BHO

Index: I

Pages 623-624

Calendar of State Papers, Ireland, 1603-1606 . Originally published by Longman and Co, London, 1872.

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Citation:

I.

Imokelly, 225.

Inchequyu (also Inchequin), grant of manor of, to Sir Richd. Boyle, 139.

Inchvinary, 195. See Inchviekriny.

Inchviekriny, 195.

Inchyolaghan, 72.

Inishemore, 16.

Infanta, the, title spoken of in Ireland, 27, 47.

Inns of Court, English, students from Ireland, of English descent, admitted there, 233.

Insholeshan. See Inchyolaghan.

Instructions, execution of, postponed, because of the term commencing, 114.

— for Ireland, 496.

Interrogatories administered to Sir Patrick Barnewall, 449.

Ireland, symbolised by figure of an Irishman, xii.

, when civilised by law, will be a commonwealth, which now is but a common misery, 112.

, for want of coin, pines in the midst of plenty, 112.

, famine in, 118.

, grants of, made by Kings of England to the eldest sons, 132, 133.

, memorials for reformation of, 134.

, discovery of its decayed state, and means to reimpower it, by Chief Justice Saxey, 217.

, questions and answers concerning state of, 229.

, discourse on, by Richard Hudson, 230.

, its ancient division into five provinces, 231.

, its division into four provinces by the English, 231.

, its subdivisions, 231.

, colonies, English, in, 232.

, inhabitants consist of English, of Irish descended of English, and of the mere and ancient Irishmen, 232.

, establishment of English laws in, 232.

, full of idle men, without any trade, ready for rebellion, 235.

, the reform of Ireland worth more than the regaining of France, 326.

, waste and decay of, 580.

, unables the soldier to live as formerly, 580.

, settlers in, 249.

Ireland, Thomas, 312.

Ireton, Henry, trustee for new university of Dublin, xcviii.

Irhirack, 89.

Irish, the, when once they have given up the sword, the most litigious people of all others, 111.

, in Ulster, reverence Chief Baron Pelham, going Judge of assize, as a good angel, 111.

Irish families in Leinster becoming peaceable and well affected, 158.

Irish, none should be judges or privy councillors, 221.

, 21 years' leases recommended for, 223.

, for the most part tenants from year to year, or for three years at longest, 223.

, 4,000 proud beggars in France and Spain, 229.

— volunteers for Spain, 336.

— going to serve as volunteers in Spain, not to come through England, 336, 345.

, the King's government scandalised by the crowds of miserable able-bodied Irishmen crowding the ways of England to embark for Spain, 336, 345.

, crowds of, with their wives and children, burden the English towns and villages, 337, 343.

— volunteers, 340, 345.

, Capt. Delahoid's men hired for Spain remain in London for want of transport though the captain received the payment, 336.

, ways to Court of London crowded with able-bodied, 336.

, flight of many to France and Spain, 345.

, their infinite love for the Spaniard, 385.

, numbers flocking to Spain, 385.

, to get pensions from the King, 385.

, few Irish of note in Munster but have a kinsman pensioner of Spain, 385.

, all that land in Spain are allotted pensions, 385.

, the, a proud, obstinate, and disobedient people, 450.

, a multitude of Irish peasants begging with wives and children about London, 462.

, formerly would relieve the soldier without money, 580.

, now will hardly do it for money, 580.

, beggars in England, 462, 487.

, —, transport of, forbidden, 487.

, —, proclamation suggested that they depart from England, 487.

, —, are fugitives returning from Spain, France, and Low Countries, 487.

, —, 80 land from France in Munster, 512.

, —, 200 more, 512.

Irish cuttings, 558.

, destroyed the establishment made by Queen Elizabeth in Monaghan, 558.

Irishry, the, becoming better affected, 158.

, better affected to the Crown than ever before, 371.

Irris, barony of, 331.

Ishy ne greah, 68.

Ittie, 196.