House of Commons Journal Volume 1: 02 January 1567

Journal of the House of Commons: Volume 1, 1547-1629. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1802.

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Citation:

'House of Commons Journal Volume 1: 02 January 1567', in Journal of the House of Commons: Volume 1, 1547-1629( London, 1802), British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/commons-jrnl/vol1/pp81-83 [accessed 22 July 2024].

'House of Commons Journal Volume 1: 02 January 1567', in Journal of the House of Commons: Volume 1, 1547-1629( London, 1802), British History Online, accessed July 22, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/commons-jrnl/vol1/pp81-83.

"House of Commons Journal Volume 1: 02 January 1567". Journal of the House of Commons: Volume 1, 1547-1629. (London, 1802), , British History Online. Web. 22 July 2024. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/commons-jrnl/vol1/pp81-83.

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In this section

Jovis, 2o Januarii

Defaulters.

This Day the Defaults were called ; and Twelve allowed by the House to make Default.

Lords adjourned.

Mr. Huyke sent in Word from the Lord Keeper, that the Lords had adjourned till One of the Clock, Afternoon.

Alms by the House.

The Alms given this Day by the House, for Relief of the Poor, amounted to the Sum of Nineteen Pounds Ten Shillings; to be distributed by Mr. Henry Knolles Senior, and Mr. Grymston.

Royal Assent to Bills.

In the Afternoon, about Three of the Clock, the Queen's Majesty sitting in the Parliament, Mr. Speaker made an excellent Oration, of Two Hours long, tending to the great Goodness of Almighty God, shewed unto this Realm, by the quiet Government of the Queen's Majesty; and shewed the Strength of Laws ; and, after Thanks to the Queen's Majesty for her gracious Pardon, offered the Subsidy, and the Pardon : And when the Lord Keeper had make a short Answer to the Special Points of the Oration, the Queen's Majesty's Assent was given to Thirty-four Acts. And immediately it pleased the Queen's Majesty to declare, in a most excellent Phrase of Speech and Sentence, that she seemed not pleased with the Doings of the Commons, for busying themselves, in this Session, with Matters which did not appertain at this Time;

Parliament dissolved.

but in the End, with comfortable Words, commanded this Parliament to be dissolved.