BHO

William III: October 1698

Pages 397-410

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William III, 1698. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1933.

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October 1698

Oct. 1.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Brown. I have received your letter of the 25th ult. and shall put it into Mr. Yard's hands to lay it before the Lords Justices for your justification. You are a little unfortunate to have your business depending between two noblemen who are at variance upon another subject, but I hope you cannot fail of recovering your debt, having an Act of parliament for your security. If there be no more wood in the forest than will satisfy you, I must the less wonder if the chief officer shew some concern and wish your debt may rather be paid another way. I think my Lord Steward aims at no more than having time to represent it to the King, and, if the Treasury will be willing to supply the money, I believe his Majesty may be inclinable enough to preserve his forest. For my own part I shall always wish that justice may be done to every man, and, as you have had a public care taken of you, I do not believe anybody wishes you so ill as to go about to defeat it; but, if you have those apprehensions, and believe I am able to prevent it, you may be assured of my sincere endeavours. [S.P.44. 99. p. 562.]
Oct. 1.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords Justices of Ireland. I have your letters of the 20th and 24th ult. I hope I was not misunderstood as if any exceptions were taken that you made use of me to give the Lords Justices an account of the prorogation, but they wondered there should be a report of it in town so long before that letter came.
The letter to the council was read on Thursday last, and accordingly the Bill is ordered to pass with those amendments.
I have read the informations enclosed in your letter of the 24th. It looks to me like a story that does not hang well together. One thing appears pretty plainly intended; that the informer had a mind to have notice taken that he was a good protestant, had been ill used, and yet he bore it patiently without the least resentment; but how that should recommend him to the confidence of a priest, so as to be entrusted with such a secret, I do not well comprehend. I know not whether you will think it worth while to have them confronted together. The letter that has the date and superscription torn out is pretty suspicious. I know not whether it be the original: it looks like the writing of a lawyer's clerk. If this be a true account, Rian should be examined upon it. If it be false, he is not the only person intended to be imposed upon. [Ibid. p. 563.]
Oct. 2.
Cork.
The injured protestant vindicated from false and unjust aspersions of papists and jacobites, or, An answer by a French officer in Cork to a letter sent from an English officer in Dublin.
In your letter [of the 27th ult.] you tell us that the great clamour raised against us at Dublin is that the Londonderry and Enniskillen officers and soldiers should be disbanded, and we continued. We cannot think him a good protestant that wants a true value for those worthy persons, who so valiantly defended those two garrisons against the common enemy. We all wish that their encouragement were rather enlarged than lessened; yet, blessed be God, they now find their country a peaceful habitation, and their king so sensible of their merits that he allows their officers half pay, and such of the disbanded soldiers as desire a continuance in the army are received into the established regiments. We should esteem ourselves happy, were we disbanded, could we find liberty of conscience, with far less encouragements from our King. But, alas, we may well complain with the psalmist that the heathens are entered on our inheritance, who have not only defiled but destroyed our temples; and all for no crime, but because our consciences will not suffer us to worship that idol worship which our King hath set up.
Your letters likewise tell us that we are reported to be thousands of French, when the muster rolls sent to the government of Dublin make us not full fifteen hundred. It is some addition to our surprise that when five times our number of bigoted French papists landed in this very port to serve King James [they] were so gratefully received by the papists, and we so soon reproached from the protestants. You likewise tell us that it is reported that we are so filled with papists that we have brought with us many of the French papists who would have betrayed Duke Schomberg's army at Dundalk, when the most diligent scrutiny cannot produce one professed papist among us.
The last particular of your letter is as false as the former, viz.: that there is no security to the subject's property in our quarters. This cannot be credited by any who understands the discipline of the King's army, which subjects us, as well as others, to be tried by the laws of the land for any offence committed against those laws, and country juries are not usually over favourable to foreign criminals. Though we and our small party are thus the butt, yet it is evident that the King himself, and one of his chief governors of this kingdom, are the mark against which these venomous arrows are shot. For though your letter tells us that that governor is so esteemed for piety, charity, justice and indefatigable industry by the generality of the English, as one of the best governors ever known in this kingdom, how can that character be consistent with his trust to suffer so many thousands of dangerous French papists to be imported? This contrariety demonstrates that these false reports receive their rise from designing papists or bigoted jacobites.
The King of Great Britain, being become the head of the protestant interest of Europe, well knows his interest to be the encouragement of protestants, and though he has too often experienced the disloyalty of his popish subjects yet gives them equal justice, and is far from using them as our king uses us.
And when the King of England resolved on the embarkation of foreign soldiers into this kingdom, he not only refused the Danes and Dutch protestants, who had been equally assisting with us in reducing this kingdom to obedience, and though he managed the late war against France without any distinction in matters of religion, and though it is well known that there is a great want of protestants in this kingdom and that their increase is both his Majesty's and the country's interest, yet on our embarkation he so far complied with the infirmities of the English, who were known not to be over kind to foreign soldiers, that he gave strict orders that not one papist be embarked with us, but likewise excluded all protestants who could with safety live in their own countries. He well knew our singular misfortune, and conceived that our late fellow-soldiers and fellow-sufferers, the protestants of Ireland, would gratefully receive us, especially when his Majesty's pay and our own strict discipline may rather make us an advantage than a prejudice to our protestant brethren. 3½ pp. Endorsed, Copy of a letter from Cork. [S.P.63. 360. ff. 11–12.]
Oct. 2–12.
Goer.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland, for a patent to discharge Sir Richard Bellingham from a debt due to Lord Gormanstown. (Printed in Calendar of Treasury Books, XIV, p. 144.) [S.O.1. 14. pp. 113–114.]
Oct. 3.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the Lords of the Treasury. The King directs that £3,000 be forthwith paid on account of bills to the amount of £5,000, drawn by Lord Paget on account of his equipage and expenses; occasioned by his journey to Belgrade, to mediate a peace between the Emperor and the Ottoman Porte.
The King leaves it to your consideration how the sloop seized at Hamburg and her lading shall be disposed of. Sir Charles Hedges will attend you for your directions. [S.P.44. 99. p. 564.]
Oct. 13.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Charles Hedges. The King has left it to the Treasury to consider how the New York sloop and her lading should be disposed of. They will therefore require an account of the matter from you. [S.P.44. 204. p. 196.]
Oct. 4.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to the earl of Stamford. I have laid your letter of the 1st inst. before the Lords Justices. A letter was read at the same time from Rupert Brown, giving an account how he had proceeded in pursuance of the Act of parliament, and he desired to know who was the person who had given such wrong informations against him. As it will not be long before you come to town, and as the Lord Steward is likewise expected, the Lords Justices think that the most proper time for hearing and determining disputes that may have arisen in relation to Needwood forest. [S.P.44. 99. p. 565.]
Oct. 4.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to Lord Ambr. Williamson. Mr. Hill, his Majesty's envoy extraordinary with the Elector of Bavaria, arrived here two or three days ago, in the William and Mary yacht, from Holland; whither he will return against the time the King comes back from Celle.
The Lord Justices met this day in council to consider two Bills transmitted from Ireland; one for encouraging the linen manufacture in that kingdom, and the other for laying an additional duty on the woollen manufacture; which will be forthwith despatched back to Ireland, where the parliament was to meet the 27th of last month.
Rear Admiral Benbow is gone to Portsmouth, to command the squadron bound to the West Indies. 1¼ pp. [S.P.32. 11. f. 13.]
Oct. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant for erecting Gloucester Hall, in the university of Oxford, into a college, by the name of Worcester College, to consist of a governor with the style and title of provost (Dr. Woodroffe to be the first provost during his life), twelve fellows, six senior fellows and six junior fellows, and eight scholars of the foundation; and for incorporating them with all privileges and advantages to such college or corporation usually belonging, to be governed by such rules and statutes as his Majesty shall under the great seal from time to time appoint.
The warrant recites that it had been represented to his Majesty by Dr. Benjamin Woodroff, principal of Gloucester Hall in the university of Oxford, that the hall was formerly a college of the same name, depending for its income upon certain religious houses long since dissolved, and remained without any revenue: that his Majesty was well informed that by the charity of some well disposed persons it might again be endowed, if his Majesty should be pleased to erect it into a college and incorporate it; that his Majesty was pleased for the encouragement of learning and charity to consent thereto. [S.P.44. 347. p. 350 and S.P.44. 151. p. 25.]
Oct. 5. Warrant to receive into custody — Whiteman; for suspicion of having counterfeited malt tickets, and uttered them in payments. [S.P.44. 349. p. 98.]
Oct. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation of Richard Sissison, clerk, to the rectory of Patrington, in the county and diocese of York, void in law by the simony of John Pighills, clerk, the present incumbent, and in his Majesty's gift. [S.P.44. 347. p. 376 and S.P.44. 151. p. 27.]
Oct. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to apprehend Lawrence Haesellum, George Peters and Robert Moor, for evil practices against his Majesty and the government. Memdum.: Haesellum and Peters were discharged 22 Novr. by Capt. Baker's desire, being to be further prosecuted at law. [S.P.44. 349. p. 86.]
Oct. 6. Warrant to apprehend Wm. Chaloner, for suspicion of counterfeiting malt tickets and uttering the same. [Ibid. p. 96.]
Oct. 7.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to Lord Ambr. Williamson. I have to acknowledge yours of 10 inst., N.S., and sent forward last night that which was directed to the "Mayor etc. of Thetford," where, I am told, Lord Paston will be chosen to parliament in your room.
The duke of Schomberg's secretary lets me know that his Grace will sign a licence of absence for Capt. Musgrove, but that he is still out of town.
Mr. Bryenne is returned and fallen ill of the gout. 2 pp. [S.P.32. 15. f. 231.]
Oct. 7.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to the same. H.M.S. Sheerness and Bonadventure are arrived in the Channel, and have brought home three of the seamen who are chiefly concerned in the design to murder the commander of the Speedwell and run away with the ship to Madagascar.
Rear Admiral Benbow is now at Spithead with H.M. ships bound to the West Indies, and will sail in a very short time.
The new East India Company intend the next week to name a person to go ambassador to the Mogul, and at the same time to send out several factors to be established in that prince's dominions. 2 pp. [S.P.32. 11.f. 15.]
Oct. 7.
Whitehall.
Thos. Hopkins to the same. We have little news at this time but what Ireland does afford us, which is all in our office paper. 1 p. [Ibid. f. 14.]
Oct. 9–19.
Cell.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland, directing a Bill to be prepared by the privy council of Ireland, to be transmitted to the privy council in England, for confirming to Lord Woodstock the estates lately granted to him in Ireland; to be considered and remitted to Ireland, in the usual manner, to pass in parliament there. [S.O.1. 14. p. 114.]
Oct. 10. Warrant to receive into custody Elizabeth Price, for suspicion of treason. [S.P.44. 349.p. 97.]
Oct. 11.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to Lord Ambr. Williamson. I hear nothing yet from the Duke of Schomberg's secretary concerning Capt. Musgrove's licence, and he himself is nowhere to be found to-day.
If you come over shortly there will perhaps be no occasion for such licence, unless it would excuse him from going to the West Indies, if the regiment he is in should be sent thither; as, it is said, it will.
'Gloucester Hall in Oxon' is erected into a college, and called Worcester College; the benefactor, who endows it, being of that county. His name I do not yet know.
Three or four persons are taken into custody, for counterfeiting malt tickets, but they were discovered so soon that they had time to utter very few, and they are recovered too. Endorsed, R. Oct. 18–28. 3pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 232–233.]
Oct. 11.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to the same. Sir Cloudesley Shovell came the 8th inst. to Spithead with eight men-of-war under his command from the Downs. 1½ pp. [S.P.32. 11. f. 16.]
Oct. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the denization of Sir David Collier, bart. [S.P.44. 347. p. 351.]
Oct. 13.
Whitehall.
A proclamation by the Lords Justices, for putting the laws in execution against forestalling, regrating and engrossing of corn.
The proclamation recites that several good statutes have been made against forestalling, regrating and engrossing of corn, amongst the rest an Act 5 and 6 Ed. VI, of which it recites the principal provisions: that this Act provided that the engrossing of corn, when under certain prices, should not be judged an offence: that since, by an Act 15 Charles II, these prices were, wheat 48s.; rye, pease and beans 32s.; barley, malt and buckwheat 28s.; and oats 13s. 4d. the quarter: that by an Act of 5 Eliz. it was enacted that no transporter of corn should be licensed but in general quarter sessions [etc.]: "and whereas the prices of corn already exceed the rates in the said Act of Charles II, and is likely to grow much dearer, to the great oppression of the poor, in part because the said Acts are not duly put in execution, if the same be not timely prevented: wherefore, and forasmuch as it will much conduce to the good of his Majesty's subjects and relief of the poor especially, that the said laws, and that all the laws for setting the poor on work should be put in execution, we command [all persons in authority] to cause the said Acts made in 5 and 6 Ed. VI, in 5 Eliz., and other Acts relating to the same matters, and all laws for setting the poor on work, to be put in execution; and that they take care that no licence be granted to any carrier or buyer of corn or grain but according to the directions of those Acts." Printed. [S.P.45. 13. No. 165.]
Oct. 13.
Whitehall.
Post warrant to Mr. Anthony Dagley, a messenger, and a guide to Holyhead. [S.P.44. 388. p. 57.]
Oct. 14.
Loo.
Wm. Blathwayt to [Sir Joseph Williamson]. This serves only to acquaint your Excellency with his Majesty's safe return to this place, entirely satisfied with the reception he found in Germany. His Majesty will probably be moving towards The Hague within less than a fortnight, so as to be in England before the end of the next month. Endorsed, R. 18–27, 98. 1 p. [S.P.32. 11.ff. 17–18.]
Oct. 14.
Whitehall.
Newsletter to the same. The new East India Company have made choice of William Norris, esq., a member of the House of Commons, to go ambassador to the Great Mogul, and have humbly prayed his Majesty's approbation thereof.
Lord Dursley is appointed to succeed Lord Paget in the embassy in Turkey, who is expected home after he has finished the treaty of peace between the Emperor and the Grand Signior, wherein his Majesty employs his mediation.
The earl of Berkeley, Lord Dursley's father, lies very dangerously ill. Endorsed, R. Oct. 18–28, 98. 2½ pp. [Ibid. ff. 19–20.]
Oct. 14.
Loo.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland to transfer the pension of 3s. 9d. a day of the Sieur de la Cloche, lately deceased, to—Desherbiers, a reformed captain, "who served in our forces in Italy and upon the Rhine, where he lost his arm in action"; and to make up his pension to 5s. a day, equal to other reformed captains, upon the next vacancy. [S.O.1. 14. p. 160.]
Oct. 14.
The Hague.
Passes to Madle. Hoquet and Mary Moriaux, two French refugees, recommended by Lord Portland. [S.P.44. 386.p. 20.]
Oct. 15.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Francklyn. I am glad you have given me notice that there is occasion to examine the seamen belonging to the Frederick sloop: for Mr. Heysham was with me this evening to press for their discharge, pretending that now he had given bail for the ship he would send the master and crew directly to Hamburg, that they might carry home the ship to New York. I told him I thought I should set them at liberty on Monday, but I intended to consult Sir Charles Hedges. But now I have an answer to give him, and the men shall not be discharged by me till you have done with them. [S.P.44. 99. p. 366.]
Oct. 17. Warrant to apprehend Sir William Jenines, for high treason for having been in France since 11th Dec., 1688, and returning without licence. [S.P.44. 349. p. 93.]
Oct. 18–28.
Loo.
Wm. Blathwayt to [Sir Joseph Williamson]. I am heartily sorry to understand from your Excellency that your late journey has put you into such a condition of health that it will be impossible for you to give us your assistance in parliament, which would have been of very great use to the King's affairs; but I hope, however, you will find such intervals of amendment as to be always ready for any occasion of his Majesty's service on this side.
The soldiers at Rotterdam come out of the States service, and will be taken care of by them. Endorsed, Octr. 28, R. Octobr. 29th, 98. 1p. [S.P.32. 11. ff. 21–22.]
Oct. 18.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to the same. The gentlemen of Ireland seemed dissatisfied at the French regiments being brought thither, and it was feared it might occasion a coolness in giving supplies in parliament; but that was soon blown over, and they have unanimously voted a Supply, but the quantum is not yet agreed on. The Lords Justices' demands are £138,000, and it is not doubted but they will raise it.
I find the foreign ministers here have an air of some convention being made in Holland relating to the succession of Spain; but they cannot tell what to make of it. They say your Excellency went to Loo for that purpose, and had a conference on that subject with the Pensioner and Count Tallard. Though this perhaps be only a surmise of theirs, I thought you would pardon me if I gave an account of what they discourse. Endorsed, R. Nov. 1, 98. 3 pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 234–235.]
Oct. 18.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir J. Williamson. [Irish parliamentary proceedings.] 1 p. [S.P.32. 11. f. 23.]
Oct. 20.
Whitehall.
Ja. Vernon to Mr. Stock. Mr. Hopkins has sent you an answer about Mr. Thorold's letters, since that I have another of the 18th giving an account of 3 wherries being seized. I hope the men were secured at the same time and their examinations taken.
If Mr. Atkins's case be as it is stated, he should send it to Lord Jersey; and I hope he will be able to procure his release. [S.P.44. 99. p. 566.]
Oct. 20.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Chappell. I received yesterday your letter of the 12th inst., with the papers concerning James Craget. By his examination he seems to clear himself from having been one of Every's crew, but the letter his wife writes to him shows he has some guilt. I know not whether he has been examined upon that letter, and that he gives an account where his wife lives; when I know it I will send for her, and see whether their stories agree. If she says true of people that have purchased their pardons, it ought to be known who those persons are, and who made such bargains with them. [Ibid. p. 567.]
Oct. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant by the Lords Justices of England, for the establishment of a surgeon, at 4s. a day, and a surgeon's mate at 2s. 6d., to be allowed to the regiment of foot commanded by Colonel Collingwood, now under orders to embark for the West Indies. [S.P.44. 167. p. 362.]
Oct. 20. Certificate by Daniel Wybrantz, that, after searching the pleas of the crown in the court of King's Bench in Ireland, he does not find that James Plunkett, of Castle Plunkett, co. Roscommon, stands outlawed for treason against his Majesty or her late Majesty. [S.P.63. 360. f. 13.]
Oct. 20.
The Hague.
Pass to John Leslie, soldier, late of Capt. Davidson's company in Col. Lawder's regiment in the service of the States, with a discharge from the colonel, dated Breda, Oct. 4, '98. [S.P.44. 386. p. 20.]
Oct. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the keeper of Newgate to receive into custody James Pritchard, for high treason in counterfeiting coin. [S.P.44. 349. p. 87.]
Oct. 21.
Whitehall.
Newsletter. The parliament, which was to meet on the 27th inst., has been prorogued till the 29th of next month.¼ p. [S.P.32. 11. f. 24.]
Oct. 21.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Lord Ambr. Williamson. The Bills transmitted from Ireland for laying an additional duty on the woollen, and for encouraging the linen manufacture, being passed under the great seal here, were on Tuesday last sent back to Ireland.
Colonel Collingwood's regiment embarked at Portsmouth on Monday last, on board the men-of-war bound to the West Indies under the command of Rear Admiral Benbow.
His Majesty has been pleased to approve of the choice made by the new East India Company of Mr. Norris to go ambassador to the Great Mogul, who is accordingly making preparations for his departure. 1½ pp. [Ibid. f. 25.]
Oct. 21.
Loo.
Warrant to the privy council of Scotland. The King has resolved to keep up the regiment of foot commanded by Col. George Hamilton, and for that end to reform other forces upon the present establishment. Orders are to be given for disbanding of 5 men and 1 drummer of each troop of the 2 regiments of dragoons, and of 2 men of each company of the regiment of footguards, and of one company of each of the 3 regiments of foot commanded by Maj. Genl. Colyear, Brigadier Maitland and Col. Row, and of each of the remaining companies of the said 3 regiments 5 men, 1 corporal and 1 drummer. Orders are also to be given for disbanding two companies of Col. George Hamilton's regiment, and of each of the remaining companies 1 corporal and 1 drummer, and for reducing each company of the regiment to the number of 35 sentinells. And, as to the method in disbanding the officers, the youngest officer of each regiment, both captains and subalterns, is to be pitched upon: if any of these officers have by their services merited a particular consideration, an account may be transmitted to the King by the commander-in-chief or their colonel. [S.P.57. 17. pp. 43–4.]
Oct. 21.
Loo.
Warrant to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland to pay Col. Hamilton's regiment out of the same fund as the other forces. [Ibid. p. 45.]
Oct. 21.
Loo.
A list of the persons whose names are to be inserted "in the commission which is to be granted by us to our privy council of Scotland."
Prince George of Denmark: Patrick, earl of Marchmont, chancellor: George, earl of Melville, president of the privy council: James, duke of Queensberry, keeper of the privy seal: James, marquis of Douglas: Archibald, earl of Argyll: John, earl of Crawford: John, earl of Erroll: John, earl of Marr: James, earl of Morton: David, earl of Buchan: Alexander, earl of Eglinton: John, earl of Cassillis: —, earl of Strathmore: —, earl of Galloway: John, earl of Lauderdale: Robert, earl of Lothian, justice general: Hugh, earl of Loudoun: James, earl of Finlater: David, earl of Leven: William, earl of Annandale: —, earl of Noresk: Charles, earl of Selkirk: Archibald, earl of Forfar: John, earl of Kintore: James, viscount Seafield, "our secretary": George, viscount Tarbat: Thomas, viscount Teviot: John, lord Strathnaver: —, lord Montgomery: William, lord Jedburgh: Patrick, lord Polwarth: William, lord Forbes: —, lord Ross: John, lord Carmichael: David, lord Ruthven: Sir James Stuart, "our advocate": Adam Cockburn of Ormstoun, justice clerk: Sir Hugh Dalrymple, president of session: Sir Colin Campbell of Aberuchell: Sir David Hume of Crosrig: Sir James Murray of Philiphaugh: Sir Archibald Hope of Ranqueillor: Sir James Falconer of Phesdo: Sir John Hamilton of Halcraig: Mr. Francis Montgomery: the laird of Grant: Sir John Maxwell of Pollock: Sir Archibald Murray of Blackbarony: Sir Robert Sinclair of Steinston: Sir George Campbell of Cesnock: David Boyle of Kelburn: the lord provost of Edinburgh for the time. [S.P.57. 17. pp. 45–47.]
Oct. 21.
Loo.
Warrant appointing the persons above mentioned to be lords of the privy council of Scotland, committing to them or any nine of them the administration of the government in all offices that may concern the peace and happiness of the kingdom, which by laws and custom pertain to the privy council: with power to meet at the place appointed for the ordinary residence of the privy council in Edinburgh or elsewhere, and (in the absence of the lord chancellor and president) to choose any of their own number to preside; to advise and determine all affairs concerning the good and peace of the kingdom according to laws and Acts of parliament, and to hear and determine causes betwixt subject and subject proper to be decided before the privy council, none being present but privy councillors, with his Majesty's clerks: with power to them, or any of them, upon any intervening occasion of disorder in such part of the country where they shall remain for the time, to command and charge the committers of such disorders to keep his Majesty's peace, and to charge the contraveners thereof to enter their persons in ward in such places and within as short time as they shall think fit, there to remain until order be taken by a full number of the council in the matter, who in case these persons shall be found to have been disobedient and to have contemned the charge may impose a pecunial sum upon the offenders, according to the quality of the offenders and the nature of their offence, and to cause them to be apprehended and their persons committed to ward; the said lord or lords of council charging as said is being always accountable to his Majesty and the rest of the privy council or their quorum for any such charge that shall be given by them: with power to make statutes for government of the kingdom and suppressing disorder, and to give warrant to the justice general, justice clerk and commissioners of justiciary for continuing execution after conviction, or for mitigating the punishment of the law in criminal cases the crimes being capital, and as the nature of the crime shall require: and to grant commissions of justiciary and other commissions: with power to give warrant to the justice general, justice clerk and commissioners for imposing fines or pecunial sums upon the crimes of adultery, bearing and wearing of hagbutts, pistols, or such other trans gressions of the Acts of parliament, where the punishment by the law is inflicted upon the body or goods or left to the arbitrament of the judge: and to grant exemptions from hosts roads or assises, and licences for departing out of the kingdom according to the conditions contained in the Acts of Parliament: with power in case of an open and avowed rebellion, which cannot be suppressed but by force, to give commissions of lieutenandry or justiciary for suppressing the same and to direct charges to such parts of the country as they shall think fit for concurrence to be given in the execution of the said commissions and to give directions for advancing such sums as shall be requisite in such expedients: with power to raise the session upon intervening necessity and to appoint times and places for their downsitting and generally to do all things that the privy council of Scotland have done: with power to set down rules for their meetings and attendance, the whole number being present upon advertisement from the lord chancellor or president when any weighty matter of state shall require, and in case of absence without licence to be censurable as neglectors of his Majesty's service. [Ibid. pp. 47– 51.]
Oct. 21
Loo.
A list of the persons whose names are to be inserted in the new commission to the Exchequer in Scotland.
George, earl of Melville, president of the privy council: John, earl of Marr: Alexander, earl of Eglinton: John, earl of Cassillis: John, earl of Lauderdale: Robert, earl of Lothian, justice general: Hugh, earl of Loudoun: David, earl of Leven: —, earl of Northesk: John, earl of Kintore: James, viscount Seafield, secretary of state: George, viscount Tarbat: Adam Cockburn of Ormstoun, justice clerk: Sir James Stuart, "our advocate": Sir Hugh Dalrymple, "president of our session": Sir Colin Campbell of Aberuchell: Sir David Falconer of Crosrig: Sir James Murray of Philiphaugh: Sir John Hamilton of Halcraig: Sir Robert Sinclair of Stevenson: David Boyle of Kelburn: Sir James Scowgall of Whitehill. [Ibid. p. 52.]
Oct. 21.
Loo.
Warrant appointing the foregoing persons commissioners of H.M. Exchequer for Scotland for giving their concurrence and assistance to the commissioners of the Treasury [named] or any three of them, as their quorum: and the King gives power to the commissioners of the Treasury or their quorum with the abovenamed commissioners of Exchequer or any five of them to receive resignations [etc.] of lands [etc.], belonging to the resigners and their authors, in Scotland, and which may be resigned in his Majesty's hands for himself or as prince and steward of Scotland, either in his Majesty's favour ad perpetuam remanentiam or in favour of whatsoever his Majesty's subjects: and to give all signatures, donations [etc.] requisite upon the said resignations [etc.], or upon whatsoever other manner of vacation, whereby the same lands have vaked in the hands of his Majesty, and by reason of recognition, bastardy, last heir, purpresture [etc.] or by whatsoever other way. As also to grant new gifts to be holden conform to the old infeftments and for payment of the like duties: with power to grant gifts of wards, non-entrys, single and life-rent escheats, last heirs, and of all other casualties vaking or falling in his Majesty's hands for himself or as prince and steward of Scotland, and that for reasonable compositions: and sicklike to grant tacks and assedations of his Majesty's customs and imposts according to use and wont: with power to grant remissions for slaughter upon sight and production of letters of slaines, and for adultery upon testimony of the deliquent's penitency and satisfaction of the church: also to pass remissions to transgressors of whatsoever penal statutes for reasonable compositions, reserving to his Majesty the granting of remissions for more licencious crimes and of greater moment and consequence: and generally to compone and agree concerning his Majesty's rents, revenues and casualties of Scotland falling under the Treasury: with power to sit and determine in all causes proper to the Exchequer. And the King ordains letters of horning, apprising and other executorials conform to the custom. And to the effect the compositions to be paid by his Majesty's subjects for passing of their gifts, signatures, and others, and especially of the property and principality, may be considered and proportioned according to the benefit arising thereby, his Majesty's will is that the Lords of the Treasury appoint days and places for themselves to meet (before the signatures, gifts [etc.] be presented to the commissioners of Exchequer to be passed) for revising and considering the signatures and gifts, and agreeing with the producers thereof for the compositions, casualties and benefits to be taken for passing them, and for payment to be made by the parties: and that the compositions so to be made be written in every signature and gift: and that the same be made known in Exchequer by the commissioners of the Treasury. [S.P.57. 17. pp. 53–6.]
Oct. 21. Warrant to apprehend Richard Gaywood, for suspicion of high treason. [S.P.44. 349. p. 87.]
Oct. 22. Warrant to apprehend Michael Johnson, for suspicion of high treason. Memdum.: Johnson was taken into custody the 23rd Oct. [Ibid.]
Oct. 24. We, his Majesty's protestant subjects of the county of Roscommon, certify that we have known Mr. James Plunkett of Castle Plunkett before the late rebellion, and ever since the reduction of this kingdom to his Majesty's obedience, to have been an honest, inoffensive gentleman and a good neighbour; and that though we retired into England during the rebellion here, so that we can not speak much of our personal knowledge during that time, yet we have been credibly informed by several of his protestant neighbours that he behaved with all friendship and humanity to them. We further certify that before the reduction of this kingdom he submitted, took the oath of allegiance, and lived peaceably in his own house. [Signed] Gilbert Ormsby, W. W. Ormsby. [S.P.63. 360. f. 15.]
Oct. 25.
Whitehall.
Newsletter. 1 p. Endorsed, R. Oct. 29–Nov. 8. [S.P.32. 11. f. 26.]
Oct. 25.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Lord Ambr. Williamson. [The letters from Dublin of the 15th give an account that] on the 14th they proceeded in a committee of the whole House upon the Bill for the better preservation of his Majesty's royal person and government; and, after several hours debate concerning the first clause, which enjoins the oaths appointed instead of the oaths of allegiance and supremacy to be taken by all persons and expresses the penalties to be inflicted on the refusers, the clause was rejected; so that unless the House shall disagree with the committee, the Bill must be lost.
Sir Cloudesley Shovell is appointed to command the men-of-war that are to attend his Majesty in his return from Holland. [Ibid. f. 27.]
Oct. 25.
Whitehall.
J. Ellis to the same. I am not deceived in my opinion of the parliament of Ireland in relation to the supply demanded, which they have given; though with some debate, the country party being displeased with the foreign regiments. Yeas were 101, Noes 72.
Mr. Molyneux, who writ a book of the independency of the parliament of Ireland upon the parliament here, which made a great noise the last session here, is lately dead, and suddenly. There is a very malignant fever in Dublin that takes away a great many people.
The harvest being backward, and corn scarce, especially in the north, where there are abundance of poor come out of Scotland, for want of corn there, the Lords Justices have restrained the exportation of it.
Capt. Baron, one of the clerks of the privy seal, is dead. Endorsed, R. Oct. 29–Nov. 8, 98. 3 pp. [S.P.32. 15. ff. 236– 237.]
Oct. 28.
Loo.
Royal warrant to the Lords Justices of Ireland, reciting that the King had allowed a pension of 8s. a day to Lieut. Col. du Bordac lately deceased; that by warrant dated the 14th inst. he granted 4s. a day of the pension to the widow of Capt. du Passy, and assigned 1s. 3d. of the pension to Capt. des Herbiers to make up his pension to 5s. a day. The warrant grants the remainder, 2s. 9d. a day, to Capt. Dampierre: upon the first vacancy on the military list of pensions on the establishment in Ireland, Capt. Dampierre is to have a further allowance to make up his pension to 5s. [S.O.1. 14. p. 147.]
Oct. 31. Warrant to apprehend Captain Macalaster alias Johnson, for coming out of France without leave. [S.P.44. 349. p. 87.]
[Oct.]
Loo.
Warrant to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland. By letter to the privy council of 20 Sept. last we signified that our regiment of foot commanded by Col. George Hamilton, ordered into Scotland, should be upon the pay of that kingdom from Oct. 21st, N.S., to which day the regiment has been paid by the States of Zealand. It is fit that the regiment be maintained so long as it stays here, until provision for its transportation be made and a fair wind offer. We have for that end allowed Col. George Hamilton to draw upon the commissaries of our army for £500. The bills drawn by Colonel Hamilton are to be charged upon the running pay of the regiment from Oct. 21, as soon as the same lands, in so far as the colonel has received here. The regiment should not be burthened with the exchange. [S.P.57. 17.pp. 56–7.]
Oct. Docquets of a pardon to Alexander Knightley, gent., of all treasons and offences, provided he transport himself out of his Majesty's dominions [S.O.3. 20. f.159 v.]: of a grant to Thomas Hoy, doctor of physick, of [the post of] reader of physick in the university of Oxford with a salary of £40 per ann. [ibid.]: of the denization of Sir David Collier, bart.; of the presentation of Richard Sissison, clerk, to the rectory of Patrington, in Yorkshire, now void in law and in the king's gift by simony [ibid.]: of the appointment of Nathaniel Blakeston, esq., to be governor of the province and territory of Maryland in America [ibid. f. 160]: of the erection of Gloucester Hall in the university of Oxford into a college by the name of Worcester College [ibid.]