cf. Cal. S.P., America and West Indies, 1697–8, No. 685.) [Ibid. pp. 542–543.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Council of Trade. I am to send you the enclosed letter of Sir Gabriel Roberts, deputy governor of the Levant Company, with a representation formerly made by the company setting forth the prejudice that arises, as well to the nation in general as to their company, by a clause in the East India Company's charter which obliges them to export yearly to the value of £100,000 in the woollen manufactures of this kingdom; and therefore praying that no such obligation be inserted in the new charter to be granted to the subscribers, but that they may be left to their own liberty in that particular.
You will report to the King your opinion. [S.P.44. 99. p. 541.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to Lord Ambr. Williamson. This being the day of election of burgesses for the city of Westminster, Mr. Montague and Mr. Vernon appeared in Tuthill fields with above 2000 horse, and Sir Hen. Colt, their sole opponent, with about 200 horse, but a great number of the rabble on foot. He, having lost it upon the view, demanded a poll, which has continued all this afternoon at the Common Pleas Court in Westminster Hall. Few elections are yet made. At Windsor Lord Fitsharding and Mr. Topham are chosen, and Sir Wm. Scawen laid aside. Mr. Yard attends my Lords Justices as their secretary. Endorsed, R. Aug. 5, 98. 3 pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 177–178.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to the same. The King embarked the second time at Margate on Wednesday about 10 in the morning, and the messenger says that at noon, when he came away, the yachts and men-of-war were out of sight, the wind being fair and a pretty fresh gale.
His Majesty has been pleased to create young Mons. Ouerqverke, who married the Duke of Ormond's sister, an earl of this kingdom by the title of earl of Grantham; Count Marton, son of the late Comte de Roy is made earl of [Lifford] in Ireland; and Mr. Christopher Vane, son of the late Sir Henry Vane, is made a baron of England by the title of Lord Barnard of Barnard Castle.
Mr. Shephard and Mr. Heathcott, who were chosen sheriffs of London, have paid their fines.
The earl of Arran of Scotland was married on Sunday last to the daughter and heiress of the late Lord Gerard of Bromley.
The earl of Albemarle, who stayed behind the King by reason of his indisposition, is much better and intends, so soon as he is able, to follow his Majesty.
This day was the election for Westminster. Mr. Secretary Vernon and Mr. Montague, Chancellor of the Exchequer, stand together, and Sir Henry Dutton Colt stands alone against them. The two first went to Tuttle fields with a greater appearance of gentlemen and others on horseback than was ever known on the like occasion, and Sir Henry Colt's appearance was as inconsiderable. The High Bailiff upon the view declared Mr. Secretary and Mr. Montague to be chosen. But Sir Henry demanding a poll, it is accordingly appointed to be taken in Westminster Hall, as usually. 2½ pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 358–359.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Newsletter. His Majesty has been pleased to appoint Sir William Ashurst, Messrs. Montague, Carr, Smith and Fleming to be commissioners of excise in the room of Messrs. Danvers, Parry, Strong, Sir Stephen Evance and Sir John Foche, who are removed; those remaining of the former commission are Messrs. Clarke, Onslow, Medows and Everard.
His Majesty has added Sir William St. Quintin to the commission of the customs.
The King has given orders for reducing the three troops of guards from 200 gentlemen to 175, and the troop of granadier guards from 180 to 160. A reduction is likewise to be made in the light horse and foot.
The earl of Albemarle is so well recovered that he went abroad to-day in his coach, and intends to set out for Holland on Sunday next.
This day being appointed for the election of parliament men for Westminster Mr. Secretary Vernon and Cha. Montague, esq., appeared with a numerous attendance of electors on horseback, and being come into the field and the writs opened, Sir Henry Colt who was the third candidate demanded a poll, though there was by a modest computation ten to one, which being agreed to, began about 2 this afternoon and continued till 8 this night, when it was adjourned till to-morrow at 7 in the morning. 1¼ pp. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 360–361.]
July 22.
The Hague.
Passes to Robt. Frazier, a Scotchman, in Capt. Frederick Lamier's company in Col. Murray's regiment, in the States service: and to Andrew Vivans, a French refugee, going to Ireland to visit some relations, recommended by Monr. Bellingham. [S.P.44. 386. p. 19.]
July 25.
The Hague.
Pass to Barth. Hamilton, late of Col. Langston's regiment, bringing a pass from Brigadier Belcastel, dated Ghent, 25 July, '98. [Ibid.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to Lord Ambr. Williamson. I cannot tell whether it is news to you that the election at Rochester has gone as you could wish it. Sir Hen. Colt continues the poll still against Mr. Montague and Mr. Secretary, though the former has 844 and the latter 786 voices more than he, and most of those he has polled are such rabble that it is likely, upon a scrutiny, few of them would be found qualified.
The Lords Justices met to-day for the first time, and only opened their commission. The two present marine regiments are to be broke into one, and three other regiments, now in being, are to be changed into marines; so that instead of two such regiments there will be four. Endorsed, R. Aug. 8th, 98. 3 pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 179–180.]
July 26. Receipt, signed by Cha. Robinson, for rent for the New-RiverWater. [S.P.32. 10. f. 362.]
July 27.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Lowndes. The King has signed the enclosed warrant for establishment of the pay of four regiments of marines. It is to be countersigned by the Lords of the Treasury and me. When signed by them you will return it to me for transmission to the Lords of the Admiralty. [S.P.44. 99. p. 544.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Francis, earl of Longford; setting forth that he has served his Majesty ever since his accession, and has suffered by the late rebellion in Ireland to the value of above £40,000: part of his fortune is a small estate in the suburbs of Dublin, mortgaged to Sir Daniel Arthur for £4,300, whereof he paid him £2,080, so that £2,220 is due only, although he obtained in those times a decree to foreclose the petitioner: Arthur is outlawed, and his interest in the premises forfeited to his Majesty. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P.44. 238. p. 287.]
July 28.
Loo.
Warrant for the establishment of the provost marshal, his deputy and other provosts, to supersede all former establishments from 1st August next, viz., the provost marshal general 8s. a day, and two horsemen 3s. a day each; the deputy provost marshal, 4s.; two other provost marshals to attend the general officers, and other officers and services, 2s. a day each. Total yearly cost: 401l. 10s. [S.P.44. 167. p. 346.]
July 28.
Kensington.
Warrant for a pardon to Alexander Knightley, gent., of all treasons, provided he transport himself beyond the seas out of the King's dominions and do not return during his life. [S.P.44. 347. p. 234.]
July 28. Warrant for the apprehension of William Brooker, for suspicion of carrying wool into France. [S.P.44. 349. p. 83.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to repair on board the Griffin, fireship, guardship at Sheerness, and there to receive into custody Thomas Lane, alias Coviaro, for suspicion of being one of Henry Every's crew. [Ibid. p. 84.]
July 28. Post warrant for Mr. La Coudriere and Mr. Najac, and a guide, to Chester. [S.P.44. 387. p. 155.]
July 29.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to Lord Ambr. Williamson. The needless trouble of a poll, that Sir Hen. Colt gave Mr. Secretary and Mr. Montague, was ended on Wednesday, and they declared burgesses for Westminster; and, though he of them that had least had near 700 more than Sir Henry, he threatens, it is said, to bring it into parliament.
The Countess of Manchester, Mr. Montague's lady, died that day. He is gone out of his house to Lord Rannelagh's at Chelsea, where there are many pleasing objects to divert melancholy. Your Excellency and Mr. Sloan are elected at Thetford. There are a great many new members already chosen, though we have notice of very few of the elections in the north, and none yet in the west. Endorsed, R. Aug. 11th, 98. 3 pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 181– 182.]
July 29.
Whitehall.
R. Y[ard] to the same. We talk of nothing but elections of members of parliament. A great many new ones are chosen; I believe almost one half. Sir Robert Rich and Mr. Heningham are thrown out at Dunwich, and Mr. Priestman at Shoreham. Lord Ranelagh lost at Chichester, but is chosen at another place by the Duke of Somerset's interest. Sir Harry Colt is angry he lost it at Westminster. He excepts against the French protestants, who voted for Mr. Montague and Mr. Vernon, and says he will petition the House of Commons, and bring an action against the Head Bailiff of Westminster. I think he will be very troublesome. Endorsed, R. Aug. 11th, 98. 1 p. [Ibid. ff. 183–184.]
July 29.
The Hague.
Pass to Mary Corbet, a poor woman left here by her husband, a fringe maker, with 2 children, recommended by Mr. Estwich, an inhabitant of the place: and to John Mascow (?), soldier, late of Capt. Franklin's company in Col. Sanderson's regiment, having late made his escape from the French. [S.P.44. 386. p. 19.]
July 29.
Whitehall.
Post warrant for Capt. Tho. Earle to Margate. [S.P.44. 387. p. 156.]
July 30.
Whitehall.
Post warrant for Mr. Henry Hawker to York. [Ibid.]
July. Docquets, of a grant of a patent to Thomas Lavery, gent., for an invention for raising water, etc., by the impellent force of fire: of the appointment of commissioners to receive subscriptions towards raising and paying into his Majesty's exchequer the sum of two million pounds [S.O.3. 20. f. 152]: of a grant of a patent to Nehemiah Grew, doctor in physic, for purging waters: of a grant of a baronetcy to Samuel Clarke of Snailwell, co. Cambridge: of a notice by the King for the determination of the East India Company's charters: of a grant of a patent to Edmund Heming, gent., for an invention for sweeping streets etc. [Ibid. f. 152 v.].
Docquet of the appointment by the King of Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury; John, lord Somers, lord chancellor; Thomas, earl of Pembroke, keeper of the privy seal; William, duke of Devon, steward of the household; Charles, earl of Dorset; John, earl of Marlborough, tutor to H.H. William, duke of Gloucester; Henry, earl of Romney, governor of the Cinque Ports; Edward, earl of Orford, first commissioners [sic] of the admiralty, and Charles Montague, esq., first commissioner of the treasury, as his Majesty's guardians and justices of the kingdom of England, and lieutenants during his absence. [Ibid. f. 153.]
Docquet of the grant to Thomas Powell of Broadway, co. Carmarthen, esq., and to Sir Basil Firebrace of London, knight, of baronetcies. [Ibid.]
Docquet of the appointment of Francis Nicholson, esq., to be governor of the colony and dominion of Virginia in America [Ibid.]; and of the creation of Christopher Vane of Rabie Castle, a baron, by the title of Lord Bernard, baron of Barnard Castle. [Ibid.]
Docquets of grants, to Sir William Daws, bart., one of his Majesty's chaplains in ordinary, of a prebendary's place in Worcester Cathedral: to William van Huls, esq., of the office of clerk of his Majesty's wardrobes [ibid. f. 153 v.]: to Sir Robert Southwell, knt., and Thomas Edwards, esq., of Craygollway farm and lands in co. Monmouth, late of Otto, baron of Schwerin (an alien), and vested in the king by reason of the baron's being an alien. [Ibid. f. 154.]
[July.] Petition of Edmund Soame, esq., to the House of Commons; shewing, that the 26th July last being appointed for the election to parliament for Thetford in the county of Norfolk, when Sir Joseph Williamson and the petitioner had a majority of duly qualified voters, the mayor, Robert Candle, refused the votes of persons who had a right and admitted others to poll for James Sloane, esq., who were not qualified, by which partial proceedings of the mayor, and by unlawful practices, James Sloane, esq., procured himself to be returned.
The petitioner prays for relief. Endorsed, Found with the papers of July, 1698. 1 p. [S.P.32. 10. f. 363.]
July. 'Note for the divident' of office fees payable during the month on certain grants, commissions, licences, etc. 1 p. [S.P.32. 10. ff. 364–365.]

Footnotes

  • 1. v. sup. p. 296; cf. Klopp, Der Fall des Hauses Stuart, vii., p. 122 seq., viii., p. 122 seq.
  • 2. See Cal. S.P. Dom., Jan. 17, 1696.