BHO

Index: P

Pages 671-678

Calendar of State Papers, Ireland, 1608-1610. Originally published by Longman and Co, London, 1874.

This free content was digitised by double-rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:

P.

Pagador, the, of Biscay, 14.

Pale, spoil of, taken by the Neyles of the Fews, x.

, Tyrone's tenants fly into, from his exactions, xxxi.

, lawyer of, employed by the inhabitants of Cavan, to protest against their removal, xcii.

, —, what he claimed for them, ib.

, —, not allowed to defend their rights, ib.

, "risings out" of, dismissed on O'Dogherty's death, 6.

, first plantation in, the best one made in Ireland, 17.

, the, 109.

, merchants of, claim exorbitant mortgages on Tyrconnell's lands, 283.

, the English, how the English language has been preserved in, 358.

, decayed churches in, warrant for repairing, 422.

, priests of, 474.

, the, 498.

, abuses concerning the military forces in, according to Barnaby Riche, 551.

, compositions of, receipts of, 577.

Palmer, Mr. Justice, 73, 77.

, Peter, 233.

Palmerston, rectory of, 514.

Paper Office, otherwise the office of the Clerk of the Papers, cv.

, first created in Ireland in 1703, ib.

, Joshua Dawson, first clerk of the papers, ib.

, office made joint to him and his son Arthur, ib.

, proof that Sir Arthur Chichester's papers were once in the Paper Office, ib.

, how they passed thence to the Philadelphia Library, ib.

Parishes in the six counties, 403.

"Park," the, tough of, 395.

Parkins, Lieutenant, servitor, to be an undertaker, 428.

Parliament, motives for holding a, in Ireland, 451.

, number of, since Conquest, ib.

, various questions concerning, ib.

, the King's intention to hold, 523.

, —, gives much satisfaction, ib.

Parratt, Sir James, see Perrot.

Parreses, John de, rector of English College at Valladolid, 51.

Parrot, see Perrott.

, Thos., pensioner, 337.

Parsons, Father, pretended messages from, xlii.

, Lawrence, clerk of crown and peace in Munster, 431.

, Sir William, 114.

, surveyor, 367.

, Mr., King's surveyor, recommended to Salisbury, 391.

, William, 321, 391.

, —, to be an undertaker, 428.

, petition for lease of reversion of two rectories, 514.

, —, sends back letters of Lord Burleigh and Salisbury, found in Sir G. Fenton's papers, 528.

Passage, in Biscay, port of, 13.

Patentees, payments to, 579.

Patents of lands and offices passed in England, to be certified by the English Chancellor into Ireland, 119.

, to be enrolled there, 119, 127.

Patrick, St., miracle of, in converting Irish xxxix.

, —, King James will work a greater miracle, ib.

Paul's chair, 50.

Paulet, Sir George, command of, in Loughfoyle, xxiii.

, —, governor of Derry, slain by Sir Cahir O'Dogherty, lx.

, —, murderer of, apprehended, 8.

, —, —, executed, 11.

, —, 80.

, —, letters of, confirm charges against Sir Donnell O'Cahan, 314.

, the Lady, 78, 347.

, —, title of, composition made for, 420.

, —, sums in her relief, 544.

Paynton, Alexander, bill to, 19.

Payton, Christopher, assignee to Thomas Fleming, 511.

Peartree, the, Jock Graham of, ci.

Peck, Mr., recommended as attorney of Ulster, 444.

Peckham, real name of Robert Hanmer, 52.

, Edmund, ib.

, Sir George, ib.

Pedigree of John O'Reilly, 419.

Pedigrees, Irish-conceived, of great lords, 402.

Peerce, Captain, Little Ardes farmed to, xii.

Pelham, Chief Baron, well received in Tyrone and Tyrconnell, xx.

, Sir Edmund, 384, 388.

, —, Chief Baron, 388.

Pelletston, in county of Meath, 140, 382.

Pells, the, clerk of, E. Reynolds, 477.

Pembroke, Earl of, his cousin Sir Edward Herbert, sheriff of Cavan, 547, 548.

Pennington, Joseph, xcix.

Pension list, for 30 September 1610, 510.

Pensions, payments of, 579.

, list of, 336.

, — (Sept. 1610), 510.

Pensions of captains and soldiers, 442.

Peppard, Patrick, 324.

Perce, Mr. Henry, 367.

Percevall, Richard, appointed by Creswell to go into England, 53.

Percy, Sir Richard, pension of, 168.

, —, 367.

Perkins, Lieutenant, 368.

Perrott, see Parrot.

, Sir James, number of his men, 33.

, —, detained for prosecution of rebels, 150.

, —, 79, 97, 219, 363, 366, 510, 547.

, —, servitor, to be an undertaker 428.

, Sir John, his "project," xvi.

, —, 574.

Personnes, see Parsons.

Persons presentative, 403.

Petition of Florence M'Carthy to Salisbury, 117.

— of John (brother of Sir Arthur) Aston to Salisbury, 125.

— of Lady Arabella Stuart to King, 152.

— of Nicholas Weston, for the fishing of the Ban, 199.

— of Sir Thomas Phillips, 202.

— of Alexander Spicer, 211.

— of Richard Plunkett, of Rathmore, 221.

— of John Leigh to Prince Henry, 247.

— for grants on sale of H.M. lands, list of, 325.

— of Lord Roch, of Fermoy, 340.

— of W. Angell, 341.

— of James O'Farrel, and the inhabitants of the county of Longford, 354.

— of Captain Bourchier, 374.

— of Saml. Molyneux, ib.

— of Mabel Countess of Kildare, and Sir Robt. Digby, 376.

— of Moriertagh M'Brien Arra, Protestant Bishop of Killalo, 384.

— of Sir Awla M'Awla, 395.

— of Sir Donell O'Cahan to Privy Council, 412.

— of Sir Neal O'Donnell, 414.

— of Sir Donell O'Cahan, 434.

— of Neale and Nachtain O'Donnell, 437.

— of John O'Connor, 456.

— of Lord Thomond, 400.

— of Margaret, Corbett, 414.

— of John Crowe to Salisbury, 419.

— of Murtagh O'Dougan, 468.

— of Captain Richard Tyrrell, 468.

— of Ninian Watson, 479.

— of Richard Waldrom, 477.

— —, to be dispensed for five years from personal residence on his proportion in Ulster, ib.

— —, offers George Sharpe and Clement Cotteril as his deputies, ib.

— of John White against Trinity College and Sir Henry Power, 484.

— of W. Hill, gent., for compensation for the tithe fish of the Ban, 505.

— of Randal Ince to Salisbury, 514.

— of William Parsons to Salisbury, ib.

— of James Duffe, ib.

Peyton, auditor, 112, 367.

, Christopher, 511.

Phelimy Reagh, [M'Davitt], the firebrand and seducer of O'Dogherty, 8. See M'Davitt.

Philadelphia Papers, the account hitherto given of their removal to America, ciii.

, deposited in Library in 1799, ib.

, —, by a supposed grandson of a Lord Chancellor of Ireland, ib.

, communications with the descendant of the depositor, in America, civ.

, the depositor was Mr. Henry Hamilton Cox, ib.

— Library, see Philadelphia Papers.

Philipstown, Sir F. Rushe's men at, 33.

, fort, cost of repairing, 408.

, constable of, Sir Garret Moore, 508.

Phillips, Callye, grant of reversion of a pension to, 49.

, Sir Thomas, commanded in Coleraine, xxiv.

, —, claims a good scope of the Fugitives' lands, liv, lxxxii, lxxxviii.

, —, employed by the King to accompany the agents of the city of London in their journey through Ulster, lxxxii.

, —, men assigned to, 10.

, —, numbers of his men, 33.

, —, fishing of the Ban sequestered on, 21.

, —, 66, 97, 202, 248, 334, 366, 494, 508, 509, 510, 541, 544, 547.

, —, repair of, to England, 189.

, —, recommended by Chichester, ib.

, —, estimate of the profits to the Londoners of their plantation, 248.

, —, promotes it, ib.

, —, but to his own loss, ib.

, —, has made seven miles of road through bogs and woods to transport timber, ib.

, —, has six years lease of same yet to run, ib.

, —, his estate not much improved since Salisbury induced him to come out of France, 249.

, —, brief of the losses he is like to undergo, ib.

, —, dangers he has undergone in maintaining his post, ib.

, —, the relief it was to the fugitives of Derry, ib.

, —, it stayed O'Dogherty, ib.

, —, appointed to accompany the commissioners of London for the plantation, 266.

, —, recommended by the Privy Council, 269.

, —, accompanies the agents of the city of London for the plantation, 287.

, —, report on iron ore found at Toome, 290.

, —, contest with Bishop of Derry, 294.

, —, commended by Chichester to Privy Council, 297.

, —, title of, composition made for, 420.

, —, to be a servitor, 428.

, Dudley, 494.

Philpots, Michael, 74.

Philtown, near Youghal, 126.

Physician to State, Dr. Metcalf, 507.

Pierce, Henry, 508.

, Capt. William, 107.

Piercie, John, a Jesuit, 50.

Piercy, see Percy.

, Henry, 227.

, Sir Richard, bill to, 19.

, —, 512.

Piers, see Pierce.

, Henry, fine of, 577.

Piggot, Mr., lxxv, 217.

Pikeman, Captain John, 127, 512.

, Captain, 367, 547.

, —, servitor, to be an undertaker, 428.

Pikman, John, 78. See Pikeman.

Pinder, Thomas, 346.

Pine, Nicholas, pensioner, 337.

Pinnar, Captain, 548.

Pinnock, Michael, 511.

Pipe staves, waste of wood in making, 174.

Pirates, "Tramontane" sent against, 28.

, too numerous to be resisted by the president of Munster, 28.

, ready to serve against the rebels and fugitives, 29.

, visit to Baltimore, 42.

, not attacked by Captain Williams, 42.

— in Munster, 69, 71, 99, 100, 105.

— at Baltimore seize a Spanish carvell with 6,000l. of gold concealed, 100.

, Lord Danvers will take care of it for the King of Spain, ib.

, believes there is more gold still concealed in her, ib.

, denies the imputations that would liken the coasts of Munster to the coast of Barbary, ib.

, Bishop of Cork writes to Lords of Council in favour of Mr. Crooke, of Baltimore, 100.

, Mr. Crooke is wrongly charged with piracy, ib.

, want of such a statute in Ireland as 28 Hen. VIII. to try them, 105.

, they are therefore to be sent over from time to time for trial in England, 106.

, to be sent to England for trial, 119.

, Lord Danvers afraid of, and detained from sailing by fear, 130.

, their suppression strongly urged, ib.

, captured by Sir Theobald Burke, 141.

, ordered to be tried in England, ib.

, account of, ib.

, names of, and proceedings regarding, 142.

, take a Dutch prize, 141.

— fight with a Frenchman, 142.

— to be diligently watched, ib.

— sent to Chester, ib.

, Lord Thomond's proceedings against, 151.

, brought to Dublin by him, 186.

, spoils found in their hands, 188.

, to be sent to Bristol or Barnstaple, ib.

, expect the King's pardon, ib.

, 200, 212, 329, 330, 343, 371, 373, 473, 480, 483, 486.

, Trevor, Roope, and Drake to be sent over, 251.

, arrival of, at Munster, 273.

, their number, 277.

, Sir R. Moryson's proceedings with them, ib.

, elect Bishop admiral, ib.

, proposed to employ them in Virginia, 278.

, party of, at Tunis, ib.

, Pepwell's attempt to persuade them to abandon piracy, 279.

, 36 of them hanged, ib.

, Chichester sends four horsemen with the Admiral's warrant into Munster to arrest the vice-admiral and others, abettors of piracy, 353.

, more necessary to have ships on the Irish coast in summer than in winter, 371.

, the galleys in winter cannot face the seas, ib.

, Captain Hull, commissioner for parleying with, 398.

, continual resort of, to Munster coast, ib.

, list of, apprehended in Munster, ib.

, note for trial of, 424.

, 50 men sent against, by Sir R. Moryson, 446.

, particulars regarding, 457.

, have now come into the Channel near Dublin, and robbed both English and Scotch ships, 473.

, they lay watching for the Londoners' money sent to Coleraine, ib.

, but missed it, ib.

, has ordered up the King's pinnace from Munster, ib.

, hears this day that Coward and Barrett, pirates, are taken by one Lenan de Rosse, a Dutchman, who lay a fishing near the Black Rock in Connaught, ib. See Rosse.

, Sackewell (Salkeld), that petty rebel, killed, 480.

, Coward says that next spring they intend to fire the fleet of fishermen at Newfoundland, ib.

, if not taken to mercy, ib.

, Chichester advises that they be pardoned, ib.

, otherwise they will prey upon subject as well as stranger, ib.

, examinations of four, before the Privy Council at Edinburgh, 483.

, Saukewell thrown overboard by Easton, who offers to submit, 495.

, Chichester has granted them protection for 40 days, knowing his own weakness, ib.

, has only the "Lion's Whelp," ib.

, the Munster, 547.

, treaty for their submission, ib.

, pirates and priests, Chichester wishes they had a commission for executing, 473.

Plantation, see Ulster plantation, also Londoners.

Plantations, in Ireland have been many, 17.

, that of the Pale the best, ib.

, that of Munster the worst, ib.

, English, various, made in Ireland, ib.

— partly rooted out by Irish, ib.

— partly degenerated, ib.

, same fate to be expected for new plantations, if precautions be not taken, ib.

, early, in Ulster, lxxi.

, enumerated, lxxi–lxxv.

, Chatterton's, in 1572, lxxii.

, Sir T. Smith's, 1572, ib.

, Earl of Essex's, 1573, ib.

, their failure, lxxiii.

— in Leinster, ib.

— —, in what reign, ib.

— —, the reverses of, ib.

— —, defects of, designed to be remedied in Ulster plantation, lxxv.

— of King's and Queen's counties, lxxiii.

— —, formerly the O'Moore's and O'Connor's country, ib.

— of Munster, lxxiii.

— —, what counties planted, ib.

— —, from what counties in England the planters came, ib.

— —, the reverses of this plantation, ib.

— —, seignories of 12,000 acres and 6,000 acres too large, lxxv.

— —, conditions of, lxxvi.

— —, fate of, ib.

— of Ulster, defects of Leinster and Munster plantations designed to be remedied in, lxxv. See also Ulster plantation.

— —, commissioners for forming project of, lxxxiv, n.

— —, their names, ib.

— —, their project, lxxxv.

— —, Sir Arthur Chichester's objections to, ib.

— —, contrasts it with the occupation and plantation of Canaan by the Hebrews, ib.

— —, where there were cities ready built, ib.

— —, but none in Ulster, ib.

— —, proceedings under the commismission of 1609, lxxxvi.

— —, the difference between the Bishop of Derry and Sir Thomas Phillips endeavoured to be composed by them, lxxxviii.

— —, lay in camp nine weeks, ib.

— —, what work they did, ib.

— —, determined again the termon lands for the King, ib.

— —, made maps of every barony, ib.

— —, commission of 1610, xci.

— —, to give the undertakers possession, ib.

— —, proceedings under commission of 1608, lxxix.

, King attends meetings of Council about, 129.

— of Londonderry, articles of, 136.

, commissioners for, ib.

— —, memoranda on, by Sir J. Davys, ib.

, orders and conditions of, 139.

, abstract of, 140.

— of escheated counties, commissioners for, project of, 139.

, printed books regarding, 155.

, Chichester has made them public, but does not know the effect of them, 157.

, proportions in which the lands are to be assigned, 158.

, mode of assignments to be followed, 159.

, lottery not a fitting mode, ib.

, tenures of escheated lands, 160.

, commissioners to have discretion as to tenure, ib.

, few here will bear any part in, 161.

, commissioners of, their proportions, 171,

, difficulties of carrying out the project, 176.

, objection to take part in, ib.

, natives will not change their course of living, ib.

, instructions to commissioners for, 181.

, services of Sir John Davys in, 185.

, city of London undertakes part of, 266.

, commissioners for, sent by, ib.

, cannot be done by private men, 270.

, must be the work of the commonwealth, ib.

, proposed that every parish in England shall plant one, two, or three men, ib.

, commissioners of, report of their proceedings, 280.

, tropic or turn-point of the journey, 282.

, different parties appearing before them, 282, 283.

, their journey homewards to Fermanagh and Cavan, ib.

, the survey of Ulster will be ready in a fortnight, 288.

, report of commissioners on Fermanagh, ib.

, report of Sir J. Davys on commission in Cavan, 292.

, inquiry as to termon lands, ib.

, confirms the report of last year, ib.

, instructions for survey of Derry plantation, 316.

, answers of the viewers who have lately been at Derry, 316–318.

, J. Carvyle, of Nunmonkton, co. Cork, project of, on 8,000 acres, 323.

, Chichester sends suggestions for distribution of lands, 390.

, Lord Salisbury said to intend to be an undertaker, 391.

, memoranda on, by Chichester, 401.

, maps of six counties sent to Salisbury, 401.

, brief of commissioners' proceedings, 409.

, distribution of precincts, 404.

, natives not to plant with Britons or Scots, 410.

, but to plant with servitors, 411.

, questions concerning the plantation, 415.

, regarding the church, ib.

, regarding corporate towns, ib.

, regarding transplantation, ib.

, answers thereto, 416.

, commissioners' proceedings, 419.

, nomination of, 424.

, plantation of Derry, arrival of the first planters, 437.

, ill-chosen and bad workmen, ib.

, will cause general scarcity of provisions, 438.

, commissions for the several, authority given for, 452.

, powers of the commissioners, 460.

, of Ulster, commissioners for, 580.

, instructions for, 580.

Plase, Henry, named assumed by Killinghall, 51.

Plomley, Captain, detained by tempests, 130.

Plumlie, a pirate, 69, 99.

Plunket, Sir Christopher, 478.

, —, popish books, &c., sent to his son, 192.

, —, brought up at Douay College, ib.

, —, security taken for his appearance, 192.

, —, surrender and re-grant of lands to, 518.

, Mr. Luke, 376, 381.

, son of Lord Killene, 150.

, Oliver, of Gibbstown, 140.

, —, condemned at suit of Sir G. Moore, 140.

, Oliver, 382.

, Richard, 221.

, Sir Thomas, 221, 382.

, of Clonybrenin, 170.

Pointall, 398.

Pontderune garrison, 541.

Pope, the, physician of, suspected of poisoning Tyrconnell, xlvii.

, the, grants the kingdom of Ireland to Tyrone, 13.

, army to land at Broadhaven, 14.

, the, 106, 283.

, has commanders and commissioners in Ireland, 463.

, names of, ib.

Popery, Chichester, has endeavoured the extirpation of, 521.

Popish books and manuscripts discovered by mayor of Chester, 192.

, intended to be brought by one Hamlyn, ib.

, were to be delivered to son of Sir Christopher Plunket, 192.

Portaferry, grant of, to Pierce Tumolton, 506.

Portlogh, precinct of, 404.

Portmarnock, tithes of, granted to Thomas Earl of Ormond, 506.

Portmore, battle of, 123.

, praise of Sir Hugh O'Niel's valour at, 123.

Portrush, 209.

Portrushe, customs of port of, 136. See Portrush.

Portugal, armada of, sent for to the Groyne, 30.

Poulet, see Paulet.

Poundage, cities seek release from, 139.

Powder sent into Ireland, return of, 148.

Powell, William, 548.

Power, Sir Henry, 97, 213, 254, 255, 334, 366, 379, 484, 508, 510.

, —, men delivered to, 5.

, —, number of his men, 33.

, —, made governor of Queen's County, by Earl of Devonshire, 254, 255.

, Capt. John, bill to, 19.

, John, suit of, with Lord Roche, 524.

, Sir William, 484.

Powerscourt castle, plan of Tyrlagh O'Toole to surprise it, 18.

Powlett, Sir George, land purchased by, at Derry, 59.

, —, this land to be purchased by the grantee of Innishowen, 60.

Prator, Mrs., a Catholie, 52.

Prayer, Book of Common, cost of printing it in Irish, 75.

Prayer-book, Common, Irish translation of, 184.

Precincts, purpose of the commission of July 1609, regarding, lxxxvi.

, distribution of, to undertakers, 404.

, English, ib.

, Scottish, ib.

, servitors and natives, 405.

, reasons for joint plantation of servitors and natives, 411.

, grant, number, names, and quantities of, in the six counties, 417.

, distribution of, unfair to servitors and natives, 521.

Presidency of Ulster intended, xiv, and foll.

, —, abandoned as hopeless, xvi.

, —, opinions as to its necessity, xxi–xxii.

, —, peremptorily objected to by O'Neil, xviii.

President, for Connaught to lie at Athlone, xv.

, for Munster, at Limerick, ib.

, at Armagh or Newry, for Ulster, ib.

, nature of the president's office and powers, xv.

Presidents, two for Ireland, at Killmallock and Lifford, xvi.

, nature and term of office, ib.

, O'Neill desired to be president of Ulster, xvii.

, chiefs of Irish and Anglo-Irish race proposed to be presidents, ib.

, four presidents proposed by Thomas Cusake, ib.

, three to be of native birth, ib.

, of Ulster, Sir Robert Jacob urges the appointment of, 197.

, —, authority of their warrants, 447.

, of Munster, his court for the convenience of undertakers, lxxvi.

Preston, Robert, 381.

Priests, the, in Ireland, magnify Tyrone, 23.

, great influx of, takes place, 30.

, reported to use "execrations and bannyngs" against many persons, 31.

, intelligence from a, 49.

, more dangerous than pirates, 143.

— Chichester advises that they be restrained, ib.

, cannot be expulsed but by fire and sword, ib.

, exorbitant presumption of, 147.

, flock like locusts into kingdom, ib.

, to be castigated like rogues and beggars by martial law, ib.

, no answer made to this suggestion, ib.

, many priests, seminaries, and Jesuits lately come into Ireland, 192.

, have held many meetings, the last in Tipperary, ib.

, 7,000 persons present, ib.

, said to be for pardons from Rome for sins of last 16 years, ib.

, such meetings always have been forerunners of rebellion, ib.

, lately arrived (1609), 203.

— and Jesuits, have flocked in in numbers, 240.

— —, the most eager and stirring come and go with the swallow, ib.

— —, sell indulgences, &c., and reap a rich harvest, ib.

— —, gather large assemblies for pardons and absolutions, ib.

— —, are protected by the people, ib.

— —, a large assembly last week at Monaincha, on borders of co. Tipperary, 240, 251.

— —, another at Inishgaltagh, in Connaught, ib.

, described by Chichester as "viperous," 265.

, obstruct the plantation, ib.

, frame reports of invasion and insurrection, 269.

, styled "caterpillars," ib.

, proposed to hang them by martial law, ib.

, persuade the people of the speedy return of the fugitives, 277.

, increased number and boldness of, 284.

, are saluted in the streets, ib.

, draw thousands to their idolatrous sacrifices, ib.

, convert many Protestants to popery, ib.

, many sent over from abroad, all able and lusty young men, 299.

, multiplied vastly in the country, ib.

, have wrought the people not to pray for Church or King, ib.

, a sudden blow is to be feared, ib.

, preach unlawfulness of service in Sweden, 300.

, flock to Ireland in the spring of the year to gather money, 399.

, if arrested by soldiers, are rescued by the young men and women of the city, ib.

, Romish, come in greater abundance than ever, 444.

, masses said openly, ib.

, draw noblemen and gentlemen's sons to schools beyond sea, 445.

, must transport them, or take other severer course, ib.

, one lately apprehended saying mass at Multifarnam, ib.

, but rescued by the country, ib.

, a man fined for refusing to assist in arresting a priest, 447.

, great influx of, into Ireland from Rome and elsewhere, 461.

, spreaders of falsehood, 462.

, "archpractizing," ib.

, arrival of, 474.

— of the Pale, ib.

, vicars general lately appointed in every diocese, 475.

, are to appoint a curate in every parish, ib.

, not a marriage, baptism, or burial in Ireland but with a priest, ib.

— of Ulster, preach that the Irish are a despised people, worse used than any ever heard or read of, to be thrust out of their homes, after being promised pardon and protection, 503.

, and Jesuits, would be prosecuted by the English and Scotch undertakers, xciv.

— —, who would be justices and jurymen, ib.

— —, no Irish would prosecute them for merely doing their church duties, ib.

— and pirates, Chichester wishes they had a commission for executing, 473.

Primate, the, of Armagh, lxxxvii, lxxxviii, 62.

, petition of, about Erenagh and Termon lands, 390.

, —, not presented till last night, ib.

Prince, the, aid for making knight to be levied in Ireland, 174.

, the young, charged with seducing Lord Essex's daughter, 453.

Priory lands in Down and Antrim, quit-rents of, 448.

Proclamation, for transplantation of the Græmes, xcvi.

, dated 4th December 1603, ib., note.

— at Cavan, that the natives retire from the lands of the English and Scottish undertakers, xcii.

, —, and settle under the servitors, ib.

, against alienations by spiritual persons, 238.

, 20th August 1610, with conditions of plantation, dated at Lifford, 490.

Project of plantation, J. Carvyle's, of Nunmonkton, co. Cork, on 8,000 acres, 323.

Proportions, undertakers', in the Ulster plantation, 116.

, —, bishops and incumbents' proportions in, ib.

, in Ulster plantation of single, middle, and double, should be given up, and the work be by baronies, 368, 391.

, how marked in maps of escheated counties, 403.

, —, with glebe land, ib.

Provost Marshal of Connaught, 252.

, —, Francis Annesley prays reversion of, after Capt. Charles Coote's death, ib.

, Edward Lenton, 507.

, of Leinster, Robert Bowen, ib.

"Punch," the, in the Indian land system, like Tyrone's rent collectors, xxviii.

Purcell, Denis, 512.

, Edmund, 493, 494.

, Thomas, 511.

Purgatory of St. Patrick in Termon Magragh, 288.

Putt, William, 511.

Pyne, Henry, desires to introduce Irish timber for the navy, 39.

, —, report on timber from Ireland, 149.

Pynnar, Captain, 368. See Pinnar.