BHO

Henry VIII: February 1518

Pages 1220-1236

Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 2, 1515-1518. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1864.

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February 1518

1 Feb.
Vit. B. III. 197.
B. M.
3913. Extracts of letters of CAMPEGGIO to WOLSEY from Rome, dated [1] (fn. 1) Feb.
The Pope has not answered the King's letters before, because he had left Rome, and on his return was engaged in the ceremonials. The brief will show how pleased he is with the mission (expeditio) of Campeggio, and the King's desire for the peace of Christendom;—thinks it desirable that England should join neither France nor the King Catholic, but remain neutral. He has sent a Confessional for the King's use, and his children's, in a most ample form, which had to be recopied through the faultiness of the transcriber. The Legate, who has returned from France, states that Francis will join the crusade in person, and offers to surrender to the Pope the duchy of Milan, with all its strongholds. To quiet men's minds it is important for Campeggio to know the truth of the rumor that the meeting of Henry and Francis, which had been fixed last year, shall take place in the spring. The Bishop of Vesprin, Viceroy in Sclavonia for the King of Hungary, writes that danger is anticipated from the Turks. The nobles of the country, so far from compounding with the Turk, are willing to become his tributaries, and allow him free passage to Austria, Styria, Carniola and the Tyrol, and even through Friuli to Italy. The Pope, who is much alarmed, has sent a sum of money to the Bishop. The Hungarian ambassador has been made Bishop of Scardona, and will be sent to the Emperor. Messengers have been sent to Belgrade and Jazar, which have hitherto resisted the Turks. News is come from Rhodes that the Sultan is making great preparations. The Emperor is resolved to send to the Pope Don John Manuel, at whose coming, it is thought, the treaty between them will take effect. No conclusion has yet been arrived at, as the Spaniards boast. Campeggio advises that the King should take into his pay one of the papal secretaries. He states that the sapphire he has received from Wolsey had on it Arabic characters, and on submitting it to a Moorish captive he interpreted it: "In nomine Dei regnavit Rex Solomon super Sion." On regaining his liberty the Moor turned Christian, and was baptised by the Pope.
Lat., pp. 4. Endd.
1 Feb.
P. S.
3914. For JOHN DAUNCE and ROGER WIGSTON.
To be receivers general of all possessions in the King's hands by the minority of heirs. Newhall, 17 Jan. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 1 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 15; and p. 2, m. 22.
1 Feb.
P. S.
3915. For HUMPH. WINGFELD.
Wardship of Ric. s. and h. of Rob. Corbett. Windsor, 7 Jan. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 1 Feb.
1 Feb.
P. S.
3916. For JOHN HOKELL, alias HOGGON, of Saint Olaves, Southwark, alias of Norwich, butcher.
Protection; going in the retinue of Sir Ric. Wingfeld, Deputy of Calais. Windsor, 27 Jan. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 1 Feb.
1 Feb. 3917. COMMISSION OF THE PEACE.
Hants.—Wm. Abp. of Canterbury, R. Bp. of Winchester, T. Bp. of Bangor, Th. Earl of Arundel, Wm. Lord Maltravers, John Tuchet, Lord Audeley, Th. West Lord de la Warr, Sir Ric. Elliot, John Erneley, Sir Wm. Uvedale, Sir Wm. Sandys, Sir Nich. Wadham, Sir Arthur Plantagenet, John Neuport, Wm. Paulet, junr., Wm. Frost, Ralph Pexsall, Ric. Andrews, Wm. Pounde and Th. More. Westm., 1 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 1d.
2 Feb.
Giust. Desp. II. 151.
3918. SEBASTIAN GIUSTINIAN to the DOGE.
Saw Wolsey on the 29th, who evinced some disquietude at the Turkish preparations, and said: "By the grace of God I have so arranged the affairs of this kingdom that his majesty will act as a right Christian prince, and prove his valor against the Turk by deeds and not by words." He asked if there were any news of the French preparations: Sebastian told him, none, although he had received much news from the Venetian ambassador in France. Wolsey insisted upon the French armada, showing that he thought it was destined against England, which is consequently making ready. Sebastian told him, if he knew of the fact of such armada, it would be either for the affairs of Barbary or Savoy; but he did not believe it, for he was sure that Francis was averse to war and anxious for the friendship of England. Wolsey desired him to write to the Venetian ambassador in France to urge Francis to declare himself openly; for it was not to his honor to embark on such an enterprise furtively: or else let him give ample assurance of his good will. Sebastian assented, stating that the Signory would employ their best services on this occasion. After dinner he, Wolsey and Norfolk discussed the same topic. London, 2 Feb. 1518.
P.S.—Hears that certain great personages had passed from England to Calais or Tournay to discover the truth.
3 Feb.
R. O.
3919. THOMAS MARQUIS OF DORSET to WOLSEY.
On Saturday, 23 Jan., James Higgenson, by the counsel of John Myllys and Wm. Osbalston of Leicester, tailor, stole two horses from a stable of George Hynde, Dorset's servant. He sent out twelve servants, and took the thief at Dancastre, with Wm. Osbalston. Sends their confessions to Wolsey. "Such stealing of horses as is in these quarters I have not much heard of before." Will do his best to attach the felons. Bradgate, 3 Feb. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: To my Lord Cardinal his grace. Endd.
3 Feb.
P. S.
3920. For the ABBEY OF HOLY CROSS, WHEREWELL.
Congé délire on the death of Matilda Rowse, abbess. Windsor, 28 Jan. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 3 Feb.
ii. Petition for the above, stating that Matilda Rowse died on the 24th. 25 Jan. 1517.
3 Feb.
P. S.
3921. For SIR JOHN NEVELL, yeoman of the Horse.
To be keeper of the royal outwood of Wakefeld, with the paling of the old park there, vice John Grey, deceased. Windsor, 16 Oct. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 3 Feb.
3 Feb. 3922. For GEO. THROKMARTON of London.
Pardon for killing William Porter, serjeant at arms, in selfdefence, in Faster Lane, parish of St. John's Zacharay, ward of Aldersgate, London. Westm., 3 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 8.
4 Feb.
R. O.
3923. INTELLIGENCE FROM FLANDERS.
"Letters written at Bruges by Philip Gualterote, merchant of Florence, to John Cavalcant dwelling in London, translated out of Italian into English by Master Richard Pace, bearing date the 4th day of this present month."
Expects an answer to the warning he gave Wolsey of the practices of the French. They are making preparations for war, to embark a number of lanzknechts. It would be well to corrupt them not to serve by sea, and to carry the war into other men's countries. Thinks the French have intelligence there. Has received Cavalcant's [letters of the 28th, showing that they do not believe these rumors. Intends remaining at Antwerp to have further knowledge. The French have at last given a wife to Duke Laurence, the Pope's nephew, viz., the daughter of Bolen, sister to the Duke of Albany's wife. Lorenzo is expected in France before Easter. The English are the only obstacle to their intentions. Great preparations of ships are making in Friesland. England should have spies there, in France and at Metz in Lorraine, "where lieth the White Rose for to know what he doth." England has to do with a powerful prince in the French King, who is sure of Spain, where Chievres is omnipotent. Leaves tomorrow for Antwerp. It is said the enterprise will be set forward in May.
Pp. 2. Endd.
6 Feb.
R. O.
3924. SILVESTER BP. OF WORCESTER to WOLSEY.
Thanks him for his favor shown to John Campucci, his kinsman. It is of much importance that he should visit Italy. Nich. Balbi, a merchant of Venice, owes him money. Rome, 6 Feb. 1518. Signed.
Lat., p. 1. Add. and endd.
R. O. 3925. JOHN CAMPUCCI.
Petition of John Campucci, merchant of Lucca, to Wolsey (Cardinal of York and Chancellor of England), asking time for the payment of a fine unjustly levied upon him, as the Bp. of Winchester and Robert Cressy can testify, by Dudley. Is in great debt, and owes to Nicholas Duodo, a Venetian merchant, 500l. stg. Duodo and Anthony Bavarino are merchants of good character,—owe the King 674l., to be paid in 1520. Has also to pay the King in July next part of a sum of 289l. 15s. Begs the King to take it by 100 nobles annually. Begs to be allowed to surrender two patents for exporting 800 sacks of wool.
6 Feb.
S. B.
3926. To CUTHBERT TUNSTAL, Master of the Rolls.
To cancel a recognizance of 100l., made by Sir Wm. Bulmer of Wilton, York, Ralph Wyclyff of Wyclyff, York, Wm. Bulmer of Redmershell, Durham, Th. Delarever of Brandesby, York, and Rob. Warcop of Warcop, Westm., 10 Nov. 21 Hen. VII., to Sir Jas. Hobart, Sir Ric. Empson, Sir John Husee, Edm. Dudley and Th. Lucas. Windsor Castle, 6 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII.
6 Feb.
S. B.
3927. To CUTHBERT TUNSTAL, Master of the Rolls.
To cancel a recognizance of 100l., made by Sir Gilbert Talbot, sen., deceased, and Sir Gilbert Talbot, jun., both of Grafton, Worc., 25 Feb. 8 Hen. VIII. Windsor Castle, 6 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII.
7 Feb.
P. S b.
3928. The PRESIDENT and CHAPTER of the MONASTERY of ST. MARY, READING, to HENRY VIII.
Signifying the election of Th. Worcetter as abbot, by Wm. Wargrave, treasurer of the monastery, to whom they gave their right of choosing. 7 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII.
7 Feb.
P. S.
3929. For JOHN WALESTON, steward of the Household.
To have a corrody in the monastery of Tavistock vice Anth. Legh, chief clerk of the kitchen, deceased. Windsor, 2 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 7 Feb.
8 Feb.
Galba, B. V. 337.
B. M.
3930. A. DE LIGNE to HENRY VIII.
Is advertised by a gentleman at arms that the King is very indignant at his having delivered Mortaigne into the hands of my Lady of Savoy. Would not have done so had he not received strict orders from my Lady and her Council that such was the good pleasure of the King of England, engaging that she would not put the town into any other hands than the King's. Understood the same by the King's letters. Clears himself of the report that he intended to have delivered the town into the hands of the French for a sum of money. Valenciennes, 8 Feb. 1518. Signed.
Fr., pp. 2, mutilated. Add.
8 Feb. 3931. For the SUBPRIOR and CONVENT of ST. ANDREW'S, NORTHAMPTON.
Congé d'élire on the promotion of Th. Skyte alias York, their prior, to the abbacy of Whitby Westm., 8 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 4.
8 Feb. 3932. For JOHN ORENGE.
Licence to alienate to Th. Polsted, John Carleton of Walton upon Thames, Rob. Warner, Rob. Hamond, and John Cotell, 24 acres of land in Apse near Kyngeston, Surrey. Westm., 8 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 15.
8 Feb. 3933. For WM. ROBINSON.
Pardon for killing Anth. Barowe, of Carlisle, yeoman, in selfdefence, on 18 Aug. 8 Hen. VIII. Westm., 8 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 14.
9 Feb.
R. O.
3934. RICHARD WOODWARDE.
His will, dated 21 Feb. 8 Hen. VIII. 1516. Desires to be buried at Essheforde, beside Elizabeth his first wife. Bequeaths 6s. 8d. to the high altar there, for unpaid tithes, and other sums, to the lights of Jesus, Our Lady of Pity, St. Ann, &c.; 24 oz. of silver to be made into a chalice for the said church, with the sign of Jesus and the name of Edward engraved at the foot, to be used at Jesus' altar; 20 marks to a priest for the souls of his father and mother, himself and his wives, for two years; the residue of his goods to Edward his son, whom he makes his executor, and John Halys to be his overseer.
As to his lands in Esshetisforde, Wyllesberough, &c., in Kent, enfeoffed by him to John Halys, William Twesynden, Robert Hall and Richard Hall, desires Alice his wife to receive the profits, and to have the bedding and the great chamber near the porch, to descend to Edward his son, who shall also have the residue of the lands till Richard, the son of William, Edward's brother, be of age; and if he die previously, to his sister Joan and the heirs of her body, with contingent remainder to Edward Woodward and Margaret his wife. Proved at Lambeth, 9 Feb. 1517.
Pp. 9. Endd.
9 Feb.
Vesp. C. I. 124*.
B. M.
3935. SPINELLY to [WOLSEY].
Wrote on 6 Jan. Has written fully to the King. Chievres continually assures him that his master is resolved to give Wolsey a good bishopric, so that he will demand the first that falls, supposing Chievres and the Chancellor will surely help. The King has taken 200,000 ducats of the Cardinal of Toledo's goods, and it is thought he will have the remanent. Provision has been made at the port for the reception of the King of England's ambassadors. The Cardinal of Tortosa commends himself to Wolsey. The Cardinal Hadrian has sent for letters of recommendation to the Pope in order to obtain his forgiveness, but will not succeed. Valladolid, 9 Feb. 1517.
In two hands, partly cipher by Spinelly, deciphered by Tuke; p. 1.
9 Feb.
R. O.
3936. TOURNAY.
Indenture by William Pawne, concerning money received from Sir Richard Jernyngham, deputy, for wages of artificers at Tournay, by the hands of Matthew Hall and Arthur Lufkyn, from 9 Oct. to 9 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII.
Mutilated.
11 Feb.
Vesp. C. I. 125.
B. M.
3937. SIR JOHN STILE to [HENRY VIII.]
* * * * "the realm of Navarre to the late King of Navarre's son, and also to restore to the gentlemen of the realm of Naples such lands as they lost for the Frenchmen's sake." Cannot report as yet the King of Castile's answer for certain, but it is said that he was content to perform the marriage, but refused to deliver the realm of Navarre, to which he had a better claim than he knew when he was in Flanders; that as to the gentlemen of Naples, he would be guided by his Council. "The said ambassador of France" was robbed two days after he came, in his lodging, and said he had lost 1,200 cr. g. in money, plate and clothing. Many believe it is a sham, to get compensation from the King, though it is certain he lost a chain of gold and 400 ducats' value of goods. The King is entirely governed by Chievres, the Chancellor and Lekshaw, and by no Spanish ministers, except the Bishop of Badajoz and Don Garcia de Padilla, who came with him from Flanders. The Bishop of Cordoanor (Cordova), Don John Manoel, who also came with the King, are not called to council. The Cardinal of Tortosa is a noble and virtuous prelate, and one of the chief councillors. He is well inclined to England. The rewards given by Henry to Armestorff were well bestowed. Chievres is one of the two contadors majors or treasurers of the realm. Antonio Fonseca, brother of the Bishop of Burgos, is the other. The Spaniards are dissatisfied that the Council is so French. There is little love between the Spaniards and the Burgundians. The Chancellor will not stay longer here than he can help. If the Infant (Don Fernando) leave for Flanders, Lord Ruys and most of the Flemings will go with him.
When the ambassador of Portugal first came here, a marriage was talked of between the Prince of Portugal and the Lady Eleanor, and that Mons. Tresany, her chamberlain, was to go to Portugal as ambassador. Has heard no more news of it, but the ambassador continues here. News has come that the Turk is making great preparations. No measures are taken here for defence. The 6,000 horsemen, and 4,500 foot, who, as Stile wrote two months ago, were to have gone to Barbary to succour Oran and the King of Tremesin against Barbarossa, lie still at Carthagena, unpaid. It is doubtful whether they will go to Barbary, or to Naples, or return. The late Cardinal of Toledo left 212,000 ducats of gold to be given to the churches and his servants; the King of Castile has appropriated the money to his own use, together with a great quantity of artillery and harness, which the Cardinal had provided. The King and his Council say that he had done more damage in casting down the walls of towns of Navarre than all his wealth amounted to.
George, the Almain gunner, is here, who served Henry at Terouenne and Tournay. He is counted one of the cunningest men in the world in the devising of artillery and fortresses. Wishing he was secured for Henry's service, had some talk with him about the slack payments which are customary here. He is determined to serve no longer, and wishes to be engaged by England, together with a son-in-law of his, a Spaniard, who is both a good artilleryman, and cunning in organs and instruments of music. George demands a noble a day for himself, and 20d. for his son-in-law. They will bring their wives and children to England, though they have land and houses here, and live at Medyna de Roy Secko, where the Almirante of Castile dwells. Two fairs are held there, to which some London merchants repair. An answer is desired by the 15th May next, otherwise he will go to the King of Portugal, who has written for him.
Was shown lately a letter of marque against the King's Irish subjects, for a ship and goods taken in the court of Corcam (harbour of Cork), belonging to a man of Portogalette, in Biscay, which was granted last August by one of the land of Ireland, "calling himself Bemaparte, Prince Schemea." Said he knew no man in Ireland who had authority to issue such letters, except the Deputy or Chief Justice, and that he knew Bemaparte to be a rebel. Begs his expences may be remembered. Last June it was a year since he had any remittance. Is in great debt, and has sold part of his plate. Is grieved to have had no intimation of the King's pleasure for two years and more. Last July sent his servant to the King with letters, which were delivered at Windsor on the 11th August, but he has not since returned. Knows not what to do. Here is Thomas Spinelly, a Florentine, who says he has a commission from the King, and that no other is authorised to be Henry's ambassador in the King of Castile's court. He is very busy with Chievres and the Chancellor, and meddles with every man's matter, and says that he has daily letters from the King and Council, and great promotions from Henry. Does not believe he has any commission. Must put up with it till he hears from Henry, though it is much marvelled at here. Valladolid, 11 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII.
Decipher, in Tuke's hand, pp. 4.
11 Feb.
P. S.
3938. For JOHN NEWPORTE.
Wardship of John Hauchet, brother and h. of And. son and h. of Wm. Hauchet, deceased. Windsor, 10 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 11 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 8.
11 Feb.
P. S.
3939. For JACOB ASKEW, yeoman for the Queen's mouth in the Pantry.
To be doorward at Sandale Castle and Park, York, on surrender by Rob. Rysshton, who held the same during pleasure, vice John Savell. Windsor, 2 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 11 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 23.
12 Feb.
Calig. E. III. 36.
B. M.
3940. SIR RICHARD WINGFIELD to [WOLSEY].
Gives some information, received from a priest, of Albany, who is at Paris. There is no appearance of business on the borders. The parties put under arrest have been enlarged. Clarencieux left on Monday last. He will surely convey ..., "for he knowthe mo wayes home th[an one]." Calais, 12 Feb.
Hol., pp. 2, badly mutilated.
12 Feb.
R. O.
3941. For RICHARD PACE.
Grant of arms. London, 12 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. 1517.
12 Feb.
P. S.
3942. For REGINALD DYGBY and ANNE his wife.
Livery of the lands of Anne Dacres, widow. Windsor, 10 June 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 12 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 19.
12 Feb.
S. B.
3943. For REGINALD POOLE, clk.
Presentation to the collegiate church of Wynbourne Mynstre, Salisb. dioc. Del. Westm., 12 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII.
12 Feb. P. S. 3944. For HEN. SQUIER.
To be clerk of the market for the Household. Windsor, 4 Jan. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 12 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 21.
12 Feb.
P. S.
3945. For JOHN HOLME, gunner.
To be a gunner in the Tower of London, with 8d. a day, vice Ric. de Sebenico, deceased. Windsor, 5 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 12 Feb.
12 Feb.
P. S.
3946. For JOHN HARBART of London, mercer.
Licence to import 20 gross of caps and hats. Windsor, 11 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 12 Feb.
Fr. 9 Hen. VIII. m. 5.
12 Feb.
P. S.
3947. For MAURICE FYLOLL.
Pardon and release as collector of customs in the port of Pool in the time of Henry VII., he having suffered three years' confinement in the Fleet prison. Windsor, 4 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 12 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 12.
12 Feb. 3948. For ROB. CLYNSON, rector of East Barmyng, Kent.
Pardon for killing Nich. Hunt of Eastfarleght, Kent, smith, in selfdefence. Westm., 12 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 18.
12 Feb. 3949. JUSTICES OF ASSIZE.
Northern Circuit.—Th. Strey with Sir Rob. Brudenell and Anth. Fitzherbert. Westm., 12 Feb.
Home Circuit.—Simon Fitz with Sir John Fyneux and John More. Westm., 12 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 6d.
Western Circuit.—Th. Elyott with Sir Ric. Elyott and John Ernley. Westm., 12 Feb.
Norfolk Circuit.—Th. Fitzhugh with Sir Rob. Rede and Sir John Butteler. Westm., 12 Feb.
Midland Circuit.—John Jenour with Th. Pygot and Brian Palmes. Westm., 12 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 15d.
13 Feb.
Vit. B. XX. 36.
B. M.
3950. SION to HEDIN.
Some time since, "admodum longa ... aliquorum Bernens' apud serenissiman d. so ... rogamus et deprecamur eandem juxta illa ... Pro viribus rem exequi suumque Sedunensem habe ... cujus fidem constantiam et devotionem erga Cæsarem s ... serenissimam D. novit optime d. v. Interea vero quæ hic agunt ..."
Some French treasurers have been at Berne with the money owing to the Swiss. They made the following proposals in the name of their master in the diet during payment:--The Pope being engaged in preparing an expedition for attacking or checking the Turks, and needing the aid of Christian princes, and especially of the French King, his majesty is desirous of setting out personally and in full force. For the security of his kingdom during his absence, he desires a league with the Swiss, and that they will permit negotiations for it to be commenced. He will send them the Bastard or the Grand Master Boysi. If they will not consent to this, he asks for the loan of 15,000 of their infantry against the Turks and his other enemies. If they will not grant this, he asks them to allow those of their infantry who are willing to serve for his pay to do so. [If they would not] grant this, they could not object "si ... nsas ad sua stipendia conduxerit. Pacta [confœderatione]," he has 20,000 at his pleasure, "et ad omnium despectum ... m in hac ultima dieta proposuere quæ volumus ... are" that for their service to Henry (?) "suæ majti ... m cuncta significet." Whither they tend is easily seen. If the rest sleep, at last on their head the bean will fall. Zurich, ides of February 1518. Signed: Vr. se. M. Carlis Sed.
Pp. 2, much mutilated. Add. at 37*b: Magnifico, etc., Joh. de Edym serenissimæ D. Margaretæ domus magistro.
13 Feb.
R. O.
3951. SIR ROBERT SHEFFELDE.
Report of the examination of Sir Robert Sheffelde, accused of harboring the murderers of one Girdlington, taken before "the most reverend father, &c.," [Wolsey.]
6 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII.—He acknowledges, (1) sending money to the murderers, as deposed by Rice and Milner; (2) that he falsely alleged he had been untruly indicted; (3) spoke unfitting words to the King; (4) accused Wolsey of prosecuting him through malice. On this he was committed to the custody of the Lieutenant of the Tower, not, as formerly, for contempt of the King and Council, but as a felon, time being given him till Wednesday next to consider whether he should plead that the King's former pardon covered the murder, or put himself on the King's mercy.
10 Feb.—On the Wednesday appointed, being further examined, confessed that he had bidden Milner and Rice beat Girdlington. On being told that he had sworn the contrary, he confessed it, and said he thought it was lawful in order to save his life, but, being corrected, submitted himself to the King's mercy. Confessed also that he had spoken with Rice in the Fleet, that he had insinuated he was persecuted for being "fast in the cause of the temporalty." Did not remember saying, "It was unhappy that the lords temporal were at variance at that time; for, had not that been, my Lord Cardinal's head should have been as red as his coat was." Remanded till Saturday, being counselled by Wolsey "to debate with his counsel the availableness of his said pardon, as well for the causes abovesaid, as for the surreptitious taking out of the Chancery of the same pardon."
13 Feb.—Confessed the words touching the variance between the lords temporal and Wolsey; surrendered his pardon, kneeling in the midst of the Council, and "with his own hands did cut and cancel the same," broke the seal in pieces, and put himself wholly on the King's mercy, beseeching Wolsey and the lords to intercede for him.
Pp. 6. Endd. by Wriothesley.
15 Feb.
R. O.
3952. FOX BP. OF WINCHESTER to WOLSEY.
Thanks him for expediting the King's letters for the free election of a new abbess of Wharwell. As the sisters had made a choice pleasant to God and true to the King, begs his favor for the bearer sent to obtain the royal assent. Hearing of the great rumor of an army and navy in Normandy, has made inquiry of the merchants, and hears that it is intended to send Albany over into Scotland, who means to punish the murderers of his lieutenant, and will go thither in force. Will advertize him of further information. If war be intended against England, the Isle of Wight and Portsmouth are too feeble for defence. "Our manner is never to prepare for the war to our enemies be light at our doors." Saint Cross, 15 Feb. Signed: Ri. Wynton.
Pp. 2. Add.: Cardinal of York, Chancellor.
15 Feb.
Vit. B. III. 199.
B. M.
3953. LEO X. to HENRY VIII.
Has willingly entered the league. Desires to stand by him on all occasions, convinced of his zeal for the Holy Church. Prompt measures must be taken for defence against the Turks, in which he relies upon Henry's aid. Will comply with his wish to proceed against Hadrian, but it must be done consistently with the honor of the Holy See. 15 Feb. 1518, anno quinto.
Lat., pp. 2, mutilated. Endd. at f. 196 b: Exemplum brevis ad Regiam Majestatem.
17 Feb.
Giust. Desp. II. 155.
3954. SEBASTIAN GIUSTINIAN to the DOGE.
Has visited Wolsey several times to learn his opinions. Has heard that a great number of lansknechts and vessels have been engaged in France. It is generally reported in England that it is for the intended return of Albany to Scotland, where his opponents now have the upper hand. It is rumored in London that the King of France means to invade Spain and Flanders. Has stated the case of the wines to Pace, who assented to his representations, but stated that, although the Council exercises great authority, all things depend upon the Cardinal. The King of England has ordered a large number of vessels to be in readiness, and the militia to be called out, should France arm itself against Flanders or Scotland. London, 17 Feb. 1518.
17 Feb.
P. S.
3955. For HEN. NORRES.
To be weigher at the common beam in Southampton, vice Anth. Legh, chief clerk of the Kitchen, deceased. Windsor, 8 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 17 (fn. 2) Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 21.
18 Feb. P. S. 3956. For WM. HORSLEY, yeoman of the Guard.
To be bailiff of the lordship of Cropton in Pikering Lith, and of Skirtenbek, York, with 63s. 8d. a year. Windsor, 12 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 18 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 12.
18 Feb.
P. S.
3957. For SIR ROB. JOHNS.
To keeper of Clonne park, and of the island and warren of Barre, in the lordship of Glamorgan and Morgannok, South Wales, with 2d. a day for each keepership, an annuity of 100s. out of the issues of Usk and Carlion. Windsor, 12 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 18 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 12.
19 Feb.
R. O.
3958. JERNINGHAM to HENRY VIII.
Has received a letter from Compton, informing him that the King had seconded his preferment with my Lady Par, and is willing that he should come to England. The countermand had not at that time arrived. Is willing to stay for the King's service, considering the preparations made by the French. Hopes his absence will not be prejudicial to his preferment. Citadel of Tournay, 19 Feb. Signed.
P. 1. Add.
19 Feb.
P. S.
3959. For RIC. LLOID.
To be Attorney General in the courts of record in cos. Caermarthen, Cardigan and Pembroke, S. Wales, with fees out of the issues of S. Wales, and power to appoint clerks, &c. on surrender of pat. 28 June 1 Hen. VIII. Windsor, 17 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 19 Feb.
19 Feb.
P. S.
3960. For WM. RUDHALE and JOHN his son.
Grant of all the possessions which belonged to Wm. Horton of Staunton, Worc., in his own or his wife Matilda's right, Horton having been outlawed for the murder of John Pauncefote of Hasfeld, Glouc., justice of the peace: to be held during Horton's life. Windsor, 5 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 19 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 15.
20 Feb.
R. O.
3961. JU. [DE MEDICI], Vice-cancellarius, to HENRY VIII.
Has received his letter on the business of Cardinal Hadrian. Thinks he has made some progress, judging by the answers he has received from the Pope, who is very anxious to oblige the King. He will learn more from the Bishop of Worcester; but the law must be strictly observed, to avoid scandal, and some delay will take place. The King is not to be alarmed at the late affinity between Francis I. and the Pope, who seeks nothing in it except to increase the power of the Church. Rome, 20 Feb. 1518. Signed.
Lat., pp. 2. Add. and endd.
20 Feb.
R. O.
3962. JU. [DE MEDICI], Vice-cancellarius, to WOLSEY.
Has heard from the Bishop of Worcester the King's wish that he should intercede with the Pope in the matter of Cardinal Hadrian. Promises to do so. Has omitted nothing which can tend to the King's service, but Wolsey will understand that a delay has taken place in the matter for the reasons stated in the Pope's letter to him. Rome, 20 Feb. 1518. Signed.
Lat., p. 1. Add. and endd.
20 Feb.
R. O.
3963. SILVESTER BP. OF WORCESTER.
"Ex literis xx. Febr. ad me Petrum Vannem datis a Domino Wigorniensi ex Urbe."
Will understand by his letters to Wolsey all that has taken place in the deprivation of Cardinal Hadrian. Is as much interested in the business he has on hand as if his life depended on it. All the delay which has occurred must be attributed to the infrequency of the King and Wolsey's letters. Had they written before, the Pope would never have contracted this affinity with the French King; but he supposed, from their silence, that they were indifferent to the marriage.
As for the gold cloth and tapestry left with him by Pace, he must wait for a ship; land carriage would be too costly. Hears that English ambassadors have been sent into Spain: if this had been done before, the marriage would not have gone forward. Perceives Wolsey's partiality for Hieron. Adorno. Commends him and Cardinal Colonna. Nic. de Scombergk desires his commendations to Wolsey.
In Vannes' hand. Lat., pp. 2.
21 Feb.
Vit. B. XX. 86*.
B. M.
3964. TITIONUS to WOLSEY.
Wolsey will learn from the letter which De Issistain will communicate on the part of the Emperor the affection, fraternal and paternal, which he at present entertains [towards] the King. If there should be any necessity, promises "... re et opere se demonstrabit absque ulla prorsus dissimulatione ... diem me illic affuturum spero, Deo favente, et latius omnia corum ... " Exhorts him to be of good courage, and he will draw more closely together the indissoluble knot between the three Kings (the work of his hands), for the acceptable time is near, and the expedition against the Infidels will soon follow. The Emperor leaves nothing undone, and is striving to bring all the forces of his empire together. He is now sure of his own people, and hopes their example will be followed by the princes of the empire. Begs to be commended to the King, in which prayer Lewis Maraton joins. Signed: "Ex Augusta Vindelicha," 21 Feb. 1518.
Lat., p. 1, mutilated. Add.: [Cardinali] Eboracen'.
22 Feb.
Er. Ep. App. 260.
3965. ERASMUS to PETER VANNES. (fn. 3)
Begs him earnestly to send whatever remains of the correspondence of Erasmus and Ammonius. Doubts not that he is zealous for the fame of his kinsman. Antwerp, 22 Feb. 1518.
Has received from him a couple of letters.
22 Feb.
Er. Ep. App. 261.
3966. ERASMUS to SIXTINUS.
Begs that his servant John may receive from Peter Vannes the papers Erasmus has asked for. His New Testament will compel him to go shortly to Basle or Venice. The Pope and the Prince are enacting a new comedy: the Turk is the pretext, but by no means the real one. Thieves abound; the magistrates are growing more vigilant. Antwerp, 22 Feb. 1518.
Has received the money from the Maruffi, and written to Peter Vannes, who is like all other Italians. Mountjoy is always the same; "aut promittit aut queritur." The Archbishop (?) was not ashamed to offer 20l., though he had given Erasmus to expect 100l.: "Non pudebat Reverendum offerre viginti libras, et ille me volebat sperare centum, qui toties expertus sim non promissa solum verum etiam dejerata."
24 Feb.
P. S.
3967. For JOHN CROFTE.
Annuity of 10l. out of the lordship of Cleobury Barnes, parcel of the earldom of March, Salop. Windsor, 16 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Windsor, 24 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 12.
25 Feb.
Calig. E. III. 69.
B. M.
3968. RICHMOND H[ERALD] to [WOLSEY].
Has been with the commissioners for deciding the causes of the English merchants. They have been diligent in attending to the complaints of the King's subjects; but, in consequence of their ignorance of the language, and the absence of necessary documents, there has been much hindrance. The French King and Queen will continue in Paris. The Queen has been "crassed." She proposes to take herself ... Paris, "the 25th day of Fevery[er]."
Hol., pp. 2, mutilated.
25 Feb. 3969. BERKELEY'S LANDS.
Gloucestershire.—Commission to Sir Maurice Barkeley, Sir Edw. Wadham, Th. Poyntz, Wm. Denys, John Walshe, Th. Matston and John Straunge, to make inquisition as to destructions, wastes and sales of deer, timber and wood in the lordship of Barkleyslandis. Westm., 25 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 12d.
26 Feb.
P. S.
3970. For the MONASTERY of HOLY CROSS, WHAREWELL, Winchester dioc.
Assent to the election of Avelena Cowdrey, subprioress, as abbess, vice Matilda Rowe, deceased. Windsor, 25 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII. Del. Windsor, 26 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 12.
ii. Petition for the above, 14 Feb. 1517.
26 Feb.
S. B.
3971. For SIR WM. FITZWILLIAM.
Grant, in fee, of the piece of waste land called Potnoll parke, Windsor forest; to be held by the service of one red rose annually. Del. Westm., 26 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 12.
26 Feb. 3972. LONDON.
Writ to the mayor and aldermen to permit the vintuers of the city to use the measures of gallons, half gallons, &c., which, upon examination in the Star Chamber, had been proved to be legal, and were delivered to the said mayor and aldermen, to remain in the Guildhall. Westm., 26 Feb.
Pat. 9 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 12d.
27 Feb.
Martene Amp. C.
III. 1277.
3973. WOLSEY to SILVESTER BP. OF WORCESTER.
The King could not answer the papal letters before, because of the important nature of their contents. In reference also to the proposition contained in them, for an expedition against the Turks, the King found it needful to summon his councillors, and upon their advice to communicate with the Catholic King, with whom he is now on the most friendly terms. If, however, the Pope is in earnest about the matter, he must enjoin unanimous peace on all the princes of Christendom; and it is unquestionable, that, but for the immoderate ambition of certain princes, the design might already have taken effect. But they on whom the Pope most relies are preparing a numerous army, and seeking for new causes of dissension; and whilst they give out that they are anxious for peace, they only lull the world into a false security, that they may attack it unawares. The King of France must be urged to set bounds to his ambition; and if temporal means prove insufficient to secure the peace of Christendom, the Pope must have recourse to spiritual censures.
The King will be obliged to Worcester if he will earnestly press the Pope to declare his thoughts as to the intentions of the French;—what he has heard from their agents and ambassadors;—whether they are inclined to war or to peace. His majesty is prepared for either event;—if they attack his kingdom, they will find him fully prepared to meet them; if they desire peace, no one is more ready for peace than he. Worcester is to be specially careful in obtaining and sending intelligence on these points.
By the arrival of the last letters from Spain has been informed that the Catholic King has determined to procure for the Duke of Urbino the daughter of Ferdinand Gundisalvo in marriage, and had sent messengers for that purpose to her mother. Such a connexion would be more beneficial to the Pope and to Christendom than any French affinity. The King of France is offended at our refusal to sell him our city of Tournay, which we have conquered at vast expence and peril, and we now hold by indubitable right and inheritance. We have acted thus, not because we derive any advantage from that city, but solely that we may place our affairs and those of the King Catholic on a safer footing, and repel injury, if any injury be offered us. (fn. 4)
After the 23rd inst. the English ambassadors sailed for Spain, and would have started before but for the tempestuous weather. They are commissioned to communicate to the Catholico the project of this expedition, and urge this affinity for the Duke of Urbino. Meanwhile the Pope must hold the French alliance off for a time. Letters say it has been concluded already, but the King has such faith in the Pope he will not believe it.
As for Worcester's information that there was a party in England plotting, in conjunction with France, to depose Wolsey, and the Pope's fears lest this design should prove successful, it is impossible to say how grateful the King is to Worcester for his diligence in communicating this information. He is more pleased with this instance of the Pope's regard, and the vigilance of the Lord Protector [de Medici], than really apprehensive of any such danger. There is no king in the world who is more ardently loved and respected by his friends, nobles and subjects than the King of England. His very look strikes terror into evildoers. As for Wolsey and his administration, the kingdom never was in greater harmony and repose than now: "tanti enim justitiam et æquitatem facio, absit jactantiæ crimen." If he were to offer to resign, he is certain that neither the King nor the nobles would allow it. It is quite possible, however, that the French should stick at nothing to disturb the quiet of the realm.
As for the privation of Cardinal Hadrian, would not say another word were he not well aware how much the King feels in this matter. Two days since letters came from Worcester, of 6 Feb., containing, ut semper, barren words and most liberal promises. Is surprised at the Pope's procrastination. Worcester says that the French King has taken Hadrian under his protection: Wolsey can well believe it, and for a sinister purpose. Wolsey would rather not have said a word on the subject: "Mitto quod magna interim nota regiæ majestati intingitur, (fn. 5) quæ semper apud omnes, plurimum apud ejus sanctitatem posse, prædicavit." The Pope might have avoided the scandal by permitting Wolsey to hold Hadrian's bishopric in commendam. Begs Worcester will let his holiness know that he cannot oblige the King more highly than by depriving that infamous Cardinal, and allowing Wolsey to hold Bath and Wells in conjunction with his present or any other archbishopric. The money he has spent shall be repaid in a few days, Sends a copy of an article (capitis) written by Franc. Chieregato, Hadrian's servant, to the Abp. of Canterbury and the Bishop of Winchester, by which Worcester may see what hopes Cheregato entertained of the intentions of the Pope. Will let him know, when Hadrian is deprived, what is to be done with Hadrian's palace. London, 27 Feb. 1518.
R. O. 3974. [HENRY VIII.] to [the POPE.]
That his holiness may understand how much he has at heart the deprivation of Cardinal Hadrian, he has thought right to ask it again under his own hand.
Lat., in the hand of Vannes; p. 1.
27 Feb.
S. B.
3975. For TH. WOLVARD.
Lease of a water mill in Mannefelde Wodehouse, Notts, and a close under the mill, lately held by Rob. Floggan. Signed: John Daunce, Barth. Westbey and Rob. Blagge. Del. Westm., 27 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII.
28 Feb.
Giust. Desp. II. 157.
B. M.
3976. SEB. GIUSTINIAN to the DOGE.
Received their letter with the Turkish news, and one from the Venetian ambassador in France, setting forth the good will of the French King. The news proved most agreeable to the King and the Cardinal, and all the lords. On offering to speak of the Turkish news, Wolsey desired to hear the French tidings, and said: "I am glad the King of France does not purpose to make any stir against England, Flanders or Scotland; so that my King may live peaceably, and accumulate treasure against the Turk, and not be compelled to impose fresh taxes on the people. We shall see, he added, if France is sincere, and will render justice to Englishmen who have suffered and received no compensation." Sebastian endeavored to justify the French King. Then Wolsey, putting his arm in Gius- tinian's, took him to the King; and on telling him the news from France, and the good disposition of his most Christian majesty, "who did not mean to attack any one unless provoked by manifold injuries," Henry began to laugh as if he suspected deceit, and said if Francis were in earnest he would not so lightly injure Englishmen, or deny them justice. Sebastian assured him that the ambassador would not have written in this tone had he not been convinced of the truth. The King rejoined, that the ambassador wrote to the best of his knowledge, but that was no more than Francis chose to tell him. The King denied Sebastian's statement of the marriage to take place at Easter between the Duke of Urbino and the sister-in-law of Albany. He ridiculed the arrangements between France and the Swiss. Sebastian thinks that the English lords consider themselves scorned and slighted by France.
After this, Princess Mary, who is two years old, was brought in. The Cardinal and Sebastian kissed her hand, "pro more, the greatest marks of honor being paid her, universally, more than to the Queen herself. The moment she cast her eyes on the Reverend Dionisius Memo, who was there at a little distance, she commenced calling out in English 'Priest!' and he was obliged to go and play for her; after which the King, with the Princess in his arms, came to me and said: 'Per Deum, iste est honestissimus vir et unus carissimus; nullus unquam servivit mihi fidelius et melius illo; scribatis Domino vestro quod habeat ipsum commendatum.'" Thinks Memo is in such high favor that he will be able to advance the interests of Venice. Two ambassadors, the Abp. of Armagh and Lord Bernes, have been sent to the Catholic King. Wolsey promised to appoint Pace and More as commissioners in the affair of the wines. The latter is in high repute for his justice. As soon as the galleys arrive, for which they are anxious, the King intends to go on board them. London, 28 Feb. 1518.
28 Feb.
S. B.
3977. For CUTHB. TUNSTAL, Master of the Rolls.
To cancel a recognizance of 50l., made by Sir Christ. Warde of Gyndale, York, Edw. Musgrave of Ednell, Cumb., Th. Wybarght of Thorneton in Craven, York, clk., and Th. Kneweston of Kyrkebystenen, Westmor., chaplain, 4 Feb. 22 Hen. VIII. Windsor Castle, 28 Feb. 9 Hen. VIII.
Feb.
Calig. E. II. 57.
B. M.
3978. JERNINGHAM and the COUNCIL OF TOURNAY to [HEN. VIII.]
According to his commandment, had sent William Bartilmewe and John Dymok to Antwerp for provisions. Here they met on the 6 Feb. with Master Davy, "king of heralds, with the King of Denmark," and two other Scottish knights, Alexander Hay and the Lord of Bokyvell. As soon as they were at their lodging the herald changed his gown for a cloth of gold, the Scotch knights for crimson velvet furred with martens; and so went with heralds in livery of green camlet to the burgomaster of Antwerp, desiring the loan of 1,000 gyldyns. On his refusal, they started for Malines on the 8th, where Davy delivered his letters to Lady Margaret from Denmark, stating the Queen was with child: thence to France. The Scotchmen were to return to Zealand. As the herald had letters of great charge, thought if they could get possession of them the King would be advertised of many secrets; sent out John Russell, who took the herald, but a servant escaped with the letters into a wood. Told the herald they only wanted the Scotchmen. By kind treatment obtained his secrets, as will appear by certain letters they send signed by the King of Denmark; to wit, desiring aid of the French King to make war on Sweden; certain money to be obtained from Scotland; pardon for the two knights to be obtained from Albany. The herald had a letter to the Duke of B ..., another to the Duke of Albany, a third to the Council of Scotland, a fourth to Albany from the secretary of the Danish chancellor, containing an account of the death of the last brother "of the King of Scots that died," and referring to other letters on this subject. This Davy was in the service of Henry VII. and is friendly to England,—is going with Albany into Scotland,-- states that France intends to make war upon England, but will have no aid from Denmark. Think it would be wise to keep a watch upon Denmark. Tournay, .. Feb.
Signed: Sr Rychard Jarnegan—Sr Ric. Whettehyll—Sr John Tremayle.
Pp. 8, mutilated.

Footnotes

  • 1. Supplied from marginal note.
  • 2. 18 Feb. on Patent Roll.
  • 3. Erasmus always calls him Peter Ammonius.
  • 4. A remarkable paragraph. Could it have been added by the King 2. II.
  • 5. Such is the reading.