BHO

Henry VIII: March 1518

Pages 1236-1252

Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 2, 1515-1518. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1864.

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March 1518

1 March.
S. B.
3979. TOURNAY.
Pardon to the garrison, bringing certificates subscribed by the council there, according to the tenor set forth; viz. to James Scherard of Ludlowe, marches of Wales, Wm. Harvey, Rob. Hampsterley, John Smyth, John West, Th. Holt, John Ap Howell, Rob. Sandeford, John Crowcher, Geo. Watson, Th. Lynche, Th. Drumme, John Baynham, Wm. Bulmer, Rob. Hayward, Wm. Levet, Philip Ap Howell alias Williams, Ric. Colyson, Rowland Ap Richard, Rob. Wynge, Wm. Turner, David Gough, James Ap Ricardis, David Lloyd, Wm. Codmore, Wm. Nicholson, Gethyn Ap Meredith, Bernard Borowe, Th. Leder and Evan Ap Richard Del. Windsor, 1 March 9 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 1.
1 March.
P. S.
3980. For RIC. SIDNOR, clk.
Presentation to the church of Elston, Linc. dioc. void by death, at the King's disposal by the minority of Geo. Vernon. Windsor, 28 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Windsor, 1 March.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 12.
1 March.
Er. Ep. III. 5.
3981. ERASMUS to SAMPSON.
Common friends are a great bond of friendship: but Erasmus also remembers his acquaintance with Sampson at Cambridge and Tournay. He cannot forget that he owes to Sampson the offer of a prebend at Tournay; and if it took no effect his own absence was alone to blame. Is glad that he and John Mill (Molendinus) like the Paraphrase. Louvain, 1518.
2 March.
Er. Ep. III. 4.
3982. RICHARD SAMPSON, commissary for Wolsey, to ERASMUS.
Would not have written in Latin had Erasmus understood English. In his letters to John Mill, which four days since he gave Sampson to read, Erasmus had called Sampson unicus patronus. Professes his readiness to serve him for his own sake, and the sake of Mountjoy, Tunstal and Pace, the last of whom has great influence with the King and the Cardinal. Speaks of More and his Utopia. Tournay, 6 non. Mart. 1514.
3 March. 3983. For ROB. BROUWYN of Hadley, Suff., clothmaker.
Protection; going in the retinue of Sir Ric. Wingefelde, Lieutenant of Calais. Westm., 3 March.
Fr. 10 Hen. VIII. m. 5.
4 March.
R. O.
3984. ELIZABETH (ISABELLA) QUEEN OF DENMARK to QUEEN KATHARINE, her aunt.
In behalf of the bearer, John Holm and Arnold Hake, who had been promised a compensation for a ship and merchandize taken by the English. Copenhagen, 4 March 1518. Signed.
Lat., p. 1. Add.
5 March.
R. O.
3985. PACE to WOLSEY.
Has heard from the Lord Steward that there is some doubt whether the King will return towards London: he has had no commandment as yet to make provision but by the ways specified "in such gists as he hath send unto your grace." He knows no reason why the King's mind is changed. Thinks the King must leave this for London, as they cannot abide here, and there is no horse meat at Woodstock. The King wishes to know from Wolsey whether any of the royal palaces near London are infected with the sickness. Abyndon, 5 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
5 March.
R. O.
3986. DACRE to WOLSEY.
Sends a letter from the Scotch Queen, showing that she has always been very ill treated this year past; also copy of a safeconduct in which every article has been broken. Her jewels have not been delivered, nor her duties levied. She has been obliged to lay in wed (in pawn) the plate given her by the King, and is likely to be driven to extreme poverty, as Wolsey will learn by her messenger. She would have been still worse off had not Magnus and Dacre, when she was at Berwick the day before her entry into Scotland, taken more suspicion than they did before, for they drew up a book in the name of the Earl of Angus, by which he renounced all claim to her conjunct feoffment. Harbottle, 5 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: My Lord Cardinal.
5 March.
Er. Ep. App. 269.
3987. ERASMUS to ABP. WARHAM.
Is going to Venice or Basle, through Germany. The road is dangerous from robbers and the sickness. Intends to increase his store of books. Should it be his fate to return, will visit England and settle there. Begs his liberality. Is sorry to hear of Grocin's death. Thinks the war against the Turks is a mere blind. Lorenzo, the Pope's nephew, is attempting to occupy Campania, and has married the daughter of the King of Navarre. Wishes he had such a horse as Warham once sent by Erasmus to the Abbot of St. Bertin's. People wonder he is going at his age to undertake such a toilsome journey; whilst he is much more astonished that the Bishop of Paris, who is now nearly 70, should engage himself in tasks much more burthensome, for purposes not half so important, in the judgment of Erasmus. Louvain, 5 March 1518.
Er. Ep. App. 312. 3988. ERASMUS to ABP. WARHAM. (fn. 1)
Must take a journey to Basle or Venice. Begs him to use his interest with the King to obtain for Erasmus some competent present. Has been compelled to stay at Louvain on account of the theologians, who would have fallen upon him otherwise. Pace has traduced him for his poverty, whilst in his own estimation he is as rich as Midas. It is the province of his correspondent to remove this insinuation. May safely trust money to this messenger. Wants a useful nag. "Bene vale cum dulcissima conjugali liberisque charissimis." Has to publish one or two books of his epistles:—requests, if he has any, to send them by the bearer. Louvain, 1518.
Er. Ep. App. 306. 3989. ERASMUS to BP. FISHER.
Is preparing for his journey to print the New Testament, which he has revised to the best of his ability. If he has done with the papers Erasmus sent him by Peter the one-eyed, begs they may be returned; and if he has any message for Reuchlin, Erasmus will see it delivered. Wants a good quiet nag; and will be glad if the Bishop can send him one. The winter has been very tedious, and he is worn out with his labors. Complains of his treatment by Faber. Regrets Grocin's illness, though he was no friend to Erasmus. Has tried the King and his Achates (Wolsey) so often, that if this throw brings nothing he will not try again. Inveighs against the arts of princes and the impudence of the Roman Court. Louvain, 1518.
5 March.
Er. Ep. App. 266.
3990. ERASMUS to PACE.
A fine jest indeed! Pace's book is not more popular with the theologians than the Moria of Erasmus. The slur of poverty is the fault of the patrons of Erasmus. Pace ought to remove it by stirring up the friends of Erasmus in England,—especially as he now has a long journey in hand. Is to apply to Montjoy and Tunstal. Wants a good horse, and has sent his servant to buy one. Has sent him a Paraphrase and the Apology. Louvain, 5 March 1518.
5 March.
Er. Ep. App. 265.
3991. ERASMUS to MORE.
Begs he will give John all such letters as he thinks may be printed with a few alterations. If Urswick is still friendly, More may urge him to send Erasmus a horse, as he must go to Basle or Venice to edit his New Testament. Will take leave of authorship afterwards. The printers at Basle excuse their delay in the Utopia by reason of the preface added by Budæus. Has not yet seen Linacre's Therapeutica. Ridicules the war against the Turks, and the restrictions imposed by the Pope on both sexes who remain at home. "Prohibet Pontifex ne uxores absentium in bello domi voluptuentur, sed abstineant a cultus elegantia, ne utantur sericis, auro, aut gemmis ullis, fucum nullum attingant, vinum ne bibant, jejunent alternis diebus." More's wife is so wise and pious a woman she will gladly comply with these inhibitions. Sends him Pace's book: Conclusiones de veniis Pontificum et consilio de bello in Turcas suscipiendo. Has received from Cologne, Julius de cœlo exclusus. The press in Germany is very violent. Begs More will allow his servant to sleep in More's house a night or two for fear of the infection. Wishes him to obtain leave to bring away three horses. Has seen a French edition of the Utopia. Louvain, 5 March 1518.
Er. Ep. App. 305. 3992. ERASMUS to COLET.
Is sorry that Coclites returned without any letter from Colet. Receives so many letters from bishops, nobles and scholars in Italy, Spain, Germany and France, that if he had nothing else to do he would be fully employed. Is grieved for Grocin's sickness. Will be compelled, on account of his New Testament, to go to Basle or Venice. Colet will ask why an old man and a valetudinarian should undertake such a journey? But what can he do? Will die at his work, or, if he survive, pass the rest of his days in England: "is erit meus ab orbe undique inquinato secessus." Hypocrites reign in the courts of princes; the court of Rome is shameless; what can be more gross than these continued indulgences? And now a war against the Turk is made the pretext, when the real purpose is to drive the Spaniards from Naples; for Lorenzo, the Pope's nephew, who has married the daughter of the King of Navarre, lays claim to Campania.
Thanks him for urging his business with the King. Has need of ample provision. Has often baited for the King and the Cardinal (reverendissimus); but his nets always fail. Mountjoy's friendship is friendship, but no more. Some complaint is made that Erasmus declined the King's offer of a pension of 40l.; he was told to expect 100l., but the promise was not kept. Wonders that neither Francis nor the One-eyed brought him a letter; Peter is so buried in drink he cannot think of these things. Has sent his servant to England, who, as he hopes, will not return empty-handed. Urswick a year ago promised me a horse, and on that expectation I gave him a New Testament. "Gratulor tibi, qui Mariam (fn. 2) habeas domi, turbulentum, inquam, illum hominem; quem ut meis verbis diligenter salutes majorem in modum te rogo; nam et amo illum ex intimis animi affectibus, et debeo plurimum; ille me suis precibus fulcit, ille epistolis et consolatur et admonet." Louvain, 1518.
5 March.
Er. Ep. App. 263.
3993. ERASMUS to BOVILL.
Was glad that he escaped the detestable sickness. Congratulates Croke and the University. Is surprised that any should be found there to take the part of Faber. Would have acted otherwise had it been Standish and not Faber: "longo aliter belluam accepissem." Has completed the New Testament. Has received a letter from Grey, dated Paris. Begs his compliments to Vaughan, Humphrey, Brian, Watson and Gerard. Louvain, 5 March 1518.
5 March.
Er. Ep. App. 264.
3994. ERASMUS to MARCUS LAURINUS.
Has proposed to visit him in Lent, but is detained at Antwerp. Is sending a servant to England. Compliments to More and Pace. Begs Marcus to forward his servant's passage to Calais or Dunkirk. Louvain, 5 March 1518.
5 March.
Er. Ep. App. 267.
3995. ERASMUS to _ (fn. 3)
Has not been unmindful of finding him a physician. Begs him to assist his servant whom he is sending to England. Hopes his father in law, the comptroller, is well. Louvain, 5 March 1518.
Ib. App. 268. A similar letter addressed to _ (fn. 4) On the same subject.
5 March.
Teulet, r. 15.
3996. LEO X. to FRANCIS I.
Has been asked by the "Dominus Sanctæ Mesme," bailiff of Leon (Leonensis), whom Francis sent to Rome, to confirm at the request of Albany the privileges of the kingdom of Scotland. Has already replied to Albany that he would take into consideration (inspicere) those privileges sooner than anything else. Can deny nothing, either to Francis or to the Duke, to whom by the wish of Francis he is so nearly related. (fn. 5) Is willing to confirm them if Albany will come to Rome, as he has promised, and offer due obedience in the name of the kingdom. Hopes Francis will endeavor to compose the disputes that have arisen in France relative to the house of Boulogne (domus Bononiensis), as he is the cause of the Pope's near affinity to that family. Rome, 5 March 1518, 5 Leo X.
Lat.
5 March.
S. B.
3997. For RIC. ROKEBY.
Lease of the manor called Burton Feldis, alias Burton Leez, York, at an annual rent of 13l. 6s. 8d., and 10s. of increase. Del. Hampton Court, 5 March.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 13.
6 March.
P. S.
3998. For TH. LYNACRE, clk.
Presentation to the church of Hollesworth, Exeter dioc., void by death. Windsor, 22 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Hampton Court, 6 March.
Pat. 9. Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 12.
7 March.
R. O.
3999. SI. DE TAXIS to WOLSEY.
Requesting payment of 200 crowns promised him for the despatch of several posts when Pace was with the Swiss. Has since done all in his power to serve England in Spain, Flanders and Germany. Begs Wolsey to write to the treasurer at Calais to pay the posts between Calais and Brussels. Worms, 7 March.
Fr., pp. 2. Add.: Monseigneur le Cardinal d'Iorck, Grant Chancellier d'Angleterre.
9 March.
R. O.
4000. SION to HENRY VIII.
Credence for Matt. Beccaria, the bearer. Zurich, vii. id. Mart. 1518. Signed.
Lat., p. 1. Add.
10 March.
Giust. Desp. II. 165.
4001. SEBASTIAN GIUSTINIAN to the DOGE.
Has visited the Spanish ambassador, who had refused to see him before. He says that Francesco Cornaro, the ambassador, is in great favor with the Catholic King, who is well disposed to Venice. He also stated there was a good understanding between France and Spain, though England had endeavored to prevent it. London, 10 March 1518.
10 March.
P. S.
4002. For ADAM GRENE of Fallingworth, Linc.
Protection; going in the retinue of Sir Ric. Wyngfeld, Deputy of Calais. Windsor, 12 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 10 March.
R. O. 4003. EXPEDITION AGAINST THE TURKS.
Draft ratification by Henry VIII. of the five years' truce published by the Pope, 10 March 1517, with a view to a general enterprize against the Turks.
Draft, with corrections in Wolsey's hand, Lat., pp. 3.
11 March.
R. O.
4004. JERNINGHAM to WOLSEY.
Received his and the King's letters on the 9 March, with a book of articles by William Bartilmewe. 400 soldiers have been discharged: this pay day 100 more. Could not discharge the 400 remaining, as Leonard Friscobald had not paid 1,000l. out of 3,000l. promised on the 8 March. Fowler did not bring the money from Calais, as Wolsey had advertised in his of the 26 Feb., till the 6 March. The soldiers are poor, and much in debt. It will be necessary to devise some substantial way for discharging the garrison and laborers "at the entering of the castle when it is at defence;" otherwise the town will be in great danger. Tournay, 11 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: My Lord Cardinal of York. Endd.
13 March.
Er. Ep. App. 274.
4005. ERASMUS to BEATUS RHENANUS.
Is quite ashamed and vexed at Pace's most frigid tract. His swans are geese: ανθρακες θησαυρος. Is sure that all his learned friends will be sorry for it. Meanwhile Pace is in great good fortune, and in high favor with the King and the Cardinal. Has written to More to dissuade Pace from such follies. Laments the evils of the time. Pope and princes treat the people as cattle, not as human beings. Louvain, 13 March 1518.
13 March.
P. S.
4006. For the MONASTERY of HOLY CROSS, WHAREWELL, Winch. dioc.
Restitution of temporalities on the election of Avelena Cowdrey as abbess, vice Matilda Rowse, deceased. Hampton Court, 5 March 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 13 March.
ii. Petition of Richard Bp. of Winchester for the above, stating he has confirmed the election. 3 March 1517.
14 March.
Er. Ep. App. 275.
4007. ERASMUS to BOMBASIUS.
Was revived at the sight of his letters. What does he mean by saying that he is relegatus instead of legatus? "Frigebat olim Trebatius apud Brittannos; et quanto tu felicior cui totam hyemem in Helvetiorum æstuariis sudare licuerit!" Such employments, he must remember, produce Bishops and Cardinals. Erasmus always deplores having left Rome. Now old age and grey hairs prevent his return thither. Complains of the theologians. Praises Pace for his many good qualities, but regrets the publication of his work, De Utilitate Studiorum. His friends expected from him a very different specimen of his learning and ability: if his aim was serious, there is nothing serious in it; if jocose, nothing witty. It is loosely put together, and Erasmus considers the jests upon his poverty and his unpopularity with the theologians as unjustifiable. Louvain, 14 March 1518.
14 March.
P. S.
4008. For ALEX. MANSENO.
Licence to import 500 tuns of Gascon wine. Windsor, 28 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 14 (fn. 6) March.
Fr. 9 Hen. VIII. m. 6.
15 March.
Giust. Desp. II. 166.
4009. SEBASTIAN GIUSTINIAN to the DOGE.
Rode to the King at Richmond, who is in some trouble, as three of his pages have died of the plague. Was graciously received: told him the news of the Turks, from whom, his majesty said, there was nothing to fear this year, as he had received intelligence from Rhodes. Sebastian pointed out the threatening nature of their preparations. The King laughed, and said Venice was on such good terms with the Turk, she had nothing to fear. Sebastian replied, they had made terms with Selim out of necessity, and from dread of the formidable power of the Sultan. "Tell your Signory," said the King, "there is a person more formidable than the Turk, who denies he has engaged any lansknechts, and yet I know he has hired them at two crowns per man." Sebastian replied, he thought it very unlikely such a thing should have escaped the knowledge of so wise a man as the Venetian ambassador in the French court. "Upon this the King drew me nearer to him, and also took my secretary by the hand,—a gesture he repeated several times in the course of the conference,—saying, 'Shall I give you manifest proof of the deceit of this King of France ?'" and then went on to insist that the forces which Francis pretended to marshal against the Turks were really intended against Italy. Sebastian combated this notion without appearing to contradict him. The King urged, "He wishes me worse than he does the devil himself; yet you see what kind of friendly language he employs towards me, in order that I may trust such deceit: but I am so prepared that, should the King of France attempt to attack me, he will find himself deceived." He then insisted on the refusal of France to do justice to his subjects; the sending of Albany into Scotland; "where he will perhaps put the King to death in like manner as his brother died, which I never intend to suffer; nor will I tolerate his presence there; and should he send him, I shall hold the said King my enemy." He then enlarged upon the love of interference on the part of Francis. Sebastian turned the conversation, endeavoring to avoid his resentment, urging that the Signory acted towards both crowns impartially. The King expressed himself satisfied, and told Sebastian he was not to detail these conversations to the ambassador in France; which, however, he intends to do. London, 15 March 1518.
15 March.
Vit. B. III. 201.
B. M.
4010. [L. CARDINAL OF ARRAGON] to WOLSEY.
In behalf of Marinus Petri di Radaglia, a merchant of Ragusa, going to England to recover a debt against Laurence Bonvixi. Rome, 15 March 1518. Signature burnt off.
Lat., p. 1. Address pasted on.
15 March.
S. B.
4011. For WM. HALL and WM. MASON, wardens of the church of St. Nicholas, Calais.
Licence to ask alms in England for one year, for the reparation of the church, which has fallen into decay, the steeple having served as a beacon to mariners. Richmond, 10 March 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 15 March.
16 March.
S. B.
4012. For JOHN TAYLER, clk.
Prebend in St. Stephen's, Westminster, vice Hen. Eynesworth, deceased. Del. Westm., 16 March 9 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 14.
16 March.
P. S.
4013. For TH. MOSSELL of Coventry, draper.
Exemption from serving on juries, &c. Windsor, 1 March 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 16 March.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 14.
18 March.
R. O.
4014. PACE to WOLSEY.
Encloses, by the King's command, two letters from the French King. Would have brought them himself, but the King would not allow him to leave till his departure on Saturday next. He has kindly accepted the herald from France, and begs Wolsey will do the same, and that answer be made to the French King's letters concerning the birth of his son. Has sent for Mr. Meutiese, who will be with Wolsey tomorrow. The King is pleased with the news brought by Clarencieux, and hopes all will be well. He thinks Pace's going to Switzerland should be deferred till he have further knowledge of the intentions of France, as it might provoke war. Richmond, 18 March.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: To my Lord Cardinal's grace. Endd.
19 March.
Vit. B. III. 201*.
B. M.
4015. SILVESTER BP. OF WORCESTER.
Extract from the letters of [Silvester] Bp. of Worcester, of the 19th [March], to [Vannes].
Repeats what he had written on the 1st; that the Pope was expecting the articles of the treaty. The Spanish ambassador had received two posts from the King Catholic with no word of it. Suspects the league has not been concluded; while Chievres remains in authority, can hope for no good against the French. Letters have been received from Genoa, stating that the Swiss in the last diet had refused peace with France. There is bad news about Galeazzo Visconti. Had seen letters of the Duke of Bari, stating that Galeazzo had endeavored to persuade him to a reconciliation with France. Pace has very much changed his mind about Ga- leazzo. The Pope showed him letters of the 9th. They are very confused. This is the sum of them, however: that if England would provide 80,000 fl., matters might succeed. Eight of the cantons, however, can hardly be dissuaded from uniting with France. The papal ambassador in France states that the King complains of Sion having brought a mandate from the Pope to England for an offensive league.
In Vannes' hand. Lat., p. 1, mutilated. Endd.: Ex literis D. Wigorniensis ... mensis decimo nono.
19 March.
P. S.
4016. For EDW. FOREST.
Wardship of Th. s. and h. of Th. Cotton, deceased. Richmond, 18 March 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 19 March.
19 March. 4017. For JOHN DAVIS of Westminster, Middx., barber.
Pardon. Westm., 19 March.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 1.
20 March.
Vit. B. III. 201**.
B. M.
4018. L. CARDINAL OF ARRAGON to HENRY VIII.
Letter of compliments. Has been well received since he returned to Rome. Rome, 20 March 1518. Signed.
Lat., p. 1, mutilated. Add.
20 March.
R. O.
4019. CHARLES KING OF SPAIN to HENRY VIII.
Sends a copy of his letters which he had sent to the Earl of Desmond (de Esmond) in Ireland, demanding the liberation of Peter de Salazar, who had been thrown into prison by him as a pirate. Valladolid, 20 March 1518. Signed.
Lat., p. 1. Add.
20 March.
Vit. B. III. 202.
B. M.
4020. JULIUS DE MEDICI, Vice-cancellarius, to PACE.
Though he had heard from the Bp. of Worcester of the high esteem in which Pace is held by the King and Wolsey, yet he was rejoiced to be informed of it by Pace's own letters, knowing the friendship that he bears towards the Pope and the house of Medici. As to the matter about which the King is so anxious, as soon as the Pope received the King's letters, signed by his own hand, he determined by all means to fulfil his promise within a very few days. The Pope rejoices along with the writer at Pace's return to England and merited promotion, and daily speaks his praises. Thinks Pace is bound to love him in return. Rome, 20 March 1518. Signed.
Ital., pp. 2. Add. pasted on.
20 March.
P. S.
4021. For WM. MERYMAN, the King's chief cook.
A corrody in the monastery of Chichester, void by death of Anth. Legh. Richmond, 9 March 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 20 March.
23 March.
Vesp. C. I. 127.
B. M.
4022. SPINELLY to HENRY VIII.
Wrote last on the 9th of last month, by the King's post, directed to the servants of Mysser Simon de Taxis dwelling at Meklynnes. On the coming of the English ambassadors Sir John Style set off to meet them towards Bilbao, the 21st day of last month. The states of Castile have granted the King 540,000 ducats, to be paid in three years next coming by even portions; to Chievres and the Chancellor 16,000; desiring that for their good service they may stay here. They have desired that no gold or silver be exported; that the King will marry at once, and not wait for the French daughter by reason of her youth; that Don Ferrando do not leave the realm till the King have heirs; that the wearing of cloths of gold and silks be restrained. Messyre Paul Darmestoff has not succeeded in persuading the Duchess of Terranova to marry her daughter to the Duke of Urbin, the Pope's nephew, because she has heard that the Pope was pressed by the French King to marry his nephew to the daughter of Bolen. Messire Simon de Taxis has suddenly been sent to Rome to contract a marriage per verba de præsenti between the niece of Chievres and the Duke of Urbin, with a dowry of 10,000 ducats of gold per annum in free lordship, which the King gave her in the kingdom of Naples; sending likewise power for the same to his ambassador Don Pedro Durias. Chievres has promised 400 ducats of rent additional. On hearing this, much as the Pope had desired to ally his nephew with a subject of the King Catholic, before the arrival of De Taxis, on the 13th day of the last month he concluded with France. The Spaniards are greatly discontented, perceiving that by the influence of the house of Ursino the French will have entire sway in Italy.
The King writes daily to his Council in Flanders to advertise his ambassadors in England of all things to the prejudice of England. They are to give help if the French attempt anything. The King has affirmed the same this morning to Spinelly, who understands that the King Catholic could in six weeks bring into the field 2,000 men at arms and 1,000 light horse,—a fair company to keep the French in check. As to the meeting with the French King, Chievres and the Chancellor have shown Spinelly that "during this bruit and many fair words given to the Frenchmen they have done and doeth continually their business, and caused their master to be received peaceably without any contradiction, saying the conclusion is yet far off, and that if the Frenchmen be vigilant and cautelous they also sleep not; and because from day to day out of France come new quarrels and petitions for to have lordships and lands restored unto those that have taken their part in the time past and to other their friends. Moreover, that an ambassador with two doctors been comen from the Queens of Navarre to ask the same realm, and join with the French ambassador." Spinelly sees little probability of the meeting, which is unpopular with the Spanish lords. The King tells him his amity with England is in deeds, with France in words; and if you will make stricter alliance with him he will be glad. Is minded to send a form of articles, and, saving his honor, will refuse nothing. Twenty-eight fair horses have come from Naples to the King. The Chancellor says he will send six of the best to the King of England. "By such advertisements out of Africa the Moor that pretende[th] to have the succession unto the realm of Tremysen with the help of the country, mowed (moved) by the preaching of an holy man of their law that sayeth, 'Those that goeth against Barbarossa doeth better service to God and Mahomet than if he went against Crystmenn,' hath overthrown him ..."
Hol.; partly in cipher, deciphered by Tuke. Pp. 4; one or more leaves lost at the end.
Date of month supplied in a modern hand at the top: 1518, March, Stil. Rom.
24 March.
R. O.
4023. PACE to [WOLSEY].
Has had large communication with the King, who approves of Wolsey's opinion of entertaining the Pope with good words, "non obstante matrimonio contracto cum Gallis." He also approves of a commission being sent to my Lord of Worcester to hear what other princes shall devise, but not to conclude. Has offered the King the child of Wolsey's chapel, with whom he is much pleased, and whom he wishes to have sent notwithstanding his disease. As Pace is not going into Switzerland, the King wishes that Cardinal Sion should be entertained there. "His grace did right well laugh at the device of the Emperor enempst the expedition to be made the first year against the Turk by him with other men's money, considering that this should be only an expedition of money." On Friday next the King goes to Abingdon. Reading, 24 March.
Hol., pp. 2.
25 March.
R. O.
4024. PACE to WOLSEY.
After his letters of yesterday, made Wolsey's compliments to the Queen, who was marvellously glad to hear to Wolsey's good health. "My lord, if it were not for the personal love that the King's highness doth bear unto your grace, surely he would have out of your chapel, not children only, but also men; for his grace hath plainly shown unto Cornysche that your grace's chapel is better than his, and proved the same by this reason, that if any manner of new song should be brought unto both the said chapels to be sung ex improviso, then the said song should be better and more surely handled by your chapel than by his grace's." Reading, 25 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: To my Lord Cardinal's grace. Endd.
26 March.
R. O.
4025. PACE to WOLSEY.
The King has spoken to him again about the child of the chapel. He is desirous to have it without the procuring of Cornysche or other. Tomorrow he will be at Newell alias Hewell. He has given substantial precepts to Dr. Clerke and Mr. More respecting their charges, especially enempst forfeitures. Sufficient provision has been made at Abingdon of horse meat for the King. Cannot tell how "other poor men" will do; insomuch that Cornysche "hath made a merry supplication unto the King's grace for a bottle of hay and an horseloaf." Reading, 26 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: To my Lord Cardinal's grace. Endd.
26 March.
R. O.
4026. SIR RICHARD WINGFIELD to WOLSEY.
The writer's old friend, Dr. Vycarye of Hull, the bearer, now returning from Paris, has news to communicate to Wolsey. Calais, 26 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: My Lord Cardinal [of Yo]rk, Chancellor of England.
26 March.
R. O.
4027. KNIGHT to WOLSEY.
Though the Council had not given him audience till the 21st, he had spoken with them severally. On their meeting they returned him thanks that his highness had more regarded the interests of the King of Castile than his own, which they perceived by his refusal to accept the offers of France for recovering Tournay. Next day rode over to the Lord Berghes at Barow, and delivered him the King's letters. He thinks it would be wise to entertain the governors and Council, as they are in constant communication with Chievres and the Chancellor, who are omnipotent in Spain. He professed his fidelity in the King's service, but thinks all are not as faithful in England as they ought to be. The bearer, a canon resident in Antwerp, is much trusted by Berghes and Iselstene. Richmond will certify him of his need of money. Mechlin, 26 March.
Pp. 3. Add.: The Lord Cardinal of York. Endd.
26 March.
S. B.
4028. For SILVESTER GYGLYS BP. OF WORCESTER.
To be ambassador to the Pope, the Emperor and all others who will join the league against the Turks. London, 26 March 1518, 9 Hen. VIII.
Fr. 9 Hen. VIII. m. 6.
26 March.
P. S.
4029. For GEO. ROCHE.
Presentation to the church of the Holy Trinity, Cork and Clonne dioc., vice Philip Gowlles. Richmond, 22 March 9 Hen. VIII. Del. ..., 26 March.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 14.
26 March.
P. S.
4030. For EDW. POXWELL.
Corrody in the monastery of Glastonbury, vice Wm. Lynche, deceased. Richmond, 20 March 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 26 March.
26 March.
P. S.
4031. For JOHN HARDEN, chaplain to the Queen.
Grant of the pension which the Abbess of Wharewell is bound to give to a clerk nominated by the King, until he be promoted to a competent benefice. Richmond, 20 March 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 26 March.
26 March.
S. B.
4032. To TH. SALYSBURY.
Lease, for 21 years, of the manor of Maisemenan, in the lordship of Defrencloyd, alias Ruthyn, Wales, at an annual rent of 60s., and 26s. 8d. increase. Del. Westm., 26 March 9 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 14.
26 March.
P. S.
4033. For ANDREW MICHELSON, native of Scotland.
Denization. Newhall, 17 Jan. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 26 March.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 23.
27 March.
Vit. B. III. 203.
B. M.
4034. PACE to WOLSEY.
Received letters yesterday dated the 5th. On the 4th the Pope, according to Worcester, had created four legates for the expedition against the Turks, viz. [Cardinal] Flisco for Almayne, Campegius for England, S. Maria in Porticu for France, and Ægidius for Spain. Showed the letters to the King, who said it was not the rule of this realm to admit legates de latere. If, however, he had nothing else except to treat against the Turks he would admit him. "The Abbot of Redyng, [who] said unto your grace that men would not judge ... your said grace's good lord, hath made to the [King's] grace and all his servants good cheer. He was ill of the ague when the Queen arrived,—would needs do his duty, and was so glad to see them he had forgotten to give them welcome, "[and said] in place of that that he was all whole [at the] sight of them. Mr. Carew and his wife be re[turned] to the King's grace, too soon after mine op[inion]." Thinks they came by commandment. The French Queen and Suffolk are ordered to be at court this Easter or before. Abingdon, 27 March.
P.S.—There is very little accommodation in this small town.
Hol., pp. 2, mutilated. Add. at f. 209*b.
R. O. 4035. SUFFOLK to WOLSEY.
Hears that the King intends "to kype hes Yestour at Abyngton." Sends his servant to know how the French Queen is to be ordered in her coming to the King. Thanks him for the great goodness he has "hall wayes found" in his grace.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: To me Lord Kardynall es grace.
27 March. 4036. For the PRIOR AND CONVENT OF ALTHELNEY.
Congé d'élire on the death of Ric. Bele, their abbot. Westm., 27 March.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 14.
27 March.
S. B.
4037. For GEO. QUARLES.
Lease of the site of the manor of Westedepyng, Linc., and lands near the manor, possessions of Margaret late Countess of Richmond. Teste, 27 March 9 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 13.
27 March.
S. B.
4038. For HUGH EDWARDIS.
Lease of various lands in Maxsey, Northt., possessions of Margaret late Countess of Richmond. Teste, 27 March.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 25.
27 March.
S. B.
4039. For DAVID HOLAND, yeoman of the Chamber.
Lease of the manor of Denorben Vaure, in the lordship of Dynbigh, N. Wales, at an annual rent of 4l., and 20s. increase. Teste, 27 March 9 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 14.
28 March.
Vit. B. III. 126*.
B. M.
4040. SILVESTER BP. OF WORCESTER.
Extracts of letters to Peter [Vannes] from the Bp. of Worcester at Rome, 28 March.
The Pope is highly pleased with the letters he has received touching the Turkish expedition. The King's letter has had much effect in the deprivation of Cardinal Hadrian. The Pope regrets he has not heard anything of the tenth promised him; the French are very urgent with the Swiss, who have hitherto resisted their offers, but if they are not supported they will join them. He thinks it would be well if the King would keep some able resident among them. "Non tamen loquor de D. Paceo qui tanta doctrina ornatus inter illos rusticos detineri magnum nefas foret." England ought to take compassion on the misguided King Catholic.
Copy in Vannes' hand. Lat., p. 1, mutilated.
28 March.
R. O.
4041. [TOURNAY.]
"The particulers of thacompte of this booke of ao ixno declared at lengthe, every nature by it selfe, as by the pagines of the same shall appere, as well for the receipte of monnye within this booke as also for the payments made owte of the same as ensuythe." From 27 April to 28 March.—Total of wages, 12,503l. 3s. 7d. Total of the whole book: provisions and wages, 17,968l. 2s.
Pp. 13.
29 March. Jortin's Eras. III. 358. 4042. MORE to the UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD.
When he was in London heard that certain scholars of the University, in contempt of Greek literature, had banded together under the name of Trojans, taking the titles of Priam, Hector, Paris and the like. After he had followed the King to Abingdon it was reported that this folly was beginning to grow serious, and that, in the public sermons made in this sacred time of Lent, much nonsense had been uttered against learning generally. Denounces in severe terms the folly of a preacher who had distinguished himself by an attack on the studies of the University, and especially on Erasmus. Insists on the necessity of a liberal education for the proper cultivation of theology. Abingdon, 4 kal. April.
29 March.
R. O.
4043. PACE to WOLSEY.
The King commands him to expedite the grants of wages for his two gunners, whom he considers very expert. The Duke of Buckingham and the Lord Steward are coming. "Carding and dicing for this Holy Week is turned into picking off arrows over the screen in the hall. The King is desirous to have the child of your chapel hastily." Abingdon, 29 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: To my Lord Cardinal's grace.
29 March.
R. O.
4044. PACE to WOLSEY.
The King has commanded him to answer his letters, and thanks him for the child of his chapel, whom he would'nt have desired except from necessity. He is much pleased with Wolsey's letter, "insomuch that he did rehearse unto the lords being with him this night your grace's most kind writing in this cause." He wishes Wolsey to do as he pleases anent the Queen's old almoner, but will not have him continued in her service longer than the time mentioned in Wolsey's letters. He is very well satisfied with the news from Spain and Flanders, and, according to Wolsey's desire, returns him Monteignye's letters. He is sorry that my Lady Margaret has dealt so hardly with De Berghes his good friend. He wishes that horses should be provided between himself and Wolsey to have the sooner knowledge of important tidings, which he much desires. Has commended to the King Wolsey's diligence and wisdom in desiring such letters as shall now be sent out of the realm "notwithstanding such diseases as be specified in your grace's letters to me." The King is well satisfied; but he is discontented with the bad treatment of his sister the Queen of Scots, and desires to see the letters she lately sent to my Lord Dacres. Incloses two passports, signed, desired by the Scots. Has spoken to Cornysche to treat the child honestly, "i.e. otherwise than he doth his own." Abingdon, 29 March.
Hol., pp. 3. Add.: To my Lord Cardinal's grace.
29 March.
R. O.
4045. PACE to WOLSEY.
The bearer, the subdean of his chapel, has pleased the King with the sermon he made yesterday, "wherein he did show both substantial and profound learning, and in his pronunciation very good eloquence, with gesture apt and convenient." On Friday Mr. Langleye did the same. The King is very anxious to hear of Wolsey's health. The Queen's servants have reported to her the great favor shown to them by Wolsey in all their causes, which is confirmed by Lord Mountjoy. His lordship wishes Wolsey to remember his annuity. Dr. Fell has been put out of his chamber by the "herbigers" and badly treated, and desires redress from Wolsey. Abingdon, 29 March.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: To my Lord Cardinal's grace.
R. O. 4046. [PACE] to [WOLSEY].
The King has enquired of him respecting Wolsey's health. Told him "he was somewhat recovered," but he did not "set apart anything touching his honor, profit or the wealth of his realm, but hourly did look thereunto." His grace is glad to hear of the Pope's dispensation and brief directed to Pace.
P. 1. Probably the conclusion of some letter.
29 March.
Giust. Desp. II. 173.
4047. SEB. GIUSTINIAN to the DOGE.
An English herald, who had been sent to France, arrived with a French herald, a few days since, and has confirmed the news, and announced the birth of the Dauphin. Did not see him, but has heard his errand from Wolsey and Ruthal. Visited the Spanish ambassador, who spoke of the forces of the Catholic King and of the desire of all parties for a general peace. Waited on Wolsey, and was summoned into his presence with the Spanish ambassador. He spoke of the Cardinal Legates appointed by the four Sovereigns, and the necessity of mutual confidence. It was impossible, he urged, to arrange a crusade unless the King of France would give up his ambitious designs, and cease to harbor Albany and Richard de la Pole. The Spaniard said that necessity would cause this union. Wolsey replied, there was not time for preparation, and, turning to Sebastian, observed: "You are in a perilous position, but more from the Christian than the true Turk." Seeing the Cardinal very warm, Sebastian pretended not to understand the allusion.
When the audience was over, they attended him to hear a sermon. Thinks it was a mere excuse of Wolsey, to conceal their indisposition to act against the Turk, and avoid the reproach they would otherwise incur. Wolsey assured him that the Emperor was trying to obtain money from the Christian powers, and wanted all that was destined for this expedition to pass through his hands; so throwing contempt upon it. England is not on good terms with the Emperor. After the sermon and the departure of the Spanish ambassador, Wolsey spoke to him in a different tone, and no longer abused the French King, but said he hoped that their disputes would be arranged, and he would do all to promote the union, whatever he himself might suffer from it. "'If I perceive the King of France to mean well towards his majesty, and administer justice to our subjects, I will at any rate conclude this union;' adding, moreover, 'The King of France has now got a son, and his majesty here has a daughter: I will unite them by these means.'" Sebastian praised his determination. London, 29 March 1518.
29 March.
Teulet, I. 8.
4048. The ESTATES OF SCOTLAND to FRANCIS I.
Have received his letters, written from La Ferté, 16 Nov., touching the murder of De la Bastie, the French ambassador and lieutenant of their own King, upon the Marches. Since the death of their late King no occurrence has grieved them more. Before receipt of his letters had taken measures for punishment of the offenders, and summoned a parliament for this very purpose in this [town], in which the murderers have been declared traitors, and their lands and goods forfeited, and the Earl of Arran commissioned to invade and apprehend them. He has taken all their castles, and pursued them into England, where, doubtless, they are received in violation of the truce and comprehension. Only one was caught, who has been hung, drawn, and quartered. Request him to write to the King of England asking him to command his wardens to deliver rebels and fugitives. Refer him for further information to his servant, Jacques Hammelton, the bearer. Hope he will soon send Albany to Scotland. Edinburgh, 29 March. Signed: André, Archevesque de Sanct André et Legat d'Escosse—Jacques, Chanceller.
Fr.
29 March.
4049. JAMES ABP. OF GLASGOW to FRANCIS I.
Has received his letters, dated 16 Nov., touching the death of La Bastie. It has not been the fault of the Council and Estates of Scotland that the crime has gone unpunished. The rebels have fled to England, but their lands have been taken, as the Archbishop has written to Albany. Has sent a herald to the King of England to demand their deliverance, according to the truce, but he has not complied. Begs Francis will take order with Albany for the security of the King of Scots and the administration of justice. Edinburgh, 29 March 1517. Signed.
Fr.
30 March.
Teulet, I. 6.
4050. ALLAIN STUARD to FRANCIS I.
The King here is well. Hopes that when he is of age he will do France as good service as his ancestors did. In accordance with Francis' letters touching the murder of De la Bastye, went to the Regents and Council, who have always been disposed to act up to the directions of Francis and Albany our governor. They immediately caused the murderers to be proclaimed traitors in full parliament and banished. Arran, one of the Regents, left on the 21 March with a great number of men, intending to besiege them in their castles, but found they had fled to England. Their castles are taken and delivered into the King's hands. The realm is in good condition, notwithstanding the troubles since Albany's departure; but if Francis do not send him back shortly, peace may not last long. Edinburgh, 30 March.
Fr.
31 March.
Teulet, I. 10.
4051. ARRAN to FRANCIS I.
Has received his letters by the bearer, Arran's son, touching the murder of De la Bastye. Has been engaged, as Francis will understand from the letters of the Regents, in the pursuit of the murderers. Has taken their castles, but they have escaped to England. Albany will inform him more at length. Edinburgh, 31 March.Signed.
Fr.
March.
Er. Ep. App. 313.
4052. ERASMUS to MORE.
A plague upon that fever which has thrown all my business into confusion! Francis has returned without any money;—Potkin declares the receipt (syngrapha) is not legal. Won't trust such agents again. "Opinor tua Smalacha te jam pridem levavit febre." Has a long and perilous journey in hand, and wants a good and patient nag. When this play is over will retire to England. Louvain, 1518.
R. O. 4053. WOLSEY to PACE.
Has received his letters. Sends to the King "at this present time, Robyn, my boy, (fn. 7) assuring you that I am as glad that his highness hath such a mind, affection and pleasure in him as I can be." There is nothing he has but shall be at the King's pleasure. Sends five letters to be signed by the King, two for the Pope, one in answer to his brief, the other of thanks for Pace's affairs; two in answer to the King of Scots; the fifth to the Deputy of Calais, for execution of Henry Leder, who is guilty of treason. Has sent to the Bishop of Worcester, at Rome, a commission under the great seal, to treat with the Pope and other Christian princes. Has written to the Pope in such form as will redound to the King's honor, and is assured that the Pope will thankfully accept the same.
Draft, in the hand of Wolsey's secretary, pp. 2.
Vesp. F. XIII. 71.
Archæol. XVII. 275.
4054. HENRY VIII. to WOLSEY.
Thanks him for the care he takes of his affairs at home and abroad, and desires him, when they are established, "to take some pastime and comfort, to the intent ye may the longer endure to serve us." Wolsey has ordered matters so substantially that nothing can be added. Nevertheless, sends his opinion by the bearer, for reformation by Wolsey and the Council. Leaves to him the matter of which Sir Wm. Sandys brought answer. The Queen desires him to make her recommendations to Wolsey as to one she loveth very well; and both she and the King wish to know when he will repair to them. "I trust we shall disappoint our enemies of their intended purpose."
Hol., p. 1. Add.: To my Lord Cardinal.

Footnotes

  • 1. So; but evidently a mistake of Erasmus or the copyist for Mountjoy.
  • 2. Sic.
  • 3. Vir clarissime.
  • 4. Honorande Domine.
  • 5. Lorenzo de Medici D. of Urbino, the Pope's nephew, married on the 16 Jan. 1518 Madeleine de la Tour, the sister of Albany's wife.
  • 6. 13 March on French Roll.
  • 7. Qu. the child of Wolsey's chapel ?